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What Is The Pavement Trip Hazard Height In The UK?

Welcome to our guide looking at the minimum pavement trip hazard height to make a claim. Have you been involved in a slip, trip or fall that left you injured? Did the accident happen because someone else breached their duty of care towards you? Are you unsure what the minimum height for a trip hazard needs to be in order for you to claim? If so, this guide could help.

How To Claim For Falling On Uneven Pavements

What Is The Pavement Trip Hazard Height In The UK?

What Is The Pavement Trip Hazard Height In The UK? A Guide.

In order to claim compensation, you need to prove that someone else’s negligence was responsible for your accident and subsequent injuries. You also need to show that the trip hazard was sufficiently high that the negligence of the person in control can be held liable.

If you have any more questions after reading this guide, you can get in touch with our team. We can then connect you with our personal injury solicitors, one of whom could handle your claim.

If you do wish to speak to us, you have three methods by which you can do so by:

  • Telephone 0800 073 8804 ;
  • Using our live chat to speak to an advisor ASAP;
  • Or leave a message on our online form .

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A guide on what is the pavement trip hazard height in the uk, what is a pedestrian injury compensation claim, duty of care under the highways act 1980, how the pavement trip hazard height uk is assessed, suing the council for falling on uneven pavements, can you claim falling on uneven pavements if they were not well maintained, how local authorities defend against highway tripping claims, what evidence can support highway tripping claims, pavement trip hazard height in the uk compensation claims calculator, special damages which could be awarded in highway tripping claims, no win no fee pedestrian injury compensation claims, start a highway tripping claim, essential references, how many road traffic accident victims are pedestrians.

  • FAQs Pavement Trip Hazard Height In The UK

In this guide, we will cover a number of different points that you may find helpful if you’re considering making a claim. To begin with, we will look at what exactly a pedestrian injury compensation claim is. Furthermore, we’ll examine the duty of care that is owed to pedestrians while walking on the pavement.

This guide will also look at how a trip hazard height might be assessed. In addition to this, we will look at how you could make a claim against a liable party, for example, a local council.

We’ll then go on to look at the evidence you could provide to support your claim for compensation. Furthermore, we’ll look at the defence that a council or local authority could provide against a claim for compensation.

In addition to this, we will also examine the amount of compensation you could receive at the end of a successful claim. In addition to this, we will look at the kinds of damages your compensation could be made up of and how these are calculated.

Remember that you can speak to one of our advisors at any time to discuss your potential claim. If your claim has a good chance of success, you could be connected with one of our solicitors.

A personal injury claim is where someone who has been injured in an accident as the result of third-party negligence claims compensation from the person responsible. It aims to return them, as much as possible, to the position they were in before they were injured.

There are a number of different scenarios where you could claim personal injury compensation. For example, you could claim after being in a road traffic accident or an accident at work . However, this guide will focus on accidents in a public place . In particular, we will discuss claiming for injuries sustained while tripping on the pavement.

If you trip on the street and fall, this could cause a wide range of different injuries. Some of these might be considered relatively minor, such as scrapes and bruises. Others, however, can be serious. In some cases, they may even be life-changing.

For example, you may experience a fracture like a broken wrist or a fractured coccyx. In some cases, the fall might result in a blow to the head, resulting in a brain injury . An injury like this can have a severe permanent effect on your quality of life.

There’s no legal threshold for what is considered a pavement trip hazard. However, local authorities will usually not consider claims for accidents caused by trip hazards of a depth of less than 1 inch (2.5cm).

If the pavement that you tripped and injured yourself on meets or exceeds this height, you could have valid grounds to make a compensation claim. Please speak to our claims team for further details.

For your claim to succeed, you must prove negligence on the defendant’s part. To achieve this, you must produce evidence that:

  • The defendant had a duty of care towards you
  • This duty of care was breached
  • The breach led to an accident that resulted in you being injured.

The Highway Act 1980 outlines the duty of care that the person in control of maintaining pavement has towards members of the public who use these spaces. It states that pavements need to be well maintained as much as is reasonably practicable.

If you’d like more information about claiming compensation for injuries you sustained in a pavement accident, speak to a member of our team today. Otherwise, you can read on for more information on how trip hazards are assessed.

As we have already mentioned, there’s no legal limit to what is considered a trip hazard on the pavement. However, claims for accidents caused by trip hazards of less than one inch will usually not be considered.

This is because, as part of the duty of care, the person in control of the area need to take all reasonably practicable steps to ensure the safety of the public. However, a trip hazard of less than one inch would not be considered enough of a hazard to warrant immediate repair.

However, if the trip hazard is an inch or higher and you’ve been injured, then you may be able to claim. The hazard should either be at least one inch above the level of the rest of the pavement or one inch below it.

When you make a claim for compensation, you need to show that the defendant breached their duty of care towards you, resulting in you being injured. For example, if you’re injured in an accident at work, you may pursue a compensation claim against your employer . For an accident on the road, you would claim against the insurance company of the driver who was at fault for the accident.

When you claim for injuries sustained when tripping on a public pavement, your claim will be made against the local council. This is because, according to the Highways Act 1980, they are responsible for maintaining all public roads, pavements and walkways within their boundaries.

However, there are some instances where your claim might not be made against the council. For example, if you tripped on paving that was in a shopping centre, then this may be controlled by the person responsible for the shopping centre.

If you’re unsure who you could claim against for an accident caused by a slip, trip or fall, speak to a member of our team today. Our advisors can offer you free legal advice about making a claim.

As part of the duty of care that a local authority has towards you, they need to repair any hazards. This includes large hazards, like a tree that has fallen down and is blocking the path.

However, they also have a responsibility to deal with smaller hazards. This can include things like wonky paving slabs that pose a trip hazard.

According to Well-managed Highway Infrastructure- A Code of Practice, councils and local authorities should take a risk-based approach to maintain highways. For this reason, the Code doesn’t outline any minimum standards but instead gives information about how an organisation can develop their own levels of services.

If there is a hazard that does not pose an obvious risk to safety, then it is unlikely that a local authority would be expected to repair it. This is why, generally, a council will not consider a claim that is made for an accident where the trip hazard was less than one inch. Because this did not pose an obvious risk to safety, the council is not in breach of its duty of care if it does not repair the pavement.

There are a number of different ways that a local authority or council might defend against a claim for compensation for tripping over a pavement. For example, they might state that they included signs around the trip hazard to alert people passing of the danger. If you tripped despite the presence of such signs, you might not be able to claim.

In addition to this, the council might defend itself by claiming that they could not reasonably be expected to have identified the hazard. Furthermore, they might have been aware of the hazard but claim that it is unreasonable to expect them to repair it in the time between it being discovered and the accident happening.

In order to give you a better chance of claiming the compensation you deserve, you should gather evidence to support your claim. Read on to find out how you can do this. You can also contact us for more information about building a claim.

There are a number of different ways that you can support your claim for compensation after a pavement accident. These include:

  • Photographs. It would help if you took photographs of the accident scene and of a ruler against the trip hazard showing how high it is. You may also want to take photographs of your injuries as they heal.
  • Medical records.  If you’ve been involved in a slip accident, you should seek medical attention even if you don’t initially think you’re seriously injured. The records that this generates will support your claim for compensation.
  • Witness details. If someone else saw your accident happen, you could ask them to provide their details. At a later date, they could be asked to provide statements to support your claim.
  • CCTV footage.  If the accident was caught on CCTV, you could use this to support your claim. You can request CCTV footage of yourself.
  • Financial evidence. As well as compensation for your physical injuries, you could also claim for the financial harm that your injuries caused you. For this reason, you may find it useful to collect evidence like receipts and bills to show the amount you have spent.

If you would like any more guidance on the evidence that you could provide to support your claim, speak to a member of our team today. Or you can read on to find out more about how compensation is calculated.

When you claim compensation for your injuries, your settlement might be made up of general and special damages. General damages compensate you for the injuries you have experienced, whereas special damages compensate you for the financial impact your injuries have had.

General damages are worked out with the help of a medical assessment with an independent expert. They’ll assess your injuries and compile their findings in a medical report. This report can be used alongside guideline compensation brackets from the Judicial College to help value your claim.

Below, we have included a table using the Judicial College Guidelines. Please bear in mind that these are not guaranteed compensation amounts.

You can also use our compensation calculator to see how much your claim might be worth. Simply input the details of your accident, and you could be given a valuation of your claim in moments.

Special damages are the part of your claim that can compensate you for any financial harm that your injuries have caused you. There are a  number of different things that can be included in special damages. These include: 

  • Loss of earnings or future earnings. If you need to take time off work as you recover, you could be compensated for the impact this has on your wages.
  • Travel costs. You could claim back the cost of travel to and from medical appointments.
  • Medical/care costs. If you need treatment that you cannot get on the NHS, or your injuries are so severe that you need care while you recover, then you may be able to include this in your claim.
  • The cost of plans you’re no longer able to commit to. For example, if you’re injured, and that means you’re no longer able to attend a holiday that you had booked, then you could claim the cost of this back.

Please speak to us for extra guidance on this area of your claim after being injured in an accident. Or, if you would like to know more about the minimum pavement trip hazard height, speak to our team today.

When you seek compensation for injuries that you have sustained because someone else was negligent, you may wish to seek legal representation. Doing so could help you get more money from your claim.  On the other hand, you may be hesitant about doing so because of the legal costs typically associated with this. However, we could offer a solution.

A No Win No Fee agreement is a contract between you and your solicitor, and it sets out what needs to happen before they get paid. With an agreement like this, you won’t be asked to pay any upfront or ongoing fees. You also won’t pay anything if your case is unsuccessful.

The only time you will be asked to cover your solicitor’s fees is if they are successful in winning you compensation. Then, a legally capped success fee will be deducted from your compensation.

Please drop us a message to learn more about No Win No Fee agreements. One of our advisors could connect you with a No Win No Fee solicitor to work on your claim.

Remember that our advisors are on hand to assist you around the clock, providing 24/7 access whenever you require it. Also, you don’t have to move ahead with a claim purely because you’ve spoken with us; there’s no obligation to continue after your initial free consultation.

You can get in touch with us today for more information by:

  • Calling our team on 0800 073 8804 ;
  • Messaging on the online contact form ;
  • Or by contacting us on our Live Chat service.

We appreciate you reading our guide about pedestrian accident claims. That being said, you may want more information. If that’s the case, we recommend that you check out the links below.

The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA) provides information on preventing accidents, including slips, trips and falls.

Should I visit A&E ? This NHS guide can help you figure out where to go for medical attention.

This page from the government website provides advice on Statutory Sick Pay (SSP).

You may find our guide on pedestrian accident claims useful.

Read our guide, where we look at No Win No Fee agreements in greater detail.

For more guidance on how a  slip, trip or fall solicitor  could help, read this guide.

Other Guides You Can Check Out

  • Gatwick Airport Accident Claims Guide
  • Wedding Day Personal Injury Claims
  • £23,000 Compensation For An Ankle Fracture
  • £500,000 Compensation For Shoulder Impingement Syndrome Injury
  • Kirkwall Airport Accident Claims Guide
  • Allergic Reaction After Eating At Taco Bell – Can I Claim?
  • Aberdeen International Airport Accident Claims Guide
  • Jersey Airport Accident Claims Guide
  • Allergic Reaction After Eating At Toby Carvery – Can I Claim?

In Britain, during 2020, there were 115,584 road traffic accident injuries. Of these, 14,717 were pedestrians.

Please note that these statistics are not related to slips, trips or falls on the pavement. Instead, they’re related to pedestrians who were involved in road traffic accidents. However, these statistics do highlight the potential risks that are posed to pedestrians.

FAQs – Pavement Trip Hazard Height In The UK

What height constitutes a trip hazard in the uk.

A height of one inch, or 2.5 centimetres, is considered the minimum for a trip hazard worthy of potential legal action. This is not a legal limit, but a local authority will usually reject a claim based on a trip hazard of less than an inch.

What is considered a trip hazard in the UK? 

A trip hazard could describe a paving stone that is not level with the rest of the stones on the path. It could also include things like potholes.

Is 5mm a trip hazard?

You can be injured after falling on a trip hazard of 5mm. However, the local council is unlikely to consider a claim for injuries caused by a hazard of less than 2.5 cm.

Thank you for reading our guide looking at the pavement trip hazard height.

Written by Armstrong

Edited by Stocks

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Patrick Mallon

Patrick Mallon

Patrick is a Grade A solicitor having qualified in 2005. He's an an expert in accident at work and public liability claims and is currently our head of the EL/PL department. Get in touch today for free to see how we can help you.

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Learn What Is The Legal Height Of A Trip Hazard In The UK

If you have been injured by a trip hazard, you may be able to claim compensation if it happened because another party breached the duty of care which they owed you. In this guide, we discuss this and related questions, such as “What is the legal height of a trip hazard in the UK?”

What Is The Legal Height Of A Trip Hazard UK And When Could I Claim For A Tripping Accident?

By Stephen Kane. Last Updated 19th March 2024. If you have been injured by a tripping hazard because another party breached their duty of care, then you may be eligible to claim compensation. You may be asking “ What is the legal height of a trip hazard in the UK ?” or if such a thing can even be applied to injury claims.

In this guide, we will discuss the eligibility requirements for claiming for injuries caused by a tripping hazard. This includes tripping accidents either at a workplace or in a public space. We’ll also discuss how a tripping hazard may be defined by local authorities that manage a public area, and the duty of care owed to you in certain situations.

Potential compensation payouts and the benefits of claiming with a No Win No Fee solicitor are also covered in our guide. There are many benefits to working with a solicitor on your claim, such as assistance with gathering evidence to strengthen your case. 

If you would like to learn more, read on, or contact our team of expert advisors today by:

  • Calling 0161 696 9685
  • Using our online contact form .
  • Or by using our 24/7 live chat service.

Cartoon of a man tripping over a floor hazard

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What is the legal height of a trip hazard in the uk.

  • Who Could Make A Claim For Injuries Caused By A Tripping Hazard?

What Is The Legal Height Of A Trip Hazard UK? – Council Responsibility For Pavements

How long do you have to claim against a council for a tripping accident, compensation payouts for injuries caused by a trip hazard, what evidence could help me receive slip, trip or fall compensation, make a no win no fee claim for injuries caused by a trip hazard in the uk.

  • More Information On The Pavement Trip Hazard Height

In law, there is no legal height defined for a pavement trip hazard. The criteria for a pavement defect that is actionable will vary between local authorities. However, many local authorities won’t consider a pavement defect actionable unless it is at least 1-inch (25mm, 2.5cm) high or deep. We’ll explain how to demonstrate the height of a trip hazard later on.

You can’t claim just because you tripped over the hazard. You must be able to demonstrate that it caused you to be injured. For this reason, you should attend A&E or book an appointment with your GP as soon as possible after the accident occurred. Not only will this provide a basis for your claim, but it will also ensure that you get the medical attention needed for your injuries. 

While the hazard height is a crucial aspect, you would also need to demonstrate that the hazard was created by third-party negligence. This could involve, for instance, evidence showing that the local council did not monitor the public park correctly.

For free claims advice on how to proceed with your pavement trip claim , please get in touch with our specialists today .

Who Could Make A Claim For Injuries Caused By A Tripping Hazard? 

It’s important to note that you cannot claim for just identifying a tripping hazard, and not all accidents caused by a trip hazard will result in a successful compensation claim. This is because your case must meet certain criteria in order to be valid, meaning you must be able to prove that:

  • You were owed a duty of care
  • This duty was breached
  • You were injured as a result of this breach 

This also determines who you make your claim against. For example, for tripping hazards in the workplace, such as trailing wires and cluttered walkways, you would claim against your employer. This is because they owe you a duty of care and must take all reasonably practicable steps to keep you safe in the workplace, according to the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 (HASAWA).

However, if you are in a public space and trip over a pavement or dislodged paving stone, then your claim may be made against the local council. This is because they are the controller of that space, and as such, owe you a duty of care under the Occupiers’ Liability Act 1957 (OLA).

If another party breaches their duty of care towards you, and you are injured as a result, then you may be able to claim personal injury compensation. Contact our team for more information.

If a pavement is in a public area which the local council is responsible for, then that council is responsible for the maintenance of the pavement.

Section 41 of the Highways Act 1980 (HiA 1980) provides that the highway authority is under a duty to maintain the highway. It is the duty of the highway authority to maintain the road in such a state of repair as to be passable in safety at all seasons of the year.

Under their duty of care, councils should maintain pavements they’re responsible for by carrying out work such as replacing broken or missing slabs and removing weeds when required. Also, to help fulfil this duty, councils will usually carry out regular inspections every year of roads and pavements to identify which ones need the most maintenance. Just how frequent these pavement inspections are can vary from council to council.

That said, you may be wondering, ‘What is the legal height of a trip hazard in the UK when inspecting pavements?’. As mentioned before, there is no specific legal height that defines a pavement trip hazard.

Councils may also respond to public reports about issues with local pavements. An online Government page allows residents in England and Wales to report problems with a pavement directly to their council.

For more advice on whether you may have grounds to claim against a council for breaching their responsibilities following a pavement trip accident, contact our advisors for free today.

In accordance with the Limitation Act 1980 , there is a three-year time limit for starting a personal injury claim against a council. This usually starts from the date your injury occurred. However, the time limit can work differently under certain circumstances.

If the injured party lacks the mental capacity to start their own claim, then the time limit will be frozen indefinitely. While the time limit is frozen, a litigation friend could start a claim against the council on behalf of the person who has been harmed. If, however, the party later regains this mental capacity and a claim has not been made, then they will have three years to start a claim from the day of recovery.

If a child has been injured, then the time limit for starting a claim against the council will be put on hold until their 18th birthday. A litigation friend could start a claim on the child’s behalf before they reach this age. Otherwise, the child will have three years to start their own claim from the date of their 18th birthday.

For more advice on the requirements for claiming for a trip hazard, the meaning of the term or other related matters, get in touch with our advisors for free today.

If your employer were to breach their duty of care you could be injured due to a trip hazard, meaning you could be owed compensation.

Following a successful personal injury claim , your compensation settlement could consist of general and special damages. General damages compensate you for the pain and suffering you have endured due to being injured by a workplace trip hazard. To help give you a clearer idea of how much you could receive in general damages for your injury, we have provided the following table. The amounts listed have been taken from the 16 th edition of the Judicial College Guidelines (JCG). The JCG is a document used by various legal professionals to help them value claims, as it lists compensation brackets for different injuries.

Compensation is awarded on a case-by-case basis, so please only use this table as a guide. Also note that the first entry in this table is an estimated figure that is not based on the JCG.

Special damages compensate you for the financial losses you have suffered due to your injury. Some of the financial closes you could claim under special damages include:

  • Medical costs.
  • Travel expenses.
  • Loss of earnings .
  • Care costs.

You will need to provide evidence of these losses in order to receive compensation for them. Payslips, bank statements, and invoices could all be used as evidence in your claim.

Contact our advisors today to discuss your particular claim. Our advisors could also help answer questions such as, ‘what is a tripping hazard, and how could my employer be liable if I am injured because of one?’

Slip, trip and fall claims revolve around proving that your injury was the result of third-party negligence. To do this, you will need sufficient evidence. You need to be able to create a causal link between the council’s negligence, for instance, and your injury. Evidence that you could use includes:

  • Photographs of your injury and the pavement defect. Photographs of the scene are particularly important as your potential claim revolves around showing that the pavement defect goes above the legal height for a trip hazard.
  • Contact details of any witnesses. As part of the claims process, your solicitor can contact them to take statements.
  • CCTV footage of the incident. This can give a clearer idea of how the accident occurred.
  • A log of the accident report if you have reported the incident. This can help confirm the time, location and date that it took place.
  • Doctor’s notes. A medical professional will assess your injury as part of receiving medical treatment. Their notes can be used to show the extent of the injury. Other medical evidence you could use includes copies of any medical scans.

If you have other queries about trip and fall claims, please contact our team of advisors for a free consultation using the details above.

Broken bricks in a pavement

If you’ve been injured by tripping on a hazard that should not have been there or should have been signposted, you may be eligible to claim compensation. A lawyer from our panel could assist you in making a personal injury claim on a No Win No Fee basis under a Conditional Fee Agreement (CFA). Under this arrangement, you would not have to pay them any fees for their work upfront or during the course of your claim.

Furthermore, if your claim does not end in compensation, you would not have to pay them for their work.

If your claim is successful, your lawyer will deduct a small percentage from your compensation. This is known as a success fee, and the percentage one can be is legally capped.

To see if you could be eligible to work with a lawyer from our panel, you can contact our advisors. They can also help answer any questions you may have about personal injury claims being made due to trip hazards.

You can reach an advisor today by:

  • Using our live chat.
  • Filling out our contact us page.

More Information On The Legal Height Of a Trip Hazard

This is the final section of our guide, so we have added some links to resources that may come in handy. If you would like any more information about claiming, please contact our team on the number above.

  • Broken Bones – An NHS article that gives advice to help you work out if you have broken a bone.
  • The Royal Society For The Prevention Of Accidents – ROSPA are a UK charity that is working towards a world free of accidents.
  • Local Authority Complaints – Information from the Local Government and Social Care ombudsman on how to raise formal complaints.
  • To show what other types of accidents we can help with, please take a look at some of the guides below.
  • Local Authority Claims  – For more information about making a claim against a local authority or council, please read our guide. 
  • Slip, Trip or Fall Claims  – If you’d like more general advice around slip, trip and fall claims, then this guide may be helpful to you.
  • Doormat Slip, Trip and Fall Claims  – It’s not just pavement defects that can cause injuries through slips and trips. Read our guide for information on claiming for an accident caused by a doormat .
  • Most Common Public Place Accidents – In this guide you can find out about the different types of public place accidents if you find that this page doesn’t match what happened to you.

Thank you for reading our guide on the legal height of a trip hazard. If you would like to learn more about the trip hazard height or have further questions, please contact us for free legal advice using the details above.

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Slips, Trips, and Falls in the Workplace: Understanding UK Laws and How to Protect Your Business!

  • February 9, 2024

Workplace Slips Trips and Falls Understanding UK Laws and How to Protect Your Business!

Don’t fall short on slips, trips, and falls – the biggest contributor to non-fatal accidents. Slips, trips, and falls in the workplace are by far the most common kind of workplace accident, and regardless of your business or operational sector, slip, trip, and fall hazards are present in every workplace.

Typically, a slip, trip, or fall contributes to around 40% of all reported major injuries to employees in the workplace and is also the most reported injury to members of the public.

Employers are required by law to take all reasonable steps to protect their employees. However, statistics clearly show that not all employers take adequate precautions concerning workplace slip, trip, and fall prevention.

In this guide, we’ll look at what they are, what the law covers, and how to manage them in any workplace.

What types of injuries are caused by slips and trips at work?

While the vast majority of slips, trips, and falls will most likely result in minor injuries—bruising, cuts, lacerations, and other impact-type injuries—the potential for more serious outcomes does still exist (falls near open staircases, near solid protruding objects). It would obviously be unwise to overlook the potential risk to your business from slips, trips, and falls.

It can often help in terms of designing and implementing control measures to prevent this type of injury from being very clear about the distinction between slips, trips, and falls (they are often ‘grouped’ together as one ubiquitous hazard), but they do have unique characteristics that should be considered.

What’s the difference between a slip, trip, and fall?

To slide unintentionally for a short distance by losing balance, footing, or sliding, usually resulting in either the regaining of balance or a fall. In general, a slip at work is caused by something reducing the friction of a surface, such as a liquid, grease, or a low-friction material such as plastic, cloth, or a mat on the floor.

To make a false or unintended step or stumble over an obstacle by unintentionally making contact with that obstacle with part of the anatomy, usually resulting in the regaining of balance or a fall. A trip is often caused during motion (e.g., walking or running) when the foot is suddenly stopped from moving, but the body continues in its motion. The foot is then not in the correct place to support the moving body, and the person is again unstable, often resulting in a trip and fall accident at work.

A fall is an event whereby an individual comes to rest on the ground or another lower level with or without loss of consciousness. A fall is often the result of losing balance as a result of a slip or trip, but it can also be the result of falling into a pit or hole in the floor because of inadequate protection around a hole in the floor opened during maintenance, causing a fall accident at work.

What UK law covers slips, trips, and falls?   

Slips and trips are covered by three main pieces of health and safety legislation:

The Health and Safety at Work Act 1974:

This law requires employers to ensure the health and safety of all employees and anyone affected by their work, so far as is reasonably practicable, including taking steps to control slip and trip risks. In addition, employees have a duty to take care of their health and safety and that of others and must use any safety equipment provided.

The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999:

This law requires employers to assess risks (including slip and trip risks) and, where necessary, take actions to address them. A slips and trips risk assessment must be undertaken to identify locations or areas where slip, trip, and fall hazards are likely to occur. Consideration must be given to issues that may increase the likelihood of an incident occurring or the seriousness of any injury, for example, where a slip or trip hazard exists on or near stairs.

The Workplace (Health, Safety, and Welfare) Regulations 1992:

This law requires floors to be suitable, in good condition, and free from obstructions. All people should be able to move around safely at all times.

How can slip, trip, & fall accidents be prevented?

Workplace control measures:

Documented procedures: Employers should consider establishing procedures for controlling the risks arising from housekeeping activities, including maintaining work areas in a safe condition, minimising waste, and making arrangements to contain and avoid spillages.

See it or sort it: All persons on site must engage in a ‘see it or sort it’ attitude to maintain good housekeeping practices and promote effective cleaning regimes.

Additional procedures could be created to control the risks arising from cleaning activities, including mitigating spillages, using appropriate cleaning equipment, and restricting access to prevent people from walking through areas during cleaning or when floors are still wet.

How to reduce slips, trips, and falls in the workplace

To mitigate the risks of slips, trips, and falls in the workplace effectively, consider the following measures:

  • Ensure Clear Traffic Routes: In all workplaces, there must be sufficient traffic routes of sufficient width and headroom to allow people and vehicles to circulate safely and with ease. Floors and traffic routes must be kept free of obstructions that may present a hazard or impede access. Protrusions into walkways must be removed, re-sited, protected by barriers or covers, or made more visible (including warning signage).
  • Maintain Safe Flooring: Floors and traffic routes must be sound and robust enough for the loads placed on them and the traffic expected to use them. In regular use, surfaces must not become uneven or slippery and must be kept free of obstructions and from any article or substance that could cause a person to slip, trip, or fall.
  • Manage Cables Properly: Good cable management practices must always be maintained. Trailing cables from work equipment, including fixed and portable equipment, must not be allowed to become trip hazards.
  • Provide Adequate Staircase Safety: The open sides of staircases must be protected with an upper rail and a lower rail. A handrail must be provided on at least one side of every staircase and both sides if there is a particular risk identified by the site risk assessment.
  • Maintain Lighting Systems: Lighting systems must be correctly maintained and not create hazardous shadows. Lighting must be sufficient to enable people to work and move about safely. Changes in level must be well-lit and easy to recognise. Slopes, steps, and abrupt changes must be minimised from one flooring material to another.
  • Document Procedures for External Risks: There must be documented procedures for controlling the risks arising from the external working environment, including paths, steps, and fire escapes that could cause slips, e.g., through a buildup of leaves, wet grass, moss, mud, etc.
  • Manage Snow and Ice Risks: Arrangements must be made to minimise risks from snow and ice, including gritting, snow clearing, and the closure of some routes, particularly external stairs, under certain conditions.
  • Enhance Visibility on Footpaths: Changes in level on footpaths must be clearly visible. Step nosings must not be difficult to see, rounded, damaged, or slippery.

Regular inspections and adaptation :

Documented procedures and record keeping : Employers should consider documented procedures for undertaking workplace inspections and recording or remediating any deficiencies that are found.

Informal inspections can be made to ensure that the work areas are tidy and free from hazards.

Formal inspections of the area should be carried out at a defined frequency (determined by the site risk assessment), looking for slip, trip, and fall hazards and evaluating existing control measures.

Planned changes: Any significant changes in workplace use (including something as simple as rearranging the layout) must be appropriately planned. This ensures that the use change does not introduce new hazards or negatively impact existing control measures.

Expert Advice for Slips, Trips, and Falls with Avensure

Workplace slips, trips, and falls prevention are your legal obligation as an employer. This extends to both workers and anyone who may be affected by your business practices. Taking a proactive approach to preventing slips, trips, and falls is crucial to avoid injuries, absences, and costly compensation claims.

Failing to meet your slip, trip, and fall prevention responsibilities could result in injury claims, tribunal hearings, and unlimited compensation fines. Don’t gamble with your business – rely on Avensure Health and Safety’s expert guidance for handling work-related accidents, including slips, trips, and falls. To learn more, visit  Avensure Contact !

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What is the Key Legislation that Surrounds Slips Trips and Falls?

Last updated on 20th December 2023

Manager looking Health and Safety legislation

In this article

It is important that you know the key legislation around slips, trips and falls, if you work in health and safety. Ensuring the health and safety of employees, and others, is not only moral and makes good business sense, it is also the law. Slips, trips and falls are a safety risk and can cause serious injury and even death. Health and safety laws are there to protect workers, and others, and to give them an opportunity to seek restitutions if a company fails in its duties.

According to Croner-i each year UK workers suffer about 11,000 major injuries caused by slips and trips.

Even though there is no specific legislation on slips, trips and falls, there are general laws that cover these risks.

  • The Health and Safety at Work, etc. Act (1974).
  • The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations (1999).
  • The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations (1992).

The Work at Height Regulations (2005)

The personal protective equipment at work regulations (1992).

Builder reading health and safety legislation

The Health and Safety at Work, etc. Act (1974)

The Health and Safety at Work, etc. Act (1974) is a very large piece of legislation so you won’t cover it all in this unit, but you will be introduced to the general duties and how they relate to slips, trips and falls.

Under the HSWA, duties are placed on certain groups.

The main sections of the Act that will relate to slips, trips and falls are:

  • Employer duties to their employees (section 2 of the Act).
  • Employers and Self-Employed duties to others (non-employees) (section 3 of the Act).
  • Persons concerned premises (section 4 of the Act).
  • Employee duties (section 7 of the Act).
  • Employees should not be charged for anything provided for health and safety (section 9 of the Act).

Employer duties 

Employers have an overall general duty to look after their employees’ health, safety and welfare whilst they are at work, so far as is reasonably practicable.

Employers also have a duty to ensure the following:

  • The provision of safe plant.
  • The provision of safe systems of work.
  • The safe use, handling, storage and transport of substances and equipment.
  • A safe place of work, which includes safe access and egress.
  • A safe working environment.
  • Adequate welfare facilities.
  • Information, instruction, training and supervision.

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The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations (1999)

The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations (1999) are also a large piece of legislation and most of the regulation will apply to slips, trips and falls. The regulations require the following (remember, this is general legislation and does not specifically detail slips, trips and falls)

Employer duties

  • Risk assessment – An employer has a duty to make suitable and sufficient risk assessments of the risks to employees and others, e.g. risk assessments will be required for slip, trip and fall hazards. The self-employed also have this duty.
  • Principles of prevention – These principles are used to implement control measures. They are similar to a hierarchy where the aim is to firstly avoid the risks of slips, trips and falls. There are nine principles in total and although an employer should always aim for the first principle, all principles can be used in conjunction with one another. The last principle is giving appropriate instruction (about slips, trips and falls) to employees.
  • Health and safety arrangements – The arrangements should cover planning, organisation, control, monitoring and review. An employer should have adequate arrangements to manage health and safety. These arrangements should include managing slips, trips and falls risks.
  • Health and safety assistance – There should be a competent person to advise and assist with health and safety arrangements, e.g. reducing the risks from slips, trips and falls. This person can be from within the organisation or an external consultant.
  • Procedures for serious and imminent danger and for danger areas – Procedures are required for emergencies, such as fire. If slips, trips and falls could be a risk during evacuation, this would need to be considered. Procedures are also required for any danger areas.
  • Information for employees – Employees should be provided with information on slips, trips and falls; particularly on slip, trip and fall risk assessments and the precautions required to control the risks. Any information provided should be able to be understood by everyone, e.g. migrant workers.
  • Cooperation and coordination – Where workplaces are shared, employers should cooperate and coordinate. For example, if there is a risk of slips, trips and falls in a common area that could affect another employer, they must be notified of the risk and precautions should be put in place.
  • Capabilities and training – Employees must be provided with adequate training relevant to slip, trip and fall risks. Training should be refreshed regularly.
  • Temporary workers – Temporary workers, such as those on a fixed-term contract or agency staff, are exposed to the same slip, trip and fall risks as permanent employees. They must be given adequate information on the risks. They should also have the necessary skills to do the job safely.
  • Risk assessment in respect of new or expectant mothers – If new or expectant mothers are particularly at risk of slips, trips and falls, this must be included in the risk assessment and they must be protected from the risks.
  • Protection of young persons – Young persons are those who are under 18. If young persons are at a particular risk of slips, trips and falls, then this must be included in the risk assessment. Young persons must be protected, as their lack of experience can put them at risk.

Employees have a duty to use equipment, and safety devices, in accordance with the training and instructions they receive. They should report any serious and imminent dangers to their employer, e.g. large spillage or trip hazard. They should also notify their employer of any shortcomings in their health and safety arrangements, e.g. poor management of slip, trip and fall risks.

Builders discussing health and safety legislation

The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations (1992)

The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations (1992) are applicable to most workplaces, but do not cover construction sites. These regulations cover the basic requirements for health, safety and welfare at work.

Slips and trips are covered under regulation 12, condition of floors and traffic routes. Falls are covered under regulation 13, but most of this section has been revoked and can now be found in the Work at Height Regulations (2005).

Employers, and also those in control of workplace premises, have duties under these regulations. Where there are shared areas in a building, e.g. lobbies/stairways, the building owner will be responsible for preventing slips, trips and falls.

Condition of floors and traffic routes

As far as slips, trips and falls are concerned, this section of the regulations requires the following to be considered:

  • Floor surfaces and traffic routes should not have holes, uneven ground, slopes or be slippery if it is likely a person would slip, trip or fall.
  • Any surfaces that are damaged should be repaired. If they cannot be repaired immediately, the damaged surfaces should be marked (e.g. by a sign) or protected (e.g. barriers).
  • Slopes should not be unnecessarily steep. Where slopes are steeper, a handrail should be provided.
  • If surfaces are likely to get wet, they should be of a type that reduces the risks of slipping. If there are other hazards nearby, floor surfaces should be non-slip and should be kept clear of obstructions.
  • If the floor becomes contaminated (e.g. leak and spillages), it should be marked, fenced off and cleaned up as soon as possible.
  • There should be slightly sloped flooring towards drainage systems if work activities make the floor wet. The drains and flooring should not increase the risk of slip and trip hazards, e.g. drains protruding from the floor surface.
  • Processes and plant should not create slip hazards. Any discharges and leaks should be contained within the process/plant, e.g. bunds.
  • Arrangements should be put in place for when it snows and when there are icy conditions, e.g. gritting or route closures.
  • There should not be any obstructions on floors and traffic routes that cause a hazard or impede access. This is particularly important on staircases and emergency exit routes.
  • Open staircases must have appropriate rails in place to prevent falls from height.

Falls are also covered under these regulations, but only where workers can fall into tanks and pits containing dangerous substances. These tanks and pits must be covered and must be fenced, so as to prevent falls.

The regulations also require suitable and sufficient lighting, outdoor workstations to be free of slip and trip hazards and for floors to be painted with a non-slip floor paint if they are likely to absorb contaminants.

Work on construction sites is covered under the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations (2015). Slip, trip and fall risks in construction will be covered under these regulations. You will not look at these regulations in this course.

Work at height used to be considered any height over 2 metres; now it is any distance above ground level where a person could fall and be injured. This also includes falling from ground level. Work at height does not include slips, trips and falls on the same level or falls from stairs in a building. However, someone can slip and trip at height and fall a distance that could cause serious injury or worse.

The Work at Height Regulations (2005) is the legislation surrounding working at height and its aim is to prevent death and injuries from falls. The regulations put duties on employers and those who control working at height activities. You will briefly look at the requirements of these regulations on the following slide.

The regulations require that:

  • Working at height is properly planned, organised and supervised.
  • People are competent to work at height and have received appropriate training.
  • Working at height is avoided where possible. There is also a requirement for a risk assessment to be completed.
  • The right equipment is used for working at height.
  • Work on, or near to, fragile surfaces (higher risk of someone falling through) is avoided and if it can’t be avoided, further precautions are required.
  • People are kept away from areas where falling objects can be a risk, by barriers and signage. Objects should be protected from falling in the first instance. Objects should not be thrown from heights.
  • Any e quipment used for working at height and places of working at height should be inspected.

Employees, and others working at height, have a duty, under the regulations, to report any dangerous situations with working at height and equipment used. Working at height equipment must be used as per any training and instructions given.

Worker at height following health and safety legislation

The Personal Protective Equipment that will be relevant to slips, trips and falls is footwear. This will come under the Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations (1992).

The Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations (1992) were created as a result of a directive from the European Union. The regulations cover all PPE apart from hearing protection and RPE.

The main requirements of the regulations are:

  • PPE provided must be: – Risk assessed, e.g. it needs to be adequate for the risks a worker is exposed to and it should fit properly. – Of a correct standard, e.g. the type should conform to relevant British, European and International standards. – Compatible with other types of PPE. – Maintained, e.g. cleaned, disinfected, repaired and inspected.
  • Suitable places/equipment should be provided for a worker to store their PPE. This protects it from damage and contamination.
  • Employees should be given information, instruction and training on its use.
  • Employees must use PPE correctly and report defects when they occur.

It is important to note that employers cannot charge employees for PPE. PPE does not include work uniforms or ordinary working clothes.

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About the author

Eve Johnson

Eve Johnson

Eve has worked at CPD from the start, she organises the course and blog production, as well as supporting students with any problems they may have and helping them choose the correct courses. Eve is also studying for her Business Administration Level 3 qualification. Outside of work Eve likes to buy anything with flamingos on it, catching up with friends, spending time with her family and occasionally going to the gym!

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Tips for Preventing Slips, Trips, and Falls in the Workplace

The tips contained in this article will give you some useful ideas for preventing slips, trips and falls in your workplace, but if you are looking at implementing control measures across your business then you may want to take our online Slips, Trips & Falls Training Course .

It’s very easy to catch your foot on a stray cable or lose your footing when walking along a wet path, and gravity is everyone’s worst enemy – all it takes is one false step while working at height to find that you’ve fallen and seriously injured yourself.

While it may be hard to believe that something as seemingly innocent as a loose mat or discarded object in a walkway can cause major injuries, the fact remains that slips and trips are the most common causes of work-related injuries every year.

Slips, Trips and Falls Statistics

According to the  Health and Safety Executive :

  • Slips, trips, and falls accounted for around 32% of employee injuries in 2022/23.
  • They are the most common cause of non-fatal workplace injury.
  • Falls from height are the most common cause of fatalities .

Statistics don’t exaggerate; these injuries all happened to real people while at work.

Both employers and employees have a duty to protect people’s wellbeing at work. In order to prevent slips, trips, and falls, employers must put in place control measures and procedures for preventing hazards from ever materialising, and it’s down to employees to uphold and follow them.

preventing slips trips and falls with a wet floor sign sign

Control Measures to Prevent Slips

Slips occur when a person’s feet cannot make contact with or grip a floor’s surface effectively, and this usually happens because the floor is contaminated with liquids. But other hazards include powder and dust, loose mats, bad footwear, or uneven surfaces.

Hazards may be created by:

  • Spillages from drinks or liquids used as part of work activities, e.g. paint.
  • Puddles or patches of wetness left behind by cleaning.
  • Trails of wetness, leaves, and mud from outside during wet weather.
  • Loose mats and rugs.
  • Poor flooring.
  • Lack of housekeeping.

9 tips for preventing slip hazards:

Working with contaminants: use drip trays when working with liquids to prevent them from spilling on the floor, use lids and fill-lines on containers, and use screens to stop splashes and overspray when using hoses.

Preventing access: carry out cleaning activities after-hours to prevent exposure to wet floors, but if this is not possible restrict access to the area. Also, minimise the amount of people present in areas where contaminants are handled.

Design and use: floors should be made of materials designed to reduce slipping. Only use cleaning equipment specifically designed for that material so you don’t wear down the anti-slip quality.

cleaning floor slip risk

Cleaning activities: do not leave puddles behind, use the correct cleaning materials for the type of floor, and let floors air dry or use a dry mop to speed up drying time if you can’t prevent access to the area. Use wet floor signs.

Footwear: when people work with potential contaminants or in wet or dusty environments, they should wear proper non-slip footwear that is designed for the hazards specific to the work activities.

Good housekeeping: clean up spillages immediately (if it is a chemical spill that you are unable to handle, contact someone qualified immediately). Store liquids in cupboards, and report loose, damaged, and worn flooring or equipment.

Anti-slip equipment: use anti-slip tape, mats, covers, and grating to prevent areas of the premises from becoming slippery and posing a risk to workers, particularly entranceways and stairs.

Wet, cold, and dark weather: in colder seasons pathways become wet or icy, and there is less natural light. Pathways should be well lit, be cleared of leaves, snow, and ice regularly, and have good drainage in place.

Lighting: poor or low lighting will prevent people from seeing hazards; ensure all walkways and rooms are properly lit with natural and/or artificial light.

Control Measures to Prevent Trips

Trips occur when a person’s foot is obstructed or snagged, which results in a loss of balance. This leads to the person stumbling forward and potentially injuring themselves on a nearby surface or object. One common trip hazard is cables running along floor spaces, but even small objects such as a discarded shoe or curled up edges of mats are enough to catch a person’s foot.

  • Poor housekeeping, e.g. leaving obstructions lying around walkways.
  • Trailing cables from machinery or equipment, including both fixed (e.g. computers) and portable equipment (e.g. hoovers)
  • Loose flooring and mats or poorly installed carpeting.
  • Bad design, e.g. sudden changes in floor level.

trailing cable trip fall hazard

7 tips for preventing trip hazards:

Design of premises: avoid single steps and sudden changes in floor level, but if unavoidable clearly highlight them with signage. Ensure there are numerous plug sockets so cables don’t need to be trailed across the floor.

Installing flooring: carpeting and other materials should be installed properly so there are no bumps or areas that are not level. Report areas where carpeting or lino/laminate has worn down and become uneven.

Trailing cables: plug in equipment as close to where it needs to be as possible. For stationary equipment, if trailing cables are unavoidable use cable tidies and cover strips.

Organise work activities: prevent rushing or overcrowding, ensure employees know how to use equipment safely, and restrict access to areas where temporary trailing cables are unavoidable.

Good housekeeping: report mats or carpeting with curled edges or fraying, keep equipment in suitable storage spaces, clear obstacles away from walkways and stairways, and dispose of/recycle rubbish on the premises.

Manual handling: employees must use proper manual handling techniques , and manual handling activities must be organised to ensure safety. A person carrying a load may not see an obstacle and could seriously injure themselves by tripping over it and/or dropping the load on them as they fall.

Lighting: poor or low lighting will prevent people from seeing hazards. Ensure all walkways and rooms are properly lit with natural and/or artificial light.

Control Measures to Prevent Falls

Falls occur when someone is working above ground level and loses their footing, causing them to fall to the ground. This probably makes you think of people working on a ladder or on a roof, but the reality is that many serious or fatal fall injuries are from falls below head height. Sometimes all it takes is hitting your head hard or landing on a limb at a bad angle to incur a serious injury.

Fall hazards need to be taken into serious consideration. Falls are the single biggest cause of workplace fatalities and are one of the main causes of major injuries.

  • Working on a ladder incorrectly or using one that is not stable.
  • Working on a mobile elevated work platform (MEWP) that is not safe for use.
  • Working close to an opening, hole in the ground, or excavation site.
  • Working on scaffolding or the back of a truck unsafely.
  • Not using safety gear when working at height, e.g. harnesses.
  • Using inappropriate platforms for accessing heights, e.g. chairs and tables.
  • Surrounding hazards, e.g. high winds, overhead power lines, and other at-height obstructions that can throw off a person’s balance.

Fall hazards may also be indirect . For example: slip and trip hazards at height puts a person at risk of falling even if they are doing everything else right, as does faulty equipment that could cause an electric shock and make the person suddenly jerk backwards.

trip hazard uk

8 tips for preventing fall hazards:

Safety equipment: use airbags and safety nets below at-height work areas and ensure people are equipped with fall arrest harnesses. Use scaffolding, podium steps, and MEWPs where needed (equipment used for lifting people must adhere to regulations. Check out our LOLER Inspection Checklist ).

Ladder safety: only use ladders and stepladders for up to 30 minutes and always rest them on a firm, level surface. Do not lift more than 10kg up a ladder, do not overreach, and do not use the top 3 rungs and platform. Furthermore, make sure the ladder is leaned against a solid, stable surface and locking devices are fully engaged.

ladder safety

Good work practices: do not use any unsuitable platforms for accessing heights, e.g. a chair. Always use a proper ladder and follow safe procedures.

Instruction and training: follow all instruction and training provided for working at height safely. Use your initiative: discontinue work activities if conditions are evidently unsafe, e.g. high winds or an unstable ladder.

Barriers: when working at height or near excavation sites, barriers must be erected or already in place to prevent people from falling, i.e. guards on scaffolding and MEWPs and fences around holes in the ground.

Space: ensure there is plenty of open space around the area when working at height: each platform requires a minimum amount of space. Having to duck or twist will increase the risk of losing footing and falling.

Equipment maintenance: ensure that equipment used for working at height, e.g. MEWPs and ladders, is installed safely, fully operational, and free of issues. Carry out pre-use checks on equipment before using it.

Prevent other hazards: eliminate slip and trip hazards, as well as risks of electrocution by ensuring that equipment is free of faults.

Slips, Trips and Falls Risk Assessments

Employers must carry out a general risk assessment and working at height risk assessment to ensure that no hazards are being posed to people during work activities. Risk assessments for working at height is particularly vital; circumstances could easily change between activities and put people at risk of falling.

General risk assessments enable employers to spot slip and trip hazards that may be present on the premises and put in place control and preventative measures – like those listed throughout this article – so no one has to suffer injuries from easily-preventable risks while at work.

Further Resources:

  • Common Office Injuries and How to Prevent Them
  • Slips, Trips and Falls Quiz
  • What are the Roles and Responsibilities of a Health and Safety Manager?
  • Working at Height Risk Assessment

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What Is The Pavement Trip Hazard Height In The UK And When Could You Claim?

In this guide, we will look at the pavement trip hazard height in the UK. If you experience a slip, trip or fall on the pavement, you could experience a wide range of injuries. If you can show that your accident was caused by the negligence of someone else, then you could be owed compensation.

When you’re in public, you’re owed a duty of care. This means that the person in control of the space needs to take reasonable steps to ensure your safety. In the case of trips on pavement, this could be a council . We will examine what a duty of care is later on in this guide.

If you can show that your injury was the result of negligence, then you may be able to claim. One of our advisors could assess your claim and offer you free legal advice, as well as value your claim for you.

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A guide about the pavement trip hazard height in the uk for highway tripping claims, what are accidents caused by falling on uneven pavements, pavement trip hazard height in the uk and councils duty of care, pavement trip hazard height in the uk and claims against the council, defences against your pedestrian injury compensation claim, accidents caused by a lack of maintenance, what pavement trip evidence do i need to collect, calculating pedestrian injury compensation claims.

  • What Else Could My Highway Tripping Claim?

What Steps Should I Take When Making A Highway Tripping Claim?

No win no fee claims for injuries due to pavement trip hazard heights in the uk, contact legal helpline today.

In this guide, we will assess what could form the basis for a valid compensation claim. In order to claim compensation, you need to show that:

  • The third-party owed you a duty of care;
  • There was a breach of this duty of care;
  • As a result, an accident took place that left you injured.

This guide will examine the height that a trip hazard needs to meet before you can make a personal injury claim. We’ll also look at the causes of trip accidents on pavements and how they can be prevented.

You will need to provide evidence of your accident on the pavement and subsequent injuries. We’ll cover the kind of evidence that could support your claim, as well as how compensation is calculated and how much you could receive.

You should also be aware that the general personal injury claims time limit is 3 years. This means that you have up to 3 years after the accident to start a claim.

However, some exceptions do apply to this time limit. To find out how much longer you have to begin a claim, speak with an advisor today. Otherwise, read on to find out more about pavement trip hazard heights in the UK.

If a pavement is uneven or poorly maintained, this could result in an accident. For example, someone could suffer a slip, trip or fall because of a trip hazard on a pavement.

This could happen if the paving stones that make up the pavement move or degrade over time. This could result in a trip hazard as one paving stone is lower or higher than all the rest.

A trip hazard could also occur because of damage to the pavement. For example, there could be a crack or pothole in a paving stone that creates a trip hazard.

There are a number of injuries that you could sustain if you experienced a trip on the pavement. These include:

  • A broken fibula
  • A fractured cheekbone 
  • A broken heel 
  • A sprained ankle 
  • Brain injury or damage

Some of these injuries can be relatively minor. However, you could also experience a serious injury as a result of a pavement trip.

The list we’ve included above is not extensive by any means. If you’ve experienced an injury that we have not mentioned above, you may still be able to claim.

Speak with an advisor today to find out more about pursuing a claim. Otherwise, you can read on for more information on how to claim for a pavement trip.

The pavement trip hazard height in the UK is not outlined in the law. However, a council will usually not consider a claim for a trip hazard that is less than one inch.

The council has a duty of care towards you as outlined in the Occupiers’ Liability Act 1957. This states that the party in control of a public place (the occupier) needs to take all reasonable steps to ensure the safety of those who use it.

Local authorities often act as the occupiers in control of pavements, footpaths and roads meaning that they have a responsibility to maintain the pavement. They should do this even if the actions that led to the deterioration were an example of improper conduct.

An example of this can be seen in the case of Rider vs Rider: CA 1973 . In this case, the council were held responsible for failing to repair a drop on the side of the road.  They argued that it was inappropriate for a driver to travel so close to the side of the road. However, the Court of Appeal stated that the council should anticipate and allow for the fact that not every driver is perfect.

In many cases, a claim for a trip on a pavement will be made against the council. This is because local authorities have a responsibility to maintain the pavement as outlined in the Highways Act 1980 .

However, a local council is not the only body that might be responsible for maintaining a pavement. There are situations in which another organisation could be responsible for maintaining pavements and walkways.

For example, there could be a pavement or paved area in an outdoor shopping centre. If this is the case, then this area may be the responsibility of the occupier of this space. They would have a duty of care to members of the public who walked on the path.

If you’re unsure who was responsible for your accident, speak with our team of advisors today; they may be able to help. If your claim is valid, you could be connected with a No Win No Fee solicitor from our panel.

If you have tripped on a pavement and injured yourself, it may not be a result of the council’s negligence. They could say they have done everything expected of them and defend the claim based on Section 58 of the Highways Act.

This section states that the council can defend against a claim for compensation for injury caused by a highway defect. They can do this by claiming that they have taken sufficient care to secure the part of the highway that the accident happened on, and an accident happened anyway.

There’s no official, one-size-fits-all schedule for checking and maintaining a highway. The frequency with which a highway is expected to be checked and maintained will depend on things like how frequently it is used, and the traffic that uses it. For example, a quiet country path that only sees a few pedestrians travel down it every day may require less maintenance and fewer checks than a busy piece of pavement at the entrance of a shopping centre.

In addition to this, the council might argue that they could not be expected to know that part of the highway was damaged, posing a danger to those using it. Furthermore, they may say that they were aware and put notices up to warn of the hazard, but that they could not be expected to repair it in the time between being made aware and the accident happening.

For more information on the pavement trip hazard height in the UK, you can get in touch with our friendly team of advisors. You could be connected with a No Win No Fee solicitor from our panel to work on your claim.

There is a code of practice that should be followed when maintaining highways. This sets out the kinds of things that should be looked at when roads or highways are being maintained.

There are 6 main types of maintenance on public highways. These are:

  • Reactive- This is where maintenance is done in response to something, for example an inspection or a complaint
  • Routine- This is maintenance that is performed regularly; for example, cutting grass or replacing streetlight bulbs
  • Programmed- This kind of maintenance is planned flexibly. It’s focused on things like structural renewal and reconditioning
  • Regulatory- these involve inspecting and regulating the activities of others
  • Winter service
  • Resilience and emergencies

Maintenance failings in any of these areas could cause a trip hazard on the pavement to be left unfixed. For example, it may be that the council had been told about a trip hazard but did not do anything about it. This would be an example of a failure to carry out reactive maintenance.

If you can prove that your accident came about because the council failed to carry out the required maintenance, you could be entitled to claim. Speak with our team of advisors today for more information and guidance.

Evidence is a really important part of the personal injury claims process. You need to be able to prove that the accident happened because of negligence and that you suffered injury as a result.

Examples of the evidence you could provide might include:

  • Photographs of the accident scene with tape measurements of the kerb height;
  • The details of any witnesses who saw the accident happen;
  • Any available CCTV footage;
  • Medical records to show the injuries you sustained.

Once you begin your claim, an independent medical assessment will be arranged for you. Here, an independent expert will confirm the extent of your injuries and that they are consistent with a trip accident. The report from this meeting will be used to value your claim.

When you make a claim for compensation, your payout could be made up of two different heads of claim. These are referred to as general and special damages.

General damages are the part of your claim that compensates you for the pain and suffering that your injuries have caused you. These injuries could be physical or psychological.

Below, we have included a table to illustrate the amount you could receive in general damages. These come from guidelines from the Judicial College .

Please be aware that these are not guarantees; instead, they’re just guideline brackets based on past awards that have been made for certain injuries. For a more accurate assessment of your claim, please don’t hesitate to get in touch with our team of advisors today.

What Else Could My Highway Tripping Claim Include?

As well as general damages, you might also receive special damages as part of your compensation award. This is the part of your settlement that covers you for any financial losses or costs you have incurred because of your injuries.

Special damages can cover things like:

  • Loss of earnings 
  • Costs of treatment and medication
  • Transport costs to and from hospital appointments
  • The cost of care
  • Home or vehicle adaptations
  • The cost of a nurse or carer.

It’s really important that you provide evidence to support the special damages head of your claim. For example, you might have an invoice to show the cost of adapting your vehicle or payslips to show that you missed out on working.

After you’ve determined that the hazard you’ve tripped on meets the pavement trip hazard height in the UK, you might be wondering what the next best steps are to take.

Initially, you should ensure that you get the medical attention you need for your injuries. You might need treatment that, if not administered, could make your condition worse. For example, if you’ve fractured your leg and you don’t get treatment for this, it could worsen over time. In addition to this, medical records could be used to help prove your claim.

You should also collect evidence of the accident itself. For example, you should take a photograph of the hazard with something to show how high it is. You could also provide details of any witnesses who saw it take place.

You may wish to speak to a personal injury solicitor about taking legal action. This isn’t a legal requirement, but having a solicitor who is aware of the pavement trip hazard height in the UK and who has experience making these kinds of claims could help.

However, you might be worried about the cost that this could incur. If so, you may be interested in finding out more about No Win No Fee agreements.

This kind of agreement sets out the conditions that your solicitor needs to meet before asking you to pay them. It means you won’t be asked to pay them anything upfront, during the claims process or if your claim is not a success.

If your claim is successful, a small “success fee” will be deducted from your compensation award. This is legally capped, ensuring that you always get the majority of the compensation you’re awarded.

Please chat with us if you need to know more about working with a No Win No Fee solicitor. You could be connected with a solicitor from our panel to represent you on this basis.

We hope that this guide on the pavement trip hazard height in the UK has helped. If you have any more questions or would like to have a free assessment of your claim, just get in touch.

Remember that you don’t have to make a claim just because you speak to us. However, you can do this if you wish, and we’re accessible all day and every day to speak. To get in touch, you can:

  • Call 0161 696 9685 ;
  • Fill out our contact form ;
  • Or leave a message on our Live Chat feature.

We hope you now have great knowledge about making a pavement trip hazard height UK claim. However, if you do need more information, why not check out these links below?

Claims Against The Council- Learn about the process of claiming compensation against a council or local authority.

Claiming for Concussion or a Minor Head Injury – You could sustain a minor head injury in a pavement accident. Read our guide for information on how to claim.

Claiming As a Pedestrian Hit By a Car – This guide contains information on the process of claiming after being hit by a car.

Broken arm- NHS guidance on a broken arm or wrist.

Report a problem with a pavement – This page on the government website allows you to report an issue with a pavement.

Highways England – Use this page to find out if a road is managed by Highways England

Below we’ve answered some questions we’re frequently asked.

What responsibility do councils and the Highways Authority have?

Amongst other things, they have a responsibility to maintain public roads and pathways. This is outlined in the Highways Act 1980.

What injuries could you suffer for tripping over?

It’s possible to suffer bruises, fractures, disfigurements, muscle tears, sprains, strains, twists and even unconsciousness as a result of tripping on the pavement. In some cases, a pavement trip could put you in the path of traffic on the road.

Thank you for reading our guide on the pavement trip hazard height in the UK. 

Written by MA

Edited by FS

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Is There A Legal Pavement Trip Hazard Height In The UK And When Could I Make A Claim?

By Jo Anderson. Last Updated 11th April 2024. If you trip over and hurt yourself you could be compensated if your injuries were caused by somebody else’s negligence. But did you know that suing the council for an uneven pavement accident might be possible if it’s caused by the likes of a raised paving slab, a pothole or missing kerbstone?

In this guide, we’ll look at what the local authority’s responsibilities are. We’ll also explain what evidence you could use to support your claim.

If you decide to take action, our advisors can help. We offer a free telephone assessment of any claim and you’ll get free legal advice on your options.

Where your personal injury claim has strong grounds, we could put you in touch with one of our solicitors. If they decide to take you on as a client, they’ll work for you on a No Win No Fee basis.

To begin the claims process today, why not call us on 0800 073 8801 right away? Otherwise, please continue reading to find out more about slip, trip and fall claims caused by uneven pavements.

A cartoon man tripping over uneven pavement.

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Is there a legal pavement trip hazard height in the uk, how to prove injuries caused by falling on uneven pavements, what injuries could be caused by tripping on an uneven pavement, pavement trip hazard accident compensation claim payouts, special damages in pavement trip accident claims, can i make a no win no fee pavement trip accident claim, call our advisors to find out if there is a legal pavement trip hazard height in the uk.

You may be wondering “ Is there a legal pavement trip hazard height in the UK?”.

When making a personal injury claim for tripping over a pavement it is vital to capture the height of the defective pavement. Although there is no legal height limit to what a defective pavement can be, different councils and local authorities will have guidance to what is considered a dangerous or hazardous defect height. 

Even if the trip hazard is over the height considered to be dangerous, this doesn’t automatically mean you can claim compensation. You would need to prove that the pavement trip accident meets the personal injury claims eligibility criteria. This means that you need to prove that:

  • A relevant third party owed you a duty of care. For example, the local authority might owe you a duty of care to ensure your reasonable safety under the Occupiers’ Liability Act 1957 . This means that if they are aware that there is a pavement trip hazard, they should take steps, such as using signage to alert the public until it can be repaired. 
  • They breached this duty. For example, if a local authority fails to take steps to warn the public of the hazard or fix the issue within a reasonable timeframe.
  • You sustained injuries because of this breach.

If you would like to learn more about whether your pavement trip injury could lead to a claim, please contact our advisors. They could check your eligibility and give you advice on the steps you could take to get the compensation you deserve.

People walking on pavement without a trip hazard in the UK.

To make a personal injury claim for falling on uneven pavement, you will need to prove liability for the injuries you suffered. Evidence that could be relevant when claiming for a pavement accident includes:

  • Accident footage . If there was any CCTV, you can request the footage of yourself to submit as part of your evidence.
  • Photographs . If you took a picture of the uneven pavement, this could help prove your claim. Additionally, you can also take photos of any visible injuries you have to submit.
  • Medical records . If you received treatment for your injuries following the pavement accident, you can request a copy of your medical records to submit as part of the personal injury claims process. These can help illustrate the nature of your injuries.
  • Witness contact information . If you make a note of the contact details of anyone who saw the pavement accident, they can provide witness statements later on.

Call our advisors for free advice about what evidence you can gather to help your claim. Additionally, they can discuss how much compensation for tripping on the pavement you might be able to claim.

So, as we have shown, if you have suffered an injury because you fell over a pavement trip hazard with a height of over 1 inch, you could sue the council for any injuries and suffering caused. This could include compensation for:

  • Wrist injuries.
  • Soft tissue damage.
  • Head injuries .
  • Back injuries .
  • Broken bones.
  • Cuts and bruises.

So long as you have the evidence to show the size of the pavement trip hazard, we could help you claim. If your case is accepted, your solicitor will approach the council to ask for evidence about when it last inspected the pavement. They will also ask about any repairs.

If it can be shown that the council doesn’t have a good inspection programme or they failed to act swiftly to fix an issue it was aware of, you could receive compensation for any injuries.

Why not call us today to see if you have the grounds to proceed to a claim?

Time Limit For Pavement Trip Injury Claims

As with any type of personal injury compensation claim, you’ll need to ensure you start your pavement trip claim within the time limit set out in the Limitation Act 1980 . Generally, you have three years to start your claim from the date you were injured.

However, there are exceptions to the limitation period . Talk to a member of our advisory team to discuss what these are and find out if you are still within the time limits to claim.

We are now going to look at what amount of compensation might be awarded for a range of different injuries. To help do so, we’ve provided a compensation table below populated with data from the Judicial College Guidelines (JCG). The JCG gives potential figures that various injuries could be awarded. We’ve also included a figure in the top row that shows how compensation could be awarded for multiple severe injuries and expenses related to these injuries.

It’s not possible to list every injury in this guide. Therefore, if yours isn’t included, why not call and ask an advisor what settlement bracket it falls into? It should also be noted that every claim is different. Therefore, this table should only be used as a guide.

Call an advisor from our team to discuss how much compensation for tripping on the pavement you could get if your claim is successful.

Along with compensation for your pain and suffering, it is also important to look at whether your injuries have resulted in expenses. If they have, you could also make a special damages claim. The idea here is to return you to the financial position you were in before the accident happened.

Damages must be based on costs that were directly caused by your accident or injuries. They could include:

  • Care costs. These might be claimed if somebody needed to look after you during your recovery. They could cover the cost of a professional carer or the time a loved one spent helping with daily tasks.
  • Medical expenses. You may need treatment that’s not available on the NHS to help you recover. Therefore, you could claim for the cost of this treatment as well as any prescription fees.
  • Lost income. Taking time off for medical appointments or to recover, can prove costly. As a result, you may wish to include any lost income in your claim.
  • Modifications to your home. If you are seriously injured and left disabled, modifying your home or vehicle might make it a little easier to cope. If that’s the case, the cost of any work could be claimed back.
  • Future lost earnings. Where there has been an adverse impact on your ability to work, any long-term loss of earnings might be considered. Where that’s the case, the settlement would be based on factors such as your age, current salary level and job prospects.

If you call our advisors, they’ll look at how your injuries have affected you financially. Please call today and we’ll review your case for free.

In this section of our guide to pavement trip hazard height in the UK, we look at how No Win No Fee works.

If you’ve been injured after tripping on pavement , you might be worried about how much a solicitor will cost you if the case loses. You needn’t be concerned if you work with us, though. That’s because our personal injury solicitors provide a No Win No Fee service for every claim they take on. That means you won’t pay any solicitor’s fees at all unless you’re paid compensation.

When you get in touch, a solicitor could review the merits of your case with you. Should they agree to work on your case, you’ll be given a Conditional Fee Agreement (CFA). It’s also known as a No Win No Fee agreement. This agreement makes it clear when you’d need to pay any solicitor’s fees.

If your case is won, a success fee will be deducted from your compensation. In the CFA, you’ll find that this fee is listed as a percentage of any settlement you’re paid. By law, success fees are capped for your benefit.

A solicitor discusses how much compensation for tripping on pavement.

If you would now like our support with starting a claim, you can:

  • Call our advisors on 0800 073 8801
  • Send us an email about your claim to [email protected]
  • Request that a specialist call you by completing this form
  • Use our live chat if you’d like to discuss your options online

We are here 24 hours a day, 7 days a week so please feel free to get in touch at a convenient time.

Please take a look at the articles and guides below if you believe they’ll be helpful during the claims process:

  • Repairing Potholes : Information on how Highways England detects and repairs potholes.
  • Wrist Injuries : NHS guidance on how to deal with pain resulting from wrist injuries.
  • Slips And Trips : Information on how trips and slips can happen and what can be done to avoid them.
  • Tripped Over A Wire : This guide looks at claims for workplace accidents caused by wires trailed across walkways.
  • Wet Floor Accident Claims : Advice on claiming if you’ve been injured because you slipped on a wet floor.
  • Pedestrian Accident Claims : Information on claiming for injuries sustained by a pedestrian in a road traffic accident.

Thank you for visiting today and reading our guide on the pavement trip hazard height in the UK.

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What Is A Trip Hazard And How To Prevent Them?

| Published on: Jul 7, 2022 | Categories: Trip hazard sign |

What Is A Trip Hazard And How To Prevent Them?

Basically, trips happen due to loss of balance after being foot struck with something unwanted. In most situations, individual trips aren’t visible as messy equipment, uneven edges, and cables. A  trip hazard sign  can ensure to prevent unwanted accidents, which are quite common incidents in the workplace. As trip hazards can also result in uncountable injuries each year, which include musculoskeletal and cuts among the other most common accidents.

You can’t work in a safer environment if people aren’t allowed to move around independently. Using  trip hazard signs in such a workplace is mandatory, where people are performing physical work and are concerned to avoid accidents. Due to the lack of illumination, scattered machinery, cables, poor housekeeping, and obstructed views – accidents are quite a common happening.

So, let’s look for –

Basic Safety Controls To Avoid Trip Hazards:

By implementing policies in the workplace to control accidents, the frequency of trips can be significantly reduced. In case you need to work under time constraints as an employee, which may cause rushes at work, or pay minimum attention to risky situations, make sure to stay aware of the safety procedures and skills to avoid accidents. Having a   trip hazard sign   used at your workplace can make you all conscious of the danger that happens. So, the following points you need to check as a priority –

That’s important to train your employees with proper education on avoiding trip hazards. A trip hazard training will also enable workers to be more aware of the risk involved at work and safety measures to prevent accidents.

Better Housekeeping

It’s the first step to avoiding trip hazards, and maintaining a good workplace will guarantee safety at the workstation for everyone. So, look for devoted housekeepers to do the best maintenance job.

Electric Cable And Material Management

It’s significant to avoid the use of extension cables (as much as possible) at the workplace, which can cause unwanted accidents. And also, employees need to get education on material management to keep things secured and prevent the risks of incidents in the workplace. You further need to maintain proper working surfaces at the office to prevent trip hazards.

Trip Hazard Sign

A  trip hazard sign  serves as a warning to avoid possible trip dangers. It doesn’t take the role of maintaining personal safety but helps to communicate the right safety guidelines to maintain at your workplace. It further helps people to stay enough careful while performing risky jobs.

Illumination

The lack of proper illumination in the workplace can increase the chances of accidents, which one can avoid by using clean stairs or walkways. In case your employees are working at the night-time, make sure to keep your space well lit by turns to enable them to see what surrounds them while working around at the workstation.

Responsibilities of Employers To Prevent Trip Hazards At The Workplace :

Employers do have a responsibility to control and manage workplace safety at any cost. So, they have to do the following responsibilities are mandatory –

  • To daily visit the workplace and conduct risk examinations at the workplace.
  • It’s vital to conduct periodic audits of material and waste management in the workstation.
  • To train employees with workplace safety guidelines.
  • To keep high standards and cleanliness at the site.
  • To monitor workplace conditions and ensure necessary steps are taken to avoid trip hazards.

In addition to employers, employees at a workplace also need to stay aware of risky conditions and work attentively to avoid the chances of accidents.

Now that you are searching to buy  trip hazard sign   at affordable prices and use it in your workplace,  3 signs  is a recommended platform to create any sign you may need to ensure workplace safety. Our in-house design team will ensure your signs comply with the latest standards to match your exact requirements. For more convenience, you can anytime visit us at  www.3signs.co.uk .

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What is a Trip Hazard and how do you prevent them?

  • by Afnan Tajuddin
  • Trip Hazard & prevention

Table of Contents

Trip hazards

Trips occur when your foot strikes or collides with something, causing you to lose your balance. In most situations, individuals trip over obstacles that aren’t visible, such as uneven flooring edges, messy equipment, tools, or cables.

Accidents from trips are among the most common causes of accidents at work! Trip hazards result in thousands of injuries every year. The most common ones are musculoskeletal, cuts, and bruises but more serious conditions can also occur such as fractures or dislocations 

You can’t have a safe and healthy work environment if people aren’t able to move around it freely.

Every day, you are tasked with performing tasks that require the use of your legs. Below I’ve listed common trip hazards and how to assess them so they don’t cause injury or accident.

TRIPING HAZARD EXAMPLE

Common trip hazards

  • Cluttered environment and poor housekeeping
  • Scattered tools, material, electrical cables & hose in workplace
  • Lack of illumination
  • Floor surfaces that are uneven or damaged or floor coverings that are unsuitable
  • Obstructed view
  • Failure to use handrails when climbing on the stairs

Safety Controls for trip hazards:

The incidence of trips in the workplace can be dramatically reduced by implementing policies to regulate behavior. Time pressures on employees who are completing tasks might cause them to rush through work or not pay attention which could lead them into dangerous situations if they do not know what precautions need to be taken when it comes down to hazards like poor housekeeping for example.

The most common type of walking hazard is the slip or trip. This can be prevented by making sure that employees have been trained on how to avoid these dangers. With the proper education, you can avoid trip hazards and reduce your risk of injury or accident. When workers are given training on trip hazards it can help them be more aware of the risks involved, as well as prevent injuries.

Housekeeping:

Housekeeping is the first step towards preventing trip hazards. Maintaining good house- Keeping includes material & waste management to keep your workplace safe for everyone

  • Housekeeping and maintenance should be handled by dedicated workers, if necessary.
  • At the workplace, sufficient trash containers in various locations must be provided with a distinct color code system for all trash containers.
  • All workplaces must maintain the greatest possible degree of cleanliness in order to ensure a safe working environment and prevent incidents. In addition, Good housekeeping contribute to safe working conditions, while poor housekeeping is one of the most common causes of accidents.
  • Before beginning a task, before ending shifts, and after finishing a job, the workplace should be clean. This must be noted and clearly defined on the Work Permit..
  • Housekeeping should be given adequate time to ensure that the premises are well maintained.

Material & cable Management:

  • Materials must be stacked or kept in a secure way that prevents sliding, falling, or collapse.
  • Provide separate storage areas apart from working places
  • Hoses, ropes, and electric cables should be arranged & should never be allowed to remain on walkways.
  • Providing electrical outlets at worksite will help avoid risk of tripping over wires.
  • Place equipment closet and electrical outlets where possible
  • Avoid the use of extension cables if possible. Instead, use retractable reel that can be wrapped up when not in use and takes up less space.
  • When trailing cables is used temporarily, it is important that they be properly secured. hang power cords over work areas rather than on floor, Use cable ties or hangers.

Illumination:

Poor illumination in the workplace is associated with an increase in accidents. Use proper lighting for walkways, stairs, and ramps to reduce accidents at workplaces where there’s no light source available such as basements or work in the nighttime; keep your space well lit by turns on before entering any dimly-lit rooms so you can see what surrounds you easily without bumping into anything while walking around aimlessly!

Walking Surfaces:

Floor surfaces that are uneven or damaged can present a trip hazard. Floors must be kept clean at all times. Stairways, gangways, passageways, and doorways should all be free of obstructions. Floor coverings with an improper safety measurement could also be dangerous, Damaged surfaces/floors are reported for rectification. Safety precautions should also be taken when covering them. A trip can happen at any time so take extra care!

Stairs / Ladder:

Handrails are important when climbing or descending stairs. Make sure that the Ladder you are using often has been inspected! Damaged rungs also lead directly towards trips. stairs should be kept clean and tidy.

Trip Hazard Sign:

Trip Hazard Sign is a cautionary signal to protect from potential trip hazards. It does not substitute for maintaining personal safety, but instead helps communicate that there are things close by which can cause injury or accident if you weren’t careful enough with what you’re doing!

TRIP HAZARD SIGN

Responsibilities:

Employer responsibilities:.

Employers have a responsibility to control & manage trip hazards. This includes:

  • Visiting workplaces and conducting workplace-specific risk assessments .
  • To ensure that obligations are fulfilled, it is important to carry out periodic audits as needed.
  • Ensure that employees are adequately trained and instructed.
  • That suitable arrangements, are in place to maintain site tidiness to a high standard.
  • To monitor daily site conditions and ensure that any remedial actions are implemented through his organization.

Employees responsibilities:

Employees also have responsibilities in relation to controlling the risk from trip hazards including: 

  • Report anything dangerous, e.g. damaged flooring.
  • Keep care of the working environment in which they are working;
  • Remove all unnecessary tools and equipment from the work site and return them to the stores.

Regulation about trip hazards:

Workplace health, safety and welfare. Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992

OSHA – Walking-Working Surfaces – 1910.22

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Slips, Trips and Falls – Everything You Need to Know

slips trips and falls

In the movies, slips, trips and falls can be highly entertaining. The old ‘slip on a banana peel’ gag can still have us rolling in the aisles. But slips, trips and falls in the workplace are no laughing matter.

Losing your footing and falling over might not seem like a big deal, but it can have serious consequences. Slips, trips and falls are the most common cause of non-fatal workplace injuries in the UK. They can happen to anyone, in any work environment, at any time.

Luckily, there are ways to reduce or even eliminate the risks associated with slips, trips and falls in the workplace. This article will examine the leading causes and explain the best ways to avoid these workplace accidents. You’ll save yourself some embarrassment and might even protect yourself or someone else from a nasty injury.

Slips, Trips and Falls Incidents - Prevalence of Injuries

There were 561,000 reported cases of non-fatal workplace injuries during 2022-23. Slips, trips and falls accounted for 32% of these injuries, according to recent figures released by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE).

This amounts to 179,520 people injured during 2022-23. To give you an idea of how many injuries there were, that’s almost double the number of people that could fit into Wembley Stadium.

Main Causes of Slips, Trips and Falls

So, how are all these people managing to fall over at work? They can’t all be clumsy. And there’s no nefarious Looney Tunes-type character dropping banana peels in every UK workplace.

As it turns out, several common causes of slips, trips and falls exist. Not many slips, trips and falls in the workplace are exotic or surprising. But that’s what makes them so common.

They can be caused by a spilt cup of tea, an extension cord, or inappropriate shoes. Any work environment can have a variety of hazards that could result in a slip, trip or fall. See our list below to check if these situations apply to your workplace. Chances are, one or more of them will.

Slips Trips and Falls Training

Learn about common slips and falls hazards and injuries and discover how to keep everyone safe with our accredited Slips, Trips and Falls Training course. This is designed to equip trainees with the knowledge needed to identify the potential slips and falls hazards in the business.

Wet Flooring Surfaces

Liquid spills, cleaning activities, leaks and rain that has come in on people’s clothing can cause floors to become wet. Walk across a wet floor, and you vastly increase your risk of slipping and falling.

Slippery Flooring Surfaces

A newly polished floor looks great but is also a significant slipping hazard. Some glossy floor tiles can be very slick even when not polished recently. Especially if you’re not wearing shoes with good grip.

Loose or Uneven Flooring

Some workplaces cover up slippery floor tiles with rugs or mats. Unfortunately, rugs, carpets and other flooring coverings can be slipping hazards if they’re not secure. And if they’re not perfectly flush with the floor, they become a tripping hazard.

Loose floorboards, broken tiles or temporary floor coverings can create hazardous uneven surfaces. Your flooring should always be even and stable to prevent slips, trips and falls .

Trailing Cables and Cords

Every workplace needs electricity, so cables and cords will always be around. If you’re not carefully placing your cables and electrical cords, they’re almost guaranteed to cause someone to trip over them.

trailing cables and cords

Obstacles and Obstructions

An obstacle is any kind of equipment, tool or material left in a place where someone might fall over it. Obstructions are more devious, however. Obstructions like steps, kerbs, low walls or floor sockets are fixed in place. Often, we don’t even realise an obstacle is a tripping hazard until we trip over it.

obstacles and obstructions

Insufficient Lighting

There’s no way to avoid slipping on something or tripping over it if you can’t see it. If you don’t have sufficient lighting in your place of work, you’re increasing the risk of slips, trips and falls. If your work environment is dim and dark, it’s time to scale up the lighting system.

Improper Footwear

What you wear on your feet could save you from a painful slip. While you might desperately want to show off a new pair of shoes, they might not be the best choice for your workplace. Appropriate safety boots or shoes must be provided and worn at all times.

Poor Housekeeping Practices

It’s important to stress the importance of maintaining a clean and organised workplace. Poorly placed equipment, supplies and waste are slip, trip and fall hazards that can result in severe accidents and significant fines .

How to Prevent Slips, Trips and Falls in the Workplace

Unfortunately, pretty much every workplace has slipping or tripping hazards. The good news is that there are straightforward and relatively simple ways to reduce or eliminate these risks.

Conduct a Risk Assessment

A risk assessment is the first thing you must do to reduce the risk of slips, trips and falls in the workplace. A risk assessment aims to identify the causes of slips, trips, and falls. Once you’ve identified hazards, you can figure out ways to eliminate or control the associated slipping or tripping risks.

To conduct a proper risk assessment, follow these five steps:

  • Identify all hazards
  • Determine who might be harmed and how
  • Evaluate the risks and decide on control measures
  • Record your findings and implement your control measures
  • Regularly review the risk assessment and update it if necessary

Maintain Your Flooring

Ensure the floors in your workplace are even and in good condition. Any loose floorboards or broken tiling should be replaced or repaired. You might want to consider installing slip-resistant flooring. If you want to know how slippery your floor is, follow the HSE’s guidance on assessing floor slipperiness.

maintain your flooring

Keep Up with Your Housekeeping

Cleanliness counts when preventing slips, trips and falls in the workplace. Clean up all spills immediately, clear all obstacles, put warning signs near obstructions and keep all your cables and cords neatly bundled and taped down so they aren’t a tripping hazard. Replace your light globes if they’re not bright enough, or install new lighting.

Increase Your Team’s Hazard Awareness

How much do your workmates know about slips, trips and falls? If you educate your teams on the hazards, they can take measures to avoid risks and learn how to identify them.

How Can You Prevent Slips, Trips, and Falls?

Every year, thousands of people in the UK are seriously hurt as a result of slips, trips and falls in the workplace. You can help prevent these injuries by learning to identify and control workplace slip, trip and fall risks.

Our Slips, Trips and Falls Training course teaches workplace fundamentals that every employee should know to prevent these injuries.

Don’t slip up when it comes to health and safety at work. Sign up for fall prevention training today.

About the author(s)

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Simon Morrison

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UK Safety Store stocks a wide range of slip and trip hazard signs for your business. Slip hazards are extremely common within the workplace, and highly visible trip hazard signs could help to reduce the number of accidents on your premises. Our slip and trip hazard signs are designed to make the onlooker aware of potential trip hazards around your premises, using compliant and highly visible designs. This range includes standard wall mounted models as well as free-standing A boards. So, whether you’re looking for a Mind Your Step sign or a dangerous when wet sign, you’re sure to find the right trip hazard sign for your business by browsing our selection below. Read more about trip hazards and slip and trip signs .

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What are trip hazard signs?

Trip hazard signs are a type of hazard sign and alert workers and visitors of potential slip and trip hazards. This could be anything from a recently cleaned floor, requiring a wet floor sign , to an upturned piece of carpet that is yet to be repaired. Trip hazard signs can be identified by their yellow colour, black text and black pictogram of a person falling backwards. They will also include the words ‘caution’, ‘warning’ or ‘danger’, depending on the severity of the risk. To learn more, read our guide to the different types of hazard signs .

Where should trip hazard signs be located?

Trip hazard signs should be located in a visible area with the trip hazard they refer to. While some of these signs may be constant fixtures on your premises, like a Mind Your Head sign to highlight a low ceiling, trip hazards tend to be short-lived and require portable solutions. For example, people responsible for cleaning a premises would use a free-standing Slippery Surface sign when a floor had not yet dried, before removing it when it is.

Are trip hazard signs required by law?

Yes, UK regulations require that trip and slip hazards that cannot be removed are signposted by trip hazard signs. This is required under the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, which requires employers to provide a safe working environment for employees, and the Health and Safety (Signs and Signals) regulations 1996, which goes on to say any risks that cannot be removed are signposted appropriately. Where possible, you should take every measure to minimise the impact and likelihood of slip and trip hazards. However, where there is a delay making repairs to remove trip hazards, or where they are unavoidable, you must provide adequate trip hazard signs to inform employees and visitors of the hazard. 

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Fury vs Usyk: Oleksandr Usyk's team complain about ring canvas ahead of undisputed world title fight

Sky Sports News has been told a member of Oleksandr Usyk's team was unhappy with the canvas seam during Wednesday's open workout; watch Usyk and Fury face off in Saudi Arabia on May 18, live on Sky Sports Box Office

Friday 17 May 2024 11:33, UK

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trip hazard uk

Oleksandr Usyk's team have complained about the ring canvas ahead of Saturday's undisputed heavyweight title fight , Sky Sports News can reveal.

Team Usyk have made a complaint with just two days to go until the clash in Riyadh.

Sky Sports News has been told that a member of the team was unhappy during the open workout, specifically about the seam joining the canvas sections together.

An identical canvas will be used on fight night, and the concern from Team Usyk is that it could present a trip hazard during the fight.

The canvas is identical to the one used in recent heavyweight fights in Saudi Arabia and the UK - including Usyk's victories over Anthony Joshua in both London and Jeddah.

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Usyk watching Fury

"I'm really intrigued, I was in that ring last night before anybody got in there and didn't notice anything," said British heavyweight Frazer Clarke, who is on the ground in Saudi Arabia with Sky Sports.

"Of course like every boxer, I was in the ring and did a bit of shadow boxing and didn't notice anything. I'm really intrigued as to what it is all about.

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"Could it be mind games? Possibly, but I doubt it. We're in neutral territory here, there's no advantage for Tyson or for Usyk."

Frazer Clarke tested out the ring for Tyson Fury's fight against Oleksandr Usyk after the Ukrainian's team complained about a seam on the ring canvas. 

Usyk and Fury face off in Riyadh this Saturday for the right to be known as the first undisputed heavyweight world champion since Lennox Lewis defeated Evander Holyfield in 1999.

The complaint from Usyk's side continues a dramatic week in Saudi Arabia, which began with Tyson's father John Fury appearing to headbutt a member of the Ukrainian's entourage.

Mike Goodall, who has made the canvas for the fight, said: "Nothing is wrong with it at all. It's been seamed as it's normally seamed. Last night at the workout, Egis (Klimas), Usyk's manager happened to come up there, have a look at it and he thought it was a little bit proud, and he made [a] comment about it, and said 'we don't want it like that for the fight'.

"Well, the identical canvas for the fight is exactly the same so they've got to put up with it.

trip hazard uk

"There's no trip factor there. The thickness of the seam is more probably an eighth of an inch. But they just happened to run their hands over it and said 'that's a bit excessive'.

"Obviously worrying and looking for excuses just in case anything does come up."

'Team Usyk worried by potential trip hazard'

Sky Sports News reporter Ben Ransom in Riyadh...

"I've been told Team Usyk have complained, they're not happy with the canvas on the ring and specifically the joins in the canvas.

"The way boxing rings for these big fights are manufactured is the ring is erected and then the canvas you see with all the sponsor logos on the floor is in six-foot panels and they are sewn together with a seam that is about a millimetre deep.

Frazer Clarke says Oleksandr Usyk's stare down during Tyson Fury's workout is a great indication that he is solely focused on the job in hand.

"A member of Team Usyk looked at the canvas last night at the open workout, where Usyk seemed fairly happy inside the ring, and it was his thought and his concern it may be a trip hazard on the night.

"So they have had to come down here and look at the identical canvas on the actual ring."

Fury and Usyk are expected to make their ring walks from 11pm UK time this Saturday, with coverage of build-up from 4pm on Sky Sports Box Office .

It's one of the biggest sporting events in a generation. Tyson Fury and Oleksandr Usyk collide for the undisputed world heavyweight championship on Saturday May 18, live on Sky Sports Box Office . Book the fight now .

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Ukraine war latest: Russian forces take control of village in Kharkiv region - defence ministry

Russian troops are continuing to advance in the Kharkiv region - with the defence ministry claiming it had taken control of 12 settlements in a week.

Saturday 18 May 2024 18:30, UK

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Five people have been injured in a Russian shelling attack in Kharkiv, the Ukrainian national police has said. 

A 13-year-old girl and 16-year-old boy are among those hurt, it said. 

The Russian military attacked the city at around 30pm, it added, with several hits recorded on residential buildings. 

"As a result of shelling, five civilians were injured, and civilian infrastructure was also damaged," police official Oleksandr Kobylev said. 

"Currently, two minor children are known to have suffered minor injuries. Necessary medical assistance is provided to all victims." 

A Russian attack plane has been shot down, a Ukrainian army brigade has reported. 

The 110th separate brigade said the Su-25 had been destroyed in Donetsk. 

It said it was the fourth Su-25 to have been shot down, adding it will keep issuing "flaming fines" to Russia for crossing into Ukraine. 

"Our sky will become hell for the occupant pilots. Our squad number will be a nightmare for them," it added. 

A Ukrainian sergeant has been stabbed in the hand by a civilian, the country's ground forces has said. 

In a statement posted on Facebook, the army said the attacker was detained and has been charged with attempted murder and obstructing the armed forces. 

The attack took place in the city of Sinelnikove, in the central Dnipro region, earlier today.

"A civilian committed an armed assault with cold weapons (knife) on the sergeant of the Armed Forces of Ukraine," the statement said. 

The sergeant, who worked for the territorial recruitment and social support centre, has been provided with "all the necessary medical care", it added. 

In Ukraine's second largest city, airstrikes have become a daily occurrence as intense battles continue. 

Russian troops have been pushing ahead with a ground offensive that opened a new front in northeastern Kharkiv region in recent days, putting further pressure on Kyiv's overstretched military. 

After weeks of probing, Moscow launched the new push knowing that Ukraine suffered personnel shortages, and that its forces have been spread thin in the northeast.

Two people were killed after Russian airstrikes hit Kharkiv on Friday as Ukrainian troops fought to halt Russian advances in the region.

The airstrikes targeted Ukraine's second-largest city during the daytime, injuring 25 people and killing two, according to Kharkiv's mayor Ihor Terkhov.

On Thursday, the air alarm sounded for more than 16 hours, a record since the beginning of the military campaign by Russia.

Here are some of the latest pictures from the city: 

Ukrainian drone attacks on Russian power facilities in early 2024 disrupted 14% of Russia's oil refining capacity, according to the US Department of Defence.

The strikes pushed up domestic oil prices by 20-30% and forced Russia to halt exports to focus on meeting domestic demand, a report from the Pentagon’s intelligence agency said.

But it caused only a "negligible disruption" to the electricity supply for Russian civilians and the military, because of Russia's "robust generation capacity" and the level of power in the grid. 

The General Staff of Ukraine's armed forces have published their daily operational update... 

Speaking about the frontline, it says the situation "remains tense" and Russia is using its advantage in the number of personnel to launch attacks on Ukrainian positions. 

In the last 24 hours, 66 "combat clashes" have taken place, it adds. 

Russian troops have been pushing ahead with a ground offensive in recent days that opened a new front in northeastern Ukraine's Kharkiv region and put further pressure on Kyiv's overstretched military. 

The update says Russian forces have attacked in the areas of Lyptsi in Kharkiv today, and fighting is continuing in the town of Vovchansk. 

"Currently, the number of combat encounters in this direction has reached 10, while the Russian occupiers tried to improve the tactical position eight times, our units in turn - twice," it says. 

Earlier today, Russia's defence ministry claimed its forces had captured the village of Starytsia in Ukraine's Kharkiv region. 

Russian troops are continuing to advance in the area, it added. 

Ukraine did not mention the village in its operational update. 

Two people were killed when their car was hit by Russian forces as they evacuated Vovchansk, according to Ukrainian officials. 

The Ukrainian Prosecutor General's Office said an investigation has been launched into what it called the "war crime".

It said the car carrying civilians came under enemy fire while driving through the border town on Thursday. 

The 70-year-old driver and an 83-year-old female passenger died at the scene, while two other passengers were injured, officials said. 

Ukrainian authorities have evacuated around 8,000 civilians from Vovchansk, three miles from the Russian border.

Russian forces have captured 40 civilians from a town in Kharkiv, a Ukrainian official has said. 

Speaking to Ukrainian news outlet Suspilne, the head of the investigative department of the Kharkiv regional police Serhii Bolvinov said they were taken while trying to escape a Russian shelling attack. 

"People are kept in basements, interrogated, and those conducting the interrogations call themselves FSB employees," he said.

It comes after Ukraine's interior minister Ihor Klymenko said Russian forces were taking civilians captive on Thursday. 

He also claimed the Russian military had carried out executions. 

"In the northern part of Vovchansk, where active hostilities are taking place, the Russian military is taking civilians captive," he said on Telegram. 

"It is known about the first executions of civilians by the Russian military. In particular, one of the inhabitants of Vovchansk tried to escape on foot, refused to obey the commands of the invaders - the Russians killed him." 

Vovchansk, in the northern Kharkiv region, has come under several attacks in recent weeks, with Russian forces claiming to control surrounding villages and forcing civilians to evacuate. 

Ukrainian forces on the frontline say the war is entering a critical phase - and they are desperate for more ammunition as they struggle to hold off relentless Russian attacks. 

Colonel Pavlo Palisa, whose 93rd Mechanised Brigade is fighting near the key strategic city of Chasiv Yar, said he believed Russia was preparing a major push to break Ukrainian lines in the east.

"Without a doubt, this will be a difficult period for the armed forces," he said. 

"I would say that it is unlikely that time is on our side, since a long war requires more resources," he said, adding that it would be critical to impose as heavy a cost on Russia as quickly as possible.

"The enemy's resources, whether in terms of manpower or the material, cannot be compared with ours. It's extraordinarily large." 

Ukrainian gun commander Oleksandr Kozachenko said his unit's US-supplied M777 howitzer, which once hurled 100 shells a day at the enemy, is now often reduced to fewer than 10. 

"It's a luxury if we can fire 30 shells." 

Gunners with his brigade in the Donetsk region said they were desperate for more 155mm rounds for their Western cannons, which had given them an edge over Russia earlier in the war.

The United States says it's rushing ammunition and weapons to Ukraine following the delayed approval of a $61bn aid package by Congress last month. 

For the soldiers facing down an encroaching enemy, the deliveries can't come soon enough. 

Poland is aiming to bolster its defences against what it says is a rising threat from Russia and Belarus with a £2bn security programme.

Poland will invest 10 billion zlotys - around £2bn - in making the eastern border "impossible to pass for a potential enemy", Prime Minister Donald Tusk told a news conference.

"We are starting a major project to build a secure border, including a system of fortifications as well as landscaping and environmental decisions," he said.

Poland's border with Belarus has been a flashpoint since migrants started flocking there in 2021, after Minsk, a close Russian ally, opened travel agencies in the Middle East offering a new unofficial route into Europe - a move the European Union said was designed to create a crisis. 

The previous Polish government built a fence on the Polish-Belarusian border that was over 180km long and 5.5m high, to protect against illegal migration. It is complemented by a system of cameras and sensors monitoring the frontier. 

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IMAGES

  1. Caution Trip Hazard Sign

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  2. Warning trip hazard sign

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  3. Custom Trip Hazard Signs

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  4. A4 Danger Trip Hazard Plastic Signs

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  5. Trip Hazard Sign

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  6. What is a Trip Hazard and how do you prevent them?

    trip hazard uk

COMMENTS

  1. Causes and prevention

    Trips. The majority of trips are caused by obstructions in walkways. The rest are caused by uneven surfaces. Preventing these accidents is often simple and cost-effective. You need to get all three right (walkways, housekeeping and design and maintenance), to prevent tripping accidents.

  2. What Is The Pavement Trip Hazard Height In The UK?

    FAQs - Pavement Trip Hazard Height In The UK What height constitutes a trip hazard in the UK? A height of one inch, or 2.5 centimetres, is considered the minimum for a trip hazard worthy of potential legal action. This is not a legal limit, but a local authority will usually reject a claim based on a trip hazard of less than an inch.

  3. What Is The Legal Height Of A Trip Hazard UK?

    In law, there is no legal height defined for a pavement trip hazard. The criteria for a pavement defect that is actionable will vary between local authorities. However, many local authorities won't consider a pavement defect actionable unless it is at least 1-inch (25mm, 2.5cm) high or deep. We'll explain how to demonstrate the height of a ...

  4. The law

    The law The Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 (HSWA) The Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 requires employers to ensure the health and safety of all employees and anyone affected by their work, so far as is reasonably practicable, which means balancing the level of risk against the measures needed to control the risk in terms of money, time or trouble.

  5. Slips and trips

    Subscribe for free health and safety news and updates on this topic. HSE explains how to prevent slips and trips in the workplace. Looks at the causes of slips and trips and discusses how to prevent them.

  6. Slips, Trips, and Falls in the Workplace: Understanding UK Laws and How

    This law requires employers to assess risks (including slip and trip risks) and, where necessary, take actions to address them. A slips and trips risk assessment must be undertaken to identify locations or areas where slip, trip, and fall hazards are likely to occur. Consideration must be given to issues that may increase the likelihood of an ...

  7. Key legislation

    Risk assessment - An employer has a duty to make suitable and sufficient risk assessments of the risks to employees and others, e.g. risk assessments will be required for slip, trip and fall hazards. The self-employed also have this duty. Principles of prevention - These principles are used to implement control measures. They are similar to a hierarchy where the aim is to firstly avoid the ...

  8. Preventing Slips, Trips and Falls: Control Measures & Tips

    Prevent other hazards: eliminate slip and trip hazards, as well as risks of electrocution by ensuring that equipment is free of faults. Slips, Trips and Falls Risk Assessments Employers must carry out a general risk assessment and working at height risk assessment to ensure that no hazards are being posed to people during work activities.

  9. What Is The Pavement Trip Hazard Height In The UK?

    Pavement Trip Hazard Height In The UK And Councils Duty Of Care. The pavement trip hazard height in the UK is not outlined in the law. However, a council will usually not consider a claim for a trip hazard that is less than one inch. The council has a duty of care towards you as outlined in the Occupiers' Liability Act 1957.

  10. Is There A Legal Pavement Trip Hazard Height In The UK?

    Call Our Advisors To Find Out If There Is A Legal Pavement Trip Hazard Height In The UK. If you would now like our support with starting a claim, you can: Call our advisors on 0800 073 8801. Send us an email about your claim to [email protected]. Request that a specialist call you by completing this form.

  11. PDF Health and Safety Executive Slips and trips

    Hazard spotting checklist. This checklist will help you identify slip and trip hazards in your workplace and decide what action to take. It will be of benefit to anyone who assesses and manages slips and trips at work. The checklist provides examples of hazards that can be found in and around workplaces, and suggests actions that you can take ...

  12. What Is A Trip Hazard And How To Prevent Them?

    A trip hazard sign can ensure to prevent unwanted accidents, which are quite common incidents in the workplace. As trip hazards can also result in uncountable injuries each year, which include musculoskeletal and cuts among the other most common accidents. You can't work in a safer environment if people aren't allowed to move around ...

  13. Slips, Trips and Falls

    Hazards in the Workplace. In 2022, 865 workers died in falls, and hundreds of thousands were injured badly enough to require days off of work. A worker doesn't have fall from a high level to suffer fatal injuries; 144 workers were killed in falls on the same level in 2022, according to Injury Facts. Construction workers are most at risk for ...

  14. Construction

    Your site should be kept in a clean and orderly condition so as to reduce the chance of injury through slips and trips. Everyone can make a contribution to reducing slips and trips on site. If you see a risk, sort it, or report it to someone who can. Key aspects of construction slips and trips include: Uneven surfaces. Obstacles. Trailing cables.

  15. What is a Trip Hazard and how do you prevent them?

    Walking Surfaces: Floor surfaces that are uneven or damaged can present a trip hazard. Floors must be kept clean at all times. Stairways, gangways, passageways, and doorways should all be free of obstructions. Floor coverings with an improper safety measurement could also be dangerous, Damaged surfaces/floors are reported for rectification.

  16. Pavement Trip Hazard Height

    The pavement trip hazard height is 1 inch and it is just as important to show this as clearly as possible. To win compensation for your injuries, you must be able to show that the pavement trip hazard height was more than one inch in depth or height. The local council is responsible for pavement maintenance and repairs.

  17. Trip Hazard: My Great British Adventure

    Trip Hazard: My Great British Adventure is a travel documentary hosted by comedian Rosie Jones for Channel 4 in 2021.The concept of the show is that Jones travels to various locations in the UK alongside a guest star, and the first series of four episodes aired on 9 March 2021.. The guest stars and locations are Scarlett Moffatt (the Lake District), Joe Wilkinson (), Jamali Maddix (), and ...

  18. Slips, Trips, and Falls: Preventing Workplace Trip Hazards

    That means preventing slips, trips, and falls is an ongoing process that relies heavily on employees being able to recognize related hazards. What Are OSHA's Trip Hazard Regulations? OSHA's primary standard for slip, trip, and fall hazards is the General Industry Walking-Working Surface standard (29 CFR 1910 Subpart D, which includes §1910.21-30).

  19. Slips, Trips and Falls

    Slips, Trips and Falls Incidents - Prevalence of Injuries. There were 561,000 reported cases of non-fatal workplace injuries during 2022-23. Slips, trips and falls accounted for 32% of these injuries, according to recent figures released by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). This amounts to 179,520 people injured during 2022-23.

  20. Trip Hazard Signs

    Yes, UK regulations require that trip and slip hazards that cannot be removed are signposted by trip hazard signs. This is required under the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, which requires employers to provide a safe working environment for employees, and the Health and Safety (Signs and Signals) regulations 1996, which goes on to say any ...

  21. Slips and trips in health and social care

    Many factors can cause slips, trips and falls. These include: methods of cleaning, flooring type, footwear, levels of lighting, contrast between floors, walls and doors, and obstructions or other trip hazards. The practical measures you can take will vary in different situations; some measures will reduce the risk to both workers and non ...

  22. Fury vs Usyk: Oleksandr Usyk's team complain about ring canvas ahead of

    "A member of Team Usyk looked at the canvas last night at the open workout, where Usyk seemed fairly happy inside the ring, and it was his thought and his concern it may be a trip hazard on the night.

  23. Travelpac: travel to and from the UK (2023 edition)

    Travel to and from the UK, with detail on traveller age and sex, trip purpose, length, and spending. From International Passenger Survey (IPS), quarterly data.

  24. Slips and trips in retail

    Slips and trips remain the single most common cause of major injury in the retail sector. Most accidents occur when. when there is failure to keep the floor free from contamination. The process of cleaning can create slip and trip hazards, especially for those entering the area being cleaned, such as the cleaners, for example, smooth floors ...

  25. Ukraine war latest: Putin wraps up China trip with subtle message for

    Ukraine war latest: Russian forces take control of village in Kharkiv region - defence ministry. Russian troops are continuing to advance in the Kharkiv region - with the defence ministry claiming ...

  26. Employers

    Prevent contamination getting on floor. Stop contamination getting on to the floor, remember a smooth, clean, dry floor, is rarely a slip risk. Review work activities - Contamination comes in various forms, fluids, swarf, saw dust, food and drink, polythene, cardboard. It is usually created by the work activity, so an assessment of the activity and way in which people work is essential if it ...