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The HMAS Melbourne-HMAS Voyager Collision: Australia’s Worst Peace-Time Naval Disaster

Nicholas egan.

hmas voyager melbourne

On the 10th of February 1964 a terrible naval accident took place in Australian waters that led to 82 deaths. Off the coast of the Royal Australian Navy base at Jervis Bay, the aircraft carrier, the HMAS Melbourne and the destroyer, the HMAS Voyager were conducting maneuvers when it soon became clear that the 2 ships were heading for collision. Both crews desperately tried to change course, but it was too late.

hmas voyager melbourne

HMAS Melbourne struck Voyager at 20:56, with the carrier's bow striking just behind the bridge and cutting the destroyer in two. Of the 314 aboard Voyager, 82 were killed, most of whom died immediately or were trapped in the heavy bow section, which sank after 10 minutes. The rest of the ship sank after midnight. Melbourne, although damaged, suffered no fatalities, and was able to sail to Sydney the next morning with most of the Voyager survivors aboard. The loss of the Voyager ranks as the 6th most deadly loss of life in Australian navy history.[i]

hmas voyager melbourne

The incident shocked the public and memorial services were held around Australia on 21 February. Public distrust in navy led inquiries over the previous few decades resulted in a Royal Commission being called to investigate the cause of the disaster. The commission, led by former Attorney General Sir John Spicer, concluded that the collision was primarily the fault of Voyager's bridge crew, in that they neglected to maintain an effective lookout and lost awareness of the carrier's location, although he did not blame individual officers. When reporting on the contribution of Melbourne and those aboard her to the collision, Spicer specifically indicated failures of its captain John Robertson and two other bridge officers, as they did not alert Voyager to the danger she was in, and appeared to not take measures to prevent Melbourne from colliding. Robertson submitted his resignation from the Navy and was considered to be a scapegoat by the media.[ii]

Over the next few years there was increasing pressure from the public, the media, and politicians of the government and opposition over the handling of the first Royal Commission, as well as claims made by Lieutenant Commander Peter Cabban, a former officer of the Voyager, that Captain Duncan Stevens frequently drank to excess and was unfit for command. Eventually in 1967, Prime Minister Harold Holt announced that a second Royal Commission would be held.

The second Royal Commission found that Stevens was medically unfit for command, although not impaired by alcohol at the time of the collision, he was suffering from a duodenal ulcer and had been confidentially prescribed amphetamines. Consequently, some of the findings of the first commission, those based on the assumption that Voyager was under appropriate command, were re-evaluated. Robertson and the other officers of Melbourne were absolved of blame for the incident.

hmas voyager melbourne

In the aftermath of the disaster, Chief Petty Officer Jonathan 'Buck' Rogers was posthumously awarded the George Cross for his actions during the sinking. Recognizing that he was too large to fit through the escape hatch, he organised the evacuation of those who could escape, then led those stuck in the compartment in prayers and hymns as they died. Posthumous Albert Medals for Lifesaving were awarded to Midshipman Kerry Marien and Electrical Mechanic William Condon for their actions in saving other Voyager personnel at the cost of their own lives.[iii]

5 Years later, the HMAS Melbourne was tragically involved in a second naval disaster, this time with the American Destroyer USS Frank E. Evans in the South China Sea. Evans sailed under Melbourne's bow, where she was cut in two. 74 of Evans's crew were killed.

hmas voyager melbourne

A joint RAN–USN board of inquiry was held to establish the events of the collision and the responsibility of those involved. This inquiry, which was believed by the Australians to be biased against them, found that both ships were at fault for the collision. Four officers (the captains of Melbourne and Evans, and the two junior officers in control of Evans at the time of the collision) were court-martialed based on the results of the inquiry; while the three USN officers were found guilty, the RAN officer was cleared of wrongdoing.[iv]

There are a number of memorials to those who were killed in both tragedies. In Jervis Bay stands a memorial to the HMAS Voyager and in Gurnee, Illinois stands a memorial to those who were lost in the USS Frank E. Evans disaster.

hmas voyager melbourne

USS Frank E. Evans memorial located in Warren Cemetery, Gurnee, Illinois. Wikimedia Commons Author: GoodSam111 https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:USFEE_memorial_large_tablet.jpg

References [i] Frame, Tom (2005). The Cruel Legacy: the HMAS Voyager tragedy. Crows Nest, NSW: Allen & Unwin. ISBN 1-74115-254-2. OCLC 61213421. [ii] Spicer, Sir John Armstrong (1964). Report of Royal Commissioner on loss of H.M.A.S. "Voyager" (Report). https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/46252538 Melbourne: A.J. Arthur, Commonwealth Govt. Printer. [iii] Burbury; Asprey & Lucas (1 March 1968). "Royal Commissioners' Report on Voyager Inquiry" (PDF). http://www.navy.gov.au/sites/default/files/documen... Navy News. Vol. 11, no. 5. Parramatta: Cumberland Newspapers Pty Ltd. [iv] Stevenson, Jo (1999). In The Wake: The true story of the Melbourne-Evans Collision, Conspiracy and Cover-up. Alexandria, NSW: Hale & Iremonger. ISBN 0-86806-681-8. (Author Jo Stevenson was the wife of Captain John Phillip Stevenson, the Commanding Officer of Melbourne at the time of the collision)

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Preserving Australia's Naval History

hmas voyager melbourne

The Melbourne/Voyager Collision – Untold Story

Stephen, Kerry · Jun 21, 2009 · Print This Page

On 10th February 1964 the Search and Rescue (SAR) crews arrived at the Marine Section at the usual time, 0750, to have their coffee and prepare for another day’s work. Twenty four hours later two of those crews had saved the lives of seventy men from HMAS Voyager . Their experiences that night have never been publicly documented. This is the story of Air Nymph , one of the boats involved in the rescue operations that fateful night.

The Marine Section, HMAS Creswell was a rather unique organisation, because although it was located in, and administered by, Creswell , it was under the operational control of the Naval Air Station HMAS Albatross . As such, it worked the same hours as Albatross . When flying operations were being carried out in the Jervis Bay area by Albatross or HMAS Melbourne , it remained operationally ready until Albatross reported that fixed wing air operations had ceased for the day. Only then would the duty SAR crew stand down until the following day. This meant that, during squadron workup periods prior to embarkation in Melbourne , or during major naval exercises, the duty crew were often on duty in the Marine Section from 0600. until approximately midnight.

A ‘hot line’, which was directly connected to the Air Traffic Control tower (ATC) in Albatross , was located in the Marine Section Officers’ office. This ‘hot line’ was tested at 0900 every morning between the two stations to ensure that instant communications were available between the ATC and the Marine Section. Alongside the ‘hot line’ was an Emergency button. When pushed it activated an Air Raid siren which sounded throughout the whole of Creswell to recall off duty SAR crew members and also warn Creswell staff of an emergency taking place. It was an operational requirement that the duty SAR crew left within 10 minutes of any emergency being sounded.

Although the Marine Section operated four SARs, the complement allowed for three crews to man the boats as one SAR was usually undergoing refit in Garden Island Dockyard. Three of the vessels, Air Nymph , Air Faith and Air Chief were all wooden hulled American built ex-World War II air sea rescue craft. The fourth, Air Sprite , was built to the same design, in the 1950s, by Halvorsen’s Shipyard. They were powered by two Hall Scott Defender 630 HP V12 engines, with two fuel tanks holding 1200 gallons of super petrol, and during World War II operated at 33.5 knots. However, because of their high fuel consumption they were governed down to a maximum speed of 28 knots. A searchlight was fitted outboard each side of the bridge for communications or search purposes. Although only two officers were borne in the Marine Section complement, Sub Lieutenant Tony Vodic and myself, each crew consisted of an officer (Lieutenant/Sub Lieutenant) in command, a seaman Petty Officer, a radio operator, a Leading Seaman (LS)/Able Seaman (AB) electrical sailor, three AB Seamen branch, an LME (leading mechanical engineer),and two MEs (MTPs),

On 10th February 1964 only two SARs were based in Creswell, Air Sprite and Air Nymph . Both Air Chief and Air Faith were undergoing maintenance or refit in Garden Island Dockyard. The two boats were taken out for their usual morning run in Jervis Bay to ensure that they were fully operational. It was likely to be a busy day; Melbourne was carrying out flying operations with Voyager , the consort and rescue destroyer. Three minesweepers (MCMVs) were also due in Jervis Bay to carry out mine countermeasure (MCM) exercises.

The two SARs returned to the Marine Section wharf where they were refueled, and the crews then carried on with their normal ship husbandry and maintenance routines. At 1600 the standby crews departed at the end of the day’s work, leaving the duty crew led by Petty Officer Ron Budd in the Marine Section. Air Nymph was the duty boat and I was the Duty Officer for that night. The routine was as normal, the duty crew having dinner in the Marine Section galley while they waited for the cessation of flying operations.

It was anticipated it would be a quiet night so everyone relaxed in the mess facilities. About 2000 that evening noise was heard in the vicinity of the Creswell swimming pool on the waterfront. Several of the duty crew went out to the Marine Section wharf to see what was going on. It turned out to be an initiation ceremony for new entry Cadet Midshipmen so they returned to the mess, advising me accordingly.

The ‘hot line’

But it was not to be a quiet night! At 2057 the ‘hot line’ suddenly rang. I immediately answered the phone to hear the Albatross duty ATC officer say ‘ Melbourne and Voyager have collided in a position 20 miles from Point Perpendicular, on a bearing of 120 degrees, scramble the SARs’. I instantly hit the Emergency button, sounding the siren, and rushed downstairs to the crew mess where I told the duty crew that Melbourne and Voyager had collided and to prepare the duty boat, Air Nymph , to get underway immediately. The crew quickly responded, boarded the boat, started the engines and made preparations to sail. Fortunately, a Surgeon Lieutenant was in the vicinity of the Marine Section at that time, so I requested he board Air Nymph to provide medical assistance if required.

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60th anniversary of sinking of HMAS Voyager II

Lenore heath.

Collection Item C349752

Accession Number: NAVY15894

This year, on 10 February, marks the 60 th anniversary of a momentous event in Royal Australian Navy (RAN) history, the loss of the destroyer HMAS Voyager II following a collision with the aircraft carrier HMAS Melbourne II. 

With many new crew members aboard, HMAS Voyager sailed from Sydney to Jervis Bay on 6 February 1964 for a series of post re-fit trials and exercises with HMAS Melbourne. On the night of 10 February the Melbourne was conducting night flying exercises off the coast of Jervis Bay, with the Voyager undertaking the role of guard escort. It was a moonless night and both ships had only navigational and operational lights in use. 

At 8.56pm the ships collided and the Voyager was cut in two. Her forward section passed down the Melbourne’s port side and the after section down the starboard side. The forward section sank soon after the collision and the after section some three hours later. The crew of the Melbourne recovered survivors from the water and the after section of the Voyager. Two RAN search and rescue boats, HMAS Air Nymph and HMAS Air Sprite, set out from shore establishment HMAS Creswell, and the crews succeeded in rescuing 70 men. RAN helicopters and minesweepers were also dispatched to assist with the search for survivors. Of the 314 men aboard HMAS Voyager, 82 died; 14 officers (including the commanding officer), 67 sailors and one civilian dock worker. 

Collection Item C258820

Accession Number: 305887

 The Memorial holds a significant collection of photographs of this incident taken by RAN photographers. After the immediate impact of the collision, HMAS Melbourne photographers hurriedly grabbed cameras and photographed the after section of the Voyager and the rescue efforts. Other photographs record injured and shocked survivors being cared for on the Melbourne, activities aboard the aircraft carrier in light of day and the major damage to the bow of the Melbourne.

Collection Item C258829

Accession Number: 305895

Collection Item C349133

Accession Number: NAVY04183

You can view more photographs related to this event here in the Collection area of the Memorial’s website.

Last updated: 5 February 2024

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John Jess MP fought for justice for dead and living following HMAS Voyager tragedy

A NEW book details the greatest political and military cover-up in Australian history — the HMAS Voyager disaster.

HMAS Voyager and HMAS Melbourne prior to the fatal 1964 collision

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NUMEROUS books and documentaries and millions of words have been written about the HMAS Voyager tragedy on February 10, 1964 that claimed 82 lives, but none has detailed the political bastardry around Australia’s worst peacetime naval disaster like ‘John Jess Seeker of Justice’.

The terms ‘cover-up’ and ‘white wash’ don’t come close to doing justice to the loathsome performance of the nation’s political elites from then Prime Minister Sir Robert Menzies down or the Royal Australian Navy and its desire to protect its reputation regardless of the human cost or the risk of history repeating itself.

Sadly in the case of HMAS Melbourne that is exactly what happened when she collided with the US Navy destroyer Frank E. Evans in June 1969 with the loss of 74 lives.

John Jess was the Victorian Liberal MP who rocked the establishment to its very foundations with his eight-year quest for the truth about how the navy’s flagship, the light aircraft carrier HMAS Melbourne, came to slice the destroyer escort HMAS Voyager in half off the NSW south coast with the loss of 82 men.

Here was that very rare breed of backbench politician willing to sacrifice his own ambition in the fight for justice.

His story is all too rare and his daughter Elizabeth McCarthy has spent 10 years tracing her father’s footsteps and meticulously researching a book that shines a light into the darkest corners of political and military intrigue.

“I set out to write my father’s biography, but that story was dominated by the Voyager tragedy and the need to see my father receive the recognition he deserves,” Ms McCarthy said.

Mr Jess’s wife Joy (nee Smart) was a cousin of the man most damaged by the Voyager ‘cover-up’, the Commanding Officer of HMAS Melbourne Captain John Robertson.

According to the book, Captain Robertson was reluctant to support John Jess in his quest for justice for 82 dead men and the survivors whose reputations were mulched by the establishment, but the Member for Latrobe would not be deterred.

Ms McCarthy has delved deep into the archives and into her late father’s personal papers to produce a story that puts the sword to any notions of honour when governments’ decide that the truth is too unpalatable for the punters to bear or too risky for them.

Mr Jess drew parallels between his own government’s actions over Voyager and George Orwell’s timeless tale ‘1984’ and the victimisation of the small man by powerful political elites.

In 1964, none was more powerful than Sir Robert Menzies and Ms McCarthy strongly argues that Menzies was the architect of one of the greatest cover-ups in Australian history.

Not only did the great ‘Ming’ establish a biased Royal Commission that mercilessly flayed Captain Robertson, but he refused to allow Jess to present fresh evidence about the serious medical condition of the Voyager’s skipper Captain Duncan Stevens who suffered from serious duodenal ulcers.

A later Royal Commission in 1967 dealt with the Stevens health issue in more detail, including his alcoholism, but even that second inquiry was deeply flawed.

It did clear Captain Robertson and his fellow officers Commander James Kelly and Alex Bate, but it sacrificed the reputation of key whistle blower Commander Peter Cabban whose statement to Jess about the performance of Captain Stevens was crucial to the outcome.

Speaking in Parliament about the second Voyager inquiry Mr Jess said, “A question of justice in this country and what justice means in this country and whether justice is based on fact and whether fair and open inquiries are worth fighting for.”

Elizabeth McCarthy said Menzies and the Navy’s top brass knew all the facts about Stevens’ poor health, but still they scapegoated Captain Robertson and sought to blame Melbourne for the disaster.

“They knew that Stevens was unfit to command,” she said.

Ms McCarthy said it was time to stand up and to correct the record for the living and the dead.

“It is time for both crews to be cleared of any blame.”

She said her father, who died in 2003, described the Voyager Royal Commission as the greatest injustice to service personnel in Australian history.

After reading the John Jess story there is little reason to doubt him.

• John Jess Seeker of Justice by Elizabeth McCarthy, published by Sid Harta Publishers, RRP $29.95.

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Voyager memorial: disaster survivors remember the sinking 50 years on

HMAS Melbourne after crashing with HMAS Voyager in 1964.

Memorial services marking the 50th anniversary of Australia's worst peacetime maritime disaster are today taking place at Jervis Bay on the NSW south coast.

Eighty-two men on board HMAS Voyager were killed after it collided with aircraft carrier HMAS Melbourne during a training exercise on February 10, 1964.

The Voyager was cut in half, but 232 people survived.

Many of the survivors will join with families of the victims and dignitaries for several commemorations, starting at 8:30am today with a memorial church service at HMAS Creswell's chapel.

One of the main events on Monday will be a memorial service at the wreck site of HMAS Voyager, about 20 nautical miles off Cape Perpendicular.

There will also be a sunset ceremony with an 82-bell toll to honour each life lost.

hmas voyager melbourne

The tragedy has had ramifications for years, with many sailors experiencing post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

There was no counselling, just a week's survivor's leave.

The subsequent cover-up by the Government and the Navy led to an unprecedented two royal commissions in pursuit of the truth.

Both inquiries were critical of the Voyager's captain and the second inquiry examined new evidence about his drinking and health.

Captain Duncan Stevens was eventually deemed unfit to command due to medical reasons.

But some survivors do not want to take part in the commemoration ceremonies.

"A lot of them, I think, have just found if they don't acknowledge it and shut it up, bottle it up, it never happened," survivor 'Bluey' Ducker said.

"They don't want to remember, don't want to even associate with their old shipmates."

Re-fitted ships 'not up to speed'

The former Chief of the Defence Force, Admiral Chris Barrie, has reflected on his own experience of the Voyager disaster 50 years ago.

We're never really going to know what happened on the night of the collision.

Admiral Barrie was a young cadet at Jervis Bay when the HMAS Voyager collided with the aircraft carrier HMAS Melbourne.

He lamented the loss of life and the lack of information about what really happened.

"We're never really going to know what happened on the night of the collision, except when I look at the paperwork what I see is two ships in post refit trials," he said.

"Neither had been at sea for very long, and having been through post refit trials myself I know that the ships weren't up to speed in operational capacity."

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HMAS Melbourne after colliding with HMAS Voyager in 1964.

The Unique Burial of a Child of Early Scythian Time at the Cemetery of Saryg-Bulun (Tuva)

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Pages:  379-406

In 1988, the Tuvan Archaeological Expedition (led by M. E. Kilunovskaya and V. A. Semenov) discovered a unique burial of the early Iron Age at Saryg-Bulun in Central Tuva. There are two burial mounds of the Aldy-Bel culture dated by 7th century BC. Within the barrows, which adjoined one another, forming a figure-of-eight, there were discovered 7 burials, from which a representative collection of artifacts was recovered. Burial 5 was the most unique, it was found in a coffin made of a larch trunk, with a tightly closed lid. Due to the preservative properties of larch and lack of air access, the coffin contained a well-preserved mummy of a child with an accompanying set of grave goods. The interred individual retained the skin on his face and had a leather headdress painted with red pigment and a coat, sewn from jerboa fur. The coat was belted with a leather belt with bronze ornaments and buckles. Besides that, a leather quiver with arrows with the shafts decorated with painted ornaments, fully preserved battle pick and a bow were buried in the coffin. Unexpectedly, the full-genomic analysis, showed that the individual was female. This fact opens a new aspect in the study of the social history of the Scythian society and perhaps brings us back to the myth of the Amazons, discussed by Herodotus. Of course, this discovery is unique in its preservation for the Scythian culture of Tuva and requires careful study and conservation.

Keywords: Tuva, Early Iron Age, early Scythian period, Aldy-Bel culture, barrow, burial in the coffin, mummy, full genome sequencing, aDNA

Information about authors: Marina Kilunovskaya (Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation). Candidate of Historical Sciences. Institute for the History of Material Culture of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Dvortsovaya Emb., 18, Saint Petersburg, 191186, Russian Federation E-mail: [email protected] Vladimir Semenov (Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation). Candidate of Historical Sciences. Institute for the History of Material Culture of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Dvortsovaya Emb., 18, Saint Petersburg, 191186, Russian Federation E-mail: [email protected] Varvara Busova  (Moscow, Russian Federation).  (Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation). Institute for the History of Material Culture of the Russian Academy of Sciences.  Dvortsovaya Emb., 18, Saint Petersburg, 191186, Russian Federation E-mail:  [email protected] Kharis Mustafin  (Moscow, Russian Federation). Candidate of Technical Sciences. Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology.  Institutsky Lane, 9, Dolgoprudny, 141701, Moscow Oblast, Russian Federation E-mail:  [email protected] Irina Alborova  (Moscow, Russian Federation). Candidate of Biological Sciences. Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology.  Institutsky Lane, 9, Dolgoprudny, 141701, Moscow Oblast, Russian Federation E-mail:  [email protected] Alina Matzvai  (Moscow, Russian Federation). Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology.  Institutsky Lane, 9, Dolgoprudny, 141701, Moscow Oblast, Russian Federation E-mail:  [email protected]

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Moscow Oblast, Russia

The capital city of Moskovskaya oblast: Moscow .

Moscow Oblast - Overview

Moscow Oblast is a federal subject of Russia located in the Central Federal District. Moscow, the capital city of the country, is the administrative center of Moscow Oblast. At the same time, Moscow is not part of this region, it is a separate federal subject of Russia, a city of federal importance.

The population of Moscow Oblast is about 7,769,000 (2022), the area - 44,379 sq. km.

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Moskovskaya oblast coat of arms.

Moskovskaya oblast coat of arms

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Moskovskaya oblast latest news and posts from our blog:.

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History of Moscow Oblast

The territory of the Moscow region was inhabited more than 20 thousand years ago. In the first millennium AD, this land was inhabited mostly by the Finno-Ugric peoples (Meryane and Meshchera). In the 9th-10th centuries, the Slavs began active development of the region. The population was engaged in hunting, fisheries, agriculture, and cattle breeding.

In the middle of the 12th century, the territory of the present Moscow region became part of the Vladimir-Suzdal principality, the first towns were founded (Volokolamsk in 1135, Moscow in 1147, Zvenigorod in 1152, Dmitrov in 1154). In the first half of the 13th century, the Vladimir-Suzdal principality was conquered by the Mongols.

In the 14th-16th centuries, Moscow principality became the center of unification of Russian lands. The history of the Moscow region is inextricably linked to military events of the Time of Troubles - the siege of the Trinity-Sergius Monastery by the troops of False Dmitry II, the first and second militias.

More historical facts…

In 1708, by decree of Peter the Great, Moskovskaya gubernia (province) was established. It included most of the territory of present Moscow oblast. In 1712, St. Petersburg became the capital of the Russian Empire and the significance of the Moscow region as the country’s economic center began to decrease.

In 1812, the Battle of Borodino took place near Moscow. It was the biggest battle of the Russian-French War of 1812. In the second half of the 19th century, especially after the peasant reform of 1861, the Moscow province experienced economic growth. In 1851, the first railway connected Moscow and St. Petersburg; in 1862 - Nizhny Novgorod.

The population of the Moscow region increased significantly (in 1847 - 1.13 million people, in 1905 - 2.65 million). On the eve of the First World War, Moscow was a city with a population of more than one million people.

In November, 1917, the Soviet power was established in the region. In 1918, the country’s capital was moved from St. Petersburg to Moscow that contributed to economic recovery of the province. In the 1920s-1930s, a lot of churches located near Moscow were closed, a large number of cultural monuments were destroyed. On January 14, 1929, Moscow Oblast was formed.

In 1941-1942, one of the most important battles of the Second World War took place on the territory of the region - the Battle for Moscow. In the postwar years, the growth of economic potential of the region continued; several science cities were founded (Dubna, Troitsk, Pushchino, Chernogolovka).

In the 1990s, the economy of Moscow Oblast experienced a deep crisis. Since the 1990s, due to the motorization of the population and commuting, road traffic situation in the Moscow region significantly deteriorated. Traffic jams have become commonplace.

Pictures of Moscow Oblast

Moscow Oblast scenery

Moscow Oblast scenery

Author: Mikhail Grizly

At the airport in the Moscow region

At the airport in the Moscow region

Author: Evgeny Davydov

Nature of Moscow Oblast

Nature of Moscow Oblast

Author: Alexander Khmelkov

Moscow Oblast - Features

Moscow Oblast is located in the central part of the East European Plain, in the basin of the rivers of Volga, Oka, Klyazma, Moskva. The region stretches from north to south for 310 km, from west to east - 340 km. It was named after the city of Moscow, which however is not part of the region. Part of the administrative authorities of the region is located in Krasnogorsk.

On the territory of the Moscow region, there are 77 cities and towns, 19 of them have a population of more than 100 thousand people. The largest cities are Balashikha (518,300), Podolsk (309,600), Mytishchi (262,700), Khimky (256,300), Korolyov (225,300), Lubertsy (209,600), Krasnogorsk (174,900), Elektrostal (149,000), Odintsovo (138,900), Kolomna (136,800), Domodedovo (136,100).

The climate is temperate continental. Summers are warm, winters are moderately cold. The average temperature in January is minus 10 degrees Celsius, in July - plus 19 degrees Celsius.

One of the most important features of the local economy is its proximity to Moscow. Some of the cities (Odintsovo, Krasnogorsk, Mytishchi) have become in fact the “sleeping districts” of Moscow. The region is in second place in terms of industrial production among the regions of Russia (after Moscow).

The leading industries are food processing, engineering, chemical, metallurgy, construction. Moscow oblast has one of the largest in Russia scientific and technological complexes. Handicrafts are well developed (Gzhel ceramics, Zhostov trays, Fedoskino lacquered miniatures, toy-making).

Moscow railway hub is the largest in Russia (11 radial directions, 2,700 km of railways, the density of railways is the highest in Russia). There are two large international airports - Sheremetyevo and Domodedovo. Vnukovo airport is used for the flights within the country.

Attractions of Moscow Oblast

Moscow Oblast has more than 6,400 objects of cultural heritage:

  • famous estate complexes,
  • ancient towns with architectural monuments (Vereya, Volokolamsk, Dmitrov, Zaraysk, Zvenigorod, Istra, Kolomna, Sergiev Posad, Serpukhov),
  • churches and monasteries-museums (the Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius, Joseph-Volokolamsk monastery, Pokrovsky Khotkov monastery, Savvino Storozhevsky monastery, Nikolo Ugresha monastery).

The most famous estate complexes:

  • Arkhangelskoye - a large museum with a rich collection of Western European and Russian art of the 17th-19th centuries,
  • Abramtsevo - a literary and artistic center,
  • Melikhovo - an estate owned by A.P. Chekhov at the end of the 19th century,
  • Zakharovo and Bolshiye Vyazyomy included in the History and Literature Museum-Reserve of Alexander Pushkin,
  • House-Museum of the composer P.I. Tchaikovsky in Klin,
  • Muranovo that belonged to the poet F.I. Tyutchev,
  • Shakhmatovo - the estate of the poet Alexander Blok.

The architectural ensemble of the Trinity Sergius Lavra is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The largest museum of the Moscow region is located in Serpukhov - Serpukhov Historical and Art Museum.

The places of traditional arts and crafts are the basis of the souvenir industry of Russia:

  • Fedoskino - lacquer miniature painting,
  • Bogorodskoe - traditional manufacture of wooden toys,
  • Gzhel - unique tradition of creating ceramics,
  • Zhostovo - painted metal crafts,
  • Pavlovsky Posad - fabrics with traditional printed pattern.

Some of these settlements have museums dedicated to traditional crafts (for example, a toy museum in Bogorodskoe), as well as centers of learning arts and crafts.

Moskovskaya oblast of Russia photos

Landscapes of moscow oblast.

Nature of the Moscow region

Nature of the Moscow region

Country road in the Moscow region

Country road in the Moscow region

Moscow Oblast landscape

Moscow Oblast landscape

Author: Mikhail Kurtsev

Moscow Oblast views

Moscow Oblast scenery

Author: Asedach Alexander

Country life in Moscow Oblast

Country life in Moscow Oblast

Author: Andrey Zakharov

Church in Moscow Oblast

Church in Moscow Oblast

Author: Groshev Dmitrii

Churches of Moscow Oblast

Church in the Moscow region

Church in the Moscow region

Church in Moscow Oblast

Cathedral in Moscow Oblast

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IMAGES

  1. HMAS Voyager disaster: Archives reveal stories of heroism, tragedy

    hmas voyager melbourne

  2. Veteran shines light on 1964 naval tragedy of HMAS Melbourne-Voyager

    hmas voyager melbourne

  3. HMA ships Voyager (D04), Melbourne (R21) and Vendetta (D08) during an

    hmas voyager melbourne

  4. HMAS VOYAGER & THE MELBOURNE

    hmas voyager melbourne

  5. Emotions run high for the 50th anniversary of the HMAS Voyager sinking

    hmas voyager melbourne

  6. HMAS Voyager disaster

    hmas voyager melbourne

VIDEO

  1. اول نهار لي في كوالا لمبور تلاقيت مع فيتنامية

  2. HMAS Westralia dual RAS

  3. HMAS VOYAGER 53rd Anniversary Memorial Reunion

COMMENTS

  1. Melbourne-Voyager collision

    The Melbourne-Voyager collision, also known as the Melbourne-Voyager incident or simply the Voyager incident, was a collision between two warships of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN); the aircraft carrier HMAS Melbourne and the destroyer HMAS Voyager . On the evening of 10 February 1964, the two ships were performing manoeuvres off Jervis Bay.

  2. The HMAS Melbourne-Voyager Collision: A Tragedy that Damaged and

    By MIDN Mollie Burns, RAN - NEOC 54 Naval Historical Society Prizewinning Essay. Introduction. The collision of HMAS Melbourne and HMAS Voyager remains the Royal Australian Navy's (RAN) worst peacetime disaster.Occurring off the New South Wales coast in 1964, the aircraft carrier Melbourne and destroyer Voyager were engaged in night flying exercises when Voyager inexplicably turned in ...

  3. Veteran shines light on 1964 naval tragedy of HMAS Melbourne-Voyager

    A veteran from the HMAS Melbourne and HMAS Voyager collision on February 10, 1964 that killed 82 people believes changes to floodlighting on the aircraft carrier caused Australia's worst peacetime ...

  4. HMAS Voyager survivors commemorate maritime disaster's 60th anniversary

    On February 10, 1964, Mr Perrin became one of 232 sailors who survived the HMAS Voyager and HMAS Melbourne collision near Jervis Bay — one of the most traumatic maritime events in Australia's ...

  5. The HMAS Melbourne-HMAS Voyager Collision: Australia's Worst Peace-Time

    HMAS Melbourne struck Voyager at 20:56, with the carrier's bow striking just behind the bridge and cutting the destroyer in two. Of the 314 aboard Voyager, 82 were killed, most of whom died immediately or were trapped in the heavy bow section, which sank after 10 minutes. The rest of the ship sank after midnight.

  6. HMAS Voyager disaster: Archives reveal stories of heroism, tragedy

    On the evening of February 10 1964, Australia's worst peacetime naval disaster occurred, when the aircraft carrier HMAS Melbourne collided with the destroyer HMAS Voyager. The disaster, which ...

  7. The Melbourne/Voyager Collision

    The Melbourne/Voyager Collision - Untold Story. On 10th February 1964 the Search and Rescue (SAR) crews arrived at the Marine Section at the usual time, 0750, to have their coffee and prepare for another day's work. Twenty four hours later two of those crews had saved the lives of seventy men from HMAS Voyager.

  8. 60th anniversary of sinking of HMAS Voyager II

    This year, on 10 February, marks the 60 th anniversary of a momentous event in Royal Australian Navy (RAN) history, the loss of the destroyer HMAS Voyager II following a collision with the aircraft carrier HMAS Melbourne II. With many new crew members aboard, HMAS Voyager sailed from Sydney to Jervis Bay on 6 February 1964 for a series of post ...

  9. Remembering the HMAS Melbourne/Voyager disaster

    Their first sight was the massive hole ripped in Melbourne's bow, the half of Voyager still floating but sinking fast and life rafts full with shocked, injured, and deceased sailors.. This was the assault on the senses that 24-year-old Lieutenant Kerry Stephens faced when his command HMAS Air Nymph, a SAR vessel from HMAS Creswell arrived at the scene two hours after the collision.

  10. HMAS Voyager (II): remembering the 82 fallen, and so many who would

    The destroyer was escorting HMAS Melbourne (II), Australia's last aircraft carrier, as it carried out flying operations. Both ships had recently emerged from refits. Voyager was the 'plane guard', positioned 1000-2000 yards off Melbourne's port quarter to recover the crew of any aircraft that might ditch.

  11. HMAS Voyager (D04)

    HMAS Voyager was a Daring-class destroyer of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN), that was lost in a collision in 1964.. Constructed between 1949 and 1957, Voyager was the first ship of her class to enter Australian service, and the first all-welded ship to be built in Australia. During her career, Voyager was deployed to the Far East Strategic Reserve on six occasions, but never fired a shot in ...

  12. HMAS Voyager

    HMAS Voyager (D04) was a Daring-class destroyer commissioned into the RAN in 1957. The ship was lost in a collision with the aircraft carrier HMAS Melbourne on 10 February 1964. Battle honours. Seven battle honours were awarded to ships named HMAS Voyager: Darwin 1942; Calabria 1940; Libya 1940-41;

  13. HMAS Voyager/Melbourne Collision

    On the night of 10 February 1964, during night flying operations, the RAN's flagship the aircraft carrier HMAS Melbourne (II) was in collision with the Darin...

  14. Navy veteran and survivor Brian Hopkins revisits HMAS Voyager collision

    Veteran of HMAS Melbourne shines light on theory surrounding tragic Voyager collision 57 years ago HMAS Voyager disaster: Archives reveal stories of heroism, tragedy 'We want our own place.'

  15. From the Archives, 1964: Hope Fades for 85 Missing Men

    This was published 5 years ago. From the Archives, 1964: Hope Fades for 85 Missing Men The collision of HMAS Melbourne and HMAS Voyager is the Royal Australian Navy's worst peacetime disaster.

  16. HMAS Voyager inquiry greatest injustice ever

    HMAS Voyager and HMAS Melbourne prior to the fatal 1964 collision. More from National. Plane forced to make emergency landing. Girlfriend's emotional post to slain brothers.

  17. Tupolev TU-144

    Crash of a Tupolev TU-144D in Kladkovo: 2 killed. Built by the Voronezh Aircraft Factory, the airplane came out of the plant last April 27. Test flights were conducted on April 27, May 12, 16 and 18. On May 23, the crew completed a fifth test flight from 1111LT and 1307LT without any incidents. At 1730LT, the crew departed Ramenskoye Airport ...

  18. 50 years on, survivors remember the Voyager sinking

    Eighty-two men on board HMAS Voyager were killed after it collided with aircraft carrier HMAS Melbourne during a training exercise on February 10, 1964. The Voyager was cut in half, but 232 people ...

  19. From the Archives, 1964: 85 missing after Melbourne-Voyager naval disaster

    In 1964, hope was fading for the 85 men missing from H.M.A.S Voyager after it was struck by H.M.A.S Melbourne and sunk in a training drill of Jervis Bay.

  20. Melbourne-Evans collision

    In 1964, Melbourne was involved in a collision with the Australian destroyer HMAS Voyager, sinking the smaller ship and killing 81 of her crew and one civilian dockyard worker. USS Frank E. Evans was an Allen M. Sumner-class destroyer. She was laid down on 21 April 1944, and commissioned into the United States Navy (USN) on 3 February 1945.

  21. The Unique Burial of a Child of Early Scythian Time at the Cemetery of

    Burial 5 was the most unique, it was found in a coffin made of a larch trunk, with a tightly closed lid. Due to the preservative properties of larch and lack of air access, the coffin contained a well-preserved mummy of a child with an accompanying set of grave goods. The interred individual retained the skin on his face and had a leather ...

  22. Moscow Oblast, Russia travel guide

    Moscow Oblast is located in the central part of the East European Plain, in the basin of the rivers of Volga, Oka, Klyazma, Moskva. The region stretches from north to south for 310 km, from west to east - 340 km. It was named after the city of Moscow, which however is not part of the region. Part of the administrative authorities of the region ...

  23. Elektrostal

    In 1938, it was granted town status. [citation needed]Administrative and municipal status. Within the framework of administrative divisions, it is incorporated as Elektrostal City Under Oblast Jurisdiction—an administrative unit with the status equal to that of the districts. As a municipal division, Elektrostal City Under Oblast Jurisdiction is incorporated as Elektrostal Urban Okrug.