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Emergency Travel Resources

Our highest priority is to protect the lives and interests of U.S. citizens overseas. We do this through routine and emergency services to Americans at our embassies and consulates around the world. Below are links to frequently visited pages on our travel website, travel.state.gov .

AMERICANS ABROAD

Lost or Stolen Passport : What you need to do if your passport is lost or stolen while traveling abroad.

Victims of Crime : We support victims overseas and in the United States.

Medical Emergencies : The availability and quality of medical services available can vary greatly depending on your location; contact the nearest embassy or consulate for assistance.

Crisis Situations : Whether traveling or living outside of the United States, learn how to prepare yourself for a potential crisis.

Financial Assistance : U.S. citizens who need money for an emergency abroad should contact the nearest embassy or consulate.

FAMILY MEMBERS

Death Abroad : We can help when a U.S. citizen dies abroad.

Sending Money : Need to send money for an emergency to a U.S. citizen outside the United States? We can help.

Locating a Loved One : If you are worried that your loved one was affected by a crisis, there are various ways to try to get in touch – and stay in touch.

INTERNATIONAL PARENTAL CHILD ABDUCTION

Children’s Passport Issuance Alert Program (CPIAP) : This program allows our Office of Children’s Issues to contact the enrolling parent(s) or legal guardians(s) to verify whether the  parental consent requirement  for minor passport issuance has been met when a child’s passport application is submitted.

Stopping an Abduction in Progress : If your child is being abducted by a parent, legal guardian, or someone acting on their behalf, contact us immediately.

Abducted Children : Learn how we can help if your child has been abducted by a parent, a guardian, or someone acting on their behalf and taken to another country.

U.S. Government Resources

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The lessons of 1989: freedom and our future.

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24 Hour Consular Emergency Line: U.S. 1.888.407.4747 / Outside the U.S. 1.202.501.4444

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Passport Acceptance Facility Search Page

Use this site to find the nearest acceptance facility where you can submit your U.S. passport application. Acceptance facilities include post offices, clerks of court, public libraries, and other local government offices which accept passport applications on behalf of the U.S. Department of State. Search for facilities by zip code, state, or state/city. You can also find facilities which offer on-site photo services.

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Please note that information on this site changes weekly. If you wish to provide feedback on using this site, click here.  

STEP

STEP is a free service to allow U.S. citizens/nationals traveling abroad to enroll with the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate.

For organization/group enrollments or advanced features, go to the STEP full site

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Safest Caribbean islands: Tropical destinations other than Jamaica

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While the United States government is urging its residents to reconsider traveling to Jamaica , a popular spring break destination, there are other options for seeking a trip to a tropical Caribbean paradise.

Even The Bahamas falls under a list of countries where the government is asking travelers to exercised increased caution, often due to crime.

These are the Caribbean islands that fall under the government's "level one" travel advisory , meaning travelers only need to exercise the normal cautions they would take on any trip.

Safest Caribbean islands for your spring break getaway

  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • British Virgin Islands (Tortola, Anegada, Virgin Gorda and Jost Van Dyke)
  • Cayman Islands (Grand Cayman, Cayman Brac and Little Cayman)
  • Saint Kitts and Nevis
  • Saint Lucia
  • Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Sint Maarten
  • U.S. Virgin Islands (St. Croix, St. John and St. Thomas)

How to see if a travel destination is safe

Thinking of somewhere not listed? If you want to see what the U.S. government has to say about a specific travel destination, visit https://travel.state.gov/advisories and type the country or island into the search bar.

Travel advisory issued for Jamaica as Americans plan Spring Break, summer vacations

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You may want to reconsider visiting Jamaica.

That’s the warning from the State Department, which is flagging crime and health concerns in the popular Caribbean destination. 

In a travel advisory issued last week, the State Department said: “Violent crimes, such as home invasions, armed robberies, sexual assaults, and homicides, are common. Sexual assaults occur frequently, including at all-inclusive resorts. (And) local police often do not respond effectively to serious criminal incidents.”

In the event of an emergency, the State Department also warned “high level or specialized” health care may not be available across the island nation, and patients may be required to pay for medical care up front.

Is it safe to travel to Jamaica?

The State Department is only asking travelers to reconsider visiting Jamaica. It has not advised Americans to avoid the country, but it does outline some high-risk areas, which certain U.S. government personnel are prohibited from traveling to due to risk of crime. 

Those areas include but are not limited to all of Montego Bay, downtown Kingston, part of St. Ann’s Parish near Ocho Rios, and certain neighborhoods in Negril.

Which countries require tourist visas (including some the government wants you to avoid)

What do I need to know before traveling to Jamaica?

Travelers are advised to be aware of their surroundings, to keep a low profile and to avoid public buses, walking or driving at night, secluded situations and resisting attempts at robbery in Jamaica.

Americans are further encouraged to enroll in the State Department’s free Smart Traveler Enrollment Program and to prepare contingency plans for emergencies.

Additionally, in bold font, the advisory adds, “We strongly encourage you to obtain traveler’s insurance , including medical evacuation insurance , before traveling to Jamaica,” as many health care providers overseas won’t accept U.S. health insurance, and neither Medicare nor Medicaid benefits apply abroad.

Watch CBS News

U.S. travel advisory for Jamaica warns Americans to reconsider visits amid spate of murders

By Tucker Reals

Updated on: February 2, 2024 / 2:32 PM EST / CBS News

The U.S. government has raised its travel alert level for Jamaica amid a spate of murders in the Caribbean nation, urging Americans to reconsider visiting the island "due to crime and [unreliable] medical services." 

The State Department announced the change, to its Level 3 travel advisory, for Jamaica just a few days after it issued a warning about the Bahamas, which remained at a Level 2 advisory , urging Americans to "exercise increased caution," despite a series of murders there.

The warnings about travel to the popular tourist destinations come as many Americans are planning and booking their vacations for the year ahead.

The U.S. Embassy in Jamaica warned that "violent crimes, such as home invasions, armed robberies, sexual assaults, and homicides, are common. Sexual assaults occur frequently, including at all-inclusive resorts."

People relax and swim at Doctor's Cave beach

It added that Jamaican police "often do not respond effectively to serious criminal incidents." The advisory said that hospitals and ambulances are not always reliable and some private institutions may require payment up front.

"The homicide rate reported by the Government of Jamaica has for several years been among the highest in the Western Hemisphere," the State Department noted.

According to statistics published by the Jamaica Constabulary Force , the nation — which has a population of about 2.8 million — had recorded 65 homicides between Jan. 1 and Jan. 27 of this year. While that represents a significant drop from the same period the previous year, when there were 81 homicides, the number of shootings and people injured in crimes increased this January compared to last. The data show a major drop in the number of recorded rapes in January 2024 compared to the previous year.

The Jamaica Gleaner newspaper, the nation's oldest, reported on Monday that this monthly's murder tally of 65 included 19 murders during the previous week alone.

In the Bahamas, the U.S. Embassy in Nassau said in a message published on Jan. 24 that there had been 18 murders in the capital city since the start of the year, which had "occurred at all hours including in broad daylight on the streets."

It said most of the recent killings were linked to gang violence and urged travelers to "exercise extreme caution in the eastern part of New Providence Island (Nassau)" in particular, and to be extra careful if walking or driving at night.

"Do not physically resist any robbery attempt," the embassy warned, adding a suggestion for visitors to review their "personal security plans."

Tourism is a huge sector for Jamaica's economy, and Minister of Tourism Edmund Bartlett told the country's lawmakers in December that he expected a "spectacular growth pattern" seen during 2022 and 2023 to continue.

"The island should record a total of 4,122,100 visitors for the period January to December, 2023," he said, according to a statement on his ministry's website. "This would signal an increase of 23.7% over the total number of visitors recorded in 2022."

According to the ministry, tourism brought roughly $4.2 billion into Jamaica's economy in 2023.

Tucker Reals is cbsnews.com's foreign editor, based in the CBS News London bureau. He has worked for CBS News since 2006, prior to which he worked for The Associated Press in Washington D.C. and London.

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Is It Safe to Travel to the Bahamas? Here’s What You Need to Know.

A string of gang-related murders in the local community prompted the U.S. embassy in the island nation to issue a security alert.

A blue-green sea with frothy waves meets a white-sand beach and a pier in the background.

By Shannon Sims

Drawn by clear turquoise waters and miles of white-sand beaches, around seven million travelers visit the Bahamas each year, but a new warning about increased violence on the island nation has raised alarm over the safety of visiting there.

On Jan. 24, the U.S. Embassy in Nassau, the capital of the Bahamas, issued a security alert advising U.S. citizens “to be aware that 18 murders have occurred in Nassau since the beginning of 2024. Murders have occurred at all hours including in broad daylight on the streets.”

The startling alert was unusual for the Bahamas. In addition to security alerts and other notices released by its embassies, the State Department issues travel advisories for countries to provide the suggested vigilance visitors should take. Currently, the Bahamas has a Level 2 (“Exercise increased caution”) warning.

Many tourism-reliant countries, including Costa Rica and the Dominican Republic, currently have Level 2 warnings, and most travelers experience safe and enjoyable vacations. The tourism industry in the Bahamas contributes around 70 percent of the nation’s gross domestic product, according to the U.S. Department of Commerce, and employs half the country’s work force.

Here’s what you need to know about the security alert and traveling to the Bahamas.

What prompted the alert in the Bahamas?

According to the State Department, “retaliatory gang violence has been the primary motive in 2024 murders,” and it is primarily affecting the local population, particularly on New Providence and Grand Bahama islands, where the cities of Nassau and Freeport are. The warnings mention that the violent crime has been occurring in both tourist and nontourist areas.

What does Level 2 mean?

To help advise Americans traveling to particular countries, the State Department employs a scale from 1 to 4 to indicate the local security situation, starting with the safest, Level 1. The levels can vary within a country, with certain areas considered a greater security risk than others.

According to the department’s website , Level 2 means, “Exercise increased caution: Be aware of heightened risks to safety and security.”

Many parts of the world are under Level 2 advisory, for reasons ranging from street crime to concerns over terrorism. The majority of visitors to those countries do not experience any danger — many are not even aware of the heightened risk indicated by the levels.

Level 3, by contrast, advises Americans to “reconsider” or “avoid” travel (countries such as Egypt, Nigeria and Pakistan are now at Level 3). Level 4 means “Do not travel” and emphasizes that “during an emergency, the U.S. government may have very limited ability to provide assistance.” Currently, Russia and Ukraine are among the countries with a Level 4 rating.

What about the rest of the region?

Currently, Turks and Caicos and Cuba are also Level 2 because of concerns over crime. Many areas of Mexico are under elevated warnings ranging from Level 2 (Mexico City) to Level 4 (Colima). On Jan. 23, Jamaica was raised to Level 3 because of crime and uneven medical care, with the State Department warning that “sexual assaults occur frequently, including at all-inclusive resorts.”

Aren’t there sharks in the Bahamas, too?

On Jan. 15, a 10-year-old boy was attacked by a shark while participating in a “shark experience” at a hotel on Paradise Island, according to the Royal Bahamas Police Force. He was reported to be in stable condition. Last month, an American woman died by shark attack while paddle-boarding in the Bahamas, the police said.

However, shark attacks are extremely rare in the Bahamas: The Florida Museum of Natural History’s International Shark Attack File indicates that there have only been 29 unprovoked attacks in the country since the 16th century.

How can I stay safe on my trip?

The U.S. Embassy in Nassau offers some guidance for staying safe , advising travelers to use “extreme caution” in the eastern part of New Providence Island — where Nassau is — especially “when walking or driving at night.” Specifically, the Over the Hill neighborhood , south of Shirley Street, should be avoided.

Travelers are also advised to take typical precautions and use common sense: to remain aware of their surroundings (leaving jewelry and electronics at home), to create a personal security plan, not to answer the door if you don’t know who it is and, if things go wrong, not to physically resist any robbery attempt. The U.S. government suggests staying especially vigilant if you’re staying at a short-term-rental property without a security presence, and women traveling alone may want to take special precautions .

Before traveling, consider obtaining traveler’s insurance, including a medical evacuation policy. Most foreign hospitals and doctors do not accept U.S. health insurance, including Medicare and Medicaid.

Another way to stay informed is to enroll in the State Department’s Smart Traveler Enrollment Program . The free program sends travelers updated information on security situations by email or text message, and makes it easier for a U.S. Embassy to contact you should an emergency arise.

Ultimately, travel comes down to a question of one’s personal comfort. If you interpret a Level 2 warning as sufficient reason to cancel your trip, there’s no shame in making a choice that eases your mind.

Follow New York Times Travel on Instagram and sign up for our weekly Travel Dispatch newsletter to get expert tips on traveling smarter and inspiration for your next vacation. Dreaming up a future getaway or just armchair traveling? Check out our 52 Places to Go in 2024 .

An earlier version of this story misstated that gang violence prompted the State Department to raise its travel advisory level for the Bahamas. The advisory was already at Level 2. The U.S. Embassy in the Bahamas issued a security alert for the Bahamas, but the State Department did not raise the travel advisory in response to the violence.

How we handle corrections

What countries to avoid on your travels, according to the U.S. government

Many countries’ travel advisories have been updated in 2024, making some popular locations dangerous to travel to.

Sunbathers walk along a patch of resort-lined crescent beach in Negril in western Jamaica in this 2014 file photo.

Sunbathers walk along a badly eroding patch of resort-lined crescent beach in Negril in western Jamaica in this 2014 file photo.

David McFadden, Associated Press

The U.S. State Department regularly updates travel advisory levels for more than 200 countries globally. Levels depend on risk factors such as health, terrorism and civil unrest. Currently, 10% of countries, 19 total, have a level four advisory, meaning no one should travel to that location, per U.S. News & World Report .

Twenty-four countries have a level three travel advisory, meaning to reconsider travel. While citizens are not barred from traveling, additional advice is given because of the severity of risks to safety and security, according to U.S. News & World Report .

Which countries have updated ‘do not travel’ warnings?

Level four is the highest and most dangerous advisory the U.S. government gives. Here are the areas to not travel to and the reasons why, in order of date updated, according to the State Department website .

Burma (Myanmar)

With armed conflict, civil unrest and arbitrary law enforcement, Burma was updated to a level four on Jan. 22.

  • Certain areas within the country, Shan, Chin and Kachin, also contain unidentifiable or unmarked landmines.
  • Many U.S. citizens have been wrongfully detained without due process.
  • Explosives are used during armed conflicts.
  • There are limited medical resources because of shortage in staffing and medical supplies.

Information on Iran was updated on Jan. 11. Terrorism, civil unrest, kidnapping and the arrest of U.S. citizens are risk factors for Iran.

  • Terrorist organizations, such as ISIS, operate in Iran.
  • The U.S. is unable to provide emergency services.

Which countries should tourists highly consider not traveling to?

Where possible, U.S. citizens should stay away from countries with a level three travel advisory. However, if necessary, appoint one family member to serve as the point of contact with others in emergencies; keep travel documents up-to-date; avoid demonstrations or crowds and do not touch unknown objects.

Here are the areas to reconsider traveling to and the reasons why, in order of date updated, according to the State Department website .

Crime, civil unrest, terrorism, kidnapping, landmines and armed conflict causes Lebanon to have a level three advisory. Southern Lebanon, the border with Syria or refugee settlements have a level four, do not travel, advisory. Lebanon’s advisory was updated on Jan. 29.

  • The U.S. Embassy is sometimes unable to assist travelers.
  • Terrorist groups are plotting attacks, especially in tourist locations.
  • Disputes often escalate quickly within families and neighborhoods, causing gunfire or other violence.
  • Kidnapping occurs due to the want of money, political motives and family disputes.
  • Landmines are found in roadside ditches, shoulders and unmarked trails.
  • Protester gatherings often turn violent. Major roads can be blocked for the protests.

Saudi Arabia

Updated on Jan. 24, Saudi Arabia has a level three advisory. There are currently threats of missile and drone attacks, terrorism, arrests due to social media activity and prohibited items within the country.

  • The U.S. government is unable to provide aid for most emergencies.
  • Iran has conducted destructive and lethal attacks with missiles and drones against government and civilian sites.
  • Debris from drone and missile attacks are dangerous.
  • U.S. citizens have been arrested for social media comments, likes, posts or reposts that are deemed critical of Saudi Arabia.
  • Drugs, weapons, pornographic material and other illegal items are often imported into the country.

Travel to Jamaica should be reconsidered because of crime and reduced medical services. The country’s travel advisory was updated on Jan. 23.

  • Violent crimes such as sexual assault, armed robberies and home invasions occur.
  • Police respond poorly to criminal incidents.
  • Families of U.S. citizens are often killed in homicides with death certificates given a year or more later.
  • Hospitals are under-resourced.

Papua New Guinea

Crime, civil unrest, piracy, kidnapping, limited health care services and natural disasters cause Papua New Guinea’s level three advisory, updated on Jan. 17, 2024.

  • Violent crime such as assault, home invasions, carjacking and robberies occur.
  • Criminals attack foreign tourist hotspots for money.
  • Police presence and their resources are limited.
  • Piracy is active in the surrounding water. The criminals often use physical violence.
  • Foreign citizens have been kidnapped.

Updated on Jan. 11, Nicaragua has increased in arbitrary law enforcement, limited health care and false detention.

  • Nicaragua’s government searches and seizes personal items, targets pro-democracy advocates and families, and prevent individuals from departing.
  • U.S. citizens can find themselves charged without fair trials.

Travel to Niger should be reconsidered because of crime, kidnapping and terrorism. The travel advisory was updated on Jan. 8.

  • Demonstrations often become violent.
  • Terrorists operate in different areas within the country and have attacked security forces.
  • Robbery is common.

Crime, terrorism, civil unrest and kidnapping are current risks in Colombia. The level three travel advisory was updated on Jan. 2.

  • Violent crimes such as assault, homicide and robbery occur.
  • Terrorist groups carry out attacks in both local and tourist locations.
  • Demonstrations regularly shut down major roads and have resulted in fatalities.
  • Why U.S. travelers are being warned about the Bahamas

Navigating fear when the world seems unsafe

Does it ever feel like you hear news about tragedy constantly? Living in a digital age allows us to hear or see recent crises in an instant.

However, for me, I’ve found that being in constant fear makes life difficult. Learning how to cope while dealing with fear has been important as I want to continue to be immersed in the news.

Promises Behavioral Health offers five ways to cope with fear to help prevent bigger problems, like depression or substance abuse, down the line.

  • Pay attention: Take the time to recognize what you are feeling and why you are feeling that way. Running from fear can make someone more anxious and depressed long-term.
  • Give fear a shape: Give your fear a silly or child-like identity, an appearance or even a name. You can then speak to your “fear” as a parent talking to a child or a person trying to get someone annoying to know why they’re wrong.
  • Focus on your present reality: Take the time to understand if you are overgeneralizing. Though there are bad people, not every one has lost kindness. Question if your thoughts are actually true or if you are just convincing yourself something bad will happen.
  • Balance the negative with the positive: Notice the good things happening around you. If you want to look into tragic events, look into heroic stories as well for balance. You can also inspire yourself and others to take action against injustices you see.
  • Get help: Never be afraid to get help if fear is consuming and creating problems in your life. Therapy and help from friends or family can be effective.

Official websites use .gov

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS

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Travel Smart from the Start

Office of the Spokesperson

March 31, 2023

The U.S. Department of State has no higher priority than the safety and security of U.S. citizens traveling and living overseas.  As more U.S. citizens travel abroad – for family visits, vacation, or any occasion – we remind you to travel smart from the start by doing the following:

  • Check your passport’s expiration date before booking travel and apply early. Many countries require at least six months of validity in order to enter.
  • Research your destination  to better understand the security environment and current travel guidance, exit and entry requirements such as visas or proof of immunizations, and what items you can and can’t bring with you into the country according to local laws.
  • Enroll in our Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive important safety and security messages directly from the local U.S. embassy or consulate and to help us contact you in the event of an emergency.
  • Save the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate’s address and contact information before you go and keep it handy. Even well-prepared travelers may face an emergency, like a lost or stolen passport or an injury.  Our embassies and consulates are available to help 24/7.

A prepared traveler is a happy traveler.  Follow TravelGov on  Facebook   ,  Twitter   , and  Instagram    for more smart travel tips from the Department of State as part of our Travel Smart from the Start campaign.

U.S. Department of State

The lessons of 1989: freedom and our future.

U.S. urges travelers to reconsider visiting Jamaica amid violence

The state department escalated its warning for jamaica to a level 3 travel advisory.

U.S. officials are asking visitors to “reconsider travel” to Jamaica because of increased crime in the nation.

The State Department escalated its warning for Jamaica to a Level 3 travel advisory last week, which the U.S. Embassy in Jamaica reinforced Thursday. An embassy statement said violent crimes — including armed robberies, sexual assaults and homicides — are common, and it specifically claimed that “sexual assaults occur frequently, including at all-inclusive resorts.”

Officials recently issued a similar warning for the Bahamas because of a spate of murders at the beginning of the year, many of them gang-related, according to officials. The Bahamas warning is a Level 2 advisory, meaning visitors should “exercise increased caution.” A Level 3 advisory, in the State Department’s ranking system , communicates an elevated risk and asks people to reconsider their travel plans altogether.

The U.S. travel advisory for Jamaica was also escalated to Level 3 in May because of crime.

According to the Jamaica Constabulary Force, officials recorded 65 murders in the first month of 2024, down from 81 during that same period in 2023. Instances of sexual assault have also declined. However, rates of shootings, people injured and robberies have increased since this time last year.

Michael Rogers, a senior intelligence director at travel security firm International SOS , said that travelers should take State Department warnings seriously but that violent crime is not primarily impacting travelers. In the Bahamas, officials said, most of the violent crime is gang-related, and none of this year’s killings have targeted tourists.

“Importantly, it is not the kind of issue that we are seeing directly affect travelers,” Rogers said, adding that visitors are more likely to encounter petty crimes, such as theft. “From our perspective, we would more likely encourage our clients to, rather than avoid travel, instead to travel safely, or travel smartly. We’re not necessarily seeing this affect resort properties or anything of that nature.”

Rogers added that violent crime isn’t a new issue in Jamaica, and it can be more prevalent in some areas than others. Officials in Jamaica previously have declared regional states of emergency in response to spikes in violence.

In the advisory, U.S. officials also claimed that local police and emergency services personnel do not “respond effectively” to serious crimes. “When arrests are made, cases are infrequently prosecuted to a conclusive sentence,” the statement said. “Families of U.S. citizens killed in accidents or homicides frequently wait a year or more for final death certificates to be issued by Jamaican authorities.”

The notice further warned visitors that, should an emergency occur, ambulance service and hospital care may not be readily available or provide the level of care needed.

Medical treatment abroad could be expensive, as U.S. health insurance (including Medicaid and Medicare) is not valid overseas. Those who decide to travel are encouraged to obtain traveler’s insurance . They also are advised to avoid walking or driving at night, taking public buses and going to secluded areas. Rogers recommended sticking to well-trafficked tourist areas and being aware of one’s surroundings.

The office of Prime Minister Andrew Holness did not immediately respond to The Washington Post’s request for comment on the U.S. advisory. This week, Holness announced that the Jamaican government is taking “strategic and definitive” measures to grow its tourism sector, which constitutes about 34 percent of the country’s economic output and employs 31 percent of its workforce, according to the Inter-American Development Bank.

In a statement issued by his office Wednesday, the prime minister appealed to prospective tourists. “Come to Jamaica,” he said, “to experience a people who have experienced hardship, who have suffered, but who have conquered. That has a deep history. That has more to offer to humanity than just sun, sea, and sand.” Those things, he said, “must be the essence of our tourism.”

More travel news

How we travel now: More people are taking booze-free trips — and airlines and hotels are taking note. Some couples are ditching the traditional honeymoon for a “buddymoon” with their pals. Interested? Here are the best tools for making a group trip work.

Bad behavior: Entitled tourists are running amok, defacing the Colosseum , getting rowdy in Bali and messing with wild animals in national parks. Some destinations are fighting back with public awareness campaigns — or just by telling out-of-control visitors to stay away .

Safety concerns: A door blew off an Alaska Airlines Boeing 737 Max 9 jet, leaving passengers traumatized — but without serious injuries. The ordeal led to widespread flight cancellations after the jet was grounded, and some travelers have taken steps to avoid the plane in the future. The incident has also sparked a fresh discussion about whether it’s safe to fly with a baby on your lap .

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Office of Governor Gavin Newsom

Governor Newsom Puts 8,300+ Boots on the Ground Ahead of Next Set of Serious Winter Storms, Urges Preparedness

Published: Feb 02, 2024

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: Governor Newsom is mobilizing state government to support communities across the state prepare for and respond to the next set of winter storms.

SACRAMENTO –  Today, Governor Gavin Newsom announced that California has mobilized more than 8,300 boots on the ground ahead of the next set of winter storms anticipated to bring serious impacts to much of the state this weekend and into early next week.

In addition to increased personnel, California has activated its State Operations Center, Flood Operations Center, Caltrans Emergency Operations Center and the Medical Health Coordination Center – all coordinating a unified response with our local and federal partners.

Supporting recovery efforts from storms in January and late December, Governor Newsom today also proclaimed a state of emergency in Humboldt, Imperial, Monterey, San Mateo and Santa Cruz counties, which join two counties the Governor proclaimed a state of emergency for last week due to storm impacts. A copy of the proclamation can be found here.

THE FORECAST: According to the National Weather Service, an atmospheric river will move into California starting early morning on Sunday and will continue through Tuesday and possibly Wednesday.

  • Rain: Heavy rainfall is possible nearly statewide, but the most likely focus will be on coastal central to southern California. Significant flooding is becoming increasingly likely, including the potential for flooding on roadways, creek and main stem river flooding, mud/rockslides, and debris flows.
  • Snow: Additional heavy mountain snowfall is expected across virtually the entire state, with snow levels on Sunday starting as low as 2,500-4,500 feet across northern California and 5,000-6,000 feet in southern California. Multiple feet of new snow accumulation are likely in several mountain ranges, and extremely difficult mountain travel conditions are expected.
  • Wind: Periods of strong, gusty winds will likely lead to outdoor property damage, tree damage, and power outages. 

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CALIFORNIA HAS MOBILIZED: 

  • Cal OES, through the California Fire and Rescue Mutual Aid System, has deployed more than 550 local government firefighters and support staff, as well as 19 swift water rescue teams, 1 local government urban search and rescue team, in 19 counties.
  • More than 4,000 Caltrans personnel deployed throughout the state.
  • California Highway Patrol officers and other personnel are available in impacted regions and can activate limited emergency operations centers.
  • CAL FIRE has prepositioned 5 hoist-rescue helicopters, 2 swift water rescue teams, additional four-wheel drive engines, and 6 handcrews.
  • The California National Guard is ready to rapidly deploy if called upon. These resources include high-water vehicles, aviation search and rescue assets, military police, general transportation, and heavy engineering equipment units.
  • 500 California Conservation Corps members available to support.
  • Caltrans has prepositioned water pumps in flood-prone areas, and is ensuring storm drains are clear of debris, checking portable backup generators, and stocking up on reflective signs in the event of power outages.
  • 7 million+ sandbags prepositioned
  • Sheltering and food supplies for 37,000+ people , including cots, blankets, water and food.
  • The State Operations Center is activated, whole of state government expertise responding 24/7.
  • Community partner phone banking effort making thousands of calls to sign up Californians for local emergency alerts in the most at-risk counties.
  • The Flood Operations Center is activated and coordinating flood planning and response. DWR Flood Fight Specialists are also on standby and are patrolling priority levees 24/7. The California Nevada River Forecast Center is in a 24-hour operation, producing updated forecasts every 6 hours throughout the duration of the event.
  • State Parks continues to actively monitor the storm’s impacts on state parks and making real-time decisions on closures as needed. As of this morning, California has fully closed 7 state parks and partially closed 6 and have staff on the ground to respond. The public is advised to stay out of the ocean during the storm. For the latest closure information, please visit parks.ca.gov/incidents .

“California has more than 8,300 boots on the ground as we prepare for this next set of serious storms.

All californians in the storm’s path – especially those in southern california – should prepare now and follow the guidance of local government officials and first responders.”.

Governor Gavin Newsom

5 things you can do to stay safer:

  • Stay connected. Dial 311 to get help or ask questions. If you have a critical emergency, call 911. Stay informed by signing up for emergency alerts including warnings and evacuation notices at CalAlerts.org .
  • Get your information from trusted sources. Check state and local government or emergency management websites and social media accounts for trusted information specific to your area. Local news outlets and meteorologists are also a good source of information. Be wary of posts from unknown sources on social platforms or from online ‘experts’ without credentials.
  • Prepare for high winds. Before a high wind event: remove any dead trees or overhanging branches near structures, remove loose roofing material, bring in unsecured objects from patios and balconies, secure outdoor objects that could blow away, shutter windows securely and brace outside doors. During a high wind event: take cover next to a building or under shelter, stay away from windows, stay clear of roadways and train tracks, avoid elevated areas such as roofs, watch for flying debris.
  • Travel safely. Avoid non-essential travel during the peak of the storm expected Sunday and Monday. If you must drive, download the QuickMap app or visit QuickMap (ca.gov)   to learn up-to-the-minute information on road conditions, traffic, closures, and more. Do not walk, swim or drive through flood waters. Turn Around, Don’t Drown! Remember, just six inches of moving water can knock you down, and one foot of moving water can sweep your vehicle away.
  • Be ready in case of power outages . Take inventory of the items you need that rely on electricity. Keep your devices charged. Plan for batteries and other alternative power sources to meet your needs if the power goes out such as a portable charger or power bank. Have flashlights for every household member.

Get more tips here.

Additional Resources

  • Storm Season Safety Guide : the state is sharing multilingual resources, deploying a network of community-based organizations through the Listos California campaign, and highlighting other work underway to protect at-risk communities this rainy season.
  • Prepare Yourself through Texts : Californians can sign up for a 5-lesson text message course through Listos California on what to do before, during and after floods, high winds, debris flows and other storm impacts. This course is available in English, Spanish, Hmong and Punjabi. Text “CAWINTER” to 20202 via SMS to sign up.
  • Visit National Weather Service for current weather patterns in your area.

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  1. US State Dept. Unveils Revamped Travel Website

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  2. Travel.State.Gov: New Requirements for Air Travelers to the U.S.

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VIDEO

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  6. Republican lawmakers are considering sealing the governors travel records

COMMENTS

  1. Travel

    If you wish to remain on travel.state.gov, click the "cancel" message. You are about to visit: Cancel GO. Travel.State.Gov. Travel.State.Gov; Congressional Liaison; Special Issuance Agency ... of private entities on this page are provided as a convenience and should not be construed as the U.S. Department of State or U.S. government endorsement ...

  2. Get your Passport Application Status

    Travel.State.Gov > U.S. Passports > Need a Passport > Get your Passport Application Status Get My Application Status Enroll in email updates about your application status You can enroll in email updates when your application is in process. Status updates may not be available in the first 2 weeks after you submit your application.

  3. Travelers

    Please call 1 (888) 407-4747 (U.S. and Canada) or 1 (202) 501-4444 (overseas) or contact the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate. Travel Advisories As a first step in planning any trip abroad, check the Travel Advisories for your intended destination. Our highest priority is to protect the lives and interests of U.S. citizens overseas.

  4. Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)

    Travel.State.Gov > International Travel > Before You Go > Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) The Smart Traveler Enrollment Program is a free service that allows U.S. citizens traveling or living abroad to receive the latest security updates from the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate.

  5. Travel Advisory Updates

    In order to provide U.S. travelers detailed and actionable information to make informed travel decisions, the Department of State regularly assesses and updates our Travel Advisories, based primarily on the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Travel Health Notices (THNs) and secondary factors such as commercial flight availabil...

  6. Travelers

    Below are links to frequently visited pages on our travel website, travel.state.gov. AMERICANS ABROAD Lost or Stolen Passport: What you need to do if your passport is lost or stolen while traveling abroad. Victims of Crime: We support victims overseas and in the United States.

  7. Travel

    Learn how to get an international driver's license Find information on passports. Learn about traveling to, from, and within the U.S. U.S. passports Find out how to apply for or renew a passport and what to do if your passport is lost or stolen. U.S. citizens traveling abroad

  8. Travel.State.Gov CSI

    Do you want to know the safety and security situation of your travel destination? Check out the color coded map from the U.S. Department of State, which shows the level of risk for each country and region. You can also find detailed information and alerts for specific locations by clicking on the map. Plan your trip wisely and stay informed with the latest travel advisories.

  9. MyTravelGov

    MyTravelGov

  10. Smart Traveler Enrollment Program

    The Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) is a free service to allow U.S. citizens and nationals traveling and living abroad to enroll their trip with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. Receive important information from the Embassy about safety conditions in your destination country, helping you make informed decisions about your travel ...

  11. Visas

    Tourism & Visit A foreign national traveling to the United States for tourism needs a visitor visa (B-2) unless qualifying for entry under the Visa Waiver Program. Tourism is a short visit for vacation, for visiting family and friends, or for medical treatment. Study & Exchange

  12. United States Department of State

    Acceptance facilities include post offices, clerks of court, public libraries, and other local government offices which accept passport applications on behalf of the U.S. Department of State. Search for facilities by zip code, state, or state/city. You can also find facilities which offer on-site photo services.

  13. STEP

    STEP. STEP is a free service to allow U.S. citizens/nationals traveling abroad to enroll with the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate.

  14. The Bahamas Travel Advisory

    Updated with additional water safety information. Exercise increased caution in The Bahamas due to crime.. Country Summary: The majority of crime occurs on New Providence (Nassau) and Grand Bahama (Freeport) islands.In Nassau, practice increased vigilance in the "Over the Hill" area (south of Shirley Street) where gang-on-gang violence has resulted in a high homicide rate primarily ...

  15. International Travel Recommendations

    Office of the Spokesperson April 26, 2022 U.S. citizens considering international travel should plan ahead and be informed about travel requirements before making decisions or firm travel plans.

  16. Home

    Welcome to MyTravelGov. MyTravelGov is a new feature from the Department of State's Bureau of Consular Affairs. With a MyTravelGov account, U.S. citizens and nationals can securely apply for consular services online. Request Services.

  17. Amid Jamaica's travel advisory, what are the safest Caribbean islands?

    Safest Caribbean islands for your spring break getaway. Antigua and Barbuda. Aruba. Barbados. British Virgin Islands (Tortola, Anegada, Virgin Gorda and Jost Van Dyke) Cayman Islands (Grand Cayman ...

  18. Is Jamaica travel safe? Americans warned to reconsider trips

    1:16. You may want to reconsider visiting Jamaica. That's the warning from the State Department, which is flagging crime and health concerns in the popular Caribbean destination. In a travel ...

  19. U.S. travel advisory for Jamaica warns Americans to reconsider visits

    U.S. raises alert level for travel to Jamaica, urges Americans to reconsider visiting island 00:53. The U.S. government has raised its travel alert level for Jamaica amid a spate of murders in the ...

  20. Secretary of State's Travel

    Secretary of State's Travel. The Secretary of State travels to all corners of the world to do his job. His duties as Secretary include acting as the President's representative at all international forums, negotiating treaties and other international agreements, and conducting everyday, face-to-face diplomacy.

  21. Is It Safe to Travel to the Bahamas? Here's What You Need to Know

    The advisory was already at Level 2. The U.S. Embassy in the Bahamas issued a security alert for the Bahamas, but the State Department did not raise the travel advisory in response to the violence ...

  22. Where should U.S. citizens not travel? Here's an updated list

    Nicaragua's government searches and seizes personal items, targets pro-democracy advocates and families, and prevent individuals from departing. U.S. citizens can find themselves charged without fair trials. Niger. Travel to Niger should be reconsidered because of crime, kidnapping and terrorism. The travel advisory was updated on Jan. 8.

  23. Travel Smart from the Start

    March 31, 2023. The U.S. Department of State has no higher priority than the safety and security of U.S. citizens traveling and living overseas. As more U.S. citizens travel abroad - for family visits, vacation, or any occasion - we remind you to travel smart from the start by doing the following: Check your passport's expiration date ...

  24. GovTravels 2024

    Register for GovTravels 2024 today! The 2024 GovTravels Symposium will be held Monday, February 26 through Wednesday, February 28, 2024, at the Hilton Mark Center in Alexandria, Virginia. Hosted by the National Defense Transportation Association (NDTA), co-sponsored by the Defense Travel Management Office (DTMO), and in association with the ...

  25. State Department raises Jamaica travel advisory to Level 3

    The State Department escalated its warning for Jamaica to a Level 3 travel advisory last week, which the U.S. Embassy in Jamaica reinforced Thursday. An embassy statement said violent crimes ...

  26. Governor Newsom Puts 8,300+ Boots on the Ground Ahead of Next Set of

    WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: Governor Newsom is mobilizing state government to support communities across the state prepare for and respond to the next set of winter storms. SACRAMENTO - Today, Governor Gavin Newsom announced that California has mobilized more than 8,300 boots on the ground ahead of the next set of winter storms anticipated to bring serious impacts to much of the state this ...