the band journey documentary

JOURNEY: New Documentary 'A Voice Lost...And Found' To Premiere On REELZ This Weekend

"Journey: A Voice Lost...And Found" will premiere on Reelz on Sunday, June 25 at 9 p.m. EDT / 6 p.m. PDT.

The official program synopsis: JOURNEY dominated the American music scene in the 1970s and 1980s with their epic arena rock anthems and power ballads. Frontman Steve Perry was dubbed "The Voice" thanks to the untouchable vocal stylings that burned up the radio waves and made him a household name. But the bigger JOURNEY became the more miserable Perry grew. He was the rare rock superstar who craved anonymity more than applause.

Then at the height of the band's success Perry did the unthinkable quitting JOURNEY . That alone should've been an absolute death knell for a band so defined by a single voice. But JOURNEY 's other longtime members refused to give up the dream and brought in a new singer to keep the music going.

Fans were livid that anyone would dare to try to fill Perry 's shoes. Shows were played in empty houses and threats were even made against the band. When that replacement singer didn't work out desperation forced the band to turn to YouTube for the most unlikely inspiration.

JOURNEY members Jonathan Cain and Deen Castronovo are joined by former members Jeff Scott Soto and Narada Michael Walden , as well as SiriusXM radio personality Eddie Trunk and former JOURNEY producer Kevin Elson to tell the band's amazing tale.

"Journey: A Voice Lost...And Found" is produced by AMS Pictures .

Reelz is available in more than 40 million homes on DIRECTV (238), DISH Network (299), Verizon FiOS TV (692HD), AT&T U-verse (799/1799HD) and Xfinity , Spectrum , Optimum , Mediacom , Peacock , Philo , Freecast , DIRECTV Stream , Dish Sling and many other cable systems and major streaming services nationwide. Find Reelz in your area by visiting www.reelz.com .

Owned by Hubbard Media Group , Reelz is headquartered in Albuquerque, New Mexico with national ad sales based in New York City with offices in Chicago and Los Angeles.

Sadly I don't have Reelz as I use YouTube TV, if there is anyone who can work out how to make a .mov .mkv .mv4 .MP4 or otherwise of this show, please DM me, I would LOVE to see it since I'm in it!! 🙏🤘😘 https://t.co/LpLHhO0i6F — Jeff Scott Soto (@jeffscottsoto) June 23, 2023

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Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey

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Ultimate Classic Rock

Inside the New Journey Documentary ‘Don’t Stop Believin': Everyman’s Journey’ With Director Ramona Diaz

The story of Journey finding their latest lead singer Arnel Pineda on YouTube is a tale that’s both well-known at this point, and hugely inspirational to others hoping that perhaps a similar type of rock star fame might someday come their way.

‘ Don’t Stop Believin’: Everyman’s Journey ’ is a new documentary that offers a bird’s-eye view of the Filipino-born Pineda and his eventual rise to success as the front man of one of America’s most successful rock and roll bands. The cameras were rolling as Pineda started his new life with Journey in 2008, tracking each moment as he began to win over concert audiences worldwide.

His enthusiastic passion for the legendary songs that he was singing each night, and the love that he had for a group that had inspired him so much as a vocalist -- which he was now part of -- were unmistakable.

The new film begins screening this weekend in theaters and on demand. We spoke with director Ramona S. Diaz about the experience of putting the documentary together.

Let’s start at the top. How did this project come about?

You know, I had heard of Arnel getting the gig through this email that was actually written by an immigration officer at the American Embassy in the Philippines who gave Arnel his visa to come to the U.S. That’s when it started. One thing led to another, and my manager called their manager, and there was a big back and forth of whether they had the story this year [in 2008] or was it [going to be] next year? And I said, “No, you have a story this year, because I think next year, the second year with the band, it’s a story, certainly, but it won’t be the story. I think it would be more dynamic and compelling [now].”

So they allowed me to film one day with the band, to show them and prove to them that they had the story. That’s when I met Arnel and then decided, “Wow, he’s really golden.” There’s something about Arnel that’s really compelling. So that’s when I decided that, "I’ve gotta make this film," and that I was that obsessed that, “Okay, this has got to happen.”

I filmed the band for a day as they rehearsed in Northern California, before their ‘Revelation’ tour in ‘08 and cut a 10-minute piece [from that] and sent it to management and they got back to us within 24 hours and said, “Come aboard, we’re hitting the road -- come with us!” I was like, “Great,” [because] we had no money, but I have a producer who made it happen.

You had a fairly large team of people working on this film. You mentioned the money issues -- how did it eventually come together so that you were able to do this?

It never came together. Seriously. This is an independently produced film. It would have been different if the band came to us and said, “Hey, make this fantastic film.” We were sort of going after that [which didn’t happen] and then they finally said yes, so we couldn’t say, “Oh yeah, can you pay for it?” So basically, my producer Capella [Fahoome Brogden] put it on her credit cards and then when she ran out of that, I borrowed money from my family and then we got some investors from friends and family, [who provided] small, small amounts of money.

That’s really how we’ve cobbled this whole thing [together]. And also at some point when the band then realized, “Oh okay, this might be something,” [they wanted to help out]. Because I don’t think they ever really [knew what it was going to be like], although they gave us access. They’re veteran rockers and I thought they were used to cameras backstage and on buses, but they weren’t used to it. They didn’t really understand what it meant to have us there constantly. So for a while, they didn’t really get it and now it makes sense to me. Someone explained to me that they were right at the cusp of [the arrival of] MTV, [before] MTV brought out the ubiquitous cameras backstage and stuff. So now it makes sense that they weren’t used to it.

They didn’t really get what the film would look like or how it would all come together. When they started getting an inkling [that], “Oh, this might be something,” two years into the project, by then we didn’t want to cross that line either of taking their money. Because then we were making [what becomes] a vanity project [by doing that], right? We needed to stay independent. So that’s what we’ve done this entire time.

What were the parameters that were laid down as far as what you could and couldn’t shoot and anything else like that boundary-wise?

You know, nothing really. They didn’t tell us that, “You couldn’t be here,” or “You couldn’t be there.” But the tough thing was when I requested that I film their process. I wanted to film them writing a song. They eventually gave me permission, but we were then, I think, a couple of years into the project. I just kept pushing. I said, “I’ve got to see that -- I’ve got to see how you guys do that.”

They gave me permission finally when we were in Manila, right after the concert and they wrote ‘ City of Hope ,’ which they dedicated to Arnel and the city of Manila, because they were so inspired. I said, “You’ve gotta let me film this.” By then, they knew me and they knew that I wasn’t out to get them. I think it’s just a matter of hanging out long enough that they trust you and they get used to you and [know that] you’re not [out to] get the “gotcha” moments. That wasn’t what I was after and they really fully understood that by the time that we were done.

You were following the band for two years and on paper, that looks like an extensive amount of filming. Can you talk about that part of the process?

We started in 2008, which was the summer tour and that was from June through September and even that summer, we jumped on and off. We covered the country, but we jumped on and off, because you know, we’d run out of money. So we’d jump off, make some commercials, raise some money and jump back on. So that was that whole summer, and then we followed Arnel to Manila right after the tour, because I wanted to see how he would adjust to his new life.

In 2009, we went back to Manila with the band and then after that, I actually continued filming with the guys in their homes. Which is not in the film -- I thought the film could handle that, but it couldn’t. I visited all of them in their respective homes. I wanted to see them outside of the tour. And then after that, I said, “You know, we’ve gotta keep on filming, because they’re going back into the studio.” They’re going to go back to record and I want to see that. So we did -- we waited and in 2010 that happened. So we filmed them at Fantasy [Studios] in Berkeley recording ‘ Eclipse ,’ their latest album.

Did the scope and direction of the project change at all during the course of making the film, from where you started out with outlining the project at the beginning?

Not really; you know, as a documentary filmmaker, you never know where it’s going to go. Arnel could have failed. It would still have been a film, but it would have been a very different film. I think the fact that he succeeded and [that] they gained new audiences and they gained this second life, it’s great storytelling for this Cinderella story. I thought it would be a Cinderella story, but I didn’t know if in actuality it would be that. I’d hoped for that, but you’re watching life unfold, so it’s very zen -- you just wait to see where it leads you.

It is a great story, because Journey is a band that certainly, they were already hugely popular, but it really has brought them a whole different audience in addition to their previous fan base. That’s really something after all of the years that this band has been together.

Yeah, it’s incredible, and you saw that actually happen in 2008. You saw this different audience coming on and I’m like, “Wow, this is incredible.” I think it took everyone by surprise. I think all of them took a leap of faith with Arnel, and Arnel took a leap of faith too, right? So there was this feeling of “Let’s see how it goes,” and it paid off for everyone.

The film is presented in a mixture of English and Filipino dialogue. How did that part develop?

I think that Arnel is more comfortable speaking in that manner and in the Philippines, a lot of people switch from Filipino to English. It’s just a matter of speaking. I realized that if I was going to get him to really articulate [about] say, the first time he performed in front of a crowd of 30,000 in Chile, I needed to liberate him from just speaking English and I understand the language, so that wasn’t a problem for me.

Were you a Journey fan?

Obviously, I grew up with their music, but I wasn’t a hardcore Journey fan. I mean, I’ve seen hardcore Journey fans [ laughs ]. I lived with them all throughout that summer. I thought they were a wonderful band and certainly loved their music, but I think that after this whole process, I have a newfound respect for what they’ve done. I’ve really understood what it is that they’ve done.

They created a catalog and not just one or two songs, but a catalog of music that’s timeless and works. Every night, it works. I saw it -- every night, ‘Separate Ways’ would come on and the entire [crowd of] 20,000 would [react] like it was the first time they were hearing it. And you know that they’ve heard it tens of hundreds of times. But you feel the energy, like it’s the first time. It’s amazing -- how did he do that? That’s magic. Not everyone can do that. So to me, it’s just pretty incredible what they’ve done.

As a filmmaker, had you seen the ‘ Frontiers and Beyond ’ documentary that they’d done in the ‘80s?

Yes -- I’d seen it in the process of research.

That really illustrates how that band did everything bigger than everybody else in that decade. It was shot by NFL Films and legendary NFL broadcaster John Facenda voiced it. How did that play into your psyche when you were working on this project? Did you think about that at all?

Oh, absolutely. You know, when you’re editing a film, you start out with a five-hour cut, right? So I did really want to cover the history. It was surprising to me to find out that they were the ones who started the [usage of] big monitors on stage, so that people in the nosebleeds would feel like it was still an intimate experience.

God, that’s really smart. Now of course, it’s a matter of course, right? Everyone does it. But the fact that they were the first ones, that they actually owned the company that did that, that rented it out . . . I was like, “Wow.” I wanted to at some point talk about that. It’s going to be in the DVD extras, obviously, but it just couldn’t be part of this film.The film couldn’t support it or really examine it in any kind of profound way.

But they did [pioneer that] and I had no idea. That was all new to me in that process of researching the band. It’s pretty incredible. And of course, then they got their reputation for being corporate rock, because they were so slick and got sponsors. Now everyone gets sponsors. Ross Valory actually told me a really funny story about how Mick Jagger came around and visited them in San Francisco, wanting to know how they did it and what they were doing business-wise.

There’s a moment in the film where you capture Chicago singer Jason Scheff [a replacement himself for original Chicago lead singer Peter Cetera] talking to Arnel backstage. That moment feels very spontaneous -- I don’t know how engineered that moment was or wasn’t . . .

No, it wasn’t at all!

You don’t necessarily know that is a singer from the band Chicago walking up to Arnel . . .

No, I didn’t. But someone, who I think was with Arnel, mentioned that Jason was backstage. I didn’t hear that -- we were just following Arnel. My cinematographer was on him and I said, “He’s our guy -- he’s our story -- follow him wherever,” and it just happened. That’s when the documentary is really golden, when those things happen and you don’t plan it.

You’ve acknowledged in the past your hesitation to do a project like this, because of what a bear of a task it is to clear popular music for a film. Can you talk about that part of working on this documentary?

Oh, my God. You know, I don’t know the details of it. Because you have music supervisors and it’s really all lawyers talking to lawyers. I knew it from other films, one piece of music appearing by Liza Minnelli and Donna Summer -- I knew even that piece of music was so difficult to clear. We cleared like 13 Journey songs, which is one of the most difficult catalogs to clear. But of course, they signed on to make the film, so I hate to say it was easy, but it was easier.

But it’s still very complicated, because at some point even if they want to, it’s beyond their control. It’s a whole lot of details that even I right now don’t completely understand. But I knew it would be difficult, just from making other films. Of course at the end of the day if we couldn’t clear it, it would have really been not good.

Watch the Trailer for 'Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey'

More From Ultimate Classic Rock

Journey’s Top 20 Post-Steve Perry Songs

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“Well-chronicled and fascinating, Don’t Stop Believin’ is a cinematic journey well worth taking.”

—usa today.

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Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey

2013, Documentary, 1h 45m

What to know

Critics Consensus

An energetic but thin portrait of the venerable rock band Journey, Don't Stop Believin' gets a boost from new singer Arnel Pineda's charming personality. Read critic reviews

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Don't stop believin': everyman's journey   photos.

Filipino musician Arnel Pineda gets the opportunity of a lifetime when Journey guitarist Neal Schon sees him perform on YouTube, leading to a job offer as the band's new lead singer.

Rating: R (Some Language)

Genre: Documentary

Original Language: English

Director: Ramona S. Diaz

Producer: Ramona S. Diaz , Capella Fahoome

Writer: Ramona S. Diaz

Release Date (Theaters): Mar 8, 2013  limited

Release Date (Streaming): Apr 14, 2016

Box Office (Gross USA): $59.6K

Runtime: 1h 45m

Distributor: Cinedigm

Production Co: Arcady Bay Entertainment

Cast & Crew

Arnel Pineda

Ross Valory

Jonathan Cain

Deen Castronovo

Ramona S. Diaz

Capella Fahoome

Executive Producer

News & Interviews for Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey

Critics Consensus: Oz the Great and Powerful Looks Good But Lacks Magic

Critic Reviews for Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey

Audience reviews for don't stop believin': everyman's journey.

Two music industry documentaries in two days, and I could not find two of the more different! This documentary directed and produced by Ramona S. Diaz was a real Cinderella story of the famous band Journey and its new lead vocalist Arnel Pineda, a Filipino who comes from a poor neighbourhood, abandoned by his father at the age of 13. The film is focused on the band and Arnel, the new singer, during the Revelation Tour in the United States and Pineda's homecoming in Manila, Philippines where they performed in front of 25,000 people. Revealing, warm, and entertaining 105 minutes will make you appreciate the opportunity this young man got to finally leave the miserable life and poverty behind him! Very energetic performance but the screenplay was very shallow. Luckily, there was the Journey music to fill up the gap. Charming Pineda stole the show - and I am extremely happy for it. Try to watch it!

the band journey documentary

A snapshot of Journey at this moment in its 30-year history, 2008, as it emerges with a new lead singer. Great Documnentary!!! I'm a big fan of Journey so I enjoyed it very much. The documentary shows how the band has been affected with Arnel Pineda now leading the iconic group, and it seems that it couldn't have been more positive in terms of popularity. We see how Journey is playing in different parts of the world now, and that there is a stunning influx of Filipino attendees at their concerts now. One wonders if it's still necessarily politically correct to refer to the band as the all American rock band. Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey follows the real life rock-n-roll fairy tale story of Filipino Arnel Pineda, who was plucked from You Tube to become the front man for iconic American rock band, Journey, thereby becoming the latest performer to go from the Internet to real life celebrity. Having already overcome a life full of painful obstacles and now saddled with the immense pressures of leading a world renowned band and replacing a legendary singer, the film follows Arnel on this personal journey.

If you have not checked out this movie yet, do it now. It's AWESOME. Very inspiring. Of course, I'm a bit biased cause I'm a big Journey fan. Regardless, it's a very cool rags to riches story. Arnel Pineda's story is amazing. From a homeless man living on the streets of the Philippines, a chance youtube search lands him the job of Journey's front man. Great stuff.

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'Don't Stop Believin'' tells Pineda's story, faithfully

Journey lead singer Arnel Pineda's life story is recounted in 'Don't Stop Believin.''

  • Arnel Pineda was plucked from the Philippines to become Journey%27s lead singer
  • Documentary profiles his life and his time in the band
  • USA TODAY review%3A * * * stars out of four%3B opens Friday in select cities

It's hardly business as usual when a rock doc opens in an elementary school in Manila.

This scene-setting device in Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey (* * * out of four; not rated; opens Friday in select cities) grabs the viewers' attention and keeps it throughout this well-structured and compelling tale. This is not your everyday concert film, as it profiles the newest, and most unlikely, addition to the 40-year-old San Francisco rock band Journey.

Arnel Pineda was born in the Philippines and sang in clubs in relative obscurity until a fan's video of him performing wound up on YouTube and caught the eye of Journey lead guitarist Neal Schon in 2007. Pineda was singing the Journey hit Faithfully , and Pineda's rendition was about as faithful a version as anyone could imagine.

"I thought 'this is too good to be true,' " says Schon, who was searching for a new lead singer at the time. "I said to myself, 'He's the guy.' ''

Pineda, meanwhile, was flabbergasted to get an email from Schon asking: "Interested in singing for the real band Journey?"

He thought it was a hoax. As his wife Cherry Pineda says, "He didn't want to believe."

Pineda, now 45, is charmingly self-effacing and engaging throughout the film — besides being a dynamic stage presence. He is shown visiting his elementary school 29 years after leaving, and when a teacher asks if he sings well, he answers, "Not really."

But his new bandmates beg to differ.

"This kid can sing," says keyboardist/guitarist Jonathan Cain. "He's unbelievable."

But Cain had some doubts: "I think my biggest concern was how do you take someone from a third-world country and throw him into this circus?"

Not to worry. Pineda navigated the circus with aplomb and focused on savoring the experience.

"I'm living a fairy tale," he says.

The film captures the sense of un-reality, the fan adulation and also some of the daily grind as Journey tours. It could, however, have used more scenes of interaction between the band members.

While Pineda comes off as remarkably adaptable, director Ramona S. Diaz catches him in moments when he repeatedly smooths and flicks back his long black hair, capturing perhaps his underlying nervousness. Which is understandable: He grew up poor, and his family was homeless for a time. When his mother died, Pineda became the family breadwinner.

Some fans were not happy about the addition of Pineda, complaining about his ethnicity and dismissing his voice as a "copycat'' of popular former lead singer Steve Perry.

"They're just die-hard fans who got used to Steve Perry's voice, and I have no argument with that," says Pineda philosophically. "I'm also a very big fan of Perry. I know where they are coming from."

But since he joined the band, Journey has drawn a huge Filipino fan base.

"It's just totally incredible how Arnel Pineda has made the world smaller," says one concertgoer.

Pineda has expanded his role beyond covering the hits by collaborating on writing songs for the second of two albums he recorded with the band. He has also formed a foundation to provide education and health services to children living on the streets of Manila.

The film is engrossing, if a bit padded, but it's somewhat strange that it's being released now, six years after Pineda joined the band. And predictably, the story ends at a concert, with Pineda singing the band's biggest hit Don't Stop Believin' .

It's a story that could only happen in an era of YouTube and American Idol . Well-chronicled and fascinating, Don't Stop Believin' is a cinematic journey well worth taking.

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Movie Review

Plucked From Obscurity, and Now a Star!

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the band journey documentary

By Jeannette Catsoulis

  • March 7, 2013

You don’t have to watch “Don’t Stop Believin’: Everyman’s Journey” for very long to understand that nothing bitter, awkward or emotionally unguarded is likely to derail its relentlessly sunny and self-serving narrative. Detailing the band Journey’s 2007 discovery and induction of its latest frontman, Arnel Pineda, this one-note documentary from Ramona S. Diaz is as hostile to conflict as the group’s songs themselves.

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A longtime purveyor of anthemic, unironic arena pop, Journey soared only with the 1977 addition of Steve Perry, whose unmatchable vocals and unflagging energy put money in the bank and fans in the stadiums. Yet the hazy history provided here slides over Mr. Perry’s two-decade tenure (with a seven-year gap in the middle) and the acrimony attending his departure , as if he were a mere blip on the success radar. That he was much, much more is evidenced by the band’s trolling of YouTube for sound-alikes (or what the members prefer to call their “legacy sound”) and surfacing with Mr. Pineda, a startled Filipino cover singer who can scarcely believe his luck.

But though Mr. Pineda comes across as a delightfully upbeat person with a serviceable voice (even his former drug and alcohol problems seem rather jolly), his lack of emotional connection to the music is clear. Rather than address this — or even admit that the band’s most recent revival is almost certainly owed to the 2007 finale of “The Sopranos” and the 2009 pilot of “Glee” — Ms. Diaz settles for a flabby, repetitive showcase for the songs and an attaboy for their newest singer.

Opens on Friday nationwide. Directed by Ramona S. Diaz In English and Tagalog, with English subtitles 1 hour 45 minutes; not rated

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Journey Recount Singer’s Wild Ride in ‘Don’t Stop Believin” Doc

By Steve Appleford

Steve Appleford

It’s never been easy to replace the singer of a hugely popular rock band. After Steve Perry left Journey in 1998, the platinum-selling Bay Area act moved on with a series of vocalists to varying degrees of success, but it wasn’t until guitarist Neal Schon landed at an obscure video on YouTube late one night that he knew he’d found his man — in Manila.

See Journey and 14 Other Bands That Hired New Lead Singers

The voice singing Journey hits in the lo-fi video belonged to Arnel Pineda, a Filipino singer who grew up in poverty and sang in local cover bands with no expectations of rock stardom. All Schon knew was that the guy sounded just like Perry, and he soon had Pineda on a plane to San Francisco to audition for the gig in late 2007. Months later, Pineda made his debut as the band’s new singer in front of 20,000 fans at the Viña del Mar International Song Festival in Chile. “He’s a clutch hitter, this kid,” guitarist Jonathan Cain tells Rolling Stone . “He comes through.”

The story of Pineda’s dramatic first year in the band is told in the documentary Don’t Stop Believin’: Everyman’s Journey , which is set to air September 30th on the PBS series Independent Lens . Directed by Ramona Diaz, the film won raves at festival screenings last year and will be released August 20th on DVD and Blu-ray.

Pineda’s first year was a grueling trial for the singer, whose dream gig came with the physical challenge of international touring and the expectations of Journey fans as he ran through an FM radio hit parade of “Faithfully,” “Any Way You Want It” and “Who’s Crying Now.” He faced moments of loneliness, stage-fright and genuine racism, but still remains with the band after six years, and will be back on the road when Journey tours next year with the Steve Miller Band and Tower of Power.

He has yet to meet Perry, but knows what he’d say if that encounter ever happened, and without a hint of sarcasm: “Can I have your autograph?”

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In Los Angeles, Pineda, Schon, Cain and bassist Ross Valory spoke with Rolling Stone about the documentary and Journey’s new era as a truly international rock act.

The lead singer position is historically a very hard spot to fill. Neal Schon: There were guys being pitched to us — people in L.A. and New York that have been doing the classic rock thing for a long time — and I really was not moved by it. I was looking for some serious talent, somebody that we could move forward with — and have serious pipes and go in new directions with us as well as cover our old stuff very well. When I found Arnel, I went, “That’s the guy.” I’d never heard any singer cover that broad of a spectrum. He’ll do Nat King Cole for you right now, and you’ll go no way. Sing for him, Arnel. . .

Arnel Pineda: [ Singing ] Unforgettable, that’s what you are . . .

It seems like a crazy idea to find your singer that way from across the world. Schon: I didn’t think it was that crazy. Everybody was concerned that he was in Manila and does he speak English? I’d go, “I just watched 40 videos and he’s singing all songs that are in English. If he doesn’t speak good English, he can always learn.”

Jonathan Cain: Ironically, the Internet proved to be a friend. When Arrival first came out [in 2001], Napster stole the album. We spent a ton of money flying to New York making this record only to have it up there for fans to get it for free, so I hated the Internet. Then it comes around to serve us well in the future. It’s quite a tool and for us it was a blessing.

What was it like for you to suddenly be immersed in Journey’s world? Pineda: It was my world being turned upside down — but in a good way, a fantastic way. I’m still in disbelief. I’m in front of thousands of people singing all these songs that I listened to when I was 18 years old. Now I’m with the big boys and it’s such a blessing. It’s one in a million.

Schon: He brings it. He sings his heart out every night, and it’s not an easy menu. Our songs are so difficult to sing. It’s going on six years now and we’ve toured a lot.

What was it like as a new performer to be faced with all the pressure that comes with playing to large audiences? Pineda: I had to give up a lot of foods that I’m accustomed to eating: dairy products, beer, wine, spicy food. And no talking. I like talking. It’s become a luxury to last even through a 10-minute talk with you. I have to go back to my room and my silence — until the next gig happens.

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Was there another downside to having this all happen at once? Pineda: I get really homesick inside. I would miss my life with my wife.

Schon: In the very beginning, we threw him in the fire, no doubt about it. I remember we’re getting ready to go on in Viña del Mar and it’s sold out and it’s live to 25 million people all over South America. Arnel is like, two seconds before we go on: “Can I go home? I don’t want to go out.” It was fear and loathing to the max, but then he went out and he went for it and the audience went nuts.

How nervous were you? Pineda: I was terrified to death. It took years, but I survived it. I’m still here.

Other bands have tried to replace a popular singer with an unknown and failed. Cain: It is rare that the audience goes with you like that.

Schon: The good news is that when he came in, it was a breath of fresh air for all of us and every scenario that went with it. All of a sudden, instead of us being a band from the U.S.A., we became a worldwide band. We’re accepted worldwide everywhere we went with him in markets we were never accepted before. There’s always going to be the naysayers who cant live with anything but exactly what it was from the beginning. You can’t please everyone.

In the film, it shows that some of the early reactions were very negative, even racist. How did you deal with that? Pineda: I just didn’t bother to get intimidated with those words. I’m not trying to compete with Mr. Perry. I’m trying to help out here. I am so blessed to be in this position, to be the one to carry the legacy.

Cain: Back in ’98, when we started with Steve Augeri [as singer 1998-2006], I was worried about him getting shot. We took a lot of flack. We used to get hate mail. Somebody got my number and would call me: “You son of a bitch!” They were reading us the riot act because how dare us be Journey without Steve Perry?

Schon: It was vicious, man.

Pineda: This is the first time I’ve said this — my wife was so freaked out with all these racist comments that she told me to bring a bulletproof vest: “You might get shot there!”

Because of your history together, you must still have business with Steve Perry. Ross Valory: Steve has been really, really cooperative. He helped produce the greatest hits video. It’s unfortunate we don’t have a physical relationship with him.

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Schon: Working on it though. I have ultimate respect and love for the guy this many years later. I’m getting older, man, and you don’t want to hang onto all the stupid things that you do in your life. You start looking back and I’m cherishing all the good times that we had — and the first time I sat in a room with him and wrote “Patiently” in 10 minutes. The door’s always been open. Arnel’s even open. If he ever wanted to come onstage with us and do a song, we’d be like, “Come on!”

What was your reaction to the documentary? Pineda: I’m so happy that it’s out there. I think it’s going to give a tremendous amount of inspiration for all of these hopeless musicians out there — especially those we will never learn about how fantastic they are. Second, it’s like I’m not supposed to be there — I look at it and it’s an ill fit. But it’s how I look and how I was born, so I’m going to live with it. It’s my journey. I’m so grateful for what’s happened, and it’s still going strong.

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Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey

Don't stop believin': journey's neal schon on finding a fron.

Journey band member Neal Schon describes how he discovered their newest member, Arnel Pineda, on YouTube, in this excerpt from the Independent Lens documentary, Don't Stop Believin'.

Previews + Extras

Don't Stop Believin': How a Fan Video Led to a Real Life Roc: asset-mezzanine-16x9

Don't Stop Believin': How a Fan Video Led to a Real Life Roc

S14 E18 - 1m 57s

Arnel Pineda tells the story of how a fan's video shot in the Philippines led to his being invited to join the band Journey, , in this excerpt from the Independent Lens documentary, Don't Stop Believin'.

Don't Stop Believin': Journey's Arnel Pineda Recalls His Deb: asset-mezzanine-16x9

Don't Stop Believin': Journey's Arnel Pineda Recalls His Deb

S14 E18 - 2m 41s

Journey frontman, Arnel Pineda describes what his debut performance with the band was like. , in this excerpt from the Independent Lens documentary, Don't Stop Believin'.

Don't Stop Believin' - Preview: asset-mezzanine-16x9

Don't Stop Believin' - Preview

S14 E18 - 30s

Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey follows the real life rock ‘n’ roll fairy tale of Filipino Arnel Pineda, who was plucked from YouTube to become the front man for iconic American rock band Journey.

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The story of Journey’s new frontman

The band Journey performing in the Philippines, the homeland of the band’s new frontman Arnel Pineda (center). “Don’t Stop Believin’: Everyman’s Journey” is director Ramona S. Diaz’s documentary about the singer’s personal journey. The film opens at the Coolidge Corner Theatre this week.

Arnel Pineda sat in the dark theater in Nashville with his hands partially covering his eyes. Occasionally, he would peek up at the screen, horror-movie style.

When the lights went up in Music City after the most important screening of “Don’t Stop Believin’: Everyman’s Journey,” Pineda could scarcely believe it was all true, his tale of being plucked from obscurity in 2008 to front the classic rock band Journey. Of how he had literally gone from rags — a homeless, high school dropout in his native Philippines — to riches — touring the globe singing huge hit songs like “Faithfully,” “Open Arms,” and, of course, “Don’t Stop Believin,’ ” to full arenas. Pineda also wasn’t crazy about the way he looked. “I was covering my eyes because I look like crap in some parts because I’d had no sleep and they were asking me questions,” says the genial, soft-spoken singer, slightly sleepy on the phone from a New Zealand tour stop.

The story is true, however, and fortunately for director Ramona S. Diaz, Pineda got over it, or else she might not have had a movie. “Don’t Stop Believin’: Everyman’s Journey” opens at the Coolidge Corner Theatre on Friday.

“That was the hardest audience I ever had to screen it for,” says Diaz, who unspooled the documentary for Pineda and the rest of Journey — guitarist Neal Schon, keyboardist Jonathan Cain, bassist Ross Valory, and drummer Deen Castronovo — last February. “At that point, we hadn’t signed off on music rights.” In other words, if the members of Journey didn’t like the film, which was financed by Diaz on credit cards, favors, family investments, wings and prayers, they could have shut it down by blocking her from using their music.

“Every fiber of my being was saying oh my God, we really could be royally screwed. But at the end,” says Diaz, with a still audible sigh in her voice “they came through for us.”

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Arnel Pineda (above) was plucked from obscurity in the Philippines to front Journey.

The film follows Pineda, who had toiled for many years in cover bands and original outfits in the Philippines and Hong Kong, from his initial audition for the band in San Francisco through the group’s first tour with the new frontman they found on YouTube.

Diaz, an Emerson grad whose previous films include “Imelda,” a 2003 documentary about former first lady Marcos of the Philippines, first caught wind of Pineda’s story by e-mail.

“I’m Filipino-American and I’m plugged into the community and whenever something big happens in the community everyone knows about it,” she says. “So there was this e-mail that was circulating that was written by the immigration officer who gave him his visa to go to the audition.”

When Pineda first told an official the reason for his visit to the United States, he saw the man chuckling in disbelief. But then he turned to another officer, and this one had actually seen Pineda’s band, Zoo, playing in local clubs and had heard him singing Journey songs. Pineda says he sang “Wheel in the Sky” on the spot and three days later he had his visa.

Disbelief was a recurring theme at the time. That Pineda had the presence of mind to film his audition with the band was a huge gift to Diaz. “He didn’t think he was going to get the gig so he wanted to record it and show people — ‘See I did audition for Journey’ — because no one believed him. And he told me that like, as a matter-of-fact, ‘Oh yeah, we filmed that.’ You filmed what? Seriously?”

From there Diaz persuaded the band to shoot a rehearsal. And then another few days. Finally she gained enough of their trust that they invited her crew on tour to document Pineda’s first year of adjusting to his new bandmates, huge venues and crowds, and dealing with the grueling tour schedule. Throughout it all, Pineda is even-keeled and philosophical. If it is possible to craft the “right” response to such an extraordinary circumstance, Pineda seems to display it: grateful, reverent, understandably overwhelmed but unfailingly fearless, even in the face of the ever unkind message board underbelly of the Internet, some of whose denizens did not take kindly to Pineda and let it be known.

Ramona Diaz director of the documentary "Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey."

“So much could’ve gone wrong,” says Diaz, looking back. “He could’ve failed; he could’ve lost his voice, or his confidence. We’d still have a film but not the same film, obviously. That’s why he was golden. Not only did he not miss a beat, but he was also very articulate about what was happening to him about his inner life, which is very rare to find that.”

Pineda shrugs off the praise of his calm. “I was just being myself because I was tired all the time. Keeping up with what Ramona was doing and then keeping up with the tour, it’s just too much information and too much responsibility to have.”

Nearly five years on, it is a responsibility that he now feels more comfortable with even though he knows some fans will never accept him. Although Journey had two other singers (Steve Augeri and Jeff Scott Soto) between their most famous frontman, Steve Perry, and Pineda, in the film the band members make clear that Pineda is their man as long as he wants to be. (Perry and the group split acrimoniously in 1998 and Perry has said that he has no interest in returning.)

“No singer in this world can ever replace what Mr. Perry has accomplished with the band,” Pineda says. “But right now the main objective is to continue sharing the message they have worked so hard for over the years. It’s no competition. Right now, I can still feel the bitterness of a lot of Perry fans out there. But they don’t really understand what’s going on. They feel threatened that Mr. Perry is being dethroned of his place in the band. Nobody’s trying to change that. I completely understand where they’re coming from, but they shouldn’t feel threatened, they should feel happy that the music is still relevant. A lot of people still come to the show to witness for themselves Journey in the 21st century.”

For her part, Diaz, not a big fan previously, came away with a new respect for Journey — specifically her favorite song, “Stone in Love” — and the rock ’n’ roll touring life in general.

“You know when rock stars are being interviewed on television and they’re saying, ‘You know, it’s not all that glamorous,’ and you’re like, oh shut up ?” she says with a laugh. “I realized it isn’t all glamorous. It’s not at all. It’s only glamorous those two hours onstage and everything is about those two hours and performing in front of 20,000 people, but it was tough because [the film crew was] still working those two hours. We did this on our own dime. People will think it’s Journey, they must have helped. But we really wanted it to be independent. I didn’t want a vanity project basically. I had final cut and that was very clear, but it wouldn’t have been clear if they had funded it.”

Which is why she was so relieved when they embraced her last year and gave her the greenlight on the music, of which the film features a great deal.

“I think people really need to see the film because, looking beyond my face, there’s a story that’s so great and so inspiring,” says Pineda, who hopes to get to work on a solo album soon. “That made me realize I don’t have to be ashamed that they’re going to see my face on the big screen and see me really awkward.”

“People ask me what I want people to take away from the film,” says Diaz. “Just that good things still happen to good people.”

Sarah Rodman can be reached at [email protected] . Follow her on Twitter @GlobeRodman.

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‘Don’t Stop Believin’: Everyman’s Journey’ Tells Uplifting Tale Of Journey Singer Arnel Pineda

‘Don’t Stop Believin’: Everyman’s Journey’ Tells Uplifting Tale Of Journey Singer Arnel Pineda

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  • Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey

Ever since metal gods Judas Priest plucked Ripper Owens out of a tribute band to replace original singer Rob Halford, the idea of the average Joe getting a gig with his favorite rock n’ roll band has captivated people’s imaginations. It inspired the 2001 movie Rock Star and a reality TV show of the same name, where aspiring singers auditioned for the rock bands INXS and Rock Star Supernova, a super-group made up of members of Metallica, Guns N’ Roses and Motley Crue. Currently streaming on Netflix , the 2012 documentary Don’t Stop Believin’: Everyman’s Journey mines similar ground, telling the true story of how journeyman Filipino singer Arnel Pineda ended up as the frontman for classic rock band Journey.

While the music of Journey alternates between ham-fisted riff rock and power ballads —all big hooks and gushy emotional cues— Don’t Stop Believin’: Everyman’s Journey is sincere, compelling and heartfelt. Directed by Fillipino-American documentarian Ramona S. Díaz, the film’s unadorned style avoids predictable rock doc clichés and sympathetically presents the story of the singer and the band as they get to know each other over the course of a grueling 4 and a half-month tour. Pineda is genuinely likable, and you wish the best for him as the movie travels towards its hopefully happy ending.

The movie begins with Arnel visiting his old grammar school in the Filipino capital of Manila. The principal there has no idea who he is, and has never even heard of Journey. It’s illustrative of the wide chasm that exists between the singer and the band. As Journey keyboard player Jonathan Cain says early on, “How do you take someone from a Third World country and throw him into this circus”? While Cain is legitimately concerned, his statement only further illustrates their differences. The Philippines isn’t even necessarily a Third World country (OK, it’s part of the “Developing World”).

the band journey documentary

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Don’t Stop Believin’ vacillates back and forth between Arnel’s story and that of Journey. Whatever you might think of the group —admittedly, I am not a fan— they actually have a pretty interesting history. Started in 1973 by refugees from Santana, the group originally played a jammy mix of hard rock and jazz fusion, which founding Journey guitarist Neil Schon describes as being like “The (Grateful) Dead on steroids.” Despite a strong live following, record sales were lacking, and in order to hold on to their recording contract Journey turned to a more commercial, radio-friendly sound. In late 1977, they brought in singer Steve Perry, whose soaring vocals powered a stream of classic rock radio hits that kept coming and didn’t stop until the late ’80s.

Schon discovered Arnel Pineda via YouTube clips a fan uploaded of his band covering classic rock standards, from Led Zeppelin to, well, Journey. From the outset, Schon was Arnel’s champion, repeatedly saying “That’s the guy.” Cain, who not only plays keyboards but also wrote some of Journey’s biggest hits, remained skeptical if the diminutive Filipino could fill Steve Perry’s “big shoes.” Despite a shaky audition, Arnel impressed the band once he relaxed a little, and ultimately secured the gig. Following a trial by fire first gig in front of a Chilean crowd of 18,000, and the recording of the Revelation album, the band set out on a big tour in summer 2008. The bulk of Don’t Stop Believin’ was filmed at various tour stops on the Revelation tour.

While his years of playing 3 to 5 hours a night in Manila nightclubs prepared him for the rigors of touring, joining a band with such a large legacy put huge pressures on Arnel. On top of that, the singer harbors insecurities about his height, his looks and his ethnicity. While it may seem ludicrous to a liberal “Coastal Elite” like myself, there were actually longtime Journey fans that were upset Pineda was not white. “I think he should be from here,” meaning America, says one tailgating Journey fan, probably unaware of her own bigotry. This is insignificant, however, when contrasted with the outpouring of pride and affection from the band’s Filipino-American fans, especially at the tour’s West Coast dates. At the end of a rapturous gig in the band’s hometown, Arnel yells out, “Thank you San Francisco! Thank you Pinoys!” As one fan says, “Arnel Peneda has made the world smaller.”

The reception is even greater when Arnel returns home to the Philippines at the conclusion of the tour’s first leg. “It’s like everything that happened was a dream,” he says reflecting on his, ahem, journey. The movie’s emotional payoff is Journey’s March 2009 gig in Manila, where Pineda plays to family, friends and about 30,000 other people. Now, I know I could have found out with a quick Google search as to whether or not he was still with the band (he is), but the film quite cannily keeps us guessing up until the very end about his ultimate fate with the group. That is until the very end, when Journey’s manager John Baruck confirms, “He’s a full member of Journey.” The finale of Journey playing the song “Don’t Stop Believin’” is of course totally predictable, but also totally appropriate, given Pineda’s arc. As he says earlier in the film, while discussing being on the receiving end of adulation, “I was just like them, I was just a fan.”

Benjamin H. Smith is a New York based writer, producer and musician. Follow him on Twitter: @BHSmithNYC.

Watch 'Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey' on Netflix

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the band journey documentary

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For more than three decades San Francisco rock band Journey has been selling out stadiums around the world; the band began in the early 1970s as a prog-rock outfit, but its biggest success came when lead singer, Steve Perry, joined the band.

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  • Cast & crew
  • Episode aired Apr 26, 2020

Michael Anthony, David Lee Roth, Alex Van Halen, and Edward Van Halen in Breaking the Band (2018)

For more than three decades San Francisco rock band Journey has been selling out stadiums around the world; the band began in the early 1970's as a prog-rock outfit, but it's biggest success... Read all For more than three decades San Francisco rock band Journey has been selling out stadiums around the world; the band began in the early 1970's as a prog-rock outfit, but it's biggest success came when lead singer, Steve Perry, joined the band. For more than three decades San Francisco rock band Journey has been selling out stadiums around the world; the band began in the early 1970's as a prog-rock outfit, but it's biggest success came when lead singer, Steve Perry, joined the band.

  • Herbie Herbert
  • Joel Selvin
  • Self - Band Manager
  • (as Walter 'Herbie' Herbert)
  • Self - Tour Manager
  • Self - Journalist
  • (archive footage)

Eric Clapton

  • Self - Music Critic

Linda Papadopoulos

  • Self - Psychologist

Steve Perry

  • All cast & crew
  • Production, box office & more at IMDbPro

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  • April 26, 2020 (United States)
  • United States
  • See more company credits at IMDbPro

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  • Runtime 45 minutes

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New Steve Martin documentary spotlights a comedy legend with nothing left to prove

Eric Deggans

Eric Deggans

the band journey documentary

Steve Martin in the Apple TV+ documentary STEVE! Apple TV+ hide caption

Steve Martin in the Apple TV+ documentary STEVE!

It's a question that often doesn't get asked in big time documentaries about big deal Hollywood stars.

And in this case, filmmaker Morgan Neville waits until the second installment of his sprawling project on comedy legend Steve Martin – STEVE! (martin) a documentary in 2 pieces – to show his star answering a question that really should be put to every famous participant facing the cameras in a major biography:

Why are you doing this?

"I see it as an antidote to the sort of anodyne interviews, generic things I've talked about a million times," Martin says about Apple TV+'s giant-sized documentary, which is divided into two films, titled Then and Now .

"What an odd life," he adds. "My whole life is backwards. How did I go from riddled with anxiety in my 30s, to [age] 75 and really happy? How did this happen?"

Redefining comedy by playing the buffoon

Pop culture, steve martin on being 'born standing up'.

Fans may already know the nuts and bolts of how Martin's success happened, particularly because he wrote a well-regarded memoir in 2007, Born Standing Up . Eventually, he became the one of the biggest stand-up comics in the world by age 35, packing arenas with his absurdist comedy.

But it's not until sitting down with the entire, three-hour-plus documentary – especially the second installment on his current life – that you realize Martin may be one of the most famous and well-liked comics who remains something of an enigma personally, even to his showbiz friends.

(One of my favorite moments in the second film involves a quick montage of people, like his Only Murders in the Building co-star Tina Fey, and Monty Python member Eric Idle, admitting they don't really know this person they have been friendly with for years.)

the band journey documentary

As a teen, Steve Martin performed magic shows with funny patter. Apple TV+ hide caption

As a teen, Steve Martin performed magic shows with funny patter.

So it is remarkable that Martin exposes so much of his life here to Neville — the Oscar-winning director of beloved non-fiction films like 20 Feet from Stardom , an exploration of background singers, and the Mister Rogers documentary Won't You Be My Neighbor . The comic, now 78, offers a treasure trove of material: set lists, recordings of old performances back to his teenage years, family photos, new interviews with his current wife and non-showbizzy friends and more.

He even puts on his costume from the 1986 film Three Amigos! – which he has kept and still fits into.

The journey of a restless, cerebral artist

What emerges through the two different films which make up STEVE! — developed with different sensibilities and approaches — is the journey of an often-restless artist who doggedly leveraged ambition, talent and a sharp analytical intellect to build a career which defied boundaries and revolutionized stand-up comedy.

"I always thought of him as the door out of the '60s," says John McEuen, a co-founder of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band and a longtime friend of Martin's, describing how his comedy was a bridge from the more issue-oriented standup of the 1960s to something more frivolous in the 1970s. "You know, [with him] you could be silly again."

The documentary's first installment shows how long it took Stephen Glenn Martin to find early success. It stretches from his start as a teenager performing magic shows with funny patter around his hometown of Garden Grove, Calif., all the way to working as a writer for The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour TV show and as an opener for performers like Linda Ronstadt.

Time spent studying philosophy in college led him to think about deconstructing comedy intellectually, including the concept of "indicators."

"[Indicators are] the things comedians do to indicate that the joke is over," Martin says, his voice floating over clips of old school comics telling jokes. "And whether it was funny or not, the audience has made a pact; that's when we laugh....[But] that's not real laughter. So I thought, 'What if I created tension and never released it?'"

That's what brings real laughter, Martin says. But it took him 15 years to perfect the idea, developing a character so taken with himself he often didn't realize how dumb he was or how absurd his efforts to entertain were. Martin says that this persona, his "wild and crazy guy" – which he modified when he walked away from stand-up comedy at the height of his popularity — was a revelation, too.

"I started to realize," he says, "what I was doing was a parody of show business."

How longing and loneliness shaped his comedy

Steve Martin tells the story of his career — through cartoons

Steve Martin tells the story of his career — through cartoons

The documentary's first installment features much more traditional storytelling, fortified by amazing archival material capturing Martin's early days. But the second film is more intimate and revelatory, digging into everything from his strained relationship with his emotionally withholding father to how themes of loneliness and longing have powered so much of his work in films like The Jerk, Roxanne and Bowfinger .

One moment, he's describing his father's reaction to his first big movie, 1979's The Jerk ("Well, he's no Charlie Chaplin," Glenn Martin said to his son at dinner after the premiere). The next, he's rooting through bound copies of his movie scripts, digging up a line from a monologue by the late John Candy in Planes, Trains and Automobiles, which makes him tear up.

Steve Martin might stop acting, but he's worn many hats over his long career

Steve Martin might stop acting, but he's worn many hats over his long career

As Neville captures him working on what would become Number One Is Walking , the 2022 book of cartoons illustrating his life in film, the director eventually asks Martin and his cartoonist collaborator Harry Bliss to provide similar illustrations for the documentary. They even disguise the comic's young daughter by superimposing an animated cartoon over her when she appears in footage.

It's a portrait of a man who has learned to relax and enjoy his life, realizing that it makes everything – including his work – better.

If there's any drawback here, it's that even a project spanning two films and more than three hours still isn't quite enough to detail Martin's wide-ranging and mind-bogglingly successful career.

Though we hear anecdotes about films like Three Amigos! and Roxanne , there's little or no time devoted to equally captivating movies like All of Me, Little Shop of Horrors, Parenthood, Grand Canyon and Father of the Bride . Martin has been a novelist, Broadway composer and lyricist, banjo musician and host (twice) of the Academy Awards. In fact, he's one honor short of an EGOT, with Oscar, Emmy and Grammy awards under his belt. But the film brushes by or doesn't mention much of this.

"As you get older, you either become your worst self or your best self," Martin says, during a drive with Only Murders costar Martin Short. "And I've become...nicer, kinder, more open."

"Yeah," Short chimes in, impishly, "because for about 50 years there, you were a real prick."

STEVE! the documentary argues that Martin has indeed landed in a wonderful place, outlining the journey of an ambitious, intelligent, supremely talented artist who finally earned enough success to realize he has nothing left to prove.

  • documentaries
  • Steve Martin

IMAGES

  1. Journey's discovery of lead singer on Internet is subject of new PBS

    the band journey documentary

  2. Journey Documentary Film Debuts First Trailer

    the band journey documentary

  3. New Documentary On How The Band Journey Acquired Its New Lead Singer

    the band journey documentary

  4. AOTM: Arnel Pineda’s Journey Chronicled in Documentary

    the band journey documentary

  5. 'Don't Stop Believin': A documentary follows Journey's new lead singer

    the band journey documentary

  6. Journey Documentary Set To Open in U.S. Theaters This Friday

    the band journey documentary

VIDEO

  1. The Journey

  2. E5C4P3

  3. Journey The Band

  4. Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey

  5. Journey

  6. Journey

COMMENTS

  1. Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey

    Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey: Directed by Ramona S. Diaz. With Arnel Pineda, Jonathan Cain, Neal Schon, Deen Castronovo. A documentary on Arnel Pineda, who was plucked from YouTube to become the new singer for the rock & roll band, Journey.

  2. JOURNEY: New Documentary 'A Voice Lost...And Found' To Premiere On

    "Journey: A Voice Lost...And Found" will premiere on Reelz on Sunday, June 25 at 9 p.m. EDT / 6 p.m. PDT. The official program synopsis: JOURNEY dominated the American music scene in the 1970s and ...

  3. Watch Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey

    Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey follows the real life rock 'n' roll fairy tale of Filipino Arnel Pineda, who was plucked from YouTube to become the front man for iconic American rock band Journey. The price before discount is the median price for the last 90 days. Rentals include 30 days to start watching this video and 3 ...

  4. Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey HD

    A documentary on Arnel Pineda, who was plucked from YouTube to become the new singer for the rock & roll band, Journey.HD- High Definition.

  5. Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey

    105 minutes [1] Country. United States. Languages. English. Filipino. Box office. $61,108 [2] Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey is a 2012 American documentary film of the band Journey and its new lead vocalist Arnel Pineda .

  6. Inside the New Journey Documentary 'Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's

    'Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey' is a new documentary that offers a bird's-eye view of the Filipino-born Pineda and his eventual rise to success as the front man of one of ...

  7. 'Everyman's Journey': Don't Believe Everything You Hear

    The thin documentary Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey tells the remarkable rags-to-riches story of the band's latest vocalist, Arnel Pineda, a Filipino singer whose uncanny cover of ...

  8. Don't Stop Believin' : Everyman's Journey

    Journey, the iconic, quintessentially American rock band who recorded 8 platinum-certified albums during their heyday between 1978-1986, has chosen a lead singer in a manner befitting this internet age: they found him on YouTube. Filipino Arnel Pineda had been singing Journey songs for many years with his cover band Zoo in clubs all over Manila, his hometown, and posting their performances ...

  9. Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey

    This documentary directed and produced by Ramona S. Diaz was a real Cinderella story of the famous band Journey and its new lead vocalist Arnel Pineda, a Filipino who comes from a poor ...

  10. 'Don't Stop Believin'' tells Pineda's story, faithfully

    Arnel Pineda was plucked from the Philippines to become Journey%27s lead singer; Documentary profiles his life and his time in the band; USA TODAY review%3A * * * stars out of four%3B opens Friday ...

  11. 'Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey,' by Ramona Diaz

    Detailing the band Journey's 2007 discovery and induction of its latest frontman, Arnel Pineda, this one-note documentary from Ramona S. Diaz is as hostile to conflict as the group's songs ...

  12. Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey Official Trailer #1 (2013

    Subscribe to TRAILERS: http://bit.ly/sxaw6hSubscribe to COMING SOON: http://bit.ly/H2vZUnSubscribe to INDIE & FILM FESTIVALS: http://bit.ly/1wbkfYgLike us on...

  13. Journey Recount Singer's Wild Ride in 'Don't Stop Believin" Doc

    The story of Pineda's dramatic first year in the band is told in the documentary Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey, which is set to air September 30th on the PBS series Independent ...

  14. Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey

    Journey band member Neal Schon describes how he discovered their newest member, Arnel Pineda, on YouTube, in this excerpt from the Independent Lens documentary, Don't Stop Believin'.

  15. The story of Journey's new frontman

    By Sarah Rodman Globe Staff,March 2, 2013, 6:00 p.m. The band Journey performing in the Philippines, the homeland of the band's new frontman Arnel Pineda (center). "Don't Stop Believin ...

  16. 'Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey' Tells ...

    Currently streaming on Netflix, the 2012 documentary Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey mines similar ground, telling the true story of how journeyman Filipino singer Arnel Pineda ...

  17. Journey/Steve Perry Documentary

    Also involving Steve Smith and Ross Valory.http://journeybandmusic.tumblr.com

  18. Journey (band)

    Originally a progressive rock band, Journey was described by AllMusic as having cemented a reputation as "one of America's most beloved (and sometimes hated) ... On March 8, 2013, a documentary, Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey, was released. The movie, directed by Ramona S. Diaz, chronicles the discovery of Arnel Pineda and his first ...

  19. Journey: Breaking The Band

    Special, Documentary TVPG. For more than three decades San Francisco rock band Journey has been selling out stadiums around the world; the band began in the early 1970s as a prog-rock outfit, but its biggest success came when lead singer, Steve Perry, joined the band.

  20. "Breaking the Band" Journey (TV Episode 2020)

    Journey: With Herbie Herbert, Pat Morrow, Joel Selvin, Mike Baird. For more than three decades San Francisco rock band Journey has been selling out stadiums around the world; the band began in the early 1970's as a prog-rock outfit, but it's biggest success came when lead singer, Steve Perry, joined the band.

  21. Journey

    Narrated by the late John Facenda. This documentary filmed by NFL films will take you on tour with the band and crew showing load ins and loud outs and live ...

  22. New Steve Martin documentary spotlights a comedy legend with ...

    "I always thought of him as the door out of the '60s," says John McEuen, a co-founder of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band and a longtime friend of Martin's, describing how his comedy was a bridge from ...

  23. I once dissed Journey in a concert review. Man, was I wrong

    In 2006, Brandon Griggs reviewed a concert by '80s rock band Journey, calling them a "nostalgia act" that would soon be playing state fairs. Today, Journey is on a 50th-anniversary tour and ...

  24. Steve Perry

    The audio in this documentary is captured from Steve Perry interviews. Perry talks leaving the band Journey, discovering music at an early age, his passion f...