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The Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, today announced that the Prime Minister of Japan, Kishida Fumio, will visit Ottawa on January 12, 2023. This will be Prime Minister Kishida’s first bilateral visit to Canada since he assumed office in October 2021.

Prime Minister Trudeau will meet with Prime Minister Kishida to discuss Japan’s priorities for its upcoming G7 Presidency. They will also continue to cooperate on Canada and Japan's shared values, including our vision for a free and open Indo-Pacific and further strengthening bilateral trade, investment, and innovation to grow our economies and benefit people in both countries.

Canada and Japan are key partners, globally and in the Indo-Pacific region. During their time together, the two leaders will continue to work closely to grow our economies, create good jobs in both countries, and improve regional security, including through Canada's recently announced Indo-Pacific Strategy and Japan's National Security Strategy. These discussions will explore ways Canada and Japan can implement joint priorities across a range of issues, from free trade, to energy security, to peacekeeping and peacebuilding.

The leaders will also discuss Russia’s illegal and unjustifiable invasion of Ukraine, and continue working together to support the Ukrainian government and people.

“Canada and Japan share a close friendship rooted in decades of cooperation, shared values, and deep ties between our people. We both benefit from a strong trade, innovation, and investment relationship bolstered by the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, which has been helping businesses and workers in both our countries succeed since 2018. I look forward to welcoming Prime Minister Kishida to Canada and working even more closely together to deliver results for people in Canada and Japan.” The Rt. Hon. Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada

Quick Facts

  • Japan has assumed its Presidency of the G7 in 2023.
  • Japan is the world’s third-largest national economy, one of Canada’s most important economic and commercial partners, and Canada’s largest source of bilateral foreign direct investment in Asia.
  • In 2021, Canada’s exports of merchandise to Japan totalled $14.5 billion, while imports from Japan were $15.5 billion. Agricultural products, energy, minerals, and forest products are among Canada’s largest exports to Japan.
  • Canada and Japan have a long history of diplomatic relations dating back to 1928, when Japan opened a diplomatic mission in Ottawa. Canada inaugurated its diplomatic mission to Japan in Tokyo on May 21, 1929, formalizing our full bilateral diplomatic relations.
  • Canada’s Indo-Pacific Strategy will advance and defend Canada’s interests by supporting a more secure, prosperous, inclusive, and sustainable region while protecting Canada’s national and economic security at home and abroad.
  • In May 2021, the Foreign Ministers of Canada and Japan agreed on six shared priorities contributing to a free and open Indo-Pacific region. These include the rule of law; peacekeeping operations, peacebuilding, and humanitarian assistance and disaster relief; energy security; health security and responding to COVID-19; free trade promotion and trade agreement implementation; and the environment and climate change. Implementation of the six shared priorities is being pursued in accordance with a detailed Action Plan announced in October 2022.
  • The Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) eliminates or reduces tariffs on most key Canadian exports to Japan, including for agriculture and agri-food, seafood, forestry, and metals and mineral products. The CPTPP is a demonstration of Canada and Japan’s shared commitment to furthering the principles of an effective, open, inclusive, and rules-based trading system.
  • There are over 99,000 people of Japanese origin residing in Canada (according to the 2021 Census) and prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, approximately 600,000 Japanese and Canadians travelled to each other’s country annually.

Associated Links

  • Canada-Japan Relations
  • Canada’s Indo-Pacific Strategy
  • Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP)
  • Canada and the G7
  • Canada’s response to the Russian invasion of Ukraine

Japanese PM to meet with Trudeau next week

Ottawa stop will be prime minister fumio kishida's first visit to canada since his election in 2021.

Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida speaks at a news conference.

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Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida will meet with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in Ottawa next Thursday.

It will be Kishida's first visit to Canada since he was elected in 2021.

A press release from Trudeau's office says the two will discuss strengthening bilateral trade, Russia's war on Ukraine and Japan's upcoming G7 presidency.

"I look forward to welcoming Prime Minister Kishida to Canada and working even more closely together to deliver results for people in Canada and Japan," Trudeau said in a media statement.

Kishida's visit will be part of his tour of most of the G7 countries, which includes a stop in Washington to meet with U.S. President Joe Biden.

With files from the Associated Press

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Japanese PM asks for Canada’s help on clean energy

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau meets with Prime Minister of Japan Fumio Kishida on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Thursday, Jan. 12, 2023. (Sean Kilpatrick /The Canadian Press via AP)

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau meets with Prime Minister of Japan Fumio Kishida on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Thursday, Jan. 12, 2023. (Sean Kilpatrick /The Canadian Press via AP)

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau welcomes Prime Minister of Japan Fumio Kishida to Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Thursday, Jan. 12, 2023. (Sean Kilpatrick /The Canadian Press via AP)

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, riht, and Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida hold a joint news conference near Parliament Hill, Thursday, January 12, 2023 in Ottawa. (Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press via AP)

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau smiles as he listens to Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida speak during a joint news conference, Thursday, Jan. 12, 2023 in Ottawa. (Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press via AP)

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida walk to a joint news conference, Thursday, January 12, 2023 in Ottawa. (Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press via AP)

Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida listens via a translation aid as Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau responds to a question during a joint news conference, Thursday, Jan. 12, 2023 in Ottawa. (Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press via AP)

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, right, and Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida walk to a joint news conference, Thursday, Jan. 12, 2023 in Ottawa. (Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press via AP)

Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida looks on as Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau responds to a question during a joint news conference, Thursday, Jan. 12, 2023, in Ottawa, Ontario. (Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press via AP)

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OTTAWA, Ontario (AP) — Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida is looking to Canada to help his country wean itself off fossil fuels from places such as Russia.

Kishida is in Ottawa Thursday for his first visit as Japan’s head of government, as part of a tour of other Group of Seven countries.

Japan holds the G-7 presidency this year and is set to host meetings with the leaders of some of the world’s richest countries. The group includes Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the United States, plus the European Union.

Tokyo plans to use the presidency to coordinate with other states on economic management and punishing Russia for its invasion of Ukraine.

Kishida arrived late Wednesday in Ottawa from London, and is expected to head to Washington, D.C. later Thursday.

The visit comes during a time of geopolitical alignment between Japan and Canada, both of which have recently singled out China as a threat to stability in the region.

Kishida’s arrival marks the first visit to Canada by an Asian head of government since Ottawa launched its Indo-Pacific strategy last November, which called for closer ties with countries that can counterbalance Beijing’s influence.

Senior Gen. Min Aung Hlaing, head of the military council, stands on a military truck as he inspects officers during a parade to commemorate Myanmar's 79th Armed Forces Day, in Naypyitaw, Myanmar, Wednesday, March 27, 2024. (AP Photo/Thein Zaw)

A new Japanese defense strategy unveiled last month included working with allies to ward off threats from North Korea and China, and made it legal for Japan to conduct military strikes against enemy bases. Tokyo is boosting its military spending by 26% in just one year.

Meanwhile, a regional trade deal launched in 2018 has helped both countries expand trade with each other’s markets. Under the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership, Canada has increased its exports of pork and oil to Japan, while it has brought in more imports of Japanese machinery and auto parts.

“Trade is booming between our two countries,” Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said at a Thursday lunch he hosted for Kishida and corporate executives.

“We share a vision for peace and prosperity on both sides of the Pacific.”

Kishida told guests that liquefied natural gas will play a “crucial role” in Japan’s energy transition, and that Canada’s looming LNG export terminal is one example of multiple ways Ottawa can help.

“On science, technology and innovation, (digital transformation) and startups, I am very keen to further strengthen co-operation between industry, government and academia in both countries,” Kishida told participants in Japanese, through an English interpreter.

“Nuclear power will also play a key role, and we look forward to working together to make the nuclear supply chain more resilient.”

The Canadian government will lead a trade delegation to Japan this fall, Trudeau said, and Japanese companies interested in mining and electric-vehicle battery components aim to visit Canada in the spring.

japanese pm visit to canada

Japanese delegation to visit Canada to meet with battery, mining companies

Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau meets with Japan's Prime Minister Fumio Kishida in Ottawa

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Reporting by Steve Scherer and Ismail Shakil in Ottawa Editing by Chris Reese and David Gregorio

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japanese pm visit to canada

Japan PM visit could highlight LNG needs, as Tokyo pushes away from Russia and China

Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida's first official visit to Canada will take place next week, as Tokyo looks to Canada to provide much-needed liquefied natural gas.

Japan takes over the rotating presidency of the Group of Seven this year and Kishida is embarking on a multi-country tour.

The G7 started as a forum for the world's largest economies to co-ordinate economic policy, but has broadened its role in recent years to take a key role in punishing Russia for its invasion of Ukraine.

The group includes Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the United States, plus the European Union.

Kishida is set to arrive Thursday in Ottawa from London before heading to Washington.

It will be the first Canadian visit by an Asian head of government since Ottawa launched its Indo-Pacific strategy last November, which called for closer ties with countries that can counterbalance China's influence.

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Japan is similarly trying to pivot away from a reliance on China and Russia for electricity and food.

To that end, Kishida has created the position of a minister of state for economic security, and is trying to bring nuclear reactors back online after dozens were halted following the 2011 Fukushima disaster.

The country is so reliant on Russian fuel that G7 countries gave Japan an exemption on a measure that caps the price of Russian oil below market rates, to avoid Japan facing the same scramble for energy that Europe undertook last year.

Trevor Kennedy, the Business Council of Canada vice-president for international policy, said Kishida will likely seek a further commitment from Canada to sell liquefied natural gas, and mention an ongoing interest in hydrogen.

"They're stuck in a situation where they're sourcing their LNG from Russia, and they don't have another option," said Kennedy, who has worked in Japan.

Japan and South Korea have invested in Canada's first LNG export terminal in Kitimat, B.C., which is set to come online in 2025.

Kennedy said both countries and Canadian firms are watching to see whether the terminal meets that timeline, given the delays other large energy projects in Canada have faced.

He said the energy sector, Tokyo and Seoul also want Ottawa to boost the LNG sector by expanding the terminal or launching more of them. Otherwise, Japan and South Korea will have to rely on gas from Russia, or ask faraway countries to send supplies through waters China is trying to control.

Last month, Foreign Affairs Minister Mélanie Joly said Canada's goal is to be as close to South Korea and Japan as Ottawa is to Germany, France and the U.K.

Kennedy said it's an obvious decision, given the pair are democratic countries who share the same values. But he said it requires a sense of urgency.

"We need to be more deliberate about how we engage," he said.

"A lot of it is a mindset, and just understanding that these are our neighbours."

Kennedy said Canadian businesses have been looking past Japan for the last three decades. The country's economic bubble burst in 1991, just as other Asian countries started posting stronger growth. Japan's population is also aging at one of the fastest rates in the world.

Yet the country remains the world's third-largest economy, Kennedy noted, and it's flush with capital that firms are seeking to invest abroad.

Railways and telecommunications companies, for example, have barely any room to develop more services within Japan, and have been focusing on investments elsewhere.

The CPTPP trade deal, which spans most of the Pacific Rim, has helped boost Canadian exports to Japan, particularly pork and canola products.

Japanese companies are now looking to expand electric-vehicle production in North America, and Ottawa is under pressure to match American subsidies on the production of green vehicles and components.

Last month, Japan's new defence strategy called for working with allies to ward off threats from North Korea and China, and has made it legal for Japan to strike enemy bases. Tokyo is also boosting military spending by 26 per cent in just one year.

Next week, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Kishida will likely take stock of a plan both countries issued last October, spanning everything from fighting illegal fishing to implementing a military intelligence sharing deal.

Kishida might also publicly endorse Canada's desire to join the Indo-Pacific Economic Framework for Prosperity, a forum for co-ordinating supply chains and tax policy. Ottawa claims that all members of that group want Canada to join.

At a Thursday speech in Washington, Japanese trade minister Yasutoshi Nishimura said his country plans to use its year leading the G7 to encourage allies to lessen their dependence on rogue states like Russia and China.

He told the Center for Strategic and International Studies think tank that rich countries assumed that economic ties with poorer states would have made them less volatile.

“It was poverty that sparked violence and conflict; prosperity was a seabed of peace,” Nishimura said. “Our assumption was unmistakably an illusion.”

He argued that like-minded countries need to identify the states that undertake "economic coercion" and have clear strategies to lessen their effect.

“By making economic growth possible, the free-trade system ended up increasing the legitimacy of authoritarian regimes,” he said.

Nishimura noted that Russia has cut off gas exports to punish countries. He chastised China for arbitrarily banning agricultural imports such as pineapples from Taiwan, an example reminiscent of China’s past ban on Canadian canola.

“There is a risk involved in relying excessively upon a single country economically and we now fear that risk more intensely than ever,” Nishimura said.

He said countries need to put up cash for innovation, such as producing semiconductors and recycling the rare minerals found in electronic waste. “We must make bold investments at a scale never seen before."

Experts will watch for large-ticket announcements at the G7 leaders summit this May in Hiroshima. Kishida has hinted he might also use the summit to try furthering the cause of nuclear disarmament, given the host city was devastated by an atomic bomb in the Second World War.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 7, 2023. 

This is a corrected story. A previous version said Kishida would arrive in Ottawa on Wednesday. He will, in fact, arrive on Thursday.

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Japan PM's first visit to Canada could highlight LNG needs

Japan

Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida speaks during his New Year's press conference in Ise, central Japan Wednesday, Jan. 4, 2023. The Japanese Prime Minister will visit Ottawa next Wednesday, the first Canadian visit by an Asian head of government since Ottawa launched its Indo-Pacific strategy last November. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Kyodo News via AP

Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida's first official visit to Canada will take place next week, as Tokyo looks to Canada to provide much-needed liquefied natural gas.

Japan takes over the rotating presidency of the Group of Seven this year and Kishida is embarking on a multi-country tour.

The G7 started as a forum for the world's largest economies to co-ordinate economic policy, but has broadened its role in recent years to take a key role in punishing Russia for its invasion of Ukraine.

The group includes Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the United States, plus the European Union.

Kishida is set to arrive Wednesday in Ottawa from London, and will leave Thursday for Washington.

It will be the first Canadian visit by an Asian head of government since Ottawa launched its Indo-Pacific strategy last November, which called for closer ties with countries that can counterbalance China's influence.

Japan is similarly trying to pivot away from a reliance on China and Russia for electricity and food.

To that end, Kishida has created the position of a minister of state for economic security, and is trying to bring nuclear reactors back online after dozens were halted following the 2011 Fukushima disaster.

The country is so reliant on Russian fuel that G7 countries gave Japan an exemption on a measure that caps the price of Russian oil below market rates, to avoid Japan facing the same scramble for energy that Europe undertook last year.

Trevor Kennedy, the Business Council of Canada vice-president for international policy, said Kishida will likely seek a further commitment from Canada to sell liquefied natural gas, and mention an ongoing interest in hydrogen.

"They're stuck in a situation where they're sourcing their LNG from Russia, and they don't have another option," said Kennedy, who has worked in Japan.

Japan and South Korea have invested in Canada's first LNG export terminal in Kitimat, B.C., which is set to come online in 2025.

Kennedy said both countries and Canadian firms are watching to see whether the terminal meets that timeline, given the delays other large energy projects in Canada have faced.

He said the energy sector, Tokyo and Seoul also want Ottawa to boost the LNG sector by expanding the terminal or launching more of them. Otherwise, Japan and South Korea will have to rely on gas from Russia, or ask faraway countries to send supplies through waters China is trying to control.

Last month, Foreign Affairs Minister Mélanie Joly said Canada's goal is to be as close to South Korea and Japan as Ottawa is to Germany, France and the U.K.

Kennedy said it's an obvious decision, given the pair are democratic countries who share the same values. But he said it requires a sense of urgency.

"We need to be more deliberate about how we engage," he said.

"A lot of it is a mindset, and just understanding that these are our neighbours."

Kennedy said Canadian businesses have been looking past Japan for the last three decades. The country's economic bubble burst in 1991, just as other Asian countries started posting stronger growth. Japan's population is also aging at one of the fastest rates in the world.

Yet the country remains the world's third-largest economy, Kennedy noted, and it's flush with capital that firms are seeking to invest abroad.

Railways and telecommunications companies, for example, have barely any room to develop more services within Japan, and have been focusing on investments elsewhere.

The CPTPP trade deal, which spans most of the Pacific Rim, has helped boost Canadian exports to Japan, particularly pork and canola products.

Japanese companies are now looking to expand electric-vehicle production in North America, and Ottawa is under pressure to match American subsidies on the production of green vehicles and components.

Last month, Japan's new defence strategy called for working with allies to ward off threats from North Korea and China, and has made it legal for Japan to strike enemy bases. Tokyo is also boosting military spending by 26 per cent in just one year.

Next week, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Kishida will likely take stock of a plan both countries issued last October, spanning everything from fighting illegal fishing to implementing a military intelligence sharing deal.

Kishida might also publicly endorse Canada's desire to join the Indo-Pacific Economic Framework for Prosperity, a forum for co-ordinating supply chains and tax policy. Ottawa claims that all members of that group want Canada to join.

At a Thursday speech in Washington, Japanese trade minister Yasutoshi Nishimura said his country plans to use its year leading the G7 to encourage allies to lessen their dependence on rogue states like Russia and China.

He told the Center for Strategic and International Studies think tank that rich countries assumed that economic ties with poorer states would have made them less volatile.

“It was poverty that sparked violence and conflict; prosperity was a seabed of peace,” Nishimura said. “Our assumption was unmistakably an illusion.”

He argued that like-minded countries need to identify the states that undertake "economic coercion" and have clear strategies to lessen their effect.

“By making economic growth possible, the free-trade system ended up increasing the legitimacy of authoritarian regimes,” he said.

Nishimura noted that Russia has cut off gas exports to punish countries. He chastised China for arbitrarily banning agricultural imports such as pineapples from Taiwan, an example reminiscent of China’s past ban on Canadian canola.

“There is a risk involved in relying excessively upon a single country economically and we now fear that risk more intensely than ever,” Nishimura said.

He said countries need to put up cash for innovation, such as producing semiconductors and recycling the rare minerals found in electronic waste. “We must make bold investments at a scale never seen before."

Experts will watch for large-ticket announcements at the G7 leaders summit this May in Hiroshima. Kishida has hinted he might also use the summit to try furthering the cause of nuclear disarmament, given the host city was devastated by an atomic bomb in the Second World War.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 7, 2023. 

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Japanese PM Kishida visits Ottawa, asks for Canada’s help on clean energy transition

Jan 12, 2023

japanese pm visit to canada

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau meets with Prime Minister of Japan Fumio Kishida on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Thursday, Jan. 12, 2023. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

By Dylan Robertson in Ottawa

Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida has asked Canada to form closer ties during a visit to Ottawa that experts say comes at a time when the two countries have significant geopolitical alignment.

Kishida visited Prime Minister Justin Trudeau for the first time as Japan’s head of government, part of a tour of other G7 countries as  Japan  seeks ways to wean off fossil fuels from places such as Russia.

Japan  holds the G7 presidency this year and is set to host meetings with the leaders of some of the world’s richest countries. The group includes Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy,  Japan  and the United States, plus the European Union.

Tokyo plans to use the presidency to co-ordinate with other states on economic management and to punish Russia for its invasion of Ukraine.

Kishida arrived in Ottawa from London late Wednesday and was off to Washington, D.C., on Thursday afternoon.

“It absolutely is crucial, even if it’s a short visit,” said Ian Burney, who served as Canada’s ambassador in Tokyo from 2015 to 2021.

“There is a near-perfect alignment between Japan’s desire to diversify its sources of imports … and Canada’s desire to diversify our export markets, which remains extremely overly reliant on just one market to our immediate south,” said Burney, who is now an investment adviser.

Kishida’s is the first visit to Canada by an Asian head of government since Ottawa launched its Indo-Pacific strategy last November, which called for closer ties with countries that can counterbalance Beijing’s influence.

A new Japanese defence strategy unveiled last month included working with allies to ward off threats from North Korea and China, and made it legal for  Japan  to conduct military strikes against enemy bases. Tokyo is boosting its military spending by 26 per cent in just one year.

“We agreed that we would strongly oppose unilateral attempts (by China) to change the status quo by force,” Kishida said of his discussion with Trudeau, through an interpreter.

Meanwhile, a regional trade deal launched in 2018 has helped both countries expand trade to each other’s markets. Under the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership, Canada has increased exports of pork and oil to  Japan  and brought in more Japanese machinery and auto parts.

“Trade is booming between our two countries,” Trudeau said at a Thursday lunch he hosted for Kishida and corporate executives.

“We share a vision for peace and prosperity on both sides of the Pacific.”

University of British Columbia political scientist Yves Tiberghien said Canada gained “first-mover advantage” by inking the trade deal with  Japan , which the United States still hasn’t done.

He noted Kishida’s visit comes just months after  Japan  and Canada both singled out China as a threat to stability in the region.

Kishida told Thursday’s lunch guests that liquefied natural gas will play a “crucial role” in Japan’s energy transition and that Canada’s looming  LNG  export terminal is one example of the ways Ottawa can help.

“On science, technology and innovation, (digital transformation) and startups, I am very keen to further strengthen co-operation between industry, government and academia in both countries,” Kishida said through an English interpreter.

“Nuclear power will also play a key role and we look forward to working together to make the nuclear supply chain more resilient.”

Yet Trudeau and Kishida did not commit to any further  LNG  projects, such as a proposed Phase 2 expansion of the looming terminal at Kitimat, B.C.

“We’re going to continue to look for ways to be that reliable supplier of energy,” Trudeau said.

“Even as we do talk about things like  LNG  and other traditional sources of energy, we know the world is moving aggressively and meaningfully towards decarbonizing, towards diversifying, towards more renewables,” he added.

Burney said global competition makes it essential for Canada to meet the 2025 timeline to export  LNG .

“It was an area of some frustration for me because we’ve been talking about becoming a major energy supplier to  Japan  for decades and for most of that time, it was just that — talk,” he said.

“Frankly, all eyes are on that project. It is, to my mind, crucial that that be completed on schedule.”

He noted Canada’s first major energy exports to  Japan  started in 2019 through a propane-export facility that quickly made up a sizable chunk of Japan’s supply.

Tiberghien said the two countries also see eye-to-eye on a shift toward green technology, digital innovation and artificial intelligence, all the while decoupling from China.

“There is tremendous interest at doing more with Canada on defence, economic security, green technology, artificial intelligence, lithium,  LNG , batteries — you name it,” he said.

There has been a recent uptick in visits by Liberal ministers to Tokyo and Trudeau said a trade delegation will head to  Japan  in the coming year. He also said Japanese companies interested in mining and electric-vehicle battery components aim to visit Canada in the spring.

Burney said the Indo-Pacific strategy hit the right tone, but ought to have included new opportunities for Canadian youth to do exchanges in  Japan , similar to the Japan’s massive program for English teachers.

“Few things matter more in  Japan  than personal relationships,” he said. “They often open doors to other opportunities.”

Both experts said the countries share so many values and so few irritants that they take each other for granted, focusing more on Washington or Europe.

Part of the current convergence stems from a relative abatement of hostility between  Japan  and South Korea compared to recent decades.

The memory of Japan’s colonization of Korea and human-rights breaches it committed before and during the Second World War flares up when Japanese politicians visit nationalist historical sites, or when Korean leaders bring up forced labour and sexual exploitation.

“Canada could have an interesting, special relationship with both at the same time and maybe play an external role in lessening any tension between them,” Tiberghien said.

He said  Japan  and Korea put an emphasis on anniversaries, and 2023 gives a pretext for Ottawa to hold events that commemorate 95 years of diplomatic relations with  Japan  and 60 years of the same with South Korea.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 12, 2023.

News from © The Canadian Press, 2023. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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OTTAWA — Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida has asked Canada to form closer ties during a visit to Ottawa that experts say comes at a time when the two countries have significant geopolitical alignment.

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Japanese PM visits Ottawa, asks for Canada's help on clean energy transition Back to video

Kishida visited Prime Minister Justin Trudeau for the first time as Japan’s head of government, part of a tour of other G7 countries as Japan seeks ways to wean off fossil fuels from places such as Russia.

Japan holds the G7 presidency this year and is set to host meetings with the leaders of some of the world’s richest countries. The group includes Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the United States, plus the European Union.

Tokyo plans to use the presidency to co-ordinate with other states on economic management and to punish Russia for its invasion of Ukraine.

Kishida arrived in Ottawa from London late Wednesday and was off to Washington, D.C., on Thursday afternoon.

“It absolutely is crucial, even if it’s a short visit,” said Ian Burney, who served as Canada’s ambassador in Tokyo from 2015 to 2021.

“There is a near-perfect alignment between Japan’s desire to diversify its sources of imports and Canada’s desire to diversify our export markets, which remains extremely overly reliant on just one market to our immediate south,” said Burney, who is now an investment adviser.

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Kishida’s is the first visit to Canada by an Asian head of government since Ottawa launched its Indo-Pacific strategy last November, which called for closer ties with countries that can counterbalance Beijing’s influence.

A new Japanese defence strategy unveiled last month included working with allies to ward off threats from North Korea and China, and made it legal for Japan to conduct military strikes against enemy bases. Tokyo is boosting its military spending by 26 per cent in just one year.

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“We agreed that we would strongly oppose unilateral attempts (by China) to change the status quo by force,” Kishida said of his discussion with Trudeau, through an interpreter.

Meanwhile, a regional trade deal launched in 2018 has helped both countries expand trade to each other’s markets. Under the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership, Canada has increased exports of pork and oil to Japan and brought in more Japanese machinery and auto parts.

“Trade is booming between our two countries,” Trudeau said at a Thursday lunch he hosted for Kishida and corporate executives.

“We share a vision for peace and prosperity on both sides of the Pacific.”

University of British Columbia political scientist Yves Tiberghien said Canada gained “first-mover advantage” by inking the trade deal with Japan, which the United States still hasn’t done.

He noted Kishida’s visit comes just months after Japan and Canada both singled out China as a threat to stability in the region.

Kishida told Thursday’s lunch guests that liquefied natural gas will play a “crucial role” in Japan’s energy transition and that Canada’s looming LNG export terminal is one example of the ways Ottawa can help.

“On science, technology and innovation, (digital transformation) and startups, I am very keen to further strengthen co-operation between industry, government and academia in both countries,” Kishida said through an English interpreter.

“Nuclear power will also play a key role and we look forward to working together to make the nuclear supply chain more resilient.”

Yet Trudeau and Kishida did not commit to any further LNG projects, such as a proposed Phase 2 expansion of the looming terminal at Kitimat, B.C.

“We’re going to continue to look for ways to be that reliable supplier of energy,” Trudeau said.

“Even as we do talk about things like LNG and other traditional sources of energy, we know the world is moving aggressively and meaningfully towards decarbonizing, towards diversifying, towards more renewables,” he added.

Burney said global competition makes it essential for Canada to meet the 2025 timeline to export LNG.

“It was an area of some frustration for me because we’ve been talking about becoming a major energy supplier to Japan for decades and for most of that time, it was just that — talk,” he said.

“Frankly, all eyes are on that project. It is, to my mind, crucial that that be completed on schedule.”

He noted Canada’s first major energy exports to Japan started in 2019 through a propane-export facility that quickly made up a sizable chunk of Japan’s supply.

Tiberghien said the two countries also see eye-to-eye on a shift toward green technology, digital innovation and artificial intelligence, all the while decoupling from China.

“There is tremendous interest at doing more with Canada on defence, economic security, green technology, artificial intelligence, lithium, LNG, batteries — you name it,” he said.

There has been a recent uptick in visits by Liberal ministers to Tokyo and Trudeau said a trade delegation will head to Japan in the coming year. He also said Japanese companies interested in mining and electric-vehicle battery components aim to visit Canada in the spring.

Burney said the Indo-Pacific strategy hit the right tone, but ought to have included new opportunities for Canadian youth to do exchanges in Japan, similar to the Japan’s massive program for English teachers.

“Few things matter more in Japan than personal relationships,” he said. “They often open doors to other opportunities.”

Both experts said the countries share so many values and so few irritants that they take each other for granted, focusing more on Washington or Europe.

Part of the current convergence stems from a relative abatement of hostility between Japan and South Korea compared to recent decades.

The memory of Japan’s colonization of Korea and human-rights breaches it committed before and during the Second World War flares up when Japanese politicians visit nationalist historical sites, or when Korean leaders bring up forced labour and sexual exploitation.

“Canada could have an interesting, special relationship with both at the same time and maybe play an external role in lessening any tension between them,” Tiberghien said.

He said Japan and Korea put an emphasis on anniversaries, and 2023 gives a pretext for Ottawa to hold events that commemorate 95 years of diplomatic relations with Japan and 60 years of the same with South Korea.

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Japanese PM Kishida visits Ottawa, asks for Canada's help on clean energy transition

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OTTAWA — Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida has asked Canada to form closer ties during a visit to Ottawa that experts say comes at a time when the two countries have significant geopolitical alignment.

Kishida visited Prime Minister Justin Trudeau for the first time as Japan’s head of government, part of a tour of other G7 countries as Japan seeks ways to wean off fossil fuels from places such as Russia.

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Japan holds the G7 presidency this year and is set to host meetings with the leaders of some of the world’s richest countries. The group includes Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the United States, plus the European Union.

Tokyo plans to use the presidency to co-ordinate with other states on economic management and to punish Russia for its invasion of Ukraine.

Kishida arrived in Ottawa from London late Wednesday and was off to Washington, D.C., on Thursday afternoon.

“It absolutely is crucial, even if it’s a short visit,” said Ian Burney, who served as Canada’s ambassador in Tokyo from 2015 to 2021.

“There is a near-perfect alignment between Japan’s desire to diversify its sources of imports … and Canada’s desire to diversify our export markets, which remains extremely overly reliant on just one market to our immediate south,” said Burney, who is now an investment adviser.

Kishida’s is the first visit to Canada by an Asian head of government since Ottawa launched its Indo-Pacific strategy last November, which called for closer ties with countries that can counterbalance Beijing’s influence.

A new Japanese defence strategy unveiled last month included working with allies to ward off threats from North Korea and China, and made it legal for Japan to conduct military strikes against enemy bases. Tokyo is boosting its military spending by 26 per cent in just one year.

“We agreed that we would strongly oppose unilateral attempts (by China) to change the status quo by force,” Kishida said of his discussion with Trudeau, through an interpreter.

Meanwhile, a regional trade deal launched in 2018 has helped both countries expand trade to each other’s markets. Under the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership, Canada has increased exports of pork and oil to Japan and brought in more Japanese machinery and auto parts.

“Trade is booming between our two countries,” Trudeau said at a Thursday lunch he hosted for Kishida and corporate executives.

“We share a vision for peace and prosperity on both sides of the Pacific.”

University of British Columbia political scientist Yves Tiberghien said Canada gained “first-mover advantage” by inking the trade deal with Japan, which the United States still hasn’t done.

He noted Kishida’s visit comes just months after Japan and Canada both singled out China as a threat to stability in the region.

Kishida told Thursday’s lunch guests that liquefied natural gas will play a “crucial role” in Japan’s energy transition and that Canada’s looming LNG export terminal is one example of the ways Ottawa can help.

“On science, technology and innovation, (digital transformation) and startups, I am very keen to further strengthen co-operation between industry, government and academia in both countries,” Kishida said through an English interpreter.

“Nuclear power will also play a key role and we look forward to working together to make the nuclear supply chain more resilient.”

Yet Trudeau and Kishida did not commit to any further LNG projects, such as a proposed Phase 2 expansion of the looming terminal at Kitimat, B.C.

“We’re going to continue to look for ways to be that reliable supplier of energy,” Trudeau said.

“Even as we do talk about things like LNG and other traditional sources of energy, we know the world is moving aggressively and meaningfully towards decarbonizing, towards diversifying, towards more renewables,” he added.

Burney said global competition makes it essential for Canada to meet the 2025 timeline to export LNG.

“It was an area of some frustration for me because we’ve been talking about becoming a major energy supplier to Japan for decades and for most of that time, it was just that — talk,” he said.

“Frankly, all eyes are on that project. It is, to my mind, crucial that that be completed on schedule.”

He noted Canada’s first major energy exports to Japan started in 2019 through a propane-export facility that quickly made up a sizable chunk of Japan’s supply.

Tiberghien said the two countries also see eye-to-eye on a shift toward green technology, digital innovation and artificial intelligence, all the while decoupling from China.

“There is tremendous interest at doing more with Canada on defence, economic security, green technology, artificial intelligence, lithium, LNG, batteries — you name it,” he said.

There has been a recent uptick in visits by Liberal ministers to Tokyo and Trudeau said a trade delegation will head to Japan in the coming year. He also said Japanese companies interested in mining and electric-vehicle battery components aim to visit Canada in the spring.

Burney said the Indo-Pacific strategy hit the right tone, but ought to have included new opportunities for Canadian youth to do exchanges in Japan, similar to the Japan’s massive program for English teachers.

“Few things matter more in Japan than personal relationships,” he said. “They often open doors to other opportunities.”

Both experts said the countries share so many values and so few irritants that they take each other for granted, focusing more on Washington or Europe.

Part of the current convergence stems from a relative abatement of hostility between Japan and South Korea compared to recent decades.

The memory of Japan’s colonization of Korea and human-rights breaches it committed before and during the Second World War flares up when Japanese politicians visit nationalist historical sites, or when Korean leaders bring up forced labour and sexual exploitation.

“Canada could have an interesting, special relationship with both at the same time and maybe play an external role in lessening any tension between them,” Tiberghien said.

He said Japan and Korea put an emphasis on anniversaries, and 2023 gives a pretext for Ottawa to hold events that commemorate 95 years of diplomatic relations with Japan and 60 years of the same with South Korea.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 12, 2023.

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Biden to meet Japan’s PM Kishida amid shared concerns about China and differences on US Steel deal

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WASHINGTON (AP) — Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida begins a much-anticipated visit to Washington on Tuesday aiming to spotlight shared concerns about provocative Chinese military action in the Pacific and at a rare moment of public difference between the two nations over a Japanese company's plan to buy an iconic U.S. company.

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WASHINGTON (AP) — Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida begins a much-anticipated visit to Washington on Tuesday aiming to spotlight shared concerns about provocative Chinese military action in the Pacific and at a rare moment of public difference between the two nations over a Japanese company’s plan to buy an iconic U.S. company.

Kishida and his wife will stop by the White House Tuesday evening ahead of Wednesday’s official visit and formal state dinner as President Joe Biden looks to celebrate a decades-long ally he sees as the cornerstone of his Indo-Pacific policy. Kishida will be the fifth world leader honored by Biden with a state dinner since he took office in 2021.

Ahead of the White House visit, Kishida is set to visit Arlington National Cemetery and stop by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Tuesday. Biden and Kishida on Wednesday will hold talks and take part in a joint news conference before Biden fetes the Japanese leader with the state dinner in the East Room.

Japan's Prime Minister Fumio Kishida, left, and his wife Yuko Kishida participate in an arrival ceremony at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., Monday, April 8, 2024. Kishida is set for his much-anticipated visit to Washington, which will include a glamorous state dinner on Wednesday. The visit comes amid growing concerns about provocative Chinese military action as well as a rare moment of public difference between Washington and Tokyo over a Japanese company's plan to buy the iconic U.S. Steel. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

The prime minister has also been invited to address a joint meeting of Congress on Thursday. He will be just the second Japanese leader to address the body; Shinzo Abe gave a speech to Congress in 2015.

The visit comes after Biden announced last month that he opposes the planned sale of Pittsburgh-based U.S. Steel to Nippon Steel of Japan, exposing a marked rift in the partnership at the very moment the two leaders aim to reinforce it. Biden argued in announcing his opposition that the U.S. needs to “maintain strong American steel companies powered by American steelworkers.”

Ambassador Rahm Emanuel, Biden’s envoy to Tokyo, sought Monday to downplay the impact of Biden’s opposition to the U.S. Steel acquisition to the relationship. Emanuel noted that in February the Biden administration approved a plan that would drive billions of dollars in revenue to a U.S.-based subsidiary of the Japanese company Mitsui for crane production in the United States.

“The United States relationship with Japan is a lot deeper and stronger and more significant than a single commercial deal,” said Emanuel, the former mayor of Chicago, in a joint appearance at Washington’s Center for Strategic and International Studies with Japan’s chief envoy to Washington. “As we would say in Chicago, you got to chill.”

Nippon Steel announced in December that it planned to buy U.S. Steel for $14.1 billion in cash, raising concerns about what the transaction could mean for unionized workers, supply chains and U.S. national security. Shigeo Yamada, Japan’s ambassador to Washington, declined to comment on whether Kishida would raise the Nippon-U.S. Steel deal with Biden.

Biden has sought to place greater foreign policy focus on the Pacific even while grappling with the fallout of the Russian invasion of Ukraine and the grinding Israel-Hamas war. Last year, Biden brought together Kishida and South Korean President Yoon Suk Yeol at the presidential retreat at Camp David, Maryland, a historic summit between leaders of two countries that have a difficult shared history.

Biden has honored Yoon with a state visit and picked Kishida’s predecessor, Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, as the first face-to-face foreign leader visit of his presidency.

The administration has been pleased by Japan’s strong support for Ukraine. Tokyo has been one of the largest donors to Kyiv since Russia’s February 2022 invasion, and Japan has surged its defense spending amid concern about China’s military assertiveness.

Yamada suggested in his joint appearance with Emanuel that Kishida would underscore Japan’s support for Ukraine during his appearance before Congress, and lay out why the conflict in Eastern Europe matters to his country. Biden is struggling to get House Republicans to back his call to send an additional $60 billion to Kyiv as it tries to fend off Russia.

Kishida has warned that the war in Europe could lead to conflict in East Asia, suggesting that a lax attitude to Russia emboldens China.

“The prime minister’s conviction is today’s Ukraine could be tomorrow’s East Asia,” Yamada said.

Kishida will stick around Washington on Thursday to take part in a meeting with Biden and Philippine President Ferdinand Marcos Jr. Philippine-Chinese relations have been repeatedly tested by skirmishes between the two nations’ coast guard vessels in the disputed South China Sea.

Chinese coast guard ships also regularly approach disputed Japanese-controlled East China Sea islands near Taiwan. Beijing says Taiwan is part of its territory and will be brought under control by force if necessary.

“Cooperation among our three countries is extremely important in maintaining peace and stability in the Indo-Pacific and in defending a free and open international order based on the rules of law,” Kishida said Monday before leaving for Washington.

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The leaders are expected to discuss plans to upgrade the U.S. military command structure in Japan. There are about 54,000 U.S. troops stationed in Japan.

Kishida and Biden are also expected to confirm Japan’s participation in NASA’s Artemis moon program as well as its contribution of a moon rover developed by Toyota Motor Corp. and the inclusion of a Japanese astronaut in the mission. The rover, which comes at a roughly $2 billion cost, would be the most expensive contribution to the mission by a non-U.S. partner to date.

On Friday, Kishida will tour Toyota’s electric vehicle battery factory under construction as well as Honda’s business jet subsidiary in North Carolina. He will also meet students at North Carolina State University.

Associated Press writer Mari Yamaguchi in Tokyo contributed to this report.

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Japan PM visit could highlight LNG needs, as Tokyo pushes away from Russia and China

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japanese pm visit to canada

Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida will visit Ottawa on Thursday, the first Canadian visit by an Asian head of government since Ottawa launched its Indo-Pacific strategy last November. 小崎一記/The Associated Press

Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida’s first official visit to Canada will take place next week, as Tokyo looks to Canada to provide much-needed liquefied natural gas.

Japan takes over the rotating presidency of the Group of Seven this year and Mr. Kishida is embarking on a multicountry tour.

The G7 started as a forum for the world’s largest economies to co-ordinate economic policy, but has broadened its role in recent years to take a key role in punishing Russia for its invasion of Ukraine.

The group includes Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the United States, plus the European Union.

Mr. Kishida is set to arrive Thursday in Ottawa from London before heading to Washington.

It will be the first Canadian visit by an Asian head of government since Ottawa launched its Indo-Pacific strategy last November, which called for closer ties with countries that can counterbalance China’s influence.

Japan is similarly trying to pivot away from a reliance on China and Russia for electricity and food.

To that end, Mr. Kishida has created the position of a minister of state for economic security, and is trying to bring nuclear reactors back online after dozens were halted following the 2011 Fukushima disaster.

The country is so reliant on Russian fuel that G7 countries gave Japan an exemption on a measure that caps the price of Russian oil below market rates, to avoid Japan facing the same scramble for energy that Europe undertook last year.

Trevor Kennedy, the Business Council of Canada vice-president for international policy, said Mr. Kishida will likely seek a further commitment from Canada to sell liquefied natural gas, and mention an ongoing interest in hydrogen.

“They’re stuck in a situation where they’re sourcing their LNG from Russia, and they don’t have another option,” said Mr. Kennedy, who has worked in Japan.

Japan and South Korea have invested in Canada’s first LNG export terminal in Kitimat, B.C., which is set to come online in 2025.

Mr. Kennedy said both countries and Canadian firms are watching to see whether the terminal meets that timeline, given the delays other large energy projects in Canada have faced.

He said the energy sector, Tokyo and Seoul also want Ottawa to boost the LNG sector by expanding the terminal or launching more of them. Otherwise, Japan and South Korea will have to rely on gas from Russia, or ask faraway countries to send supplies through waters China is trying to control.

Last month, Foreign Affairs Minister Mélanie Joly said Canada’s goal is to be as close to South Korea and Japan as Ottawa is to Germany, France and the U.K.

Mr. Kennedy said it’s an obvious decision, given the pair are democratic countries who share the same values. But he said it requires a sense of urgency.

“We need to be more deliberate about how we engage,” he said. “A lot of it is a mindset, and just understanding that these are our neighbours.”

Mr. Kennedy said Canadian businesses have been looking past Japan for the last three decades. The country’s economic bubble burst in 1991, just as other Asian countries started posting stronger growth. Japan’s population is also aging at one of the fastest rates in the world.

Yet the country remains the world’s third-largest economy, Mr. Kennedy noted, and it’s flush with capital that firms are seeking to invest abroad.

Railways and telecommunications companies, for example, have barely any room to develop more services within Japan, and have been focusing on investments elsewhere.

The Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) trade deal, which spans most of the Pacific Rim, has helped boost Canadian exports to Japan, particularly pork and canola products.

Japanese companies are now looking to expand electric-vehicle production in North America, and Ottawa is under pressure to match American subsidies on the production of green vehicles and components.

Last month, Japan’s new defence strategy called for working with allies to ward off threats from North Korea and China, and has made it legal for Japan to strike enemy bases. Tokyo is also boosting military spending by 26 per cent in just one year.

Next week, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Mr. Kishida will likely take stock of a plan both countries issued last October, spanning everything from fighting illegal fishing to implementing a military intelligence-sharing deal.

Mr. Kishida might also publicly endorse Canada’s desire to join the Indo-Pacific Economic Framework for Prosperity, a forum for co-ordinating supply chains and tax policy. Ottawa claims that all members of that group want Canada to join.

At a Thursday speech in Washington, Japanese trade minister Yasutoshi Nishimura said his country plans to use its year leading the G7 to encourage allies to lessen their dependence on rogue states like Russia and China.

He told the Center for Strategic and International Studies think tank that rich countries assumed that economic ties with poorer states would have made them less volatile.

“It was poverty that sparked violence and conflict; prosperity was a seabed of peace,” Mr. Nishimura said. “Our assumption was unmistakably an illusion.”

He argued that like-minded countries need to identify the states that undertake “economic coercion” and have clear strategies to lessen their effect.

“By making economic growth possible, the free-trade system ended up increasing the legitimacy of authoritarian regimes,” he said.

Mr. Nishimura noted that Russia has cut off gas exports to punish countries. He chastised China for arbitrarily banning agricultural imports such as pineapples from Taiwan, an example reminiscent of China’s past ban on Canadian canola.

“There is a risk involved in relying excessively upon a single country economically and we now fear that risk more intensely than ever,” Mr. Nishimura said.

He said countries need to put up cash for innovation such as producing semiconductors and recycling the rare minerals found in electronic waste. “We must make bold investments at a scale never seen before.”

Experts will watch for large-ticket announcements at the G7 leaders summit this May in Hiroshima. Mr. Kishida has hinted he might also use the summit to try furthering the cause of nuclear disarmament, given the host city was devastated by an atomic bomb in the Second World War.

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What’s expected at Japanese PM Kishida’s US visit? A major upgrade in defense ties

japanese pm visit to canada

By Mari Yamaguchi, The Associated Press

Posted April 8, 2024 4:56 am.

Last Updated April 8, 2024 9:56 pm.

TOKYO (AP) — Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida is making an official visit to the United States this week. He will hold a summit with President Joe Biden that’s meant to achieve a major upgrading of their defense alliance.

He will also join a first-ever summit of the U.S., Japanese and Philippine leaders in Washington to showcase their cooperation in the face of an increasingly assertive China .

The Associated Press explains the significance of Kishida’s visit and the two summits.

WHAT DOES KISHIDA WANT TO ACHIEVE?

The biggest event during the weeklong trip is his summit with Biden on Wednesday. Kishida hopes to further strengthen the alliance as China’s influence grows in the Indo-Pacific.

Kishida is also reaching out to the American public to showcase Japan’s contribution to the U.S. economy and ensure stable relations regardless of who wins the U.S. presidential election later this year.

Kishida, who has pushed sweeping changes fortifying Japan’s defense capabilities since taking office in 2021, will emphasize that Japan and the U.S. are now global partners working to maintain a rules-based international order, and that Japan is willing to take on a greater international role in security, economy and space to help Washington.

Expanding arms equipment and technology cooperation between the two countries and other like-minded partners is also highly important, Kishida on Friday told selected media , including AP.

Kishida, stung by a corruption scandal, needs a successful U.S. visit to shore up low support ratings at home.

WHAT IS A STATE VISIT?

As a state guest, Kishida will be welcomed in a White House arrival ceremony on the South Lawn, a formal state dinner and other official events. He is the fifth state guest of Biden, who has also hosted leaders of India, Australia, South Korea and France, underscoring America’s focus on Indo-Pacific security partnerships.

Kishida is the first Japanese leader to make a state visit since Shinzo Abe in 2015. Abe made a major revision to the interpretation of Japan’s pacifist Constitution, allowing its self-defense-only principle to also cover its ally, the United States.

WHY THE DEFENSE FOCUS?

Defense tops the agenda because of growing worries about threats from China, North Korea and Russia. Chinese coast guard ships regularly approach disputed Japanese-controlled East China Sea islands near Taiwan . Beijing says Taiwan is part of its territory and will be brought under control by force if necessary.

There are also worries about North Korean nuclear and missile threats and Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. Kishida has warned that the war in Europe could lead to conflict in East Asia, suggesting that a lax attitude to Russia emboldens China.

“While we maintain the Japan-U.S. alliance as a cornerstone, we believe it is important to cooperate with like-minded countries, including the Philippines,” Kishida said.

WHAT ARE THE SUMMIT’S MAIN ISSUES?

Biden and Kishida are expected to agree on a plan to modernize their military command structures so they can better operate together. America stations 50,000 troops in Japan. The Japanese Self Defense Force is preparing to restructure so it has a unified command for ground, air and naval forces by March 2025.

Also expected are new initiatives for defense industry cooperation, including co-production of weapons, possibly a new missile, and the repair and maintenance of American warships and other equipment in Japan to help U.S. operations in the western Pacific.

Japan’s possible participation in a U.S.-U.K.-Australia security partnership to develop and share advanced military capabilities, including artificial intelligence, electronic warfare and hypersonics, may also come up.

Kishida and Biden are also expected to confirm Japan’s participation in NASA’s Artemis moon program and its contribution of a moon rover developed by Toyota Motor Corp. and the inclusion of a Japanese astronaut. The rover, which comes at a roughly $2 billion cost, is the most expensive contribution to the mission by a non-U.S. partner to date, a U.S. official said.

WHAT’S JAPAN’S DEFENSE AIM?

Since adopting a more expansive national security strategy in 2022 , Kishida’s government has taken bold steps to accelerate Japan’s military buildup. He hopes to show Tokyo is capable of elevating its security cooperation with the U.S. Kishida has pledged to double defense spending and boost deterrence against China, which Japan considers a top security threat.

Japan, working to acquire what it calls a “counterstrike” capability, has purchased 400 U.S. Tomahawk long-range cruise missiles. After prohibiting almost all weapons transfers, it has relaxed export guidelines twice in recent months, allowing the sale of lethal weapons to countries from which they were licensed and the overseas sales of a fighter jet it’s co-developing with the U.K. and Italy. The changes have allowed Japan to ship Japanese-made PAC-3 missiles to the U.S. to help replace those contributed by Washington to Ukraine.

WHAT ABOUT THE SUMMIT WITH THE PHILIPPINES?

The first-ever trilateral summit between Biden, Kishida and Philippine President Ferdinand Marcos Jr. comes as the Philippines faces escalating maritime tension with China over their contested South China Sea claims.

Biden wants to show that the three maritime democracies are unified as they face aggressive Chinese action against the Philippine coast guard and its supply vessels off the disputed Second Thomas Shoal in the South China Sea, according to a senior Biden administration official.

Japan has sold coastal radars to the Philippines and is now negotiating a defense agreement that would allow their troops to visit each other’s turf for joint military exercises.

The trilateral comes eight months after Biden hosted a meeting with leaders from Japan and South Korea at Camp David .

“Cooperation among our three countries are extremely important in maintaining peace and stability in the Indo-Pacific and in defending a free and open international order based on the rules of law,” Kishida said Monday before leaving for Washington.

WHAT HAPPENS IN NORTH CAROLINA?

Kishida also wants to highlight Japan’s economic contributions in the U.S. There is growing uncertainty in Tokyo about U.S. elections, reflected by questions about what happens if former President Donald Trump wins, though experts say there is a bipartisan consensus on a stronger U.S.-Japan alliance.

Kishida will meet with business leaders and visit Toyota’s electric vehicle battery factory under construction for a planned launch in 2025, and Honda’s business jet subsidiary in North Carolina. He will also meet students at North Carolina State University on Friday.

In his congressional speech on Thursday, Kishida said he plans to convey “what Japan and the United States want to hand down to future generations and what we need to do for them.”

Mari Yamaguchi, The Associated Press

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Biden and Japan’s Leader Look to Bind Ties to Outlast Them Both

Hovering over a state visit to Washington is the possibility of a swing in American foreign policy if Donald Trump returns to the White House.

Fumio Kishida and Joe Biden walk together inside the lobby of a building, Mr. Biden with a hand on Mr. Kishida’s shoulder.

By Motoko Rich

Reporting from Tokyo

When President Biden welcomes Japan’s prime minister, Fumio Kishida, to Washington this week for a visit highlighted by the pomp of a state dinner, there will be an inescapable subtext to all the ceremony: Both leaders are in a fight to keep their jobs.

With Mr. Biden facing a tight re-election contest with his predecessor and Mr. Kishida’s approval ratings falling to record lows amid a political scandal, the leaders are expected to discuss ways to entrench their countries’ alliance so it remains strong even if they are no longer around to nurture it.

The goal is to “create a situation where no one can unbind their ties,” said Narushige Michishita, a professor of international relations at the National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies in Tokyo.

The risk of drastic change appears to be much higher on the American side. Japanese officials, lawmakers and media outlets have taken to referring to “moshi Tora” — “if Trump” — or even “hobo Tora,” which roughly translates to “probably Trump,” using an abbreviation of the name of the former president and current Republican candidate.

Given Donald J. Trump’s unpredictable behavior and his transactional view of international alliances , Japanese officials are bracing for possible swings in American foreign policy.

On the Japanese side, even if Mr. Kishida does not survive a leadership election this fall in his own party, it will still control the government at least until the next general election and probably beyond that — meaning any big changes in Tokyo’s policy commitments are unlikely.

At the summit this week, during which Mr. Kishida will also address a joint session of Congress, the leaders are expected to talk about closer military cooperation between U.S. forces based in Japan and their Japanese counterparts; collaborations on artificial intelligence, space technology and semiconductors; and the potential for Japan to make and export more weapons to the United States.

The military cooperation in particular “smells of future proofing,” said Tobias Harris, founder and principal of Japan Foresight, a political risk advisory firm in Washington.

During the Trump presidency, the relationship between the two countries withstood some turbulence as Shinzo Abe , Japan’s prime minister at the time, went to great lengths to court Mr. Trump’s favor.

Mr. Biden has worked with two Japanese leaders — Yoshihide Suga , the successor to Mr. Abe, who was assassinated in 2022, and Mr. Kishida — to restore and expand the alliance while also developing stronger bonds with other partners in Asia to counter China’s rising power.

Last summer, Mr. Biden hosted Mr. Kishida and his South Korean counterpart, Yoon Suk Yeol, at the president’s first meeting with foreign leaders at Camp David . This week, Mr. Biden and Mr. Kishida will meet with President Ferdinand Marcos Jr. of the Philippines in the first trilateral session among leaders of those three countries.

In an interview with foreign media outlets on Friday, Mr. Kishida said high-level talks between multiple partners were crucial given the “very complex and challenging security environment.”

“Japan believes that it is important for peace and stability in the region to cooperate with the Philippines and other like-minded countries while maintaining the Japan-U.S. alliance as a cornerstone,” Mr. Kishida said.

China, which has militarized islands in the South China Sea, clashed repeatedly with Philippine boats and pursued a strategy of squeezing Taiwan , has stopped short of a major confrontation that could draw in the United States and, by extension, Japan.

Mr. Biden hopes to consolidate a binding network of Pacific countries to deter Chinese aggression at a time when the United States is already entangled with wars in Ukraine and Gaza.

“The U.S. is obviously running thin in resources and diplomatic capital,” said Mireya Solís, author of “ Japan’s Quiet Leadership: Reshaping the Indo-Pacific .” “There is a desire to make sure that the alliance is fit for purpose” if there is a conflict in Asia.

For its part, Japan has made bold changes in defense policy after years of nominal pacifism, doubling the amount earmarked for military spending and acquiring Tomahawk missiles from the United States.

Late last year, Japan shifted postwar policies that restricted the export of weapons and agreed to sell American-designed Patriot missiles made in Japan to the U.S. government.

This week in Washington, Mr. Biden and Mr. Kishida are expected to discuss the formation of a joint defense council that would explore further exports, including additional Japanese-produced Patriots, cruise missiles and trainer jets used by fighter pilots, according to a senior American government official who requested anonymity to speak about details of the meeting. Japan could also cooperate with the United States to help repair American Navy ships so they do not have to leave the region for maintenance.

Beyond defense, an economic component to Mr. Kishida’s visit — an expected trip to a Toyota battery plant for electric vehicles in North Carolina — may also be intended to offer a public reminder of Japan’s investments in the United States.

Such reminders may be aimed particularly at Mr. Trump: In 2019, during a Group of 20 summit in Osaka, Japan, Mr. Abe gave the president a one-page, colorful map that showed American investments by companies based in Japan, the largest foreign direct investor in the United States.

Without explicitly mentioning it, Japan may also be trying to exert pressure on the Biden administration to allow Nippon Steel, a Japanese corporation, to acquire U.S. Steel , the struggling manufacturer based in Pittsburgh.

Last month, Mr. Biden said in a statement that it was “vital” for U.S. Steel “to remain an American steel company that is domestically owned and operated .” White House officials have indicated that the administration will review the proposed deal for national security implications.

“The contrast between an administration raising national security concerns about a Japanese steel company buying an American steel company at the same time you’re trying to raise military industrial cooperation — the messaging is a little messy,” said Mr. Harris, the Japan analyst.

If the deal does not go through, it could complicate business ties between the two countries, said Wendy Cutler, vice president of the Asia Society Policy Institute and a former U.S. trade representative in Asia.

“The question is whether going forward this leaves a chilling effect in the eyes of other Japanese investors or, frankly, investors from other allies and partners,” Ms. Cutler said.

Rahm Emanuel, the U.S. ambassador to Japan, said the alliance between the two countries “runs a lot deeper and is a lot stronger and has a lot more strategic alignment than a single commercial deal.”

With Congress stalled over extending American military assistance to Ukraine , Mr. Kishida’s aides declined to say whether the prime minister would invoke Japan’s support for Ukraine during his speech to American lawmakers this week.

But in the interview on Friday, Mr. Kishida said he would like to “express and acknowledge with President Biden the importance of continued efforts to achieve a just and lasting peace in Ukraine through unity among the G7 and other like-minded countries.”

As for the ceremonial parts of the visit, no word yet on whether the prime minister will follow his South Korean counterpart by crooning an iconic American song at the state dinner on Wednesday.

Kiuko Notoya contributed reporting.

Motoko Rich is a reporter in Tokyo, leading coverage of Japan for The Times. More about Motoko Rich

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Biden to meet Japan’s PM Kishida amid shared concerns about China and differences on US Steel deal

japanese pm visit to canada

By Aamer Madhani, The Associated Press

Posted Apr 9, 2024 12:06:38 AM.

Last Updated Apr 9, 2024 05:25:10 AM.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida begins a much-anticipated visit to Washington on Tuesday aiming to spotlight shared concerns about provocative Chinese military action in the Pacific and at a rare moment of public difference between the two nations over a Japanese company’s plan to buy an iconic U.S. company.

Kishida and his wife will stop by the White House Tuesday evening ahead of Wednesday’s official visit and formal state dinner as President Joe Biden looks to celebrate a decades-long ally he sees as the cornerstone of his Indo-Pacific policy. Kishida will be the fifth world leader honored by Biden with a state dinner since he took office in 2021.

Ahead of the White House visit, Kishida is set to visit Arlington National Cemetery and stop by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Tuesday. Biden and Kishida on Wednesday will hold talks and take part in a joint news conference before Biden fetes the Japanese leader with the state dinner in the East Room.

The prime minister has also been invited to address a joint meeting of Congress on Thursday. He will be just the second Japanese leader to address the body; Shinzo Abe gave a speech to Congress in 2015.

The visit comes after Biden announced last month that he opposes the planned sale of Pittsburgh-based U.S. Steel to Nippon Steel of Japan, exposing a marked rift in the partnership at the very moment the two leaders aim to reinforce it. Biden argued in announcing his opposition that the U.S. needs to “maintain strong American steel companies powered by American steelworkers.”

Ambassador Rahm Emanuel, Biden’s envoy to Tokyo, sought Monday to downplay the impact of Biden’s opposition to the U.S. Steel acquisition to the relationship. Emanuel noted that in February the Biden administration approved a plan that would drive billions of dollars in revenue to a U.S.-based subsidiary of the Japanese company Mitsui for crane production in the United States.

“The United States relationship with Japan is a lot deeper and stronger and more significant than a single commercial deal,” said Emanuel, the former mayor of Chicago, in a joint appearance at Washington’s Center for Strategic and International Studies with Japan’s chief envoy to Washington. “As we would say in Chicago, you got to chill.”

Nippon Steel announced in December that it planned to buy U.S. Steel for $14.1 billion in cash, raising concerns about what the transaction could mean for unionized workers, supply chains and U.S. national security. Shigeo Yamada, Japan’s ambassador to Washington, declined to comment on whether Kishida would raise the Nippon-U.S. Steel deal with Biden.

Biden has sought to place greater foreign policy focus on the Pacific even while grappling with the fallout of the Russian invasion of Ukraine and the grinding Israel-Hamas war. Last year, Biden brought together Kishida and South Korean President Yoon Suk Yeol at the presidential retreat at Camp David, Maryland, a historic summit between leaders of two countries that have a difficult shared history.

Biden has honored Yoon with a state visit and picked Kishida’s predecessor, Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, as the first face-to-face foreign leader visit of his presidency.

The administration has been pleased by Japan’s strong support for Ukraine. Tokyo has been one of the largest donors to Kyiv since Russia’s February 2022 invasion, and Japan has surged its defense spending amid concern about China’s military assertiveness.

Yamada suggested in his joint appearance with Emanuel that Kishida would underscore Japan’s support for Ukraine during his appearance before Congress, and lay out why the conflict in Eastern Europe matters to his country. Biden is struggling to get House Republicans to back his call to send an additional $60 billion to Kyiv as it tries to fend off Russia.

Kishida has warned that the war in Europe could lead to conflict in East Asia, suggesting that a lax attitude to Russia emboldens China.

“The prime minister’s conviction is today’s Ukraine could be tomorrow’s East Asia,” Yamada said.

Kishida will stick around Washington on Thursday to take part in a meeting with Biden and Philippine President Ferdinand Marcos Jr. Philippine-Chinese relations have been repeatedly tested by skirmishes between the two nations’ coast guard vessels in the disputed South China Sea.

Chinese coast guard ships also regularly approach disputed Japanese-controlled East China Sea islands near Taiwan . Beijing says Taiwan is part of its territory and will be brought under control by force if necessary.

“Cooperation among our three countries is extremely important in maintaining peace and stability in the Indo-Pacific and in defending a free and open international order based on the rules of law,” Kishida said Monday before leaving for Washington.

The leaders are expected to discuss plans to upgrade the U.S. military command structure in Japan. There are about 54,000 U.S. troops stationed in Japan.

Kishida and Biden are also expected to confirm Japan’s participation in NASA’s Artemis moon program as well as its contribution of a moon rover developed by Toyota Motor Corp. and the inclusion of a Japanese astronaut in the mission. The rover, which comes at a roughly $2 billion cost, would be the most expensive contribution to the mission by a non-U.S. partner to date.

On Friday, Kishida will tour Toyota’s electric vehicle battery factory under construction as well as Honda’s business jet subsidiary in North Carolina. He will also meet students at North Carolina State University.

Associated Press writer Mari Yamaguchi in Tokyo contributed to this report.

Aamer Madhani, The Associated Press

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japanese pm visit to canada

TOKYO — Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida was just 6 years old in 1963 when he and his family moved from Tokyo to New York, an entire hemisphere and endless cultural differences away.

The boy from ethnically homogenous Japan was struck by the diversity and generosity of his classmates while attending public school in Queens for three years, an impression that Kishida still recalls fondly six decades later.

Kishida can expect the same warmth during a state visit this week when he returns to the United States not just as the prime minister of his country, but as the one who has led the U.S.-Japan alliance to its strongest point.

“The world is now facing a historical turning point with Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in the Middle East, and the security environment in East Asia,” he said in a one-on-one interview with The Washington Post at his official residence in Tokyo ahead of the visit. “It is important to demonstrate to the world the importance of the Japan-U.S. alliance and how strong it is in today’s uncertain international society.”

President Biden will host Kishida at the White House on Wednesday for a state dinner. On Thursday, Kishida is scheduled to deliver a speech at a joint meeting of Congress. Both will be the first for a Japanese prime minister in nine years.

The trip will underscore the two countries’ growing partnership, bound by concerns of an increasingly tumultuous security environment in East Asia. The two leaders are expected to discuss new areas of cooperation, including closer coordination between the U.S. forces in Japan and the Japanese military, and joint development and production of military and defense equipment.

Beyond security, the leaders plan to talk about cooperation in space, artificial intelligence, global supply chains and more. Kishida also will tour new Toyota and Honda plants in North Carolina to highlight Japan’s economic importance as the largest foreign investor in the United States.

“During the visit, I would also like to emphasize that the Japan-U.S. alliance is not a relationship that is formed solely between the leaders of the two countries, but also between the Congress, between governments, and many private companies, local governments, and so on,” Kishida said.

That emphasis is sure to revive controversy over Japanese company Nippon Steel’s planned acquisition of U.S. Steel, which has sparked an outcry from lawmakers from both parties and from the powerful United Steelworkers union.

The Japanese steelmaker has pledged not to cut jobs, but the deal nonetheless has become a flash point in Pennsylvania, a critical swing state where U.S. Steel is headquartered. Kishida said he does not plan to discuss the deal with Biden.

Other points of friction are likely to include the impasse in Congress over the $60 billion U.S. aid package for Ukraine, which has frustrated American allies, and Japan’s need to strengthen its cybersecurity capabilities, which U.S. officials think is a weak link in the alliance. And officials from both countries will look to lock in plans in case of an unpredictable U.S. president’s return .

Japan is now at the center of U.S. strategy to counter China through what American officials call a “latticework” of groupings between like-minded nations.

The latest step in cementing this strategy will be the first trilateral summit on Thursday between Biden, Kishida and Philippine President Ferdinand Marcos Jr. As China ramps up aggression in the South China Sea, rising maritime tensions have prompted Manila to draw closer to Tokyo and Washington. The three leaders are expected to announce new measures, including in maritime and economic security.

But this week’s pomp will mainly celebrate Kishida and the dramatic shifts Tokyo has made under his leadership to shed longtime postwar pacifist constraints.

In the past two years, Japan has taken previously unthinkable steps to bolster its defense capabilities , including increasing its defense budget to 2 percent of gross domestic product over five years, making it the third-largest in the world, and acquiring “ counterstrike ” capabilities to hit enemy bases with long-range missiles.

These moves demonstrate Japan’s growing desire to defend itself and better help enforce the global order. Since the Russian invasion of Ukraine, Kishida has repeatedly warned that “Ukraine today may be East Asia tomorrow.” The invasion triggered deep alarm in Japan that without a strong response, it could embolden China to attack Taiwan and lead to war in the Asia-Pacific region.

If Russia prevails, “it would show that force can actually bring benefits, even when breaking international law. If so, what would happen to East Asia? We must not allow any country to receive the wrong message,” Kishida said.

The prime minister recalled his visit in 2023 to Kyiv , where he spoke with victims in Bucha, the site of a civilian massacre by Russian troops, and said he was “outraged by the cruelty.”

“My visits to Kyiv and Bucha last March had a very significant impact on me,” Kishida said. “Actually touching the harsh and tragic reality of the war through the visit made me more determined in pursuing … lasting peace in Ukraine as soon as possible.”

Placid demeanor belies dramatic changes

The man who has led Japan through these dramatic changes is anything but dramatic. The mild-mannered leader almost never strays from prewritten talking points and has followed a traditional political career.

As a child living in Tokyo, Kishida spent every summer in Hiroshima, his family’s hometown. He would listen to stories from his grandmother and other survivors about the unfathomable horrors of nuclear devastation.

Kishida, 66, considers Barack Obama’s 2016 visit to Hiroshima , the first by a sitting U.S. president that he helped broker as foreign minister, among his most memorable achievements. Now, Kishida has hosted Group of Seven world leaders there twice , drawing attention to his oft-stated dream of a “ world without nuclear weapons .”

“Many leaders understand this [need for nuclear disarmament] in their heads, but to be able to take serious and concrete action, I think it is important for them to actually see the tragic and harsh reality with their own eyes and feel it in their hearts themselves,” he said.

Kishida’s familial path into politics is a common one in Japan; he followed in the footsteps of his father and grandfather, who were both lawmakers.

He cut his teeth helping with his father’s election campaigns. Although he has had by far the highest title in three generations of Kishida men in politics, he credits his father with teaching him the fundamental values of public service.

After his father died in 1992, Kishida won his seat in Hiroshima, moving up the ranks before becoming prime minister in October 2021.

Diplomacy has been one of the few bright points of Kishida’s tenure that has been unscathed by scandals. Domestically, Kishida’s ruling Liberal Democratic Party has been mired in problems, including a massive political fundraising scandal that threatens his future as prime minister. Support for Kishida and his cabinet has been historically low.

Former Japanese prime minister Shinzo Abe laid the groundwork for Japan’s assertive foreign and defense policy, in hopes that Japan would play a bigger role on the global stage. But it is Kishida who put that plan into action, partly because he is not as divisive as Abe, many analysts say.

“He’s picked up on some of the important elements of the Abe revolution and advanced them in subtle and effective ways. He’s been able to do what Abe wasn’t able to do,” said Daniel Russel, former assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific Affairs. “He’s got dovish politics and aura, but what that really means is that he’s trusted in ways that Abe never was. … That’s a huge asset, and he’s utilized it with real agility.”

One of the most dramatic moments of his term so far was the July 2022 assassination of Abe, Japan’s longest-serving prime minister. A year later, a man tried to attack Kishida . Both times, the politicians were on the campaign trail. And both times, Kishida insisted on immediately resuming campaign activities, saying the democratic process would not be deterred by violent attacks.

One area that U.S. officials are likely to laud during the visit is Kishida’s work with South Korean President Yoon Suk Yeol to break a 12-year diplomatic stalemate and work together to cooperate with Washington to counter threats in the region. Yoon’s overtures have led to a resumption of “ shuttle diplomacy ” as both men try to show they are serious about setting aside thorny historical issues from Japan’s colonization of Korea in the first half of the 20th century.

Historical issues have bedeviled the two countries’ periods of rapprochement. It could happen again, with changes in domestic politics in both countries. In fact, the Kishida-Biden summit will be on the same day as the National Assembly elections in South Korea, which could render Yoon a lame duck well before his term ends in 2027.

But Kishida said he learned as foreign minister that personal relationships make a huge difference in diplomacy, and that he hopes his relationship with Yoon will help the two countries build trust over time. The two men met seven times last year and have reportedly connected over their love for baseball and mutually high alcohol tolerance. Yoon has “never wavered in his promises or decisions, at least in my experience,” he said.

“Ultimately, it comes down to the relationship between the top officials who make the decisions on diplomacy,” Kishida said.

Julia Mio Inuma contributed to this report.

japanese pm visit to canada

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  10. Japanese PM Kishida visits Ottawa, asks for Canada's help on clean

    OTTAWA - Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida has asked Canada to form closer ties during a visit to Ottawa that experts say comes at a time when the two countries have significant geopolitical ...

  11. Japanese prime minister visits Canada

    Last Updated Thursday, January 12, 2023 7:34PM EST. OTTAWA - Japan ese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida has asked Canada to form closer ties during a visit to Ottawa that experts say comes at a time ...

  12. Trudeau vows trade mission, closer ties with Japan amid 'tough' world

    WATCH: Trudeau announces Canada trade mission to Japan during PM Kishida visit. - Jan 12, 2023. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is pledging to build closer ties with Japan as both countries adapt ...

  13. Japanese PM asks Canada for help on clean energy transition at Ottawa visit

    Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida has asked Canada to form closer ties during a visit to Ottawa that experts say comes at a time when the two countries have significant geopolitical alignment.. Kishida visited Prime Minister Justin Trudeau for the first time as Japan's head of government, part of a tour of other G7 countries as Japan seeks ways to wean off fossil fuels from places such as ...

  14. Japanese PM Asks for Canada's Help on Clean Energy

    Japanese PM Asks for Canada's Help on Clean Energy. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, right, and Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida walk to a joint news conference in Ottawa, Ontario, Jan ...

  15. Japan PM's first visit to Canada could highlight LNG needs

    The Canadian Press. Published Saturday, January 7, 2023 7:55AM EST. Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida's first official visit to Canada will take place next week, as Tokyo looks to Canada to ...

  16. Japanese PM Kishida visits Ottawa, asks for Canada's help on clean

    By Dylan Robertson in Ottawa Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida has asked Canada to form closer ties during a visit to Ottawa that experts say comes at a time when the two countries have significant geopolitical alignment. Kishida visited Prime Minister Justin Trudeau for the first time as Japan's head of government, part of a tour of other G7 countries as Japan seeks ways to wean off ...

  17. Japanese PM visits Ottawa, asks for Canada's help on clean energy

    Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida is looking to Canada to help his country wean itself off fossil fuels from places such as Russia. ... Kishida's is the first visit to Canada by an Asian ...

  18. Japanese PM Kishida visits Ottawa, asks for Canada's help on clean

    Article content. OTTAWA — Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida has asked Canada to form closer ties during a visit to Ottawa that experts say comes at a time when the two countries have ...

  19. Japanese PM's Canada visit could highlight liquefied natural gas needs

    Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida's first official visit to Canada will take place next week, as Tokyo looks to Canada to provide much-needed liquefied natural gas.. Japan takes over the ...

  20. Biden to meet Japan's PM Kishida amid shared concerns about China and

    Breaking News, Sports, Manitoba, Canada. WASHINGTON (AP) — Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida begins a much-anticipated visit to Washington on Tuesday aiming to spotlight shared concerns ...

  21. Japan PM visit could highlight LNG needs, as Tokyo pushes away from

    Japanese PM's visit comes as the country looks to pivot away from a reliance on China and Russia for electricity and food. ... Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the United States, plus ...

  22. What's expected at Japanese PM Kishida's US visit? A major upgrade in

    A major upgrade in defense ties. FILE - An MV-22 Osprey takes off as Japan Ground Self-Defense Force guards the landing zone during a joint military drill with U.S. Marines in Gotemba, southwest of Tokyo, on March 15, 2022. Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida is making an official visit to the United States this week.

  23. Japan and US Seek to Strengthen Ties as Kishida Visits

    April 7, 2024 Updated 3:43 p.m. ET. When President Biden welcomes Japan's prime minister, Fumio Kishida, to Washington this week for a visit highlighted by the pomp of a state dinner, there will ...

  24. Biden to meet Japan's PM Kishida amid shared concerns about China and

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida begins a much-anticipated visit to Washington on Tuesday aiming to spotlight shared concerns about provocative Chinese military action in the Pacific and at a rare moment of public difference between the two nations over a Japanese company's plan to buy an iconic U.S. company. Kishida and his […]

  25. Biden to meet Japan's PM Kishida and hold trilateral meeting with

    Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida is beginning a much-anticipated visit to Washington on Tuesday. Kishida will take part in a meeting with Biden and Philippine President Ferdinand Marcos Jr. Philippines-Chinese relations have been repeatedly tested by skirmishes between Chinese and Philippine coast guard vessels in the disputed South China Sea.

  26. Japan's Kishida warns world at 'historic turning point' as he touts

    Spiraling geopolitical tensions have pushed the world to a "historic turning point" and are forcing Japan to change its defense posture, Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida told CNN Sunday ...

  27. Biden to host Japanese PM Kishida next week for official visit as ...

    President Joe Biden will host Japanese Prime Minister Kishida Fumio at the White House next week for an official visit to the United States, which will include a joint news conference and a state ...

  28. Japanese prime minister Kishida to discuss Ukraine, security with Biden

    TOKYO — Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida was just 6 years old in 1963 when he and his family moved from Tokyo to New York, an entire hemisphere and endless cultural differences away.