Plan Your Stay

Quirpon lighthouse inn.

A deserted island offers the quintessential experience of lighthouse life.

Plan Your Tour

Zodiac tours.

These tours are an incredible way to get up close with icebergs and whales.

Multi-Day Tours

Contact us to plan your touring schedule with Linkum.

Cape Anguille Lighthouse Inn

Stay at our beautifully restored century-old light-keeper’s home.

Torngat Mountains National Park

Labrador Tour

Tour Overivew

A world renowned vacation experience..

Polar bears, Inuit culture and mile high mountains in Canada’s newest park. Explore northern Labrador in the Torngat Mountains National Park, with mountains over 1,600 metres, rising directly from the water in massive fjords.

  • Arrive at Basecamp on your charter flight from Goose Bay.
  • Using the zodiacs and other boats, spend days exploring the fjords that define this coastline.
  • To get a feeling for the shear isolation and scale of northern Labrador, camp out at the base of the mountains.
  • Visit Hebron , the abandoned community host to the historic Moravian church.
  • Helicopter tours are available! Seeing the mile-high mountains from above is an experience not to be missed, particularly for photos.
  • Going home on Day 8? The charter takes you back to Goose Bay. Staying for the optional 4 day hike ? Load your pack!

torngat mountains national park tours

Package Pricing

Please call for 2022 prices.

All prices are in Canadian dollars. Plus applicable taxes.

Package details

Tour the torngats, price includes.

  • Charter flight from Goose Bay to Saglek and return.
  • Accommodations in camps.
  • Shuttles around the park by speed boat and longliner.

Clients are required to supply their own clothing and sleeping bags. A suggested equipment list will be sent to you. If this adventure appeals to you contact us and we can provide more details.

Space is limited so don’t delay!

Explore the Torngats and experience Inuit culture.

This tour explores the northern extremes of Labrador. The highlight of the trip is the Torngat Mountains National Park. With mountains over a mile high, and fjords that slice into them for many miles, it is a dramatic landscape. Polar Bears and Black Bears patrol the territory while icebergs drift south from Greenland. Our days will be filled exploring the coast and fjords by boat and walking in the mountains and on the tundra. Meals will feature local foods and the entire trip will be an exploration of local Inuit culture as much as the landscape. An optional helicopter tour over the mountains and seashore to view the park, icebergs and animals is available. When we set out to explore the Torngats prepare to be awestruck by the magnificent scenery and landscape viewed through an Inuit cultural lens. Our past clients agree – living day to day with our Inuit partners not only brought their history alive but also added unexpected depth to our understating of the land and the sea. Traditional food was often our daily fare, from fresh arctic char cooked on hot rocks over an open fire at sunset to snacking on traditional plants as we hike. In all our adventures, we endeavour to remove anything that can come between the traveler and the experience. In Labrador one of the subtlest barriers to truly appreciating the land and the Inuit world is our own culture. Step away from the trappings of western society and allow our Inuit hosts to introduce you to an ancient and still vibrant world. We travel only with what we need to remain safe and comfortable but we leave behind the excess accoutrements that actually separate us from appreciating the experience.

Keeping You Safe

Never underestimate wildlife..

Safety – Our primary concern is safety. Our guides are experienced on the land and trained in a wide range of emergency situations specific to this area.

A bit about Polar Bears:

Polar bears are present in the Torngat Mountains year round. As a consequence we take every precaution to ensure your safety. At all times you will be accompanied by two guides including an armed Inuit guide, and at night you will camp in areas that are surrounded by an electric and alarmed fence. In addition, your Linkum Tours guide will have a trained and experienced bear dog that will accompany you on all excursions.

Nature & Culture in Perfect Balance

Tours to suit your tastes and pace..

This is a place where untouched nature and vibrant cultures blend to create perfect memories. Icebergs, whales and birds await you in Newfoundland, while polar bears patrol the rugged landscape of Labrador.

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Pitsik Dried Char

Experiences

Torngat mountains national park, the inuit story, perspectives of the land, walk in the footsteps of inuit ancestors.

Visitors to the park have the opportunity to experience this breath-taking landscape together with Inuit. Excursions into the park by air, by sea or on foot deepen visitors’ understanding of the connections between the majestic wild nature of this special place and the enduring cultural traditions of its people.

Torngat Mountains Base Camp and Research Station  offers visitors daily excursions from base camp into the park and the surrounding landscape. Parks Canada staff provide interpretive programming on all trips in the park, and with logistical support from Torngat Mountains Base Camp, we are able to offer visitors a wide range of experiences. Here you will find descriptions of some of the day trips many visitors will have an opportunity to experience.

The remote and wild landscape of Torngat Mountains National Park is an Inuit homeland. Inuit have thrived here for centuries, travelling and hunting with their families along the shores of the Labrador Sea. Today, as evidenced by the mythology of Inuit and a deep sense of spirituality, the relationships between the land, animals, and Inuit still hold strong. The park offers visitors a unique opportunity to explore the deep connections between a place and its people.  The Spirits of Sallikuluk (Rose Island) Picnic, Hike, and Swim at Silluak (North Arm) Tea at the Old Village in Ramah

Amid the towering mountains and wide valleys of Torngat Mountains National Park, polar bears and caribou roam beside deep fjords as icebergs and glaciers brush against some of the earth’s oldest rocks. The spectacular wilderness of this park is home to a wide array of arctic flora and fauna, inspiring local Inuit and researchers to work together to learn from the land. Experience the rich stories of the natural world in this special place and discover the wonders of healthy, thriving Arctic ecosystems. Bears and Bergs by Boat “Micro” Torngats - Plants and Insects Hike Some of the Oldest Rocks in the World

Related links

This Spectacular Canadian Wildlife Reserve Is So Remote, You Can Only Get There Five Weeks a Year

Among serious adventure seekers, word is spreading about Torngat Mountains National Park—an Inuit-run reserve in Labrador, Northeastern Canada

Adam Leith Gollner, Travel + Leisure

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Canada’s Inuit people call the polar bear nanuk. In Torngat Mountains National Park, an Inuit-run nature reserve in the northernmost part of Labrador, I lost count of how many nanuk s I saw, often just yards away, in the space of four days. As I skimmed the bottle-green depths of the park’s spectacular fjords in a Zodiac, they appeared everywhere: prowling the coastline, paddling through the shallows, surveying their dominion from the barren mountainsides.

My guides were three senior members of the Inuit community: Jacko Merkuratsuk and cousins John and Paul Jararuse. They explained that polar-bear populations in northeastern Canada are not just healthy but may actually be on the rise, thanks to regional conservation programs. They pointed out a mother and her two cubs swimming across a bay, their snouts and little round ears poking out of the frigid waves. We were able to get so close we could hear them hissing, a warning sound not unlike steam escaping from an engine. After peering at us and huffing a few times, the creatures chugged toward land, leaped onto shore, and began lumbering away over the boulders at remarkable speed. I stared after them in astonishment: I had never seen wildlife of such grandeur before.

The nanuk commands serious respect among Inuit people, and with good reason. On arriving at the Torngat Mountains Base Camp, every visitor has to watch a half-hour video about staying alive in polar-bear country. The film makes it clear that the bears are highly intelligent and, as the alpha predator in these parts, not to be underestimated. The recommended response to a surprise face-to-face encounter goes as follows: aim desperate punches at the animal’s nose and, as the narrator shouted into our screen, “FIGHT FOR YOUR LIFE!”

Fortunately, there’s a sizable team of rifle-bearing Inuit guards in the park, and no visitor is allowed to venture beyond the buffer zone surrounding the base camp’s fenced-in, electrified perimeter without being accompanied by at least one of them. Several years ago, I was told, a group of hikers who attempted an overnight trip without notifying the guards were attacked as they slept in their tents, and one was mauled nearly to death. The lesson was clear: in the Torngats, if it’s humans versus the wilderness, the wilderness will win.

Like many Canadians, I’m fascinated by the idea of the far north, and by the possibility of connecting with and learning from the people whose ancestors inhabited this land long before European settlers arrived. Labrador borders my home province of Quebec, yet no Quebecker I know has ever been to the region. That’s partly because it’s complicated and expensive to get there, but also because, until the Torngat Mountains National Park’s visitor-friendly base camp was upgraded in 2010, there weren’t many places to stay. The camp, which doubles as a research facility, is open for just four or five weeks of the year, from late July to late August — the only time it’s warm enough to visit. Guests spend their days taking guided expeditions into the wilderness: hiking is the way to explore by land, helicopter by air, and Zodiac by sea.

The name Torngat means Place of Spirits in Inuktitut, the Inuit language. In the past, Inuit shamans would venture into this mountainous, 3,745-square-mile wilderness to communicate with the spirit realm. The park is located in the far northern tip of the remote, rugged province of Newfoundland and Labrador, within the autonomous Inuit region of Nunatsiavut. Inuit lived there year-round until the completion of a government-led relocation effort in 1959. One of the Inuit community’s guiding principles is defined by the phrase, “You find what you seek.” Should you be the kind of traveler who seeks a profound sense of our planet’s majesty, you will find it there.

Paul Jararuse

Some rocks in the Torngats are almost 4 billion years old, making them among the oldest on earth. Simply being on my feet felt like straddling history — I could sense a kind of primeval energy billowing up from the ground. The mountains are geological mille-feuilles striated with ancient minerals in layers of ocher, copper, and taupe. In the park cafeteria one morning, I met a geologist who told me about the origins of this extraordinary topography, explaining that, many millennia ago, continental rifts caused the earth’s mantle to burst through its surface. In a way, he said, this is what the planet would look like turned inside out.

The park isn’t simply one of Canada’s most striking corners ; it also embodies the nation’s efforts at reconciliation with its aboriginal peoples. The Inuit and their predecessors have inhabited Arctic Labrador for millennia, but during the 1950s, the government forced those communities to relocate southward, mainly to the towns of Nain, Hopedale, and Makkovik, where they were cut off from their way of life and underwent the notorious traumas of Canada’s residential school system. As part of land-claim settlements signed in 2005, the federal government agreed to hand control of this territory back to the Labrador Inuit and, in 2008, delivered on its promise to protect the Torngat region by granting it full national park status.

Flying there takes anywhere from a day or two up to a week, depending on the weather. This is the Arctic: scheduling extra days for contingencies is recommended. A fisheries researcher I met on the trip told me he recently sat through 10 days of storms waiting for flights to resume. “A week and a half late! The wife back home was pretty furious, eh?”

I was luckier. Arriving at Labrador’s Goose Bay airport with my friend John Cullen, who took the photographs for this story, I found our flight was due to take off within a few hours of its scheduled departure time. Once the conditions were right, a Twin Otter took us to Nain, the province’s northernmost town, and then an hour or so north to Saglek Bay, just outside the park. The plane, though cold and cramped, delivered a series of mind-blowing glimpses of the landscape below. I watched a pod of porpoises skim through the turquoise surface of the Labrador Sea and moose roam through the swaths of coniferous woodland covering the rocky Canadian Shield. The terrain was broken up by mirror-gray lakes, violet waterways, and forest-green bays. Then the spruce trees began to get smaller and sparser, until there were no trees anymore. We were now above the tree line, in the Arctic tundra .

Soon, we were out over the ocean, a wrinkled cerulean tapestry broken, here and there, by icebergs. Then we entered a patch of cloud. The air in the plane grew colder. When the mist began to part, huge shapes appeared in the distance, indistinct at first. I couldn’t tell if they were mountains or some kind of low-air-pressure-induced hallucination. These were the Torngats, their glacier-capped peaks protruding above the clouds.

“What an incredible flight!” I exclaimed to the pilot as we stepped out onto the gravel landing strip at Saglek. “You haven’t even seen the really beautiful stuff yet,” she said. “This is just the beginning.”

Arriving at Torngats base camp must feel a little like arriving on the moon. Part of the reason for that is the accommodation: a series of extraterrestrial-looking green geodesic domes, each of which comes equipped with propane heaters — crucial for getting through the chilly Arctic nights. The outer-space effect is compounded by the fact that the archaeologists, naturalists, and other scientists who use the camp as a research station, as well as many of the Inuit staff, often walk around in full-body mosquito suits, moon boots, and snow pants to protect themselves against the elements and the bugs. You’re also cut off from the rest of the world. There is a satellite phone for emergencies, and a weak Internet signal can sometimes be accessed in the cafeteria, but that’s it. Guests become part of a tiny human enclave set within a vast, permafrost wilderness.

On our first afternoon, we set off to explore the coastline by boat. Within minutes, we came across a massive iceberg drifting gently through the doldrums of the Labrador Sea like a blazing white palace. Everyone knows that the majority of any iceberg is actually submerged, but there’s something transformative about seeing the mansion-size tip with your own eyes, and contemplating what lies beneath. We could hear what’s known as the “bergy seltzer” — a popping soda-like sound caused by thousand-year-old air escaping from pockets in the ice.

Torngat Mountains National Park

Beyond all the polar bears , I was amazed at how much wildlife we spotted from the water as we toured the park coastline, from caribou on the tundra to bearded seals frolicking off the ice floes. Looking down through gin-clear water to the ocean floor, we could see colonies of sea urchins everywhere — enough uni to last several lifetimes. At one point, we rounded a headland to see a minke whale breaching right in front of our boat, flashing its dorsal fin as if flirting with us.

I asked John Jararuse what went through his mind when taking in such sights. “Home,” was his simple reply. Later that morning, he steered our boat into another fjord to show us a little plateau of greenery just above the shoreline, with nothing but a soaring wall of rocks as shelter. “This is where I was born,” he said. We all bobbed there in silence for a moment, imagining the drama of birth in such an open environment, so far from a hospital or modern comforts of any kind.

Inuit livelihoods have changed radically over the past half-century. Hunting and fishing are still a way of life, but these days, Merkuratsuk and the Jararuses live in Nain year-round, traveling to the Torngats for seasonal work. John Jararuse spoke to us of the painful realities he had experienced during the resettlements, being separated from his home and loved ones. But all the Inuit I met on this trip shared a sense of optimism and relief that this place has been returned to its rightful custodians. “Now that this is a national park, it will be safe for other generations,” Paul Jararuse said.

As we navigated the coastline, our guides talked about the old ways, how their families had thrived on this land, of their own happy childhoods here. They’d lived in the Torngats year-round, spending winter in igloos and sod houses at first and, later on, in homes they’d built in a now-abandoned community named Hebron. To survive in such an extreme climate (it’s so cold that, in places, the ground stays frozen all year) they relied on skills developed by their ancestors centuries earlier. These included being able to identify the medicinal properties of an array of fantastical-sounding indigenous plants. Their pharmacopoeia included a medicinal cottony grass called suputaujak, whose fluffy white seeds can be inserted into ear canals to help with earaches or used to staunch a newborn’s bleeding navel. They’d chew a tundra flower called the river beauty to prevent nosebleeds and mix black crowberries with fish roe and seal blubber to make suvalik, a kind of Inuit ice cream. As kids, they’d rub the leaves of northern bunchberry plants on their faces and giggle at the tickling sensations they caused.

As we bounced around through the waves, every new vista brought a fresh astonishment, from the shock of sudden color on a mossy hillside to the tranquility of mist curling through the opalescent bays. The mountains seemed as imposing and impressive as cathedrals of stone. In places, erosion had caused some of them to shatter apart into piles of scree deposits, which in turn had gradually formed rivulets of what look like crushed Oreo cookies. We saw Mount Razorback, ridged with jagged points, and Blow Me Down Mountain. “The name describes it, I’d say,” Merkuratsuk offered. “It’s windy up there. People have gotten blown off mountaintops here and died.”

On our last night, two Inuit throat singers joined us around the campfire, chanting in transcendental tones. In the past, missionaries forbade these songs, branding them demonic. Fortunately, the tradition survived, and anyone hearing the singers today can’t help being transfixed by the way they emulate the sound of wind coursing past rocks or water rushing along a riverbed.

The northern lights appear

As they sang, the northern lights appeared overhead, bright green vectors arcing through the firmament like gigantic flashlights. As we stood there next to the bonfire, our heads craned upward, it felt like something, or someone, was shining immense tunnels of light through the sky in order to survey its territory.

“How can you not believe in spirits in a place like this?” asked Evie Mark, a throat singer and cultural liaison for the park. “I sing to them all the time — to the spirit of the elements, of the mountains, of the rivers.”

These elements are perhaps at their most breathtaking in the corridor of cliffs rising above Tallek Arm, off Nachvak fjord. We were lucky enough to take a helicopter ride to that part of the park and, from above, got a sense of how the minerals leaching out of the mountains affect the surrounding waters. Some rivers were deep black, while other bodies of water shimmered with iridescent tones ranging from magenta to jade. Near Little Ramah Bay, we spotted a lake the pale blue of milky sapphires.

Arctic char drying

On my final afternoon, I joined a group of the staff on a fishing excursion. After casting for a while, I sat down on the shore next to Andrew Andersen, the park’s half-Inuit, half-Australian visitor-experience coordinator. “Guests want to hike and see polar bears and icebergs — all that’s super, but we also like it when visitors want to engage with us Inuit,” he told me. “A lot of people come here without knowing that this culture — our culture — is here. Many of them say that coming here changed their life, that it made them think in different ways.”

Andersen’s father, William Andersen III, was the president of the Labrador Inuit Association during the nineties and early aughts, and he played a key role in the talks that led to the national park status for Torngats. Andersen told me how his father spoke of this region as the Inuit gift to the rest of Canada and, by extension, the rest of the world. For travelers lucky enough to come here, that gift brings with it the chance to see this place as the Inuit do: as a land alive with elemental forces.

When I mentioned this to Andersen, he said that the relationship goes both ways. “Seeing this place the way you see it — the way newcomers react to things we’re familiar with — is also a gift for us, because it constantly allows us to see our homeland through fresh eyes and to be reminded of how special this place is,” he said. “Like all true gifts, it benefits the giver as much as the receiver.”

How to Visit Torngat Mountains National Park

Set aside a week for a trip to this icy, rugged wilderness. You’ll need to plan carefully, but the experience will be unforgettable.

Getting There

Air Canada flies to Labrador’s Goose Bay airport from major U.S. hubs. From there, Parks Canada will arrange a puddle-jumper to Nain and, from there, a private charter flight to the Torngat landing strip. Weather delays are common and can last several days, so schedule extra time for contingencies.

Tour Operator

The park is open to visitors for only five weeks a year, so book well in advance. Base camp accommodations—huts and fiberglass domes — can comfortably accommodate up to six people and come with electricity and propane heaters. It is also possible to camp within the fenced-in property, in either your own tent or one provided by the park. In all cases, bathrooms and showers are shared. The four- or seven-night Tuttuk package, available through the park authority’s website, includes lodging, meals, guided excursions, cultural activities, and flights to and from Goose Bay. thetorngats.com ; from $4,978 per person. Helicopter tours start at $750.

What to bring

Pack wool socks, hiking boots, long johns, and rainproof gear; a down jacket and pants may also come in handy. Sunscreen and bug spray are essential.

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Newfoundland & Wild Labrador: A Torngat Mountains Adventure

15 days | take an exploration aboard the ocean endeavour to newfoundland and wild labrador.

Torngat Mountains NP, Labrador, Canada

Take an arctic and coastal expedition aboard the Ocean Endeavour ship with this 15-day adventure through Newfoundland and Labrador. Visit Gros More and Torngat Mountains National Parks, uncover remote communities rich with history, learn firsthand from Inuit guides local to the area, hike through fascinating landscapes and learn about the geology from onboard experts. Spot countless marine wildlife like seabirds, walruses, whales, seals, falcons, eagles and polar bears and maybe even spot some black bears and caribou, too! If you’re a nature-lover who loves an adventure off the beaten track – this is for you.

Trip overview

  • Take an adventure aboard the Ocean Endeavour, where you’ll be guided by experts on daily Zodiac excursions, take in-depth workshops and presentations, and enrich your understanding of this complex corner of the world.
  • Hike through the expansive Gros Morne National Park – a UNESCO World Heritage site in Newfoundland – and explore the Tablelands where the mineral-rich rocks are an eerie example of what lies beneath the Earth’s crust.
  • Learn about Inuit history, culture and way of life in Nain and Hebron and take the unique opportunity to explore their communities with local guides who have local insight.
  • Spend four days exploring the mountainous tundra of Torngat Mountains National Park, where some of Canada’s highest peaks can be found. Visit archaeological sites and look out for polar bears, black bears and falcons.
  • Sail through Hudson Strait and look out for marine mammals, whales, seals, polar bears, walruses and seabirds in the Arctic waters.
  • Temperatures in the Arctic can be freezing. It can also get surprisingly warm when the sun comes out or with increased physical activity. It’s best to dress in layers when you journey outside. You’ll be provided with waterproof boots that are sturdy and warm. Please see the trip notes for information about what to bring.
  • Polar bears are one of the most incredible animals on the planet but are also powerful predators with little fear of humans. Therefore, knowing the guidelines surrounding any contact with polar bears is necessary. Follow your leader’s instructions and do not stray from your group – your leader carries equipment to protect you. We may need to adjust our plans to visit alternate Arctic landing sites.
  • Weather and sea ice play a pivotal part in this adventure, and although there’s an itinerary in place, there are no guarantees that you’ll be able to do everything planned. Flexibility and openness to embracing the unexpected are important in expedition travel, especially in remote areas.

Bienvenue! Welcome to France. Just off the shores of Newfoundland lie the islands of Saint-Pierre and Miquelon—an official territory of the French Republic. A charter flight is included early this morning from St Johns, Canada. When you arrive, you can admire the colourful shops and the town’s historical character before you board the Ocean Endeavour tonight.

  • Expedition Cruise Ship (1 night)

A pre expedition cruise meeting will be held the night before this trip at a hotel in St Johns. At this meeting you will be able to meet your fellow travellers, receive your expedition jacket and information about your included charter flight the following morning. Details of this meeting will be provided closer to your departure date. We recommend you book an additional nights accommodation in St Johns so as you can join this pre expedition cruise meeting.

Over the next two days, you’ll journey through the beautiful windswept coast of southern Newfoundland, dotted with bays, coves and a few remote outport communities. Admire outstanding geology and botanical life, explore scenic coastlines and spot abundant birds, whales and other wildlife as your group makes the most of every opportunity with Zodiac cruises and land excursions.

  • Expedition Cruise Ship (2 nights)
  • Breakfast (2)

Today, you’ll hike through the incredible Gros Morne National Park. Soak in the extraordinary views of beautiful Bonne Bay and explore the park’s interpretation centre. You’ll also explore the town of Woody Point. Witness the spectacular Tablelands – a 600 m plateau that forms one of the world’s best examples of exposed mantle. Normally found below the Earth’s crust, the mineral-rich rocks support very little life, making the Tablelands an eerie landscape.

Today, you’ll experience the rugged beauty and fascinating history of Battle Harbour – Newfoundland and Labrador's hidden gem. This restored 19th-century fishing village is on a small island in the Labrador Sea, once the saltfish capital of the world. Step back to the 1800s and immerse yourself in the village's rich history as you explore the National Historic District, which has been restored to its original state.

Wander the southern Labrador coast today, where you’ll find coastal barrens, high subarctic tundra, high boreal forest, mid-boreal forest, string bog and diverse islands. Your onboard team will look for opportunities for exciting Zodiac cruises or hikes whenever possible during expedition landings.

Today you’ll visit thriving Nain – the most northerly community in Labrador and the administrative capital of Nunatsiavut. Stop in at the historic Moravian church and learn about its history, listen to the brass band and visit Illusuak – the new cultural centre by the waterfront. The cultural centre showcases the history, language and culture of the Inuit of Labrador and is a place where the community gathers. Get to know the locals and see the abundant arts and handicrafts throughout Nain, where many of your expedition team members call home. Explore the community through walking tours and scenic hikes and take the opportunity to create long-lasting cultural connections.

Step back to the historical site of Hebron today, which preserves a Moravian Mission station dating back to the 1830s. Visit the old church, where Inuit who resided in 1959 learned they would be forced to relocate. A plaque here commemorates this history and the apology to people affected by the relocations issued by the government of Newfoundland and Labrador in 2005. Listen to the stories your guides share and meet former Hebron residents and their kin, who continue to visit the site to hunt and fish nearby.

Spend the next four days exploring treeless, mountainous tundra in Torngat Mountains National Park, where some of Canada’s highest peaks east of the Rockies can be found. Hike, visit archaeological sites and hop on daily Zodiac cruising excursions. Inuit of Nunatsiavut will be your guides through their spiritual homeland, as they play a key role as partners in the management of the park. Many see the park as a portal for the understanding of Inuit culture. Torngat is derived from the Inuttut word ‘tongait’, meaning ‘place of spirits’, where Inuit shamans travelled to connect with higher powers. During your adventures, look out for marine mammals, polar bears, black bears, caribou, falcons and eagles.

  • Expedition Cruise Ship (4 nights)
  • Breakfast (4)

Over the next two days, you’ll sail through the beautiful bay of Hudson Strait – named for bygone explorer Martin Frobisher. Stay on the lookout for wildlife, such as polar bears, seabirds, walruses, and different species of whales and seals. Your geologists aboard the ship will also teach you about the fascinating geology of the area – don’t be surprised if, after this trip, you have a new affinity for rocks! Take in the sweeping scenery and the wonder of the Arctic.

Today, you’ll say goodbye to the Ocean Endeavour and head to Iqaluit, where you’ll take a charter flight to Ottawa, Canada. This is where your trip comes to an end. If you need to book accommodation in Ottawa, just speak to your booking agent.

It is recommended that you book an extra night in Ottawa, as your flight will arrive in the late afternoon or evening.

14 breakfasts, 13 lunches, 14 dinners

Expedition cruise ship, zodiac

Expedition cruise ship (14 nights)

Dates and availability

Important notes.

This trip includes an early morning charter flight from St Johns, Canada to Saint-Pierre, France on day one We recommend you book one nights hotel accommodation in St Johns Canada the night prior to starting your trip.

This trip also includes a charter flight from Iqaluit to Ottawa, Canada on the last day of the trip. We recommend you book one nights hotel accommodation in Ottawa on the last day of the trip as the charter flight arrives into Ottawa in the evening of the last day.

SPECIAL BOOKING CONDITIONS This trip is operated by our partner Adventure Canada on board the Ocean Endeavour ship.

You are required to pay a non-refundable deposit of AUD3000, USD2000, EUR1800, NZD3200, GBP1700, CAD2800, CHF2000 or ZAR34,900 per person per trip for your booking to be confirmed.

Final payment is due 120 days before your trip departure date.

If a booking is cancelled up to 120 days before departure, 50% of the non refundable deposit per person per cruise will be held as a future Travel credit. If a booking is cancelled from 91 days to 120 days before departure, a 65% cancellation fee will apply. If a booking is cancelled at 90 days or less before departure, a 100% cancellation fee will apply.

Please refer to our "Booking terms and conditions" page on our website for all Adventure Canada terms and conditions.

COVID 19 VACCINATION All customers must be fully vaccinated against covid19 to join this trip. Adventure Canada also strongly recommends all customers to keep up to date with their booster shots to maximise your own personal safety.

Want an in-depth insight into this trip? Essential Trip Information provides a detailed itinerary, visa info, how to get to your hotel, what's included - pretty much everything you need to know about this adventure and more.

Check back later or explore reviews for similar trips.

Labrador and Torngat Explorer

  • Get inspired by the possibilities.
  • Build your ideal trip.
  • Venture into Torngat National Park, home to stunning landscapes & wildlife
  • Explore the viking site L'Anse aux Meadows with a resident archaeologist
  • Visit the northernmost settlement in Labrador, Hebron's Moravian mission
  • Navigate narrow fjords in search of whales, walruses, and seals
  • Small Ship Cruises
  • Adventure Options
  • Village Visits
  • Whale Watching
  • Wildlife Viewing
  • Atlantic Coast
  • Baffin Island
  • Canadian Maritimes
  • Newfoundland & Labrador
  • North America
  • L'Anse aux Meadows
  • Newfoundland
  • Nova Scotia
  • Battle Harbor
  • Button Islands
  • Gros Morne National Park
  • Monumental Island

Full Itinerary

Day 1: embark in louisbourg, nova scotia, day 2: gros morne national park.

  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner

Day 3: L'Anse aux Meadows

Day 4: battle harbour, day 5: hopedale, day 6: hebron, day 7: torngat mountains national park, day 8: nachvak fjord, day 9: martin bay | button islands, day 10: monumental island, day 11: disembark in iqaluit.

  • 1 Breakfast

Akademik Sergey Vavilov

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torngat mountains national park tours

Torngat Mountains National Park in Newfoundland, Canada

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Torngat Mountains National Park

Top choice in Labrador

Named from the Inuktitut word torngait (place of spirits), this national park is the ancestral home of Inuit and their predecessors. Its spectacular wilderness features herds of caribou, polar bears and even seals in a freshwater habitat. The park comprises 9700 sq km, extending from Saglek Fjord in the south, including all islands and islets, to the very northern tip of Labrador. No superlatives can do the beauty of this place justice.

Visitation is difficult since there is only plane and boat access. The park office is in Nain.

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Small-Ship Expedition Cruise

Greenland & Wild Labrador: A Torngat Mountains Adventure

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Small-ship expedition cruise greenland & wild labrador: a torngat mountains adventure.

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Take a hike in Torngat Mountains National Park

Marvel at the gorgeous fjords, landscapes ablaze with autumn colours, and wonderful wildlife sighting opportunities, including the possibility of both polar and black bears .

Travel to one of the least-visited coastlines in the country—the Torngats are simply unbeatable!

Some of the tallest mountains in Canada east of the Rockies form the backdrop to this national park, the only one initiated and staffed entirely by Inuit.

Cross the Arctic Circle

Enjoy the stunning mountain scenery of Kangerlussuaq Fjord (Søndre Strømfjord) as you sail south from Kangerlussuaq to Baffin Bay.

At 190 kilometres in length, this incredible waterway showcases some of Greenland’s finest scenery.

Enjoy your special moment of crossing the Arctic Circle , catch a glimpse of the Greenland ice cap, and watch for Northern Lights above the mountain peaks.

Visit Nuuk, Greenland’s intriguing capital

Take your time to wander the city of Nuuk, which offers a fascinating glimpse into Greenland ’s history—and future.

Enjoy the bustle of activity at the art galleries, cafés, and restaurants that possess a strong Scandinavian influence in their design, architecture, and flavours.

Look a little closer and you will see modern Inuit artworks and historic buildings from the whaling era dotting the streets, too.

Be sure to visit the excellent museum , offering a deep dive into the fascinating history and culture of Greenland.

Enjoy a warm Inuit welcome in Nain, capital of Nunatsiavut

Journey to lovely Labrador, where few have had the pleasure of going; fewer still have carried onwards to Nunatsiavut , the Inuit region of which Nain is the administrative capital.

Stop in at the historic Moravian church , enjoy the vibrant musical tradition, and peruse plenty of art and handicrafts that await you.

Adventure Canada has a family connection here and you can expect a very warm welcome.

Visit the restored Viking archaeological site at L’Anse aux Meadows

Travel back in time to the only authenticated Norse archeological site in all of North America, L’Anse aux Meadows —a must-see!

Learn more about the Viking settlement here, first discovered in the 1960s and now reconstructed, with a fabulous interpretation centre and wonderful guides in period costume who bring Viking history to life.

Ocean Endeavour

Our spacious, ice-strengthened vessel features twenty Zodiacs, and advanced navigation equipment. A doctor, paramedic, medical clinic, and enhanced health regime offer peace of mind. Roomy facilities offer comfortable travel with plenty of breathing room for all.

Explore Magazine

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Explore Magazine

Hiking Through the Remote, Northern Torngat Mountains National Park, Newfoundland and Labrador

Melody Wren

Melody Wren

April 15, 2021

torngat mountains national park tours

The view in front of me has a spectacular coastline, and when I turn around, the steep and rugged Torngat Mountains in their beautiful fall colours both dwarf and inspire me.

We often fly to other parts of the world seeking beauty, other cultures and traditions and to meet people with different backgrounds. I found all those elements right in our own country on a trip to the Torngat Mountains National Park . It was my last trip before Covid-19.

I was on a small expedition ship with Adventure Canada, spending part of the trip travelling down the eastern coastline of Labrador, with daily hikes exploring the different areas within the national park. Inuit guides and interpreters shared their love of the country and culture with us.

You can’t enter the park without a bear monitor. Adventure Canada has access to the Torngat Mountains because of the Indigenous locals working as staff on board that double as bear patrols because of the high number of polar and black bears.

torngat mountains national park tours

Conversations with the Inuit bear monitors guiding are filled with the history of the park mixed with Inuit history. The strong lure to travel to the Torngats are the low numbers of visitors every year as its only accessible five weeks out of the year, with less than 600 people visiting annually compared to Banff National Park with 4.09 million. The weather changed to clear blue skies with sunshine as we approached the Torngat Mountains. The name comes from the Inuktitut word Tongait, meaning “place of spirits.” Once I started hiking through it, the mystical, sacred and magical parts of it were as crystal clear as the icebergs. The park has been called “the lost corner of Labrador” as it’s so inaccessible physically.

We anchored and took zodiacs to a small landing site in Ramah. Heavy rain cleared and the sun, along with a full rainbow behind the mountains, highlighted the same spectrum of fall colors in the tundra blanketing the hills. Mountains sculpted by glacial ice lured hikers high up in the hills, while others lingered near waterfalls next to caves.

I traversed a tricky wide stream, one booted foot in the cold water and one to plonk onto the next rock, and repeat. I wanted to get to the other side to see the relics of Inuit life from hundreds of years ago, including fragments of homes and pieces of stoves set in the wilderness. Talking to our Inuit guide, Derek, he told us that the longest solo hunting trip he had taken in winter was 66 days. I love being on this land, but it’s the people that are making it a rich experience.

torngat mountains national park tours

As we hiked, I chatted to our Inuit guides about their background and the traditions they are bringing back to daily life including tattoos on wrists, ankles and arms, representing the mountains we hiked through, the water, caribou and hunting spears. After hiking, we continued our chats onboard, our hands warming around mugs of tea, their hands beautifully adorned with traditional tattoos, mine bare, not wearing my history but wishing I were.

Sharing pieces of their backgrounds set the tone for the journey. We were encouraged to ask questions and to abandon pre-existing ideas. It can be difficult to talk about culture, which requires a lot of honesty and openness on both sides. Reconciliation was openly discussed throughout the voyage. Learning more about Inuit culture and traditions became a focus of my journey in miles and personally .

Hiking onto a beach in Nachvak Fjord gave us a chance to hike around the deep fjord. Our hiking group was scattered on the beach when our guide spotted three polar bears on the far side of the fjord. Two of the bears started swimming close to our protected zone. The guide quickly gathered us together and urged us to move quickly to board waiting zodiacs. Hiking any day through the Torngats, we had to be prepared to change course because of wildlife or bad weather, all adding to the enjoyment and adrenalin.

torngat mountains national park tours

A favourite stand-out, purely magical day was at Eclipse Sound. We spent a sunny morning hiking where multi-hued colours were highlighted in the dense growth. Rivers, waterfalls, frequent wildlife sightings, rainbows during the day and northern lights at night helped me to understand the reason the area is the spiritual home of Inuit. Seals were spotted, caribou swam offshore and, once again, we saw polar bears. I remember feeling like I was part of a movie set because it was such a record-breaking memorable day. How did I not know how beautiful northern Labrador was?

The day we anchored near St. John’s Harbour, part of the Torngat Mountains base camp, we set out in three different hiking groups: extreme, ridge hike and a waterfall hike. I was part of the last group.  After hearing so much about base camp, it was interesting to finally see the camp of permanent buildings with plastic igloo-shaped domes to stay in. The domes are the only place to stay in unless you are staying on an expedition ship anchored nearby.

torngat mountains national park tours

Beyond base camp, colorful tundra and cascading waterfalls were surrounded by multi-textured rock formations making an incredible backdrop to our hike. Seeing the bear monitors with rifles strapped to their backs nearby kept it realistic. The monitors kept looking for bear scat on the trails and broken branches. We couldn’t stray from the trails because of the lurking dangers and had to be respectful. After all, we were in a natural environment encroaching on the bears territory—they weren’t in ours. Offshore, we spotted minke whale spouts. The area felt so remote, I had to remind myself that I was still in Canada.

Every day was such a gift to see so much beautiful scenery and wildlife while forming new connections. I was sad to leave so much behind, but I knew I would keep in touch with many of the people I met along the way.

torngat mountains national park tours

Background information : Torngat Mountains National Park is at the most northern tip of Labrador, on an Inuit-run reserve. Running along the border with Quebec on the west side and the Labrador Sea on the east, the park is huge at 6,237 miles, and it’s not easy to get to. In the summer, visitors can take a plane north from the town of Happy Valley-Goose Bay in central Labrador or visit by ship which visits once a year.

Disclaimer: Melody was hosted by Adventure Canada. The article was neither approved nor reviewed by them. Explore was not affiliated with this press trip.

For more information, visit Adventure Canada .

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torngat mountains national park tours

It's everything you hike for.

Vast and vibrant, illuminating and inspiring. Encounter nature like few on earth have ever done.

Whether you’re a novice or a highly experienced backpacker, The Torngats are the outdoor adventure of a lifetime.

torngat mountains national park tours

We are pleased to offer an exciting new experience for our visitors: a ridge hiking excursion. Participants take an 8 minute flight from Base Camp to a nearby mountain ridge where they spend the day overlooking some of the park’s most spectacular landscapes. A short tour of the surrounding area will take you back to base camp for the evening. If you would like to add this unique helicopter excursion to your Torngat adventure, please enquire as to fees and scheduling.

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Nakvak Brook

Koroc Palmer 

Bears Gut to Branagin Island Valley

Base Camp to the Domes Summit 

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torngat mountains national park tours

Torngat Mountains National Park

Bears gut to branagin island valley, koroc river - palmer river loop, nakvak brook trek, traveling independently, leave no trace.

There are no roads, trails, or signs in Torngat Mountains National Park. There are, however, unmarked hiking routes and traditional Inuit travel routes marked by inuksuit. Visitors can explore the park on guided/ unguided day hikes and interpretive walks, overnight camping trips, multiday backpacking treks, and technical rock-climbing excursions.

With help and logistical support from Torngat Mountains Base Camp and Research Station, Parks Canada offers a range of day trips and overnight hiking opportunities in Torngat Mountains National Park. These are tailored for different skill and fitness levels, and there is something for everyone!

Multi-Day Backpacking

Parks Canada has prepared a number of multi-day and shorter single-day hiking route descriptions for visitors. These outline known routes and offer some interpretation of the area. Parks Canada staff have hiked these areas with visitor safety in mind and have selected the best routes possible. These route descriptions are reliable for describing the area that you are hiking in, but you must carry your own map, compass, and GPS. Do not use the route description as your only means of navigation.

Parks Canada also sets up satellite camps each summer to provide support for visitors that are looking for an overnight hiking experience. These satellite camps are big enough to hold 5-6 pup tents enclosed by a temporary bear fence. Visitors can do day hikes to and from these camps to areas of interest, ideally in the company of an Inuit bear guard.

For more information about hiking opportunities in the park, and the level of skill required for different routes, please contact Torngat Mountains National Park or Torngats Base Camp and Research Station.

Topographical Maps

For reliable hiking maps of the Torngat Mountains National Park, we recommend 1:50,000 scale NTS topographic maps. Also available are 1: 250,000 scale topographical maps. These maps are good for general route planning: 14L - Hebron 24I – George River 24P – Pointe Le Droit 14M – Cape White Handkerchief 25A – Grenfell Sound

There are a number of useful map dealers online as well as the Canada Map Office on-line search tool.

To buy 1:50,000 and 1:250,000 topographical maps go to: http://www.canmaps.com/topo/browse-topo-maps/014.html and select the map area you want coverage for.

You can also visit the Canada Map Office at: http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/earth-sciences/geography/topographic-information/maps/9771

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IMAGES

  1. Nine Reasons to Visit Torngat Mountains National Park

    torngat mountains national park tours

  2. Torngat Mountains National Park

    torngat mountains national park tours

  3. The Torngats

    torngat mountains national park tours

  4. Bucket List Guide: Torngat Mountains National Park

    torngat mountains national park tours

  5. Torngat Mountains National Park: A Treasured Gift to Canada

    torngat mountains national park tours

  6. Nine Reasons to Visit Torngat Mountains National Park

    torngat mountains national park tours

VIDEO

  1. Home (Jan’s Song) in The Torngat Mountains

  2. Labrador To The Core in The Torngat Mountains

COMMENTS

  1. Excursions

    Located just south of Torngat Mountains Base Camp, the community of Hebron was first settled by Moravian Missionaries, in 1830. Now a National Historic Site, this once-thriving and beloved Inuit settlement has a richly storied past of both triumph and tragedy, that will touch your heart. Your guided tour to Hebron is an exciting full day ...

  2. Torngat Mountains National Park

    Tour Overivew A world renowned vacation experience. Polar bears, Inuit culture and mile high mountains in Canada's newest park. Explore northern Labrador in the Torngat Mountains National Park, with mountains over 1,600 metres, rising directly from the water in massive fjords. Arrive at Basecamp on your charter flight from Goose Bay.

  3. Plan your visit

    Visitor Information for Torngat Mountains National Park Reserve of Canada. Parks Canada is pleased to assist with any questions visitors may have about visiting the Torngat Mountains National Park. Please call us at 709-922-1290 or email [email protected] for more information. The chartered flights are available for the ...

  4. Torngat Mountains National Park

    Torngat Mountains National Park takes its name from the Inuktitut word Tongait, meaning place of spirits. It is 9,700 square kilometres of spectacular wilderness stretching north from Saglek Fjord to the northern tip of Labrador, and westward from the Atlantic seacoast to the Québec border. It's a land of mountains and polar bears, small ...

  5. The Torngats

    The Torngat Mountains have been #1 on my places to see in the world for a few years now, and I've traveled a great deal. Seeing and being there was an experience of a lifetime. Congratulations - stay with your concept of minimal impact to nature and environment, preserve the pristine landscape!

  6. Torngat Mountains Safari

    As you spend your days in Torngat Mountains National Park, experience the remote beauty and unique wildlife of Arctic Canada. ... For an extra cost, take a beautiful and thrilling 1-hour aerial tour of the park by helicopter to see some of the world's most majestic fjords and peaks. Search for caribou, polar bears, and other wildlife as you ...

  7. Torngat Mountains National Park

    Torngat Mountains National Park: Torngat Mountains National Park <p> PO Box 471<br> Nain NL A0P 1L0 </p> Contact us. Telephone: 709-922-1290 EN 709-458-2417 FR ... Tour the only known Viking site and the earliest known evidence of European presence in North America. Experience Norse life and see original 11th century artifacts at this UNESCO ...

  8. Experiences

    The spectacular landscape of Torngat Mountains National Park holds centuries of Inuit cultural history in its fjords, valleys, and mountains. A variety of hiking experiences give visitors of every skill level opportunities to explore this special landscape and discover its hidden histories in the company of Inuit: light interpretive day hikes foster a deeper connection to the region; and multi ...

  9. Activities and experiences

    Visitors can explore the park on guided/ unguided day hikes and interpretive walks, overnight camping trips, multi-day backpacking treks, and technical rock-climbing excursions. With help and logistical support from Torngat Mountains Base Camp and Research Station, Parks Canada offers a range of day trips and overnight hiking opportunities.

  10. Torngat Mountains Base Camp & Research Station

    Newfoundlandlabrador.com is your online resource for discovering everything you need to know about travelling to and around Newfoundland and Labrador. Prepare to be intrigued by our rich history, culture and the natural beauty of whales, icebergs, wildlife and breathtaking scenery.

  11. This Spectacular Canadian Wildlife Reserve Is So Remote, You Can Only

    In Torngat Mountains National Park, an Inuit-run nature reserve in the northernmost part of Labrador, I lost count of how many nanuks I saw, often just yards away, in the space of four days. As I ...

  12. Newfoundland & Wild Labrador: A Torngat Mountains Adventure

    Take an arctic and coastal expedition aboard the Ocean Endeavour ship with this 15-day adventure through Newfoundland and Labrador. Visit Gros More and Torngat Mountains National Parks, uncover remote communities rich with history, learn firsthand from Inuit guides local to the area, hike through fascinating landscapes and learn about the geology from onboard experts.

  13. Plan Your Trip

    The Torngat Mountains have been #1 on my places to see in the world for a few years now, and I've traveled a great deal. Seeing and being there was an experience of a lifetime. Congratulations - stay with your concept of minimal impact to nature and environment, preserve the pristine landscape!

  14. Labrador and Torngat

    Call 1.406.541.2677. Start Planning My Trip. The coast of Labrador and Torngat Mountains amaze with their wild mountain ranges, rich history of more than three different cultures, and breathtaking wildlife viewings. Numerous wildlife species are found along this coastline, including bears, seals, whales, and migratory and resident birds.

  15. Torngat Mountains National Park

    Named from the Inuktitut word torngait (place of spirits), this national park is the ancestral home of Inuit and their predecessors. Its spectacular wilderness features herds of caribou, polar bears and even seals in a freshwater habitat. The park comprises 9700 sq km, extending from Saglek Fjord in the south, including all islands and islets, to the very northern tip of Labrador.

  16. Greenland & Wild Labrador: A Torngat Mountains Adventure

    Take a hike in Torngat Mountains National Park. Marvel at the gorgeous fjords, landscapes ablaze with autumn colours, and wonderful wildlife sighting opportunities, including the possibility of both polar and black bears.. Travel to one of the least-visited coastlines in the country—the Torngats are simply unbeatable!. Some of the tallest mountains in Canada east of the Rockies form the ...

  17. Hiking Through the Remote, Northern Torngat Mountains National Park

    Background information: Torngat Mountains National Park is at the most northern tip of Labrador, on an Inuit-run reserve. Running along the border with Quebec on the west side and the Labrador Sea on the east, the park is huge at 6,237 miles, and it's not easy to get to. In the summer, visitors can take a plane north from the town of Happy ...

  18. Torngat Mountains National Park

    These super ferries carry hundreds of vehicles and passengers to two entry points - Port aux Basques and Argentia. Marine Atlantic. +1 (800) 341 7981. www.marine-atlantic.ca. There are many places in the province that are only accessible by intra-provincial ferry system.

  19. Hiking

    Whether you're a novice or a highly experienced backpacker, The Torngats are the outdoor adventure of a lifetime. We are pleased to offer an exciting new experience for our visitors: a ridge hiking excursion. Participants take an 8 minute flight from Base Camp to a nearby mountain ridge where they spend the day overlooking some of the park ...

  20. Hiking

    For more information about hiking opportunities in the park, and the level of skill required for different routes, please contact Torngat Mountains National Park or Torngats Base Camp and Research Station. Topographical Maps. For reliable hiking maps of the Torngat Mountains National Park, we recommend 1:50,000 scale NTS topographic maps.

  21. Torngat National Park

    Torngat National Park. 544 likes · 5 were here. Learn about operating a tour or booking a tour in the Torngat Mountains National Park. Email, call or visit the website to apply to experience The...