Travel to Mexico Now

Travel to Mexico Now

Explore the Beautiful Aztec Country!

Best Travel YouTube Channels on Mexico

If you have ever looked online for some travel inspiration, you most likely have found a lot of travel YouTube channels. There are lots of them on the subject. It doesn’t matter if you’re looking for info on Europe, Latin America, Asia, you name it. You will always find videos on your desired destinations. Mexico is no exception. There are tons of videos about our country. It has been in the travel spotlight for quite some time now. What surprises me is that not only Mexicans are discovering their country through YouTube but foreigners are doing it, too! Some of them have even made Mexico their new home! In this post, I will talk about my favorite travel YouTubers in Mexico. They have been a great inspiration for many of us, not to mention they always provide firsthand, useful information. Are you still with me? Let’s get started!

Kinetic Kennons

Tablet showing YouTube.

Greg “Goyo” and Hilary “La Güera” are a young couple from Texas that have traveled across Mexico for the last 3 years. They loved our country so much that they moved to Puerto Vallarta in central Mexico. Some of their videos like the one they made about the earthquake in Mexico City (2017) and Mexican Independence Day (2019) have surpassed 1,000,000 views each. Their videos are very informative, and they provide lots of tips to make the most out of your travels in Mexico. They recently announced they would stop making videos. We weren’t given any reason, but we certainly hope they reconsider their decision. In the meantime, you can check out one of their videos below.

Tangerine Travels

Jordan and Maddie are another American couple that fell in love with Mexico. They sold everything they had and ventured out into the world. Their adventure started in Mexico, but they loved it so much that they made it their home. They currently live in Puerto Morelos near Cancún . Not only do they share with us the cool destinations they visit, but they also provide us with tips, do’s, don’ts, and what living in Mexico is like, among other things. Check them out!

Ford Quarterman

Ford a.k.a. El Gringo Loco is a free-spirited guy who has traveled extensively since 2015. He even bought a car and drove from the U.S. to Argentina on the Pan-American Highway. What I love about Ford is his authenticity. He has broken lots of stereotypes about Latin culture, particularly the Mexican one. He has traveled to places off the beaten path and has shown the world what Mexico is really like. No wonder he has been featured on TV. Unlike other YouTubers in Mexico, Ford makes his videos using a combination of English and Spanish. In fact, he speaks very good Spanish. He received his Mexican permanent residence not too long ago and spends time between Mexico and the U.S. You can watch one of his videos below.

Coreano Vlogs

It seems not only Americans love our country but people from as far as South Korea do, too! Such is the case of Christian, a young Korean guy. Not only did he move to Mexico but he also married a Mexican girl. His initial fanbase was mostly teenagers. For some reason, Korean culture has become very popular in Mexico over the years and that has helped him tremendously. He initially opened his channel to practice his Spanish, but after moving to Mexico, he started traveling extensively across the country. We can learn a lot about Mexican traditions, gastronomy, and culture in general by watching his videos. Check him out below.

This duo is composed of Jan and Mou, two German guys that left their country to pursue new adventures in Mexico. Their first videos were mostly funny sketches or comparisons between life in Mexico and Germany, but they eventually changed the focus of their channel. They speak very good Spanish, and they even have learned how to master albures (double entendre). Who would have thought? What I love about their channel is its versatility. Wherever they go, they always show us something new and we can learn from them while having fun. They have tried different “jobs” where they have helped construction workers, artisans, cooks, farmers, etc. Very funny. Check them out!

This Swiss guy married a Mexican girl and currently lives in Mexico. However, just like the name of their channel, they’re wanderers and don’t stay at the same place for a long time. They have lived in Oaxaca , Chiapas , Monterrey , among other places. His videos cover a wide range of topics: comparing life in Mexico and Europe, Mexican gastronomy, Mexican destinations, life in Mexico, etc. The videos are of excellent quality and are very informative. Some of the best videos I have seen on his channel are the ones about Mexican Independence and the Day of the Dead . Check him out!

Popurrí de Viajes

Of course, the list could not be complete without including a Mexican YouTuber. This is by far one of my favorite channels. If you ask me, I seriously think it’s underrated. The focus is 100% travel. Manuel Gibrán, its creator, shows us beautiful destinations, some of them not too well-known. He gives us great tips on how to get there, what to do, what to expect, etc. He makes emphasis on sustainable travel and is a great example of what responsible travel should be like. You can learn a lot about Mexico and get great ideas to make an itinerary for your next visit. You can check out one of his videos below.

Alan x el Mundo

Alan Estrada, the creator of this channel, never imagined the success he would have on YouTube when he started. Although he is an actor, he wasn’t as famous as he is now. He just opened his channel to share his adventures, but now, 10 years later, he has around 2.5 million subscribers. The focus of his channel is 100% travel. However, unlike the other travelers on the list, his focus is not Mexico. That doesn’t mean he doesn’t have several videos about it, though. You will love his videos. He is one of the most famous travel YouTubers in the Spanish world. Check him out.

That’s a Wrap

You may have visited some of the channels mentioned above. If not, I strongly recommend you do it. These videos come in handy when preparing for a trip. You can get tips and lots of advice to make your itinerary and make the most out of your travels. There is a stigma around YouTubers , not only travel YouTubers but of all kinds. I don’t doubt there are questionable YouTubers out there, so it’s important to be careful. I hope you liked this post and found it useful. If you liked it, please share it with your loved ones. Do you know any of the channels on this post? Let me know in the comments below. See you soon!

Book your trip now!

Book your flight

The first thing you have to do is find cheap flights. But where do you find those? There are many search engines, but the one I highly recommend is Skyscanner . Here you can compare fares from all over the world and pick the one that suits you best.

Book your accommodation

The next thing you have to do is secure your lodging. Whether you prefer a hostel, a guesthouse, a B&B, or a hotel, you can find them all on Booking . You can find lodging of all kinds ranging from cheap to expensive and somewhere in between. Many people have scored good deals using it.

Another popular option is Hostelworld . This website focuses on hostels as opposed to hotels.

Book a tour

In some places, you might want to hire a tour. Not all places are equally accessible to visit by oneself. It helps enormously when you visit with a local guide who can show you around and answer any questions you might have…all in your native language. My to-go place is Viator as they offer tours of all kinds and have a presence all over the world.

Public transportation is usually cheaper than renting a car, but it’s sometimes more complicated and time-consuming. That’s a reality. In some cases, it’s more convenient to rent a car. My recommendation is Rentalcars.com . Here you can compare rates and choose the one that fits you best.

Book your bus tickets

You can save money by booking bus tickets online. My favorite site to do this is Busbud .

Get travel insurance

Never travel without a travel insurance policy, especially during these days! Travel insurance can save your life. My recommendations are World Nomads and Insured Nomads . Both companies cover COVID-19 related incidents, which is crucial these days.

More resources

Just click on the “Plan your trip” tab at the top of this page, and you will find more resources like getting Mexican insurance for your foreign car, buying travel accessories, and learning Spanish. And, of course, don’t forget to check back often to read about more tips on Mexico travel.

Download my FREE ebook to learn more about Mexico travel! All you have to do is join our email list below.

You can unsubscribe at any time. We keep your data private and share your data only with third parties that make this service possible. Read our full Privacy Policy .

Check your inbox or spam folder to confirm your subscription.

6 Replies to “Best Travel YouTube Channels on Mexico”

Mexico has some of the most beautiful locations in the world that make for great vacation travel destinations. Additionally, there is a lot of rich history to explore scattered throughout the country! 

I really appreciate this great list of Mexico travel youtube channels to get in some nice virtual travel while we all wait for the pandemic to pass and for international travel to Mexico to open up again.

You’re most welcome. Hope you visit soon.

Aloha and thank you for sharing the best travel youtube channels on mexico.

Personally, my girlfriend and I are also travel and food vloggers so I can definitely relate.

We’ve never been to mexico before, nor have we heard of any of these channels, but I’ll sub to anyone in travel because we love travel vlogs.

Thank you for sharing!

I can’t wait to travel to mexico hopefully when this whole thing is over!

Hi, Lorenz,

That’s so cool! I might open my channel in the near future. Who knows?

Hope you visit someday. I’m sure you’ll love it.

Thanks for commenting.

Some very interesting channels there in your list! I like Kinetic Kennons, it’s a shame they are planning to stop making videos. Regarding YouTube, I think there is a lot of useful information there and I’m personally subscribed to many channels that make videos about topics I like. I haven’t been to Mexico yet but it’s on my list so I appreciate all the information you provide. Thank you!

Yes, it’s a shame they’re retiring from YouTube. I loved watching their videos.

I might open my YouTube channel in the near future, but I don’t think this is the right moment. In the meantime, we can all enjoy and dream by watching the existing content on YouTube.

I hope you visit Mexico someday. I’m sure you’ll love it.

Thanks for commenting. 🙂

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

 Yes, add me to your mailing list

  • Mobile Apps
  • Stream on discovery+
  • Program Guide
  • Ghost Adventures
  • Ghost Hunters
  • Ghost Brothers
  • Conjuring Kesha

The Dead Files

  • Destination Fear
  • Eli Roth Presents: A Ghost Ruined My Life
  • Expedition Bigfoot
  • Ghost Nation
  • The Holzer Files
  • Kindred Spirits
  • Mountain Monsters
  • Paranormal Caught on Camera
  • Portals to Hell
  • Amy Bruni and Adam Berry
  • Destination Fear Team
  • Don Wildman
  • Ghost Adventures Crew
  • The Holzer Files Team
  • Jack Osbourne and Katrina Weidman
  • Steve Dischiavi
  • Watch Live TV
  • Tips for Solo Travelers
  • 4 Gorgeous Waterfalls
  • 5 Extreme Swings
  • World's 10 Best Swimming Holes
  • Best BBQ in America
  • Tilt! at 360 Chicago

Digital Exclusives

  • Big City, Little Budget: New York
  • Big City, Little Budget: San Francisco
  • Bizarre Foods in the Kitchen
  • One Bag and You're Out

From Our Shows

  • Bizarre Foods
  • Bizarre Foods: Delicious Destinations
  • Booze Traveler
  • Expedition Unknown
  • Hotel Impossible

Mysteries at the Museum

Top domestic.

  • New Orleans
  • New York City
  • Washington, DC

Top International

  • Myrtle Beach
  • Niagara Falls
  • San Antonio

Explore By Region

  • Asia Pacific
  • Middle East & Africa
  • North America
  • South & Central America

Top Interests

  • Amusement Parks
  • Arts and Culture
  • Food and Wine
  • National Parks
  • Health and Wellness
  • Long Weekends
  • Outdoor Adventure

By Traveler

  • Family Travel
  • Girls' Getaways
  • LGBT Travel
  • Solo Travel

Travel Tips

  • Budget Tips
  • Gear and Gadgets
  • Hotels and Lodging
  • Plan Your Bucket List
  • Savvy Traveler
  • Travel's Best
  • Destinations

Mexico Video

Showing 1 - 18 of 120 results.

travel video of mexico

Things to Do in Ogunquit 10 Photos

travel video of mexico

10 Things to Do in Costa Rica With Kids 10 Photos

travel video of mexico

Marianela Behind the Scenes 10 Photos

travel video of mexico

10 Incredible Ocean Views 10 Photos

travel video of mexico

Taste of Italy: Venice 13 Photos

travel video of mexico

Things to Do in Glasgow 11 Photos

travel video of mexico

Travel's Best Beach Awards 2014 11 Photos

travel video of mexico

10 Best Things to See and Do in Greenland 11 Photos

travel video of mexico

Europe's Must-Visit Soccer Stadiums 10 Photos

travel video of mexico

The Best Toiletry Bags for Your Next Getaway 13 Photos

travel video of mexico

Starvation Heights Pictures 10 Photos

travel video of mexico

Florida's Best Parks and Beaches for $6 Fun 12 Photos

travel video of mexico

Secret Eats: Sneak Peek Pictures 16 Photos

travel video of mexico

South Dakota's Must-See Attractions 15 Photos

travel video of mexico

The 10 Newest International Museum Openings of 2019 10 Photos

travel video of mexico

Top 10 Cities for Singles 10 Photos

travel video of mexico

10 New Museums You Have to Visit in 2018 10 Photos

travel video of mexico

Jaw-Dropping Rentals 39 Photos

travel video of mexico

War Gin Pictures 10 Photos

travel video of mexico

Bizarre Foods America: West Virginia Pictures 15 Photos

travel video of mexico

12 Ultra-Stylish Belt Bags + Fanny Packs for Summer 12 Photos

travel video of mexico

Singapore Layover Journal 7 Photos

travel video of mexico

Sturgis' Most Tasty Pictures 11 Photos

travel video of mexico

World's Wackiest Races 15 Photos

travel video of mexico

Booze Traveler: Spain Pictures 9 Photos

travel video of mexico

10 Great Small Towns for Big Vacations 11 Photos

travel video of mexico

18 Ultra-Stylish Pet-Friendly Hotels 19 Photos

travel video of mexico

#VanLife: 10 Road Trip Tips 10 Photos

travel video of mexico

Outdoor Movies Around the World 15 Photos

travel video of mexico

How to Look Fancy: Caviar for Beginners 10 Photos

Follow us everywhere.

Join the party! Don't miss Travel Channel in your favorite social media feeds.

More From Travel

  • Sweepstakes
  • Stream Travel Channel
  • Ways to Watch Travel Channel

travel video of mexico

  • Privacy Notice
  • Visitor Agreement
  • Online Closed Captioning
  • California Privacy Notice
  • Accessibility
  • Discovery, Inc.
  • Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information
  • Food Network
  • Travel Channel
  • Cooking Channel
  • Discovery.com
  • © 2024 Warner Bros. Discovery, Inc. or its subsidiaries and affiliates. All rights reserved.

Woman walking in Punta Sur, Isla Mujeres, Mexico

© Marco Bottigelli / Getty

good costumer service

Check out this year's Best in Travel winners

Palm-fringed beaches, chili-spiced cuisine, steamy jungles, teeming cities, fiesta fireworks: Mexico conjures diverse, vivid dreams – and then delivers them.

Best Time to Visit

Best places to visit, leave the planning to a local expert.

Experience the real Mexico. Let a local expert handle the planning for you.

Attractions

Must-see attractions for your itinerary.

ba01413.jpg

Tulum Ruins

Tulum is one of the most visited archaeological zones in Mexico and for good reason: it’s sublime. The ruins sit on seaside cliffs, high above turquoise…

Aerial of a path between palm trees on Isla Contoy.

Parque Nacional Isla Contoy

A white sand beach with manta rays gliding through the shimmering turquoise waters. No hotels. No nightclubs. No roads or cars of any kind. It’s hard to…

Pyramid of the Sun in Teotihuacan, Mexico.

Teotihuacán

North of Mexico City

This fabulous archaeological zone lies in a mountain-ringed offshoot of the Valle de México. Site of the huge Pirámides del Sol y de la Luna (Pyramids of…

SFER IK

Wandering barefoot through the contemporary art museum at Azulik hotel, you feel like you’re in a giant cocoon. Nature surrounds you, inside and out:…

Palace Bellas Artes

Palacio de Bellas Artes

Alameda Central

Immense murals by world-famous Mexican artists dominate the top floors of this splendid white-marble palace – a concert hall and arts center commissioned…

Puerto Vallarta Botanical Garden.

Jardín Botánico de Vallarta

Puerto Vallarta

For a change of scenery from the beach, head for the tropical highlands of the Sierra Madre mountains and wander the well-curated Jardín Botánico de…

Museo Maya de Cancún

Museo Maya de Cancún

Surrounded by dense tropical forest, the contemporary Museo Maya de Cancún is a welcome respite from the beach and buffet lines of the neighboring high…

Beach in Yelapa, Mexico.

Home to a small fishing community, the picturesque beach of Yelapa hugs an emerald coastline backed by jungle-shrouded mountains. The remote coastal…

Top picks from our travel experts

The best things to do in mexico: 19 unmissable experiences.

Mercado 20 de Noviembre

Mercado 20 de Noviembre

Oaxaca City

Looking for cheap street food? Look no further. Dozens of good, clean comedores (food stalls) fill this large market where wait staff will thrust menus to…

Museo del Tequila y el Mezcal

Museo del Tequila y el Mezcal

Centro Histórico

This museum on Plaza Garibaldi has exhibits explaining the origins and production process of Mexico’s two most popular distilled agave drinks. The tour…

Los Danzantes

Los Danzantes

Excellent Mexican fusion food in a spectacular architect-designed patio makes Los Danzantes one of Oaxaca’s special dining spots. The hierba santa …

travel video of mexico

Museo Frida Kahlo

Coyoacán & San Ángel

Renowned Mexican artist Frida Kahlo was born in, and lived and died in, Casa Azul (Blue House), now a museum. Almost every visitor to Mexico City makes a…

travel video of mexico

Instituto Cultural de Cabañas

Guadalajara

Standing proudly at the eastern end of dramatic Plaza Tapatía is one of Guadalajara’s architectural landmarks, and a Unesco World Heritage site since 1997…

The ruins of the Templo Mayor in Mexico City.

Templo Mayor

Before the Spaniards demolished it, the Aztec 'Great Temple' Teocalli of Tenochtitlán covered the site where the cathedral now stands, as well as the…

Mural at Antiguo Colegio de San Ildefonso.

Antiguo Colegio de San Ildefonso

Diego Rivera, José Clemente Orozco and David Siqueiros painted murals here in the 1920s. Most of the work on the main patio is by Orozco; look for the…

500px Photo ID: 90987349 - Trumpet player in Mariachi band

Plaza Garibaldi

Every night the city’s mariachi bands belt out heartfelt ballads in this festive square. Wearing silver-studded outfits, they toot their trumpets and tune…

North America, Mexico, Oaxaca state, Oaxaca, garden in Santo Domingo church

Jardín Etnobotánico

In former monastic grounds behind the Templo de Santo Domingo, this garden features plants from around Oaxaca state, including a staggering variety of…

Trajinera or punt on the canals and floating gardens of Xochimilco Mexico City

Xochimilco Canals

Mexico City

Hundreds of colorful trajineras (gondolas) await passengers at the village’s 10 embarcaderos to paddle you through the waterways dotted with birdlife and…

Plaza de los Mariachis

Plaza de los Mariachis

Just south of Avenida Javier Mina and the Mercado San Juan de Dios, this is the very birthplace of mariachi music. By day it’s just a narrow walking…

Los Cocuyos

Los Cocuyos

Suadero (beef) tacos abound in the capital, but this always-open stand reigns supreme. Follow your nose to the bubbling vat of meats and go for the artery…

El Vilsito

Auto-mechanic shop by day, taco diner by night. No worries, though: the experts slicing down those excellent al pastor (spit-cooked pork) tacos aren't the…

travel video of mexico

Playa Carrizalillo

Puerto Escondido

Small is beautiful at Carrizalillo, set in a sheltered cove west of the center that's reached by a stairway of 157 steps. It’s popular for swimming and…

Museo Memoria y Tolerancia

Museo Memoria y Tolerancia

A mazelike, unique museum of 55 halls dedicated to preserving the memory of genocide victims. The multimedia exhibit chronicles crimes committed against…

Museo de la Tortura

Museo de la Tortura

Displaying European torture instruments from the 14th to 19th centuries, including a metal-spiked interrogation chair and the menacing skull splitter,…

Museo de Arte Popular in Mexico City.

Museo de Arte Popular

A major showcase for folk art, this is a colorful museum that even kids love. Crafts are thematically displayed from all over Mexico, including carnival…

Mano Santa Mezcal

Mano Santa Mezcal

Often compared to having a drink at home because of the cheap, quality mezcal (or because you live in a designer-school laboratory), this small bar…

Museo de la Revolución

Museo de la Revolución

This pockmarked 19th-century house was the scene of the first battle of the 1910 Revolution. The renovated house retains its bullet holes and some…

Bósforo

Blink and you might walk right past the coolest neighborhood mezcalería in town. Behind the Bósforo’s nondescript curtain await top-notch mezcals, an…

Por Siempre Vegana Taquería

Por Siempre Vegana Taquería

Vegans can join in the street-food action with soy and gluten taco versions of al pastor, loganiza (sausage) and chorizo. The late-night experience is…

Rivera's mural entitled "A Dream of a Sunday Afternoon in Alameda Park," in the Museo Mural Diego Rivera in Mexico City.

Museo Mural Diego Rivera

This museum is home to one of Diego Rivera’s most famous works, Sueño de una tarde dominical en la Alameda Central (Dream of a Sunday Afternoon in the…

Museo del Calzado El Borceguí

Museo del Calzado El Borceguí

At this shoe museum – and the oldest shoemaker in Mexico, operating since 1865 – there are over 2000 pieces of footwear on show, many from famous feet…

Pirámide Tepanapa

Pirámide Tepanapa

The incredible Pirámide Tepanapa looks more like a hill than a pyramid, but it's still the town's big draw, and with miles of tunnels veining the inside…

Mercado Medellin

Mercado Medellin

Self-caterers can stop into this colorful market for quality cuts of meat, fresh produce and nuts amongst the piñatas. It's also a popular spot for lunch:…

Planning Tools

Expert guidance to help you plan your trip.

Best Things to Do

From swimming in cenotes and eating street food to soaking up the history and culture of this vibrant nation, here are the best things to do in Mexico.

Transportation

From ski slopes and jungle to deserts and sublime stretches of sand, expect to use many transport options to get around the world's 13th biggest country.

Visa Requirements

If you’re planning a vacation in Mexico, these are some of the ins and outs of navigating its visas, tourist permits and more.

Money and Costs

Soak up history and art without spending a cent, and find out how to make every peso stretch further with our top tips for visiting Mexico on a budget.

Best Road Trips

Fuel your wanderlust on the open road in Mexico with these epic drives.

Traveling with Kids

Family is at the center of daily life in Mexico, and children are warmly welcomed almost everywhere. Here are the top things to do with little ones in tow.

Plan with a local

Experience the real Mexico

Let a local expert craft your dream trip.

travel video of mexico

Latest stories from Mexico

Filter by interest:

  • All Interests
  • Adventure Travel
  • Art & Culture
  • Beaches, Coasts & Islands
  • Food & Drink

travel video of mexico

Feb 1, 2024 • 7 min read

We asked four of our Mexico correspondents for recommendations about where they vacation in their country.

Mexico City, Mexico, ; October 26 2019: Parade of catrinas at the Day of the Dead celebrations in Mexico City ; Shutterstock ID 1665984247; your: Zach Laks; gl: 65050; netsuite: Online Editorial; full: Discover

Oct 30, 2023 • 6 min read

travel video of mexico

Oct 24, 2023 • 4 min read

travel video of mexico

Oct 18, 2023 • 7 min read

travel video of mexico

Oct 13, 2023 • 8 min read

Friends enjoying day outdoors

Oct 10, 2023 • 9 min read

Two men laughing as they walk along a beach path with bikes in Mexico

Oct 9, 2023 • 14 min read

A smiling couple walking down a street in Mexico while holding hands

Oct 8, 2023 • 5 min read

A woman sitting near the main pyramid at Chichen Itza in Mexico

Oct 7, 2023 • 14 min read

travel video of mexico

Aug 24, 2023 • 4 min read

in partnership with getyourguide

Book popular activities in Mexico

Purchase our award-winning guidebooks.

Get to the heart of Mexico with one of our in-depth, award-winning guidebooks, covering maps, itineraries, and expert guidance.

Mexico and beyond

A tourist admiring the beautiful stained glass windows along a corridor inside Chapultepec Castle.

Touropia Logo

Touropia Travel Experts

Tours & Top Tens

17 Best Places to Visit in Mexico

Last updated on February 5, 2024 by Becky Griswold - 4 Comments

Gorgeous beaches, a delicious culinary scene, festive culture and ancient pyramids all make Mexico a popular tourist destination. Mexico is a land of color and contrasts. Crowded beaches lead into quiet colonial towns while resort cities open gateways to jungles ringing with parrots and howler monkeys.

Majestic mountains descend to remote deserts. Traditional pueblo houses sit near Spanish haciendas. Ruins of Mayan cities lie excavated outside of modern metropolises.

The capital, Mexico City, is a huge metropolis boasting a historical center, top museums, and chic shopping opportunities. Another popular destination on our list of the best places to visit in Mexico is the enigmatic town of Oaxaca – home to colonial architecture and a fantastic Day of the Dead festival. Traces of it’s Pre-Columbian past can be found in Teotihuacan, with its pyramid dating back to 200 CE; and the archaeological site of Chichen Itza in the Yucatán Peninsula.

Map of Places to Visit in Mexico

Map of Places to Visit in Mexico

In this post, we'll cover:

Puebla

Founded in 1531, Puebla , in central Mexico, is the fifth largest city in the country with over 2 million inhabitants. Its strategic location, halfway between the port of Veracruz and Mexico City, made it an important city.

Today this charming colonial city pairs perfectly with hungry travelers, since it’s known as the gastronomic capital of Mexico. Be sure to try mole poblano, a traditional Mexican dish said to be invented here.

Standing in the shadow of the volcano Popocatepetl , Puebla visitors also won’t want to miss the Catedral de Puebla, with its onyx statues and domed ceiling patterned after St. Peter’s in Rome. The nearby town of Cholula boast one of the largest pyramids ever built, though the structure has been badly neglected over the centuries.

16. Acapulco

Acapulco

Once a popular destination among spring breakers, Acapulco is the largest city in the state of Guerrero. This large beach resort city is situated on a semi-circular bay that is characterized by traditional architecture on one side and luxury high-rise hotels on the other side.

Beautiful beaches are Acapulco’s primary crowd-puller. Most of the popular beaches like Hornos, Icacos, Papagayo and Tamarindos are found along the bay area known as Las Costera. Favored for their cleanliness and direct location on the ocean, the beaches of Langosta and Caleta are good choices as well.

Acapulco Cliff Divers

Those who desire more than just the beaches may find the Fort of San Diego an interesting visit for its historic buildings and on-site museum that details the history of the area. Another good museum is the House of Masks, which showcases a collection of masks from all over the world. Shaded by palm trees, the city’s main square is where tourists can visit a stunning cathedral, watch street performers, dine in cafes, shop and experience the local culture.

A must-do in Acapulco is watch the city’s famous La Quebrada Cliff divers plunge 147 feet into a shallow inlet. A tradition since 1934, this spectacle can be viewed from a platform on the cliff tops or from nearby restaurants.

15. Playa del Carmen

Playa del Carmen

Commonly referred to as simply “Playa,” Playa del Carmen is a lively resort town in the state of Quintana Roo on Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula. Formerly a quiet fishing village of distinct European influence, the town has expanded in recent years into a vibrant resort town of beautiful beaches and entertainment venues. However, Playa still retains its relaxed atmosphere and friendly locals.

As it is situated within the Riviera Maya region, Playa del Carmen is a frequent cruise stop and within easy reach of other popular tourist spots like the Xcaret Eco Park and Sian Ka’an Biosphere Reserve . With the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef just off the shore, there are also plenty of opportunities for scuba diving and snorkeling.

Quinta Avenida, or 5th Avenue, is the heart of Playa. Along this 20-block thoroughfare are shops, boutiques, restaurants, bars, clubs and hotels.

Merida

Nicknamed the “White City” because of its white stone buildings, Merida is the capital of Mexico’s Yucatan state . Due to its geographical isolation near the northwestern tip of the Yucatan Peninsula, the city has its own unique dialect, cuisine and culture shaped by Mayan, Caribbean and colonial influences.

Founded by Spanish Conquistadors in 1542 upon an ancient Mayan city, Merida features numerous colonial buildings including the palace of a former Conquistador leader. The city’s main plaza, “el Zocalo,” is the location of many historic structures such as a 16th century cathedral, the Governor’s Palace and Old City Hall.

Merida Plaza

The tree-lined street of El Pasea Montejo with its beautiful mansions reflects the city’s former glory days as the rope-making capital of the world. This street is a nice place to enjoy an evening walk after the heat of the day. Most locals here work in the mornings and take a lunch and siesta when the tropical weather is at its peak.

Tourists will find a variety of things to see and do in Merida like relaxing in public parks, browsing colorful markets for souvenirs and visiting nearby Mayan archaeological sites.

Taxco

Surrounded by rolling hills, valleys and mountains, Taxco is set in a very scenic spot, some 170 kilometers to the southwest of Mexico City. Besides the lovely landscapes and breathtaking views, the city is also known for its colonial architecture and intricately carved artisanal silverware.

Presiding over everything is the beautiful baroque architecture of Santa Prisca Cathedral – the city’s symbol and main sight . From atop its belltowers, you can enjoy fabulous panoramas over Taxco’s surroundings, as well as a bird’s eye view of the narrow, steep streets weaving their way up the hillside.

Much of the city was built from the wealth mined from the nearby mountains. Exquisite silver jewellery can still be bought to this day. Nowadays, however, Taxco’s economy is mainly based on the steady stream of tourists who come to delve into its rich history, culture, and architecture. Holy Week is a good time to visit Taxco because of its All Souls processions where residents turn out to show their faith.

12. Los Cabos

Los Cabos

Regarded as the marlin sport fishing capital of the world, Los Cabos has rapidly gained popularity over the last few decades as a top tourist destination in Mexico due to its beautiful resort beaches, excellent scuba diving, whale watching experiences and lively party scene.

Located in the Mexican state of Baja California Sur, Los Cabos is composed of two towns, San Jose and San Lucas, that are divided by twenty miles of scenic highway known as “the Corridor.”

While the former mission town of Cabo San Jose is a traditional Mexican town with colonial architecture and a relaxed, quiet ambiance, Cabo San Lucas is one of Mexico’s fastest growing tourist destinations, featuring luxury resorts, upscale restaurants, championship golf courses and a glittering party scene. San Lucas is also a hot spot for water sports that include scuba diving, parasailing, snorkeling and glass-bottom boat tours.

Lover's beach

Sporting a splendid coastline dotted with gated residential communities and high-end resorts, the Corridor is home to beautiful beaches like Chileno Beach, which is favored for its crystal clear waters and marine life.

Cabo San Lucas is also known for its natural attraction, Land’s End , which features a cluster of rocks shaped by the sea and wind into distinctive formations. One particular rock, El Arco, is a good spot to view sea lions.

11. Cozumel

Cozumel

Located in the Caribbean Sea on the Yucatan Peninsula, the thirty-mile island of Cozumel is one of the top diving destinations in the Western Hemisphere. For this reason, dive shops abound all over the island.

Except for the calm beaches at Chankanaab National Park , the island’s ocean current and wind conditions are not ideal for swimming, but Cozumel’s beaches are ripe for surfing and parasailing. However, there are many beach hotels that offer swimming pools. Other water activities include deep-sea fishing and glass-bottom boat tours.

Cozumel Diving

Cozumel is one of Mexico’s most visited cruise port-of-calls , and tourists will find the cruise docks bustling with vendors selling a variety of souvenirs from t-shirts to tequila. The main town on the island, San Miguel, offers a myriad of shops, entertainment venues and restaurants.

In addition to beach fun, Cozumel offers other fascinating attractions such as the Mayan archaeological sites of San Gervasio and El Caracol. Chankanaab National Park is a great place to explore nature trails, stroll along beautiful botanical gardens and view numerous iguanas.

10. Palenque

Palenque

Nestled away among the dense jungle of Chiapas State, Palenque is a famous Maya city that flourished around the seventh century. Although the archaeological site is much smaller than Chichen Itza or Calakmul, it boasts some of the best Mayan carvings, sculptures, and architecture.

Palenque has several large temple and palace complexes for visitors to explore. In general, these are exceptionally well-preserved. Thanks to the marvelous hieroglyphics and bas-reliefs, much is known about the site and its former inhabitants, as well as their mysterious mythology.

The most arresting structure is the Temple of Inscriptions which is a funerary monument to Hanab-Pakal – Palenque’s most famous ruler. Its elaborate carvings document and depict events and rituals of centuries gone by, and a splendid sarcophagus and death mask were found within the tomb. Other important ruins include the Temple of the Cross and the Temple of the Sun, although less is known about their images and iconography.

9. Copper Canyon

Copper Canyon

Named after the copper-green color of the canyon walls, the Copper Canyon is a network of six canyons that combined measures larger than the Grand Canyon in the United States. Located in the Sierra Madre of the state of Chihuahua, this canyon system offers some of Mexico’s most extraordinary scenery.

Copper Canyon is rich in biodiversity with many different species of trees, flowers and wildlife as well as waterfalls and intriguing rock shapes such as the San Ignacio formations that resemble the likes of humans and animals. A number of traditional Mexican towns are found throughout the area including Creel, Hidalgo de Parall, Batopilas and Urique.

Copper Canyon Train

There are many ways to explore Copper Canyon, but the most outstanding way is by the Chihuahua-Pacific Railway , commonly called “El Chepe.” The track passes over 37 bridges and through 86 tunnels, rising as high as 2,400 meter (7,900 feet) above sea level featuring some of the Copper Canyon’s most spectacular scenery.

The train makes several vista stops such as the popular one at Divisadero where travelers can enjoy breathtaking views and purchase foods and handicrafts from the Tarahumaran people.

8. Guanajuato

Guanajuato

Guanajuato, capital of the state with the same name, doesn’t lack for charm. Cobblestone lanes, sidewalk cafes and some of the most stunning baroque architecture in North America give it a European flavor and are among Guanajuato’s drawing cards. The city also has a network of underground tunnels that serve as roads making this place really unique in the world.

Founded in 1559, Guanajuato quickly became famous for its gold and silver mines. Some of the mines can be visited today; this includes La Valencia , one of the richest silver mines in the world.

Guanajuato

Next to the mine is the Church of San Cayetano, lavishly adorned with silver and gold. The city is a good place to enjoy traditional mariachi music.

Cancun

A world famous tourist destination on the Caribbean coast of Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula , Cancun presents a complete vacation package of fabulous beaches, a first-class hotel zone , Mayan ruins, modern attractions and an exuberant nightlife.

Cancun’s year-round perfect weather and gorgeous beaches are the island’s top tourist magnets. With fourteen miles of powdery white sand bordering turquoise waters, these beaches offer a wide range of water sports and locals selling souvenirs. The downtown area, known as El Centro , beats to a more authentic Mexican tune with its historic architecture, restaurants, markets, bars and clubs.

Hard Rock Cafe in Cancun

There are a few small Mayan archaeological sites in Cancun. While some remain covered in jungle, others are popular tourist attractions such as El Meco and El Ray , with the latter found within the hotel zone. Tourists will find a variety of recreational activities around Cancun like jeep safaris, snorkeling and scuba diving.

Shoppers can browse La Isla mall, and sports fans can watch football at the downtown stadium or play golf among the island’s many courses. Cancun is known for its vivacious nightlife, and tourists will find no shortage of choices that range from bars and nightclubs to dance halls and dinner cruises.

Oaxaca

The capital city of the state by the same name , Oaxaca is located in a valley below the Sierra Madre mountains. Colonial architecture, archaeological sites, a pleasant climate and tranquil atmosphere make it a popular tourist destination in Southern Mexico.

At the heart of Oaxaco is its charming town square, Zocalo , where tourists can admire beautiful colonial landmarks like the Santo Domingo church, tour museums, shop for souvenirs and relax at an outdoor cafe.

Monte Alban

Several archaeological sites around the city can be explored such as Monte Alban. Perched on a mountain, Monte Alban was the site of the ancient capital city of the Zapotec inhabitants. A visit here presents impressive views of the valley. The site of Mitla is intriguing for its walls of geometric patterns.

Oaxaca is also known for its unique food dishes such as mole, which involves the likes of a sauce made with chocolate and chiles. The city’s favorite drinks, Mezcal and hot chocolate, are easily found in every restaurant and bar.

Traditional Oaxacan handicrafts are regarded worldwide, and the city’s markets are good places to purchase popular items like Zapotec wool rugs, wood carvings and black pottery.

One of the best Day of the Dead festivals in Mexico takes place in Oaxaca as well as the Guelaguetza, a festival exhibiting the traditional dances of local indigenous cultures.

5. Mexico City

Mexico City

The capital of Mexico, Mexico City is one of the world’s largest cities comprised of many ethnic groups from all over the globe. Not only is this vast city the most important political and cultural center in Mexico, but it is also one of the most important financial centers in Latin America. Moreover, Mexico City boasts one of North America’s oldest and largest universities.

While there are no beaches in Mexico City, tourists will discover a great number of exciting things to see and do . The Historic Center is teeming in prominent landmarks such as the Plaza de la Constitucion, the Metropolitan Cathedral , the National Palace and the ruins of an ancient Aztec temple .

Plaza de la Constitucion

With hundreds of museums, art galleries and performing arts centers, Mexico City is one of the world’s leading cities of arts and culture. In addition to public parks like the impressive Chapultepec Park, the city also boasts the must-see Xochimilco Floating Gardens .

Many of Mexico City’s neighborhoods can be easily reached by the large metro system. For safety reasons avoid hailing a cab in the street. Instead, ask the hotel to call a cab. A good way to see the city’s main attractions is by taking the Turibus, a hop-on, hop-off sightseeing bus.

4. Puerto Vallarta

Puerto Vallarta

Situated on the Bay of Banderas along Mexico’s Pacific Coast in the state of Jalisco is the popular vacation city of Puerto Vallarta. Landscapes of gorgeous beaches and lush jungle mountains envelope this picturesque town of colonial landmarks, first-class resorts, gourmet restaurants and dozens of nightclubs.

The city’s main attraction , the golden sand beaches, offer relaxation and water sports such as sailing, kite surfing and deep sea fishing. As Puerto Vallarta is a popular diving destination , there are many dive shops located throughout the beaches. Giant manta rays and dolphins can be viewed here while humpback whales can be seen between December and March.

day of the dead

Lined with shops, restaurants and bars, the beautiful boardwalk, the Malecon , is a great place to shop, dine, socialize, watch street performers and view the ocean.

Outside of the city, tourists can tour mango and papaya plantations or visit quiet fishing villages and secluded coves. The lush hills and mountains offer hiking and horse riding trails in addition to canopy and ziplining adventures.

3. Teotihuacan

Teotihuacan

Located just 50 kilometers to the northeast of Mexico City , Teotihuacan is home to some of the largest and most awe-inspiring pyramids on Earth. While its origins and the identity of its founders are shrouded in mystery, the city later became one of the most impressive and influential cities in the Americas.

At its zenith in the first half of the first millennium, the sprawling metropolis boasted countless buildings, as well as huge temples and palaces, squares and stadia. Although it was already abandoned by the time of the Aztecs, they named the ruined city ‘Teotihuacan’ – or ‘ birthplace of the gods ‘ – as they believed that it was here that the universe was created.

climbing Teotihuacan pyramid

While its star waned long ago, the might of the ancient Mesoamericans is still on show at the extensive and astonishing archaeological site. Well-preserved murals and buildings can be found along the famous Avenue of the Dead. The massive Pyramid of the Sun and Pyramid of the Moon are its two standout attractions.

Tulum

The Tulum ruins are a walled Maya city perched on a rocky cliff overlooking the Caribbean in the Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico. The site is of modest scale and was built during the post Classic period when the Mayan culture was in decline and therefore lacks the elegance of some other famous Mayan ruins. The tropical beach backdrop however makes this a unique site which should not be missed.

The most imposing building in Tulum is the 25 feet (7.5 meter) tall El Castillo (the castle) set above the cliff. It was once covered in with stucco and painted. A small shrine appears to have been used as a beacon for incoming canoes. On the beach below, where the canoes came ashore, tourists combine a visit to the Mayan ruins with a dip in the Caribbean.

Ven a La luz sculpture

It is important to know that there are really three different areas all referred to as Tulum, located near each other, but not close enough to walk to and from.

The town center, sometimes referred to as Tulum Pueblo , lies across the highway south of the Coba junction. There are frequent buses to Cancun, Merida, Playa del Carmen and Valladolid from the town center. Tulum Playa or Zona Hotelera extends for more than 6 miles (10km) of great white sandy beaches along the Caribbean coastline while Tulum Ruinas is the archaeological site where the Tulum Mayan ruins stand.

1. Chichen Itza

Chichen Itza

Situated in the Yucatan Peninsula, Chichen Itza is the most famous, most visited, and most impressive of the country’s many Mayan sites. This is somewhat ironic because its most famous structures do not have a typical Classic Mayan architecture but show strong influences from other civilizations from Central Mexico.

While the scorching sun and teeming crowds can put some people off, it is not without reason that the astounding archaeological ruins were selected as one of the New Seven Wonders of the World.

Cenote Ik Kil

Built between the ninth and twelfth centuries, the once-great city covers a huge area, and many of its buildings, temples and palaces are still in remarkably good condition. These feature a wide array of different architectural styles and offer a fascinating insight into the Mayan civilization.

The undoubted highlight is The Pyramid of Kukulcan – or El Castillo – which is the site’s most famous landmark. The hulking temple’s stone terraces dominate Chichen Itza and were ingeniously constructed to give the illusion of serpents crawling down the side of the pyramid.

Many tourists visit Chichen Itza as a day trip, especially from Cancún or Merida but it is also possible to stay a night or two here.

Mexico Travel Video

Share this post:.

travel video of mexico

10 Best Beaches in Mexico

travel video of mexico

10 Best All-Inclusive Resorts in Mexico

travel video of mexico

10 Best Vacation Spots in Mexico

volcanoes in Mexico

12 Most Amazing Volcanoes in Mexico

travel video of mexico

7 Most Amazing Pyramids in Mexico

travel video of mexico

12 Prettiest Small Towns in Mexico

travel video of mexico

15 Best Cities to Visit in Mexico

Regions in Mexico

9 Most Beautiful Regions in Mexico

travel video of mexico

12 Most Fascinating Mayan Ruins in Mexico

Best Cenotes in Mexico's Yucatan

14 Best Cenotes in Mexico’s Yucatan

Reader interactions.

' src=

November 28, 2019 at 6:15 pm

Chichen itza is a toltec maya site once a part of the mayapan federation

' src=

June 16, 2019 at 2:45 pm

I am sorry to say that there are no safe places in Mexico to vacation. It is a country where government are murdered, you are rosking your lifes by visiting Mexico. The corruption, and organized crime runs to deep.

' src=

November 2, 2017 at 9:16 am

It didn’t make the list, but I’m totally a fan of the mayan ruins at Palenque. The complex is immense, and built on a hill which makes it quite picturesque. Not overly crowded (it’s a little tougher to get to than Tulum, etc) and not as sterile as Chichen Itza (where you can’t climb or touch ANYTHING).

' src=

January 10, 2016 at 2:43 pm

If you’re going to the coast area (cancun, playa del carmen..) I recommend you visit the cenotes, go to tulum, spend a day in cancun and visit isla mujeres. This is a beautiful country and I can’t see how you could possibly not be happy here, try and get enough time though I was only 7 days and I didn’t get time to visit everything I wanted to.

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed .

travel video of mexico

  • Things to do

Explore > Destinations > Mexico City > Mexico City Vacation Ideas for Planning an Itinerary

Mexico City Vacation Ideas for Planning an Itinerary

[video-container][video-title] [video-tag]

Ideas of places to visit in Mexico City

Tick off the top things to do and places to visit in Mexico city. From its tourist hotspots, to its hidden gems, there’s something here for every traveler.

This is a city rich with history, culture and flavor. Let the travel guide video show you the best Mexico City attractions where the Latin American spirit shines brightest, the parks grow greenest, and the landmarks are the oldest.

Zocalo Main Square - Mexico City

(1:35 in the video) This main square of Mexico City is formally known as Plaza de la Constitución, but you will always hear it referred to as Zocalo. The square stands proudly as the heart of Mexico City, as it has done even for cities past. Watching over the massive plaza are iconic buildings like The Metropolitan Cathedral and the National Palace.

Historic Center of Mexico City

(2:12 in the video) In Mexico City, you can begin your adventure in the middle – the Centro Histórico district (Historic Center of Mexico City) famously flaunts its extraordinary heritage and serves as the city’s hub. Browse the hundreds of market stalls at La Ciudadela, or the masterpieces at San Ildefonso College. Art lines the streets of Mexico City. Don’t miss the intricate tiles adorning Casa de Azulejos (House of Tiles) pictured in the video.

Palacio de Bellas Artes Mexico City

Museums and Galleries

(2:52 in the video) Where once stood the Aztec Empire, we now have Mexico City. This is a place built on great history. Get to know the story of the city and the art born from it within the walls of its many museums – you’ll be spoilt for choice. From the grandeur of Palacio Postal and Palacio de Bellas Artes, to the mass of treasures at Museo Franz Mayer (Franz Mayer Museum).

Chapultepec Park Mexico City

Chapultepec

(3:29 in the video) Not many parks offer several museums, an amusement park and a castle within its leafy expanse like Chapultepec Park. From the Modern Art Museum, to the National Museum of History, the National Museum of Anthropology, to the Auditorio Nacional (Natiafonal Auditorium) – find culture amid nature. Walk down the Avenue of the Poets or meet the animals at Parque Zoologico de Chapultepec (Chapultepec Zoo) . Kids will love La Feria Chapultepec Mágico (The Magic Chapultepec Fair).

Castillo de Chapultepec Castle Mexico City

Niños Heroes

(4:15 in the video) This monument pays respect to six soldiers whom died defending Castillo de Chapultepec (Chapultepec Castle) in what was the last major resistance to U.S. troops in 1847. These soldiers were aged 13-17 and the monument therefore pays tribute to them in this battle and to the child heroes in the war.

Museo Soumaya Mexico City

Museo Soumaya

(4:50 in the video) Museo Soumaya (Soumaya Museum) was founded by one of the world’s richest men, Carlos Slim, and is filled with over 60,00 artworks from his private collection. Perhaps as beautiful as the art within is the impressive structure of the building itself. Many visitors to stop and gaze upon the 16,000 aluminium plates on its surface. Watch the video for a glimpse of its honeycombed walls in the sun.

Museo Frida Kahlo Blue House Coyoacan Mexico City

The Blue House

(5:54 in the video) Found in Coyoacán, one of Mexico City’s oldest and loveliest neighborhoods, is The Blue House. This was the home of famed Mexican artist Frida Kahlo where she was born and where she passed away. It has since been turned into the Frida Kahlo Museum, as it stands today.

Ciudad Universitaria

(6:51 in the video) The Ciudad Universitaria is a university two kilometres south of the charming neighbourhood of San Ángel. This institution has seen five of their alumni become presidents of Mexico among other notable successes by former students. The university lays claim to Estadio Olímpico Universitario (Olympic Stadium), which at the time of construction was Mexico’s largest stadium.

Xochimilco canal boats mexico city

(7:37 in the video) Miles of waterways make up the remnants of what was built by the Aztecs. Xochimilco is a much-loved tourism sight in the Mexico City area. Make your way through the floating gardens (chinampas) on the multi-colored canal boats (trajineras) as shown in the youtube video footage.

Travel Inspiration for Mexico City

We have a wealth of Mexico City photography hosted on our travel image library . For professional photos of Mexico City capturing unique shots of visitor favorites to close-ups of hidden gems, check out these images for your travel inspiration.

We have hundreds of travel videos  mapping out incredible destinations around the world. It’s time to get inspired – let the voyage begin before you even leave home.

Ready to start planning the trip?

Mexico City Hotels Flights to Mexico City Vacation packages to Mexico City Car rentals in Mexico City Things to do in Mexico City

Stay updated on new vids

This article was originally published on [publish-date]. If you’d like to stay updated on new videos of the beautiful destinations that our planet has to offer, subscribe to Expedia’s YouTube channel. [/full-width-paragraph]

[youtube-cta-US]

[travel-video-cta-US]

[/video-container]

More Articles With Destinations

Finding wheelchair-accessible things to do in London can often be a tricky task that require extra research and planning but a new app will help you find all the best accessible attractions and restaurants.

Join a Disney podcaster and mega fan for some insider tips.

He's analyzed this year's forecast, researched the historical likelihood of Christmas Day snow, and stirred in a bit of weatherman’s intuition to come up with his holiday list.

UAE's capital is an ultra-modern city where big desert, epic adventure, and next-level luxury come together to offer the perfect getaway.

Nomadic Matt's Travel Site

Travel Better, Cheaper, Longer

Mexico Travel Guide

Last Updated: November 10, 2023

Historic ruins near the ocean in Tulum, Mexico with lush greenery on a sunny day

While most people visit Mexico for its big tourist centers like Tulum , Cabo, Cancun , or Cozumel, there’s a lot more to the country than just its luxurious resorts.

Now, I’ll be honest: I was late to visiting Mexico.

But when I did, I fell in love with it. Mexico is an incredible destination with a rich history, amazing food, and friendly people.

It’s an awesome country to backpack around, drive through, or just vacation in. There’s a ton of stuff to do here, and the locals are some of the friendliest people on the planet.

From Mayan ruins to pristine beaches to Mexico City’s art and food and Oaxaca’s mezcal scene, Mexico has it all.

And the food? World-class. Gorge yourself on delicious tacos, tostadas, tamales, sopas, seafood, and mole (to name a few items from Mexico’s very long list of traditional dishes).

I could go on forever as to why I love this country. Whatever amount of time you’re planning to visit is not enough — you’ll always leave wanting more.

This Mexico travel guide will help you get out of the touristy towns, explore the country, and fall in love with what you discover!

Table of Contents

  • Things to See and Do
  • Typical Costs
  • Suggested Budget
  • Money-Saving Tips
  • Where to Stay
  • How to Get Around
  • How to Stay Safe
  • Best Places to Book Your Trip
  • Related Blogs on Mexico

Click Here for City Guides

Top 5 things to see and do in mexico.

The famous ruins of Chichen Itza, the Wonder of the World, in beautiful Mexico

1. Explore Oaxaca

Located in a valley surrounded by craggy mountains in southwestern Mexico, Oaxaca and its surrounds have been inhabited for thousands of years by indigenous Zapotec and Mixtec peoples. A city of colorful buildings, scenic rooftop restaurants and bars, street art, historic Spanish colonial churches, cobblestone streets, and many parks, it’s a center for heritage tourism. It’s also one of the gastronomic hotbeds of Mexico as well as the hub of mezcal production too. With fascinating museums, bustling markets, historic buildings, delicious food and much more, there really is something for everyone in Oaxaca . I loved my time there ! You must visit!

2. Tour Mexico City

Found in the Valley of Mexico at an altitude of around 2,225 meters (7,300 feet), Mexico City is a sprawling, chaotic, messy city in the best way possible. Originally built over a lake, it has some 150 world-class museums, sprawling markets, tons of historic buildings, city squares, and more. In the historic center, you can visit the impressive main square (the only one bigger in the world is Red Square in Moscow). To the south of the city there’s a network of beautiful canals, and Teotihuacan, the City of the Gods, is just a 45-minute drive away. The city also has an incredible foodie scene and is fast becoming one of the centers of gastronomy in the world.

3. Relax on the Pacific Coast

Vacation spots like Puerto Vallarta, Los Cabos, and Sayulita on Mexico’s Pacific Coast offer just as many epic beaches and resort properties as the Caribbean Coast. Go to Puerto Vallarta or Los Cabos to hang out on the pristine white sandy beaches, or head to Sayulita to check out the busy surf scene. Surf and enjoy watersports, visit historical monuments, and check out all the local art by day. By night, you can indulge in sunset cocktails, enjoy fresh shrimp tacos or seafood skewers, and salsa the evening away.

4. See the Mayan Ruins

Mexico is filled with ruins. You have Chichén Itzá, which dates back to 550 CE and is one of the largest (and most popular) Mayan sites in Mexico for its enormous Kukulkan Pyramid (which is considered one of the new Wonders of the World). Other ruins worth visiting are the Tulum Archaeological Zone, the Palenque Archaeological Zone, the Calakmul ruins (which are inside the huge Calakmul Biosphere Reserve), the ruins at Ek Balam, and so many more! Admission is 571 MXN for the Wonder of the World Chichén Itzá while the rest cost anywhere from 80-500 MXN.

5. Visit a volcano

Other things to see and do in mexico, 1. wander through mexico city’s chapultepec park.

Chapultepec is one of the largest city parks in the world, spanning over 1,700 acres. It encompasses the Mexico City Zoo, La Feria amusement park, and the Museum of Anthropology, which houses a vast collection of sculptures, jewels, and artifacts from ancient Mexican civilizations. The museum costs 85 MXN, as does the Chapultepec Castillo (Castle) which houses the National History Museum. You can also rent a rowboat or paddle boat and go out on Chapultepec Lake for 60 MXN. Entry to the park itself is free.

2. Visit the markets

Just about every town in Mexico has a busy, diverse market where you can enjoy traditional food, pick up some bargain items, and purchase souvenirs. Two of the best are the Mercado Ciudadela in Mexico City (for handmade textiles and artwork), and Oaxaca’s Mercado Benito Juárez (for local foods like fresh ground coffee beans, juices, and grasshopper tacos). If you’re in Merida, check out Mercado Santa Ana for their Yucatecan cuisine, like cochito horneado , a marinated pork dish that is slow-cooked in underground pits, or head to El Mercado Lucas de Galvez for their specialty seafood cocktails (the locals swear by it to cure your hangover).

3. Explore Zócalo (Plaza de la Constitución)

Zócalo is the main plaza in the heart of Mexico City. It dates back to the Aztecs, encompassing both the Templo Mayor (an ancient Aztec temple) and the Palacio Nacional (a colonial palace with offices of Mexico’s president). Situated just off the Zócalo is La Catedral Metropolitana, a magnificent cathedral with a gold altar. It’s a perfect example of Spanish colonial architecture.

4. Go diving

The seas surrounding Mexico have some of the world’s best diving spots thanks to their diverse marine life, large coral reefs (including the second largest reef system in the world, the Great Maya Barrier Reef), and excellent visibility. The Gulf of Mexico is home to five different species of sea turtles, blue whales, lemon sharks, and dolphins, and so much more! Aside from diving, the waters are popular for snorkeling, sports fishing, waterboarding, surfing, and more or less any other watersports. A two-tank dive starts at 2,800 MXN. Some of the best places to dive in Mexico are Discovery Bay, Cenote Dos Ojos, Revillagigedo Islands, and Isla Mujeres.

5. Relax in Cancún

Depending on what you’re looking to do, Cancún can offer you a crazy-fun party in the sun or some quiet and hidden local markets and restaurants. You have spas, resorts, and picturesque beaches as well as Mayan ruins, archaeological sites, and little nearby villages. There’s a ton to see and do here if you leave the resorts!

6. Get lost in Guadalajara

Guadalajara is the second-largest city in Mexico and is known for its tequila and mariachi. It’s chock full of museums, such as Cabañas (a UNESCO building with incredible murals), MUSA (paintings & sculptures by local artists), and the Páramo Galeria (contemporary art); nightlife venues, and a labyrinth of old colonial streets. Visit the Hospicio Cabañas, a hospital built in the 19th century, and then spend some time at the Guadalajara Cathedral. The cathedral’s Gothic interior features artworks from famous Mexican artists like Murillo (a Baroque painter).

7. See Teotihuacan

The Aztec empire left an enormous mark on Mexico. Don’t miss the awe-inspiring Aztec pyramids at Teotihuacan, located 48 kilometers (30 miles) outside of Mexico City. Teotihuacan was founded as early as 400 BCE, but its biggest structures weren’t completed until around 300 BCE. Its three giant pyramids are known as the Temple of the Sun, the Temple of Moon, and the Temple of the Feathered Serpent, and they dominate the landscape. If you’re going to visit just one Aztec site, this is it. It’s unsheltered here, so bring sunscreen and a hat. Admission is 85 MXN. Full-day guided tours from Mexico City cost 880 MXN.

8. Visit the bizarre Island of Dolls

Known as “La Isla de la Muñecas” in Spanish, this is perhaps one of the creepiest tourist attractions in the world. Decades ago, a hermit named Don Julian Santana moved here, learned a girl drowned in the nearby lake, and started collecting and hanging dolls all over the island to please the drowned girl’s spirit. It’s creepy. Like beyond creepy. You’ll have to hire a boat from Xochimilco to get there but it’s worth it!

9. Honor the Day of the Dead

Yearly on November 1st and 2nd, Mexico celebrates a major festival: Día de Los Muertos. The festival is a vibrant and lively affair with celebrations for those who are gone but not forgotten, including parades and elaborate and colorful costumes. Families also commemorate their dead relatives by setting up ofrendas , or altars, with pictures of the deceased, candles, yellow marigold petals, and food. This meant to encourage the deceased to cross back over into the land of the living and join in the celebrations. Oaxaca or Mexico City are the two best places to experience this celebration.

10. Visit the UNAM Botanical Garden

If you need to escape the hustle and bustle of Mexico City for a little while, the Botanical Garden at the National Autonomous University of Mexico is the perfect place. Keeping with the Aztec traditions of having gardens for both medicinal and ornamental purposes, there is also an added focus on conservation and environmental education here. Built on top of and around lava formations from the eruption of the volcano Xitle (which happened over 2,000 years ago), visitors can explore the naturally formed grottoes, ponds, and waterfalls. This garden has the most diverse cactus collection in the world (800 different kinds!), and ponds full of koi and turtles, an orchidarium, and a medicinal garden. Admission is free.

11. Relax on Isla Holbox

Holbox is an island located off Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula and is home to white sand beaches and crystalline waters. It is a relaxing, slow-paced island that’s easy to get stuck on. One day can easily turn into a week. It’s an island paradise where you can relax in a hammock on the beach, hike in the jungles, swim, dive, snorkel, and everything in between! While it used to be a hidden gem, it’s slowly becoming more and more popular (and developed). Be sure to see bioluminescent waters here. From Cancún, you can get to the ferry port at Chiquilá in around two hours by bus. The ferry takes 25 minutes and costs 220 MXN. If you just want to visit for the day, full-day tours from Cancún/Playa del Carmen cost 3,000 MXN.

12. Visit Mérida

Mérida is one of my favorite places in all of Mexico. It is a safe and wonderful city filled with history, cool mezcal bars, and some of the best food in the country. Some of my favorite places to eat and drink in town are La Chaya Maya Casona, Acervo Mezcalero, La Negrita Cantina, and Café Créme. Also, don’t miss the nearby Uxmal ruins, which are just one-hour away. There are also some cool museums here, like the Folk Art Museum of Yucatan, the Yucatan Music Museum, and the City Museum (which has all kinds of Mayan artifacts).

13. Enjoy San Cristóbal de las Casas’ architecture

San Cristóbal is a highland town known for its charming colonial architecture. There are narrow cobblestone streets, local craft markets, and the entire area is enveloped in pine forests. Don’t miss the town’s 16th-century cathedral, and if you want to get out and explore the nearby nature, take a boat tour of the Cañón de Sumidero. You’ll see tons of birds, monkeys, and crocodiles. For a view of the town and surrounding area, visit the Guadalupe Church to enjoy the view from the roof. Free Walking San Cristóbal offers daily tours if you want a guide to show you the highlights.

14. Sample the Cenotes of Yucatan

Cenotes are natural sinkholes that are full of groundwater. They were used by the Mayans as sources for freshwater, however, today they are popular swimming holes for locals and tourists alike (you can even scuba dive in some). There are tons of them all around the Yucatan Peninsula. Some are completely exposed, some are walled in by cliffs, and some are covered entirely by caves. Calavera, Cristalino, Casa Cenote, Yaxmuul, Choo-Ha, and Escondido Cenote are some of the most popular cenotes in the region. If you’d rather do a tour, you can join a cenote tour for around 1,350 MXN.

15. Visit Sayulita

Located on the Pacific coast, Sayulita is a hip beach town with a lively community of expats and surfers. The town has a laid-back vibe owing to the sizable surfing and yoga community. It’s a great place to surf and there are plenty of yoga retreats available here. You can also take a jungle trek, go zip lining, ride ATVs along the coast, and simply soak up the sun on the beach. It’s the perfect place to chill for a few days. Canopy tours start at 1,800 MXN.

16. Explore Campeche

Campeche is located just south of Merida on the Yucatan. It’s home to UNESCO World Heritage colonial architecture, including fortified walls and over 2,000 historic buildings. Visit the Museo De La Arquitectura Maya for Mayan history and antiquities, see the Mayan ruins at Edzná (which is just 45 minutes away and sees very few tourists), and wander the old city wall to take in the view.

  For information on specific cities in Mexico, check out these guides:

  • Cancún Travel Guide
  • Mexico City Travel Guide
  • Oaxaca Travel Guide

Mexico Travel Costs

The beautiful beaches and coastline of Cancun, in sunny Mexico

Accommodation – In Mexico, hostels start at 250 MXN per night for a dorm bed, but average closer to 300 MXN. Private hostel rooms cost anything from 600-1,900 MXN per night. Prices are usually a bit lower in the low-season or shoulder-season. Free Wi-Fi and free breakfast are both common, as are self-catering facilities.

For those traveling with a tent, a basic plot for two people without electricity costs around 200 MXN per night.

For budget hotels, expect to pay 700 MXN for a basic room in a two-star hotel. These two-star rooms typically include an en-suite bathroom and free Wi-Fi, but not always air conditioning.

Airbnb is also an option in Mexico, with private rooms starting around 300 MXN but averaging much more (usually between 600-1,200 MXN). Entire homes and apartments average around 1,000-1,800 MXN although you can find them for as little as 600 MXN if you book early.

Food – You’ll find a lot of rice, beans, fruits, and veggies like tomatoes, corn, avocado, and peppers in Mexican cuisine, which is a mix of Mayan, Aztec, and Spanish traditions. Typical Mexican dishes include tacos, mole (a sauce with lots of ingredients, often including chocolate), salsa, enchiladas, tamales (stuffed corn pockets), pozole (hominy stew topped with onion, avocado, and chili), and guacamole.

Street stalls and markets are the best way to go for authentic and inexpensive food. Tacos, quesadilla, sopas, tortas, and other street foods are generally 15-45 MXN. Sometimes, you’ll find tacos for as cheap as 10 MXN. In Mexico, street food is the best — and most affordable — option.

A meal at a local Mexican restaurant serving traditional cuisine costs around 150 MXN. Look for the ones filled with locals as that is generally a sign that the food is really good. Expect to pay around 300 MXN for a multi-course meal in a mid-range restaurant.

A beer is about 20 MXN in the street but double that at a restaurant, while a cocktail shouldn’t cost more than 80 MXN in most places. A combo meal at McDonald’s costs around 120 MXN and a cappuccino costs around 50 MXN.

Tap water is not safe to drink in Mexico. If you’re buying bottles of water, expect to pay 15 MXN (less if you buy in bulk but a more environmentally friendly (and cheaper) solution is to bring a portable water purifier ( LifeStraw makes a good one.

If you plan to cook your meals, expect to pay between 750 MXN per week for groceries including rice, vegetables, chicken, and beans.

Backpacking Mexico Suggested Budgets

If you’re backpacking Mexico, expect to spend around 800 MXN per day. This budget gets you a hostel dorm, street food and self-cooked meals, public transportation, and a few attractions (such as museums and galleries) each day. If you plan on eating out more or drinking, you’ll need to add another 100 MXN per day.

On a mid-range budget of about 1,800 MXN per day, you can stay in a private hostel room or Airbnb, eat out at restaurants serving cheap traditional cuisine for every meal, visit more attractions, enjoy a few drinks, and take the occasional taxi to get around.

On a “luxury” budget of 3,600 MXN or more per day, you can stay at a hotel, eat out for all your meals, enjoy plenty of drinks, take taxis everywhere or rent a car, and do some guided trips and tours. This is just the ground floor for luxury though. The sky is the limit!

You can use the chart below to get some idea of how much you need to budget daily, depending on your travel style. Keep in mind these are daily averages — some days you’ll spend more, some days you’ll spend less (you might spend less every day). We just want to give you a general idea of how to make your budget. Prices are in MXN.

Mexico Travel Guide: Money-Saving Tips

Mexico is incredibly budget-friendly. Unless you’re splurging on food or resorts, it’s really easy to visit on a budget. That said, it never hurts to save more money! Here are some ways to save in Mexico:

  • Shop at the markets for food – Mexico’s markets are a great place to eat inexpensively and stock up on food for day trips. Most towns have a local market selling fresh fruits, veggies, and other goods for cheap.
  • Eat street food – Street food is the best food in the country — and the cheapest. Stick to street stalls to save money and enjoy the country’s best eats.
  • Take a free walking tour – Many cities have free walking tours that give you a solid introduction to the main sights. Both Mexico City and Oaxaca have excellent free tours — just be sure to tip your guide!
  • Travel off-season – By traveling between late April and early December, you can pick up bargain accommodation, food and travel rates as this is low season.
  • Venture inland – Mexico’s coasts are the most famous, most touristy parts of the country, but the interior has an amazing amount to offer. Prices are cheaper, and you’ll be more likely to meet some locals if you head away from the coast.
  • Stay with a local – Use Couchsurfing to stay with locals and connect with people who can share their insider tips and advice. Just make sure to send your requests early.
  • Embrace “comida corrida” – This hearty mid-day meal option is usually available between 2pm-4pm and is often quite affordable. It’s a set menu, but it’s much cheaper than most lunch or dinner options. If you plan on eating out on a budget, aim for places that offer comida corrida.
  • Drink less – Alcohol is cheap in Mexico, but it’s definitely more expensive at bars and clubs. Try to buy your alcohol from a local store instead of drinking at the bar if you’re on a budget.
  • Skip the taxis – Taxis are overpriced and not always safe. Skip them. If you do need a taxi, don’t just hail one on the street. Head into a nearby hotel/hostel and ask them to call one for you. Only get in taxis that use a meter.
  • Being a water filter – Since the tap water here isn’t safe to drink and single-use plastic is bad for the environment, bring a water bottle with a built-in filter. LifeStraw makes reusable bottles with a built-in filter so you can ensure your water is always clean and safe.

Where to Stay in Mexico

Hostels are plentiful in most of Mexico’s cities. Here are some of my favorite places to stay in Mexico:

  • Suites DF Hostel (Mexico City)
  • Mexico City Hostel (Mexico City)
  • Hostel Ka’beh Cancún (Cancún)
  • Mama’s Home (Tulum)
  • Gran Hostal (Playa del Carmen)
  • Casa Angel Youth Hostel (Oaxaca)

How to Get Around Mexico

Ancient buildings in bustling Mexico City, Mexico with a MExican flag in the foreground

Public transportation – Public buses (also known as camiones ) are the most common way to get around in cities and towns (and to nearby villages). These buses are also the cheapest, costing no more than a few pesos per journey. In some cities, smaller microbuses have replaced the older buses, but the cost is still the same.

Mexico City and Guadalajara have subway systems. One-way tickets for the subway and the bus system are around 5 MXN. In Mexico City, you’ll have to buy a rechargeable Metro Card at any of the Metro stations for 15 MXN, and you can use the card for the Metro, Metrobús, Light Rail, Ecobici, Trolleybus, RTP buses, and on Cablebús.

Bus – Most of Mexico is served by buses. On longer journeys, make sure to take an express bus (called a “directo”) if you can as they are much faster and stop less. A bus from Puerto Vallarta to Guadalajara (5.5 hours) costs around 585 MXN. A bus from Cancún to Mexico City (27 hours) costs around 1,800 MXN. A bus from Puebla to Mexico City (2 hours) costs around 200 MXN.

Some of the biggest and most reliable bus companies include:

  • Primera Plus
  • Estrella de Oro
  • Omnibuses de Mexico
  • ETN (Enlaces Terrestres Nacionales)

Most cities have a central bus terminal from where all long-distance buses depart. You can show up to buy your ticket, or research routes and ticket prices via each company’s website.

To find bus routes and prices, use BusBud .

Train – There are virtually no passenger train services remaining in Mexico. For long-distance travel, you’ll need to fly or take the bus.

Flying – For long journeys, consider flying. The route from Cancún to Mexico City by bus takes 27 hours and costs around 1,800 MXN but a flight starts around 470 MXN and only takes two hours. A one-way fare from Mexico City to Guadalajara is about 525 MXN. Even a four-hour flight from coast to coast from Cancún to Puerto Vallarta is just 1,200 MXN one-way.

Aeroméxico is the biggest airline in Mexico, but low-cost carriers are becoming more popular. These include:

  • VivaAerobus

Car rentals – Car rentals are surprisingly affordable in Mexico. You can find week-long rentals for around 3,000 MXN. Renters must be 21 years of age and have had their license for at least two years. Some companies require renters to be over 25 and it’s best to carry an International Driving Permit (IDP). Avoid driving at night, when crimes against drivers are more likely to occur. Also, don’t leave any valuables in your vehicle overnight as break-ins can occur.

For the best car rental prices, use Discover Cars .

When to Go to Mexico

Summer (June to October) is the rainy season in Mexico, but this is mostly just in the center of the country. You can expect it to rain each day heavily, but the downpour is usually short. It hardly ever rains in the northern part of the country, and humidity is thick in the south and along the coastal areas. Temperatures during this time hover somewhere between 26-32°C (79-90°F).

September to the middle of October is hurricane season and is not a good time to visit.

December to the end of April (winter) is the busiest tourist season as temperatures are hot, but the coastal areas provide plenty of relief for vacationers. This is the best time to visit if you’re looking to take advantage of Mexico’s tropical environment. It’s the dry season, so you’ll experience very little rain. You can expect big crowds as people flock to the resort areas around Cancún and Puerto Vallarta.

The average daily temperature during this time is 28°C (82°F). But if you’re in the mountains, pack lots of layers! It can get frigid, especially in the evenings.

How to Stay Safe in Mexico

The media (especially the American media) likes to paint Mexico as a dangerous place to visit but the reality is far more complex. While petty theft is very common in Mexico, most of the serious conflicts occur between the authorities and Mexican drug cartels. The people who tend to be involved in major incidents are usually doing drugs or taking part in sex tourism. Avoid those, and you’ll drastically increase your chances of staying safe.

Moreover, where you are greatly influences how safe you are. Yucatan and Oaxaca are incredibly safe states to visit while states near the US border are less so and more likely to experience violence and crime.

Officials looking for bribes are pretty common in Quintana Roo, as is drug-related violence due to tourists looking for drugs there. States near the southern border can also be sketchy and it’s wiser to keep an eye out on your stuff there though violent crime is pretty uncommon.

So don’t believe the media that “Mexico is unsafe.” Mexico is like any big country – some parts are safe, and some parts aren’t. Use some common sense when you travel: don’t flash your money, avoid wearing expensive watches or jewelry, don’t walk along drunk at night, make copies of your passport and official documents, and tell people where you are regularly.

Another important safety tip to keep in mind is about the water. While Mexico’s water purification and treatment systems have improved, it still is not safe to drink ordinary tap water when visiting. Luckily, bottled water is available everywhere. Bringing water filter like LifeStraw is advised as it has a built-in filter so your water is always clean and safe.

Keep an eye out for common scams against tourists , such as fake ATMs, taxis that don’t use a meter, and questionable tour operators.

The emergency services number in Mexico is 911. However, if that doesn’t work (since it isn’t in use in every region of Mexico), try 066.

The most important piece of advice I can offer is to purchase good travel insurance. Travel insurance protects you against illness, injury, theft, and cancellations. It’s comprehensive protection in case anything goes wrong. I never go on a trip without it as I’ve had to use it many times in the past.

Mexico Travel Guide: The Best Booking Resources

These are my favorite companies to use when I travel. They consistently have the best deals, offer world-class customer service and great value, and overall, are better than their competitors. They are the companies I use the most and are always the starting point in my search for travel deals.

  • Skyscanner – Skyscanner is my favorite flight search engine. They search small websites and budget airlines that larger search sites tend to miss. They are hands down the number one place to start.
  • Hostelworld – This is the best hostel accommodation site out there with the largest inventory, best search interface, and widest availability.
  • Booking.com – The best all around booking site that constantly provides the cheapest and lowest rates. They have the widest selection of budget accommodation. In all my tests, they’ve always had the cheapest rates out of all the booking websites.
  • Get Your Guide – Get Your Guide is a huge online marketplace for tours and excursions. They have tons of tour options available in cities all around the world, including everything from cooking classes, walking tours, street art lessons, and more!
  • SafetyWing – Safety Wing offers convenient and affordable plans tailored to digital nomads and long-term travelers. They have cheap monthly plans, great customer service, and an easy-to-use claims process that makes it perfect for those on the road.
  • LifeStraw – My go-to company for reusable water bottles with built-in filters so you can ensure your drinking water is always clean and safe.
  • Unbound Merino – They make lightweight, durable, easy-to-clean travel clothing.
  • Top Travel Credit Cards – Points are the best way to cut down travel expenses. Here’s my favorite point earning credit cards so you can get free travel!

Mexico Travel Guide: Related Articles

Want more info? Check out all the articles I’ve written on backpacking/traveling Mexico and continue planning your trip:

The 5 Best Hotels in Oaxaca

The 5 Best Hotels in Oaxaca

Where to Stay in Oaxaca: The Best Neighborhoods for Your Visit

Where to Stay in Oaxaca: The Best Neighborhoods for Your Visit

How to Spend 5 Days in Oaxaca

How to Spend 5 Days in Oaxaca

The 15 Best Things to Do in Oaxaca

The 15 Best Things to Do in Oaxaca

Is Tulum Safe?

Is Tulum Safe?

Where to Stay in Mexico City: The Best Neighborhoods for Your Visit

Where to Stay in Mexico City: The Best Neighborhoods for Your Visit

Get my best stuff sent straight to you, pin it on pinterest.

  • Where To Stay
  • Transportation
  • Booking Resources
  • Related Blogs

Protect Your Trip »

Best places to visit in mexico for 2023-2024.

With year-round warm weather and diverse destinations ranging from metropolitan Mexico City to the sands of Tulum, Mexico boasts vacation spots that appeal to all sorts of visitors. To help you determine which locale is best for you, U.S. News compiled this list of the best places to visit in Mexico by factoring in cultural attractions, food options, beaches, water-based activities and nightlife, along with traveler votes and expert opinions. Vote for your favorite vacation spots below to help us determine next year's ranking. (Note: The U.S. Department of State advises against traveling to certain Mexican states due to crime; check the  website  for updates before booking your trip, and be cautious if you decide to travel.)

Zihuatanejo

Isla mujeres, isla holbox, mexico city, playa del carmen.

travel video of mexico

Located on Mexico's Pacific coast, Zihuatanejo offers travelers an authentic Mexico experience full of brilliant sunsets and laid-back vibes. In this fishing village, shopaholics can buy local handicrafts (think: ceramics and woodcarvings), and foodies can savor fresh fish tacos and ceviche along the beach. The city's Playa La Ropa serves as the main beach and stands out because of its clean, family-friendly atmosphere. Playa Larga, another excellent beach option, is set slightly outside of town, so it offers a quieter atmosphere and plenty of room to sprawl out. Just off the coast, divers and snorkelers can pick from several dive sites brimming with marine life.

travel video of mexico

Home to Mexico's most famous waterfront Mayan ruins, Tulum appeals to history buffs and water lovers alike. Positioned along a coastal stretch of the Riviera Maya, about 40 miles south of Playa del Carmen, Tulum offers some of the best hotels in Mexico , ranging from small boutique hotels to wellness retreats to all-inclusive resorts. Regardless of where you stay, you can spend time lounging on some of the world's most beautiful beaches (try traveler-approved Playa Paraíso or Playa Ruinas), exploring ancient ruins (consider booking a daytrip to nearby Chichén Itzá for a larger-scale site) and swimming in secluded cenotes, unique underwater caves located around the Yucatán Peninsula.

travel video of mexico

This island is probably best known for two things: coral reefs and cruise ships. Travelers love this destination's brilliant blue water and laid-back beaches, plus its abundance of water sports activities. Numerous outfitters and resorts offer kayaks, paddleboards and snorkeling gear. While you could spend every minute in the water or on the beach with a good book, Cozumel is also a quiet place to learn about Mayan culture. Visit the Mayan ruins at San Gervasio archaeological site for a dose of pre-Hispanic history.

travel video of mexico

Ixtapa's curved coastline is packed with hotels, restaurants and nightlife, giving the Pacific coast city (located just north of Zihuatanejo) a bustling vibe. Playa El Palmar, the main beach, often proves better for sunset strolls and people-watching than swimming or snorkeling due to the strong waves. Still, warm, clear and generally gentle water and coral beds farther offshore make Ixtapa one of the best places for beginner scuba enthusiasts. Anyone interested in the area's history should also explore the Archaeological Museum of the Costa Grande, a small museum that details the various cultures and events that make the region unique. 

travel video of mexico

A great option for a weekend stay or a quick daytrip tour , Isla Mujeres is set off the coast of Cancún and offers beautiful beaches perfect for relaxation and coral reefs ready for exploration. In fact, it's one of the best places to go snorkeling in the world thanks to a unique underwater museum and one of the world's largest coral reefs (home to all sorts of colorful fish). See marine life from another perspective on a glass bottom boat. When you want to catch some rays, Playa Norte is the most popular beach, framed by white sand, turquoise water and swaying palm trees.

travel video of mexico

Quiet beaches, a relaxed atmosphere and stunning crystal-clear water are some of Isla Holbox's standout attributes. This up-and-coming slice of paradise is perfect for travelers looking to truly get away from it all, thanks to its car-free, off-the-beaten-path location. Isla Holbox is situated off the northern coast of the Yucatán Peninsula and only 26 miles long. Expect quaint boutique hotels, stretches of white sand beaches (Playa Punta Cocos and Punta Mosquito are two top spots), opportunities for snorkeling and sailing, and more than 100 species of birds, including vibrantly colored flamingoes.

travel video of mexico

About 25 miles north of Puerto Vallarta, Sayulita is a small beach town known for awesome surfing conditions and scenic stretches of sand. If you've never surfed before, sign up for a lesson from a local to learn. Visitors can also go whale watching, snorkeling, scuba diving, horseback riding or zip lining, or hop on a relaxing boat tour. After a day of fun in the sun, head into town to check out the local art galleries and grab a bite to eat at one of the tasty restaurants (Sayulita is a burgeoning foodie destination), which feature everything from cheap eats to fine dining.

travel video of mexico

Anglers recognize Manzanillo as a world-class deep-sea fishing destination for anyone searching for sailfish and marlin, but many types of travelers will enjoy a trip to this Pacific coast destination, located 170 miles south of Puerto Vallarta. The city's two bays mean there is no shortage of beaches for visitors to swim and sunbathe on: Top spots include Playa la Audiencia and Playa Salagua. Water sports like snorkeling and kayaking are also popular activities to enjoy here. If you have time, visit the small town of Barra de Navidad (about 30 miles northwest) for charming hotels, restaurants and stores along the beach. 

travel video of mexico

Dreamy white sand , nightclubs, all-inclusive resorts and inexpensive flights from the U.S. make Cancún a go-to spot for spring breakers and vacationers seeking an easy beach getaway. But this city on the Yucatán Peninsula also sits close to lush jungles and tranquil cenotes, making it an excellent option for nature lovers. Not to mention, travelers will find diverse and cheap street food served from various carts in the downtown area. Visiting in fall or winter will ensure you see this city (one of the most-visited spots in Mexico) in its most tranquil light, but December through April is when the weather is closest to perfect.

travel video of mexico

Ornate baroque and neoclassical buildings, busy plazas and colorful homes are everywhere you turn in this UNESCO World Heritage-listed city. Guanajuato, situated about 50 miles west of San Miguel de Allende, is known for its subterranean streets and tunnels, which you can explore on a walking tour or at your own leisure. After admiring the city's cobblestone roadways and charming colonial architecture, grab a souvenir or bite to eat at the bustling Mercado Hidalgo. If you enjoy art, arrive in October when the popular Festival Internacional Cervantino takes place.

travel video of mexico

As the capital of Yucatán, Mérida's rich culture is visible around every turn. White stone mansions line Paseo de Montejo (the city's main street), while vibrant Sunday markets provide a taste of old-world Mexico. Those looking for Mayan ruins are also in luck; many ancient archaeological sites are in close proximity, including the famed Chichén Itzá just 75 miles east. Meanwhile, museum and art enthusiasts praise El Gran Museo del Mundo Maya de Mérida, as well as the city's art galleries and local murals. When it comes to lodging, travelers will have their pick of quaint boutique hotels.

travel video of mexico

The most populous city in Mexico is steeped in history and culture. Mexico City boasts delectable cuisine, ancient Aztec sites and world-class hotels – all at fairly low costs – but if you feel like splurging, you'll find an array of high-end shops along the tree-lined Avenida Presidente Masaryk in the Polanco neighborhood. Must-see attractions in Mexico City include the Zócalo, the Palace of Fine Arts, Chapultepec Castle and the Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe. And if you want to eat your way through the city, consider signing up for a food tour .

travel video of mexico

For a vacation packed with authentic character, head to Puebla. This city, which sits about 80 miles southeast of Mexico City, is filled with colonial architecture and numerous churches, but its main draws are its stunning Talavera pottery, its historical forts and museums, and its sweet and spicy cuisine. Visitors must try mole poblano (made with numerous ingredients, including chiles, meat, chocolate, cinnamon and garlic) and chiles en nogada (chiles stuffed with beef and served with a walnut sauce and fruit like peaches, apples and pomegranate seeds). When the sun sets, venture to Callejón de los Sapos to listen to live music.

travel video of mexico

Playa del Carmen boasts an exciting food scene, with eateries dishing out everything from delectable tacos and tostadas to sushi and expertly cooked seafood, plus an even hipper bar culture. What's more, this destination in the Riviera Maya beckons to vacationers with its soft white sand blanketing its beaches and its stunning shoreline views. Visitors can also bike to a nearby cenote for a refreshing dip or hit the links at one of the numerous surrounding golf courses. All-inclusive resorts , vacation rentals and boutique properties abound in Playa del Carmen, too, giving travelers plenty of options to find the best fit for their preferences and budgets.

travel video of mexico

This secluded vacation spot is known for its luxurious lodging options (from vacation rentals to high-end hotels like the St. Regis and the Four Seasons), golf courses and charming beaches, such as El Anclote and Playa de Punta Mita. The small resort village of Punta Mita sits on a peninsula in Banderas Bay and most appeals to travelers seeking a relaxing atmosphere. Those interested in scuba diving, snorkeling, fishing and surfing will be able to enjoy those activities here as well. If you're visiting between December and March, book a whale watching tour for a chance to see humpback or orca whales.

Vote to Add these Destinations to the Rankings

travel video of mexico

Puerto Vallarta

travel video of mexico

Cabo San Lucas

travel video of mexico

San Miguel de Allende

travel video of mexico

Guadalajara

travel video of mexico

You May Be Interested In

travel video of mexico

Best Mexico Beaches for 2024

travel video of mexico

Best Places to Visit in the Caribbean for 2023

travel video of mexico

Best Spring Break Destinations

travel video of mexico

Central & South America

Best Places to Visit in Central and South America in 2023

travel video of mexico

Best Cheap Winter Vacations

travel video of mexico

Best Cheap Mexico Vacations

If you make a purchase from our site, we may earn a commission. This does not affect the quality or independence of our editorial content.

Recommended

The 50 Best Hotels in the USA 2024

Christina Maggitas February 6, 2024

travel video of mexico

The 32 Most Famous Landmarks in the World

Gwen Pratesi|Timothy J. Forster February 1, 2024

travel video of mexico

9 Top All-Inclusive Resorts in Florida for 2024

Gwen Pratesi|Amanda Norcross January 5, 2024

travel video of mexico

24 Top All-Inclusive Resorts in the U.S. for 2024

Erin Evans January 4, 2024

travel video of mexico

26 Top Adults-Only All-Inclusive Resorts for 2024

Zach Watson December 28, 2023

travel video of mexico

Solo Vacations: The 36 Best Places to Travel Alone in 2024

Lyn Mettler|Erin Vasta December 22, 2023

travel video of mexico

26 Cheap Beach Vacations for Travelers on a Budget

Kyle McCarthy|Sharael Kolberg December 4, 2023

travel video of mexico

The 50 Most Beautiful White Sand Beaches in the World

Holly Johnson December 1, 2023

travel video of mexico

The 26 Best Zoos in the U.S.

Rachael Hood November 16, 2023

travel video of mexico

44 Cheap Tropical Vacations That Feel Expensive

Holly Johnson|Alissa Grisler November 10, 2023

travel video of mexico

Local Passport Family

Homeschooling Mexico: Virtual Tour of Mexico with Kids: Mexico Global Learning Guide

Are you looking forward to learning about mexico with kids but can’t travel there quite yet come join us as we travel on a virtual visit with our homeschooling mexico unit.

travel video of mexico

Come along with us as we take a virtual trip to Mexico and explore from home! Perhaps you’re planning a trip to Mexico for kids in the future, or maybe you just want to learn more about the country right from home. Either way, this is a guide to learn about history, culture, food, people, as we enjoy our homeschooling Mexico unit.

This guide is a great way to connect via heart and mind with those of diverse backgrounds from around the world. It’s perfect for preparing for future family travel, to help with homeschooling, or just for fun. We can’t wait to learn more about the beauty and diversity of Mexico with kids.

Our family likes to spend 1-2 weeks on a virtual field trip to each country. We typically spread out these activities and pick a couple each day. I hope you enjoy learning with us as we explore these Mexican activities for kids!

homeschooling mexico unit

This post about learning about Mexico with kids contains affiliate links, but all opinions are 100% my own. That means I earn a small commission if you purchase through my link, but doesn’t change your price.

Table of Contents

MEXICO WITH KIDS:

Homeschooling mexico unit to explore from home, mexico virtual travel video.

If you’d like to see a video of some of the things our family did to virtually visit Mexico, you can head here!

YouTube video

Fun Facts for Mexico Homeschooling

  • Millions of monarch butterflies migrate to Mexico every year from the U.S. and Canada.
  • A Mexican tamale called the zacahuil is three feet long and weighs about 150 pounds.
  • Popcorn was first made in pre-historic cities in Mexico. It was made in very hot clay pots and was called momochtli.
  • Chocolate was invented in Mexico! The Aztecs used cocoa pasted in drinks for its health benefits.
  • The Maya people were the first to invent chewing gum!
  • The border between Mexico and the United States is the second largest border in the world (only the U.S.-Canadian border is longer).
  • Mexico City has the highest elevation and is oldest city in North America. It is also one of the largest cities in the world.
  • Red poinsettias come from Mexico. They were renamed after Joel Roberts Poinsett, the first United States ambassador to Mexico.
  • Mexico has more Catholics than any other country in the world except Brazil.

YouTube video

Language Arts Mexico Homeschooling

Languages spoken in mexico.

  • Spanish is the most common language spoken in Mexico. While it is officially the language used in government, it is not required by law.
  • Indigenous languages are also common in Mexico. Those are languages that were used in what is now Mexico, but prior to the arrival of European settlers.
  • Mexico has more Spanish speakers than any other country.
  • Hola means “hello” in Spanish.

YouTube video

Mexico Literature & Mexican Folktales

Mexican folktales are often allegorical. They are used to teach principles such as honesty, hard work, endurance, and wisdom.

Here is a read aloud of a Mexican folk tale called Cuckoo .

Writing Prompts for elementary and middle school children

  • Write a paragraph on what excites you about visiting Mexico.
  • Look up a paleta recipe. Write your own with different fruits!

Day of the Dead Writing Assignment: Homeschooling Mexico Language Arts Activity

Read a book about Dia de los Muertos. Have children research an ancestor and write an essay talking about her or his life. Have kids consider for what they think the ancestor would most want to be remembered.

Reading: Books to Learn About Mexico for Kids

Culture & people: homeschooling mexico for kids.

Mexico has gone through many cultural transformations. It tends to follow the history of the country with major changes happening around the time of Spanish colonization, Mexican independence, and the Mexican Revolution.

While the overwhelming majority of Mexicans speak Spanish, many also speak indigenous languages. Did you know the word “chocolate” comes from the language Nahuatl?

Family is extremely important in Mexican society. Extended families tend to be large and close. Hosting family parties is very common in Mexican culture.

One major Mexican family event is the quinceañera, when a young woman turns 15. She usually has a large party with lots of family and friends, very fancy dress, and a church mass.

YouTube video

Mexican Poncho Craft

The Mexican  sarape , or poncho, is commonly worn. It’s often brightly colored and fringed at the end. You can make your own poncho at home!

Paper bag Colored paper Markers Scissors

Make a poncho

History & Government: Homeschooling Mexico Facts

The official name of the country is Estados Unidos Mexicanos, or the United Mexican States. It is a federal republic.

The current President of Mexico is Andrés Manuel López Obrador. The president is also the commander of the Armed Forces. The government is divided into executive, legislative, and judicial branches. Mexico has 32 states.

  • Stone tools have been found in Mexico that suggest humans lived there around 23000 years ago.
  • The Olmec people were Mexico’s first complex society. They first emerged around 1200 B.C. Next came the Maya, the Toltec, and the Aztec people.
  • The Spanish arrived around 1500. They brought several diseases with them, including smallpox, which made many of the Aztecs sick. The also destroyed the Aztec capital, Tenochtilán.
  • Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, a Catholic priest, started the Mexican war of independence on September 16, 1810. The war went on for over 11 years.
  • Many Mexicans today have a mix of Native American and Spanish blood, and are called mestizos.

YouTube video

1 USD ~ 23 Mexican pesos 1 peso = 100 centavos

  • Mexico has 7 Official Federal Holidays.There are many other civic holidays and festivities.
  • Cinco de Mayo celebrates the Mexican army defeating a French army in the city of Puebla in 1862, but is not celebrated throughout the country.
  • Here is a children’s book read aloud of Dia de los Muertos !
  • Mexican children usually receive gifts on Three Kings Day (January 6) instead of Christmas Day.

YouTube video

Mexican History Activity Suggestions:

Mexican flag activity.

  • Green = Hope
  • White = Unity
  • Red = Blood of the national heroes
  • Coat of arms = An eagle on a prickly pear cactus eating a serpent. The leader of the Axtecs (also known as the Mexica : Meh-shee-ka), Tenoch had a dream that their nomadic tribe should settle wherever they saw this. They settled there and built the great city of Tenochtitlan.

Mexico Flag

Coloring sheet flag from HERE

Video About Homeschooling Mexico History for Kids:

YouTube video

Geography: Mexico for Kids

  • Find Mexico on a map or globe
  • Mexico City is the capital of Mexico (find the star on the map).
  • Mexico has 32 states
  • The land area of Mexico is about 1/5 the size of the USA.
  • Mexico’s climate varies from arid (dry and hot) to tropical (wet and hot). Some places have both depending on the season.
  • One of the biggest mountain ranges in Mexico is the Sierra Madre Occidental.
  • The longest river in Mexico is the Rio Grande. It is shared with the USA.

Mexico Geography Activity Suggestions:

  • Color in Mexico on the map. Older children may like coloring in the Mexican states map.
  • Count how many countries Mexico borders (3: the United States of America, Guatemala, and Belize)

Mexico Geography Video (12 minutes)

YouTube video

(Map from HERE )

Food: Mexican Recipes for Kids: Mexican Food That Kids Will Enjoy

Food is a perfect way to “travel” to a country from home. Making these recipes was one of our favorite parts of our homeschooling Mexico unit! Mexican food often uses vibrant spices such as cumin, coriander, lime, and more. Corn is also very common in Mexican cooking.

Here are some common foods in Mexico:

  • Tamales – a dough made of corn cooked in a corn husk
  • Pozole – a soup made with broth, corn, spices, and toppings
  • Chilaquiles – fried corn tortillas topped with eggs, salsa, cheese, and cream
  • Tortillas – a flatbread
  • Meat, especially beef and pork
  • Taco – a folded tortilla with fillings
  • Aguas frescas – fresh juices

Mexican Food Activity

If you don’t feel up to making a whole recipe, consider just smelling a few of the common Mexican spices you may have in your cupboard! You could also visit a local Mexican restaurant.

Mexican Recipes for Kids

Cooking is a perfect activity for a homeschooling Mexico unit. Here are some of our favorite kid friendly Mexican food recipes!

  • Simple and kid-friendly Instant Pot black bean and rice burrito filling . My 9 year old can make this recipe on his own, so you definitely can, too! It’s not the most traditional filling, but is adapted to be vegetarian and very easy to make.
  • Horchata (cinnamon rice drink)
  • Creamy poblano pepper enchiladas

YouTube video

travel video of mexico

Famous Landmarks: Mexico with Kids

  • Ancient Maya ruins, such as Chichen Itza , Tulum , Coba , and, my personal favorite, Uxmal (the best preserved Maya ruins in the Yucatan)
  • Teotihuacán – an ancient civilization later used by the Aztecs
  • San Ignacio Lagoon to see gray whales
  • Isla Mujeres
  • Cenote dos Ojos – an underwater cave popular for snorkeling and scuba diving
  • Copper Canyon – a system of canyons larger than the Grand Canyon

YouTube video

Art History: Mexican Art History with Kids

Art in Mexico is very old! It dates back to before recorded history. There are different periods of Mexican art, including the prehispanic period, a colonial period, a time before and after independence, and more modern Mexican art after the Mexican Revolution.

  • Historians believe the oldest rock art in the Americas is in a cave on the peninsula of Baja California.
  • The first major Mesoamerican culture was the Olmecs. They created hieroglyphics, the 365 day calendar, and did art with jade, a beautiful greenish stone.
  • Most Mesoamerican art was created for religious or political purposes, not just to be pretty. They often used ceramics, amate paper, and architecture.
  • Feather work was popular in prehispanic times. The Spaniards later became very interested in it.
  • The Mexican Revolution (1910-1920) greatly affected Mexican art. Murals became popular during this time, and it was art for all the people that was not in a museum and that could not be moved somewhere else.
  • Murals were often political and supported the Revolution. They became most popular during the 1930s.
  • Diego Rivera was a very popular muralist.
  • Frida Kahlo was a very important Mexican artist. She painted on canvases instead of murals. She focused on Mexican folk themes, as well as themes that focused on women, such as motherhood or domestic violence. Frida was married to Diego Rivera.

Mayan Glyphs

Image from HERE

Art Activities: Homeschooling Mexico Art Activities with Kids

Frida kahlo activity for kids.

Frida Kahlo was born in Mexico and cared deeply about sharing Mexican folk culture. She did not want it to get lost from colonization. She often wore traditional Mexican clothes.

Frida painted in a way that shared Mexican culture with all who viewed it. She used strong lines and bright colors. She also painted to share the experience of a woman, which was not common during that time. Frida painted other women and situations specific to women (like motherhood), and even hard things like abuse towards women.

Frida painted several self-portraits in a distinct, colorful style. You, too, can paint a self portrait!

White paper Paint in bright colors Paint brushes A mirror An image of Self Portrait – The Frame , by Frida Kahlo

uploads5.wikiart.org/images/magdalena-carmen-fr...

HERE are 9 other Frida Kahlo-inspired art projects for kids!

Draw a sugar skull.

YouTube video

draw a sugar skull with kids

Mexican Crafts for Kids: Mexican coloring pages

  • Mexican coloring pages
  • Chichen Itza coloring page
  • Dahlia coloring page – national flower of Mexico

HERE are some other wonderful Mexico craft project ideas!

Religion & spirituality: homeschooling mexico for kids.

Mexico is over 80% Catholic Christian. Evangelical Protestantism and Mormonism are religions that have been growing in Mexico in recent decades.

Mexico allows freedom of religion. That means it allows people to choose and also change their religion.

Movies about Mexico for Kids and Grown Ups

  • Coco (a beautifully animated celebration of family and Dia de los Muertos)
  • The Book of Life (animated)
  • Selena (a biographical drama about the musician)
  • Catinflas (about the Mexican actor)

Math & Science in Mexico: Mexican Inventions

  • The Olmecs of Central America originally created the 365 day calendar, and the Maya perfected it in about the 1st century AD.
  • A Mexican engineer named Guillermo González Camarena figured out we could watch colors through the television!
  • Alejandro Alagón developed a scorpion antivenom.
  • José Antonio de Alzate developed a toilet float in 1970!
  • Manuel González Flores developed earthquake-resistant foundations in 1948.

Animals in Mexico

Gray whales come from Alaska to Baja California each year in the winter to breed.

The rain forests and wet lands have lots of unusual animals such as jaguars and quetzal birds.

YouTube video

STEAM and Craft Activity Suggestions when Homeschooling Mexico with Kids

  • Chichen Itza activity
  • Make homemade maracas
  • Make Mexican flag slime
  • Mexican metal art

hispanic heritage

Learn About Chichen Itza with Kids

The ancient Maya city of Chichen Itza with was a very sacred place. The ruins today show pyramids, temples, and other stone buildings. The Temple of Kukulkan (El Castillo) is the most famous structure. It’s a pyramid with 365 steps – one for each day of the year.

When the sun hits the temple at just right time at the equinox, an image of a serpent appears!

The biggest Maya ball court (juego de pelota) is in Chichen Itza. It is nearly 600 feet long! Despite this, if you whisper at one end of the court, someone can hear it all the way at the other end due to the acoustics . Each side of the court has stone hoops.

mexico homeschooling chichen itza activity

Chichen Itza Activity for Kids

Old cardboard boxes Scissors Tape Markers

Discuss some of the key features of Chichen Itza and why it is important. Then build your own model of Chichen Itza. How many steps can you build?

You may also want to consider if you were an ancient Maya, what god you would revere. Would you pay homage to the rain god? The earth god? How would you design your own temple to that god?

mexico homeschooling for kids build chichen itza

Music: Homeschooling Mexico Music Unit

Dance & portraiture activity.

José Limón was a dancer and a choreographer. This activity discusses rhythm, his portrait, provides a children’s book and video, and has children dance and create a self portrait.

Forms of Mexican Music

There are many different styles of Mexican music. One popular style is  mariachi music. Mariachi developed in the Mexican countryside in the 1700s. Mariachi music usually has at least 2 violins, 2 trumpets, and a few different types of guitars. It can often have as many as 20 musicians!

YouTube video

Sports, Games, and Movement in Mexico

The most popular sport in Mexico is football (soccer).

Mexican rodeo is popular and can be dangerous.

YouTube video

Children’s Games in Mexico

If you’re looking for some other ideas for Mexican games and activities, here are a few simple and fun ones:

  • Hopscotch (Avion)
  • La Gallinita Ciega (The Blind Hen)
  • El Balero (A Ball and Cup game)

Thanks for Taking a Virtual Field Trip to Mexico With Us!

We’ve loved putting together this resource to virtually visit Mexico. We’d love to hear if you do any of these activities for a homeschooling Mexico unit, or if you visit in person!

We hope to inspire curiosity and connection through exploring and learning, and we hope this guide helps you and your families. Please share any activities you do with us over on our Instagram . And we’d be delighted if you passed this Mexico with kids virtual tour and homeschooling resource along to others, as well!

travel video of mexico

IF YOU LIKED THIS POST ABOUT HOMESCHOOLING MEXICO WITH KIDS, YOU MIGHT LIKE THESE POSTS TOO:

  • 15+ Travel Activities for Kids to Explore from Home
  • Fiction Travel Books for Kids
  • Virtual Field Trips: Tips for Toddlers and Preschoolers

NOT READY TO EXPLORE MEXICO WITH KIDS FROM HOME QUITE YET? PIN THIS POST FOR LATER!

mexico virtual field trip

Recent Posts

travel video of mexico

Best Areas to Stay in Paris With Family

travel video of mexico

Google Maps Hacks for Travel

travel video of mexico

Credit Card Rewards Travel 101: Using Points and Miles for Family Travel

travel video of mexico

What We Gave Our Kids for Their Birthdays in 2023

travel video of mexico

A Paris Weekend with Kids (in January!)

travel video of mexico

What to Know About Mobile Passport Control with Kids

travel video of mexico

Our Favorite Minimal Packing Essentials for Families

travel video of mexico

Introducing: Home Buyer’s Best Friend

7 responses.

[…] Virtual Tour of Mexico with Kids […]

[…] Homeschooling Mexico Unit […]

Actually, the Mexico-USA border is only the tenth longest border in the world, NOT the second! The second longest border is the one between Russia and Kazakhstan. It is more than twice as long as the Mexico-USA border!

[…] Even when everything is closed, you can create your own magic. Try these ideas for making your next vacation a virtual adventure. If you have children, turn your tour of Mexico into something educational! […]

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Don't subscribe All Replies to my comments Notify me of followup comments via e-mail. You can also subscribe without commenting.

2023 MONTHLY GLOBAL CHILDREN'S BOOK CLUB

  • Privacy Policy
  • Recommended Destinations
  • North America
  • South America
  • Middle East
  • Accommodations
  • Photography
  • Travel with Infants & Toddlers
  • 2023 Global Children’s Book Club
  • 2022 Global Children’s Book Club
  • A-Z Global Children’s Book Club
  • 2021 Global Children’s Book Club
  • Global Service Advent
  • Virtual Travel
  • Holidays Around the World
  • Home Education
  • Curious Kids Email Course
  • Travel Products
  • Gift Guides
  • Gifts We Gave
  • Favorite Things
  • Weekly Deals
  • Holidays at Home
  • Home With Kids
  • Weekly Menus
  • Summer with Kids
  • Work With Us
  • Privacy Overview
  • Strictly Necessary Cookies

Local Passport Family

This website uses cookies so that we can provide you with the best user experience possible. Cookie information is stored in your browser and performs functions such as recognizing you when you return to our website and helping our team to understand which sections of the website you find most interesting and useful. Read more about our Privacy Policy .

Strictly Necessary Cookie should be enabled at all times so that we can save your preferences for cookie settings.

  • Share full article

Advertisement

Supported by

Is It Safe to Travel to Mexico? Here’s What You Need to Know.

A spate of incidents, including a kidnapping and the death of two Americans near the border, have prompted travel warnings from the U.S. government.

travel video of mexico

By Elisabeth Malkin and Isabella Kwai

Two Americans found dead after they were attacked and kidnapped near the border. Airports shuttered amid gang violence in Sinaloa. Turmoil among taxi drivers in Cancún.

A number of recent security incidents have raised concerns about the risks of traveling to Mexico, where more than 20 million tourists flew last year to visit the country’s beaches, cities and archaeological sites, or to obtain health care .

Ahead of the spring break holiday, a popular time for American tourists to visit the country, the U.S. Embassy issued a travel alert , urging visitors to exercise caution by avoiding dangerous situations and drinking responsibly, among other recommendations. “Crime, including violent crime, can occur anywhere in Mexico, including in popular tourist destinations,” the alert said. And the State Department has warned tourists to steer clear of six states, including the state of Tamaulipas, where the recent kidnapping occurred — and to exercise increased precautions in other popular destinations like Playa del Carmen, Cancún, Tulum and Mexico City.

An overwhelming majority of visitors enjoy a safe vacation in Mexico, and tourists are largely sheltered from the violence that grips local communities. But the attack and kidnapping of four Americans in the border city of Matamoros, two of whom were later found dead, along with recent disorder in Cancún and violence in early January that forced the closure of three airports in northwest Mexico, is prompting questions about whether the country’s broader unrest is spilling into other destinations.

What happened on the border?

On March 3, four Americans from South Carolina traveling in a white minivan crossed the border from Brownsville, Texas, into the city of Matamoros, in the Mexican state of Tamaulipas. One of the Americans was scheduled for cosmetic surgery.

Soon after the Americans crossed the border, gunmen fired on their vehicle and then abducted the group in a pickup truck. Officials later said that two of the group were found dead at a rural location alongside the other two, who had survived.

The Americans were attacked as a result of “confusion,” according to Irving Barrios, the state prosecutor in Tamaulipas. Matamoros has a long history of violence and highway shootouts, though that reputation has partially subsided in recent years. Then, in late February, one gang moved into the city to wrest control of drug sales from another, said Eduardo Guerrero, the director of Lantia Intelligence , a security consulting company in Mexico City.

“There are places in the country where the situation can change abruptly from one week to another,” he said. While the motives in the attack remain unclear, the Americans had “very bad luck,” Mr. Guerrero said, because they likely stumbled into a battle between the two gangs.

What happened earlier this year in Cancún?

Uber has been challenging the taxi unions for the right to operate in Cancún and won a court decision in its favor on Jan. 11. The ruling infuriated the powerful unions, which are believed to have links to local organized crime figures and former governors. Taxi drivers then began harassing and threatening Uber drivers.

The conflict generated widespread attention after a video of taxi drivers forcing a Russian-speaking family out of their rideshare car went viral, and after unions blocked the main road leading to Cancún’s hotel zone. That prompted the U.S. Embassy in Mexico to issue a security alert .

Mr. Guerrero said that the authorities will try to negotiate some kind of compromise, but there was a probability of more violence ahead.

Have authorities curbed violence that might affect tourists?

As a rule, criminals in Mexico are careful not to kill tourists, Mr. Guerrero explained, because doing so “can set in motion a persecution that can last years,” the consequences of which can be “very dissuasive,” he said.

But the rule doesn’t always hold. And in two popular destinations for foreign tourists — Los Cabos , at the tip of the Baja California peninsula, and the Caribbean coast — local and state officials have recently sought help from the United States to take on organized crime that threatened to drive off tourists.

A spasm of violence at the end of 2021 and early 2022 rattled the tourist industry along the Riviera Maya, the 80-mile strip of Caribbean resorts south of Cancún. Two visitors were killed in crossfire between local gangs in Tulum; a gunfight on a beach in Puerto Morelos sent tourists running for cover into a nearby hotel; a hit man gained entry to a luxury hotel in Playa del Carmen and killed two Canadian tourists believed to have links to organized crime.

The federal government sent National Guard units to patrol the beaches, and Quintana Roo state authorities asked U.S. law enforcement agencies, including the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Drug Enforcement Administration, to provide intelligence, Mr. Guerrero said. Local authorities, flush with tourism revenues, invested in the police, which is typically the weakest link in Mexican law enforcement.

The joint approach led to a lull in gangland gun battles in Quintana Roo’s tourist areas, and experts say that drug sales to meet foreign demand no longer take place on the street, although they are continuing more discreetly.

The success in tamping down drug violence in Quintana Roo follows a similar improvement in Los Cabos a couple of years ago when U.S. authorities also collaborated with local officials in the state of Baja California Sur. The murder rate soared in Los Cabos in 2017 amid cartel wars, and although tourists were not targeted, that year police chased gunmen into the lobby of a luxury hotel in San José del Cabo, and a cooler containing two heads was left in a tourist area.

What about tourist areas in other states?

Even in states where crime is very high, tourist areas have generally been spared. San Miguel de Allende, a haven for U.S. retirees, is an island of relative peace in a state, Guanajuato, that has been riddled with cartel violence .

The Pacific Coast state of Jalisco, home to the resort of Puerto Vallarta, picturesque tequila country and the cultural and gastronomic attractions of the state capital, Guadalajara , is also the center of operations of the extremely violent Jalisco New Generation Cartel . The cartel’s focus of violence is in the countryside; Puerto Vallarta and the beaches to its north, including the exclusive peninsula of Punta Mita and the surfers’ hangout of Sayulita, are all booming — and, despite drug sales, the cartel’s control seems to limit open conflict.

Mexico City has become a magnet for digital nomads and shorter term visitors , and concerns about violence there have receded. The city’s police force has been successful in reducing violent crime, particularly homicides, and the number of killings has been cut almost in half over the past three years.

Are there any other safety concerns?

Street crime is still a problem almost everywhere, especially in bigger cities and crowded spaces. Kidnapping and carjacking are a risk in certain regions and many businesses that cater to tourists operate under extortion threats. While tourists may not be aware of underlying criminal forces, their power sometimes spills out into the open in spectacular shows of violence.

The attack in Matamoros is only the most recent example. Mexican border cities, which have long endured waves of violence, are not typically tourist destinations, although Americans often cross the border to visit family, seek out cheaper health care or dine at restaurants.

Three airports in the state of Sinaloa, including the beach destination Mazatlán, were closed on Jan. 5 amid gang violence after Mexican security forces arrested Ovidio Guzmán López, a son of Joaquín Guzmán Loera, the crime lord known as El Chapo, who is serving a life sentence in the United States. A stray bullet fired by cartel gunmen shooting at a Mexican military plane as it landed at the airport in the state capital, Culiacán, clipped an Aeromexico plane preparing to take off for Mexico City. Nobody was hurt and the plane returned to the terminal.

In August, gunmen positioned burning cars and buses to block roads around Guadalajara in response to a military raid on a meeting of criminal bosses. In October, a local politician was shot and killed in an upscale steakhouse in suburban Guadalajara as terrified diners crawled to safety.

Pierre de Hail, the president of Janus Group Mexico, a risk management company in Monterrey, is skeptical that security has improved. “There is too much random risk,” he said. “It’s all about being in the wrong place at the wrong time.”

What precautions should tourists take?

Mr. de Hail recommends researching the resort and news from the area you’re visiting. The U.S. State Department provides state-by-state information about travel risks in Mexico. As of early March, the department had issued its strongest possible warning — Level 4: Do Not Travel — for six states, including Tamaulipas and Sinaloa. Quintana Roo and Baja California Sur are at Level 2, indicating that visitors should exercise increased caution. (By comparison, the same Level 2 advisory is applied to France and Spain.)

The Matamoros incident shows how violence can flare up in places that have been quiet recently. Mr. Guerrero suggests searching on the internet before traveling for news of recent outbreaks.

Mr. de Hail also suggests buying travel insurance in case of a medical emergency or theft, and recommends that tourists keep a low profile to avoid attracting attention, he said, warning that it is easy to misread situations.

As anywhere, common sense should prevail, Mr. de Hail said: Don’t wear expensive watches or jewelry, and avoid dark and deserted places. He recommends making a copy of your passport, remaining alert while walking home at night and not leaving your drinks unattended. “I have had numerous cases of people asking for help because they were extorted coming back from bars,” he said.

He added: “If you’re staying in a place that has a report of strikes or demonstrations, don’t go there. You’re a fish out of water.”

Follow New York Times Travel on Instagram , Twitter and Facebook . And sign up for our weekly Travel Dispatch newsletter to receive expert tips on traveling smarter and inspiration for your next vacation. Dreaming up a future getaway or just armchair traveling? Check out our 52 Places to Go in 2023 .

Isabella Kwai is a breaking news reporter in the London bureau. She joined The Times in 2017 as part of the Australia bureau. More about Isabella Kwai

Open Up Your World

Considering a trip, or just some armchair traveling here are some ideas..

Italy :  Spend 36 hours in Florence , seeking out its lesser-known pockets.

Southern California :  Skip the freeways to explore the back roads between Los Angeles and Los Olivos , a 100-mile route that meanders through mountains, canyons and star-studded enclaves.

Mongolia : Some young people, searching for less curated travel experiences, are flocking to the open spaces of this East Asian nation .

Romania :  Timisoara  may be the most noteworthy city you’ve probably never heard of , offering just enough for visitors to fill two or three days.

India: A writer fulfilled a lifelong dream of visiting Darjeeling, in the Himalayan foothills , taking in the tea gardens and riding a train through the hills.

52 Places:  Why do we travel? For food, culture, adventure, natural beauty? Our 2024 list has all those elements, and more .

Love Exploring

Love Exploring

30 Incredible Things To See And Do In Mexico

Posted: August 30, 2023 | Last updated: August 30, 2023

<p>Once the land of the Maya and Aztec civilizations, Mexico is steeped in history and culture. With ancient ruins, beautiful beaches, enchanting cities and incredible food there are countless memorable experiences to be had. This is by no means a definitive list, but here are 30 awe-inspiring things to do in Mexico to get you started.</p>

Unmissable Mexico

Once the land of the Maya and Aztec civilizations, Mexico is steeped in history and culture. With ancient ruins, dazzling beaches, charming cities and incredible food, there are countless memorable experiences to be had. This is by no means a definitive list, but here are 30 awe-inspiring things to do in Mexico to get you started.

These stunning rock formations can be found at Cabo San Lucas. The famous arch itself is locally known as El Arco and is most beautiful at sunset. It’s believed 16th-century pirates would hide behind it waiting for Spanish ships. You’ll find tours at most beaches along the Los Cabos corridor, which usually include a stop-off at nearby Lover's Beach.

Watch the sunset at Land’s End

Frida Kahlo’s home in Mexico City is now a museum dedicated to her life and artwork. Known as Caza Azul, or the Blue House thanks to the cobalt-blue walls, each room is full of her furniture, clothes, trinkets and original art – although her most famous pieces are elsewhere. Arrive early to escape the largest crowds. You will be asked to pay extra if you want to take photographs.

Visit the lifelong home of Frida Kahlo

<p>The beach at Nuevo Vallarta is one of the few places in the world where sea turtles come ashore to build their nests and lay eggs. But, once hatched the new-borns face a treacherous journey into the sea. <a href="http://www.puertovallartatours.net/baby-sea-turtles.htm">Puerto Vallarta Tours</a> offers volunteers the chance to give the turtles a helping hand while protecting them from predators. Tours run seasonally, from September to January.</p>  <p><strong><a href="https://www.facebook.com/loveexploringUK?utm_source=msn&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=front">Love this? Follow us on Facebook for travel inspiration and more</a></strong></p>

Save baby sea turtles at Puerto Vallarta

The beach at Nuevo Vallarta is one of the few places in the world where sea turtles come ashore to build their nests and lay eggs. But, once hatched the new-borns face a treacherous journey into the sea. Puerto Vallarta Tours offers volunteers the chance to give the turtles a helping hand while protecting them from predators. Tours run seasonally, from September to January.

Love this? Follow us on Facebook for travel inspiration and more

Join in with the nation as they remember and honor their deceased loved ones. The Day of the Dead festivals are held around 1 November, when families believe their relatives' spirits come back to see them. Parades and parties take place in public squares and cemeteries across the country, but you’ll find the most impressive events in Oaxaca, Lake Patzcuaro on the island of Janitzio and San Andres Mixquic.

Celebrate the Day of the Dead festival

Head to this grand white-marble building to admire the vast murals and sculptures that take center-stage on its top floors. Situated in Mexico City, the Palacio de Bellas Artes is also home to a concert hall and hosts opera, dance and literature events throughout the year. It’s such an important cultural hub, it was recognized by UNESCO as an artistic monument in 1987.

Visit the Palacio de Bellas Artes

Wonder at the ancient remains of pyramids, temples and palaces at one of Mexico’s most important archaeological sites. Founded around 600 BC, this walled city is perched on a flattened hilltop 1,312 feet (400m) above the valley floor. ‎Located near Oaxaca, in central Mexico, the ruins were once the home to the Zapotec civilization.

Explore the pyramids of Monte Alban

<p>Why choose between beautiful beaches, lush vegetation and ancient ruins when you can enjoy them all at once? Tulum is the only coastal Maya city and is popular with tourists thanks to its laid-back, New Age vibe. When you tire of lounging by the sea, head to the Castillo (pictured), perched on the edge of a 39-foot-high (12m) limestone cliff. Just be careful negotiating the steep steps on your way down.</p>  <p><a href="https://www.loveexploring.com/galleries/75464/the-worlds-most-dangerous-beaches?page=1"><strong>These are the most dangerous beaches in the world</strong></a></p>

Visit a clifftop castle at Tulum

Why choose between beautiful beaches, lush vegetation and ancient ruins when you can enjoy them all at once? Tulum is the only coastal Maya city and is popular with tourists thanks to its laid-back, New Age vibe. When you tire of lounging by the sea, head to the Castillo (pictured), perched on the edge of a 39-foot-high (12m) limestone cliff. Just be careful negotiating the steep steps on your way down.

These are the most dangerous beaches in the world

Guadalajara is Mexico’s second largest city and where some of the nation’s longest-standing, most famous traditions were born. Expect to find wide-brimmed sombreros, folk dancing and mariachi music bands. There’s also some stunning historic architecture, such as the cathedral (pictured). Head to the fashionable Chapultepec neighborhood for modern shopping, restaurants and a burgeoning art scene.

Explore Guadalajara where modernity meets tradition

Like WWE in America, Lucha Libre wrestling is all for show, but it’s still very entertaining. In fact, it’s the second most popular spectator sport in the country, eclipsed only by football. Expect over-the-top dramatics, colorful Spandex and a whole lot of attitude both in the ring and from the bloodthirsty crowd. You’ll find shows around the country, but the Arena Mexico in central Mexico City is the nation’s most famous venue.

Get swept away with the crowds at Mexican wrestling

Head to the spectacular rock formations at Hierve el Agua to swim in the hot springs and admire the waterfalls. Here you’ll discover the 164-foot-tall (50m) 'cascada chica', which pours into turquoise-green lakes that are rich in minerals and said to have healing properties. Nearby, you’ll also find a 'petrified waterfall' (pictured), which appears frozen but is really crystallized salt.

Go hiking and swimming at Hierve el Agua

<p>Buried in the jungle on the Sierra Madre hillside you’ll find this surreal garden of quirky sculptures and deliberately unfinished artworks. Las Pozas was created over 20 years by the eccentric British artist Edwards James, who dreamt of building a surreal lost city as a "joke to future generations". Despite the strange intentions it’s still a great place to visit with giant gothic structures, spiral staircases that lead nowhere, a labyrinth of paths and a waterfall.</p>

Wonder at Las Pozas surrealist gardens

Buried in the jungle on the Sierra Madre hillside you’ll find this surreal garden of quirky sculptures and deliberately unfinished artworks. Las Pozas was created over 20 years by the eccentric British artist Edwards James, who dreamt of building a surreal lost city as a "joke to future generations". Despite the strange intentions it’s still a great place to visit with giant gothic structures, spiral staircases that lead nowhere, a labyrinth of paths and a waterfall.

<p>Playa Norte on Isla Mujeres is one of the best beaches in the world, <a href="https://www.tripadvisor.co.uk/TravelersChoice-Beaches-cTop-g1">according to TripAdvisor</a>. With its white sands, turquoise ocean and bohemian atmosphere, the beach is a short walk from the ferry port and the most popular shore on the island, which is only five miles (8km) long and located just north of Cancún.</p>

Head to Mexico’s most beautiful beach

Playa Norte on Isla Mujeres is one of the best beaches in the world, according to TripAdvisor . With its white sands, turquoise ocean and bohemian atmosphere, the beach is a short walk from the ferry port and the most popular shore on the island, which is only five miles (8km) long and located just north of Cancún.

<p><a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/worlds-best">Recently voted the fifth best city in the world by Travel + Leisure</a>, after ranking first in 2021 and second last year, San Miguel de Allende is often described as a fairy tale destination. With charming colorful streets, enchanting architecture and a picturesque city square, it’s a photographer’s dream. Aside from the scenery, you’ll find hot springs, great nightlife, galleries, museums and the ancient pyramid at Canada de la Virgen where you can enjoy a spectacular sunset.</p>

Explore one of the best cities in the world

Recently voted the fifth best city in the world by Travel + Leisure , after ranking first in 2021 and second last year, San Miguel de Allende is often described as a fairy tale destination. With charming colorful streets, enchanting architecture and a picturesque city square, it’s a photographer’s dream. Aside from the scenery, you’ll find hot springs, great nightlife, galleries, museums and the ancient pyramid at Canada de la Virgen where you can enjoy a spectacular sunset.

<p>When Museo Soumaya art gallery was completed in 1994, it became an instant landmark of Mexico City and it’s easy to see why. The stunning two-part structure was designed by famed architect Fernando Romero. One of the nation’s most visited buildings, the interior is just as impressive and is home to 66,000 European and Mexican artworks, including pieces by Dali, Monet, Matisse, Picasso and van Gogh.</p>  <p><a href="https://www.loveexploring.com/galleries/89355/the-worlds-most-beautiful-museums?page=1"><strong>These are the world's most beautiful museums</strong></a></p>

See world-class art

When Museo Soumaya art gallery was completed in 1994, it became an instant landmark of Mexico City and it’s easy to see why. The stunning two-part structure was designed by famed architect Fernando Romero. One of the nation’s most visited buildings, the interior is just as impressive and is home to 66,000 European and Mexican artworks, including pieces by Dali, Monet, Matisse, Picasso and van Gogh.

These are the world's most beautiful museums

<p>Wade through turquoise rivers and wonder at the dramatic stalactites and stalagmites overhead in this ancient network of caves. Rio Secreto, meaning secret river, at Playa del Carmen was discovered in 2005 by a farmer who moved some rocks while chasing an iguana. It has since become a popular and highly-rated attraction among visitors. You don’t need to be a strong swimmer to take part and guests are issued with wetsuits and hard hats.</p>

Explore the underground rivers of Rio Secreto

Wade through turquoise rivers and wonder at the dramatic stalactites and stalagmites overhead in this ancient network of caves. Rio Secreto, meaning secret river, at Playa del Carmen was discovered in 2005 by a farmer who moved some rocks while chasing an iguana. It has since become a popular and highly-rated attraction among visitors. You don’t need to be a strong swimmer to take part and guests are issued with wetsuits and hard hats.

Mexico’s Hidden Beach is one of the country’s most spectacular stretches of sand. Located on the Marietas Islands, off the coast of Puerto Vallarta, it can only be reached by swimming or kayaking through an underwater tunnel. It’s believed this natural sunroof may have been caused by bombing during WWI.

Head to a Hidden Beach

Head to Cancun Underwater Museum to see around 500 sculptures, mostly created by British artist Jason Taylor, underneath the ocean. Located off the coast of Isla Mujeres, the museum is a non-profit organization created to draw people away from the natural corals and give marine life a chance to regenerate and breed. Most of the artwork, which is submerged up to 18 feet (5.5m) below the surface, has become covered with algae and polyps, making the area the largest artificial reef in the world.

Snorkel above hundreds of underwater sculptures

<p>With 23 exhibition halls and the world’s largest collection of ancient Mexican art, you could spend a few days at the National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico City. Laid out in chronological order, it culminates in the Aztec Hall, where you’ll find the famous Aztec Calendar or Stone Sun (pictured). Other highlights include the statue of Aztec god Xochipilli and a peacock feather and gold thread headdress made for the Aztec ruler Moctezuma II. Don’t miss the El Paraguas stone sculpture in the courtyard.</p>

Learn about Mexico’s cultural history

With 23 exhibition halls and the world’s largest collection of ancient Mexican art, you could spend a few days at the National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico City. Laid out in chronological order, it culminates in the Aztec Hall, where you’ll find the famous Aztec Calendar or Stone Sun (pictured). Other highlights include the statue of Aztec god Xochipilli and a peacock feather and gold thread headdress made for the Aztec ruler Moctezuma II. Don’t miss the El Paraguas stone sculpture in the courtyard.

The town of Playa del Carmen is about an hour from Cancun but smaller and a little less touristy. Popular with vacationers searching for a more relaxed vibe, it’s lauded for its beautiful palm-lined beaches, pedestrianized streets and array of shops and restaurants. In the evening, head to Quinta Avenue where you’ll find most of the best bars in the area.

Relax and party in Playa del Carmen

<p>Looking for something a bit more unusual? Take a two-hour canal ride from Mexico City and head to the Island of the Dolls. This accidental tourist attraction was created by reclusive local man Julian Santana Barrera, who died in 2001. He collected and hung the dolls to appease the spirit of a young girl he believed to be haunting the woods. The area was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987.</p>  <p><a href="https://www.loveexploring.com/galleries/68140/haunted-hotels?page=1"><strong>Would you be brave enough to check into these haunted hotels?</strong></a></p>

Be spooked by the Island of the Dolls

Looking for something a bit more unusual? Take a two-hour canal ride from Mexico City and head to the Island of the Dolls. This accidental tourist attraction was created by reclusive local man Julian Santana Barrera, who died in 2001. He collected and hung the dolls to appease the spirit of a young girl he believed to be haunting the woods. The area was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987.

Would you be brave enough to check into these haunted hotels?

Get away from the tourists and enjoy breathtaking views of the Teotihuacan Pyramids in a hot air balloon. One of Mexico’s most famous landmarks and an UNESCO World Heritage Site, the holy city is dedicated to the sun and moon. Various operators offer tours that last around an hour and most include hotel transfers from Mexico City.

Take a balloon ride over the Teotihuacan Pyramids

The Paricutin volcano is one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World and is famous for being the youngest volcano on Earth. Located in Michoacan, it was discovered after an earthquake in 1943 by a farmer. He initially ignored it but within 10 weeks it had grown to 1,000 feet (305m). The volcano erupted continuously until 1952 and now stands at 10,400 feet (3,170m)high. The most popular way to reach the top is on horseback, and you’ll find many local guides ready to show you the way.

Go horse-trekking at the world’s youngest volcano

<p>Travel back in time and discover how Mexico’s most famous tipple was originally made during a tour on the <a href="https://tequilaexpress.mx/">Tequila Express</a>. During the expedition, you’ll hear about the distilling process and be serenaded by Mariachi musicians, while passing through fields of blue agave plants. The tour starts at Guadalajara station at 10.15am at weekends, and booking is essential.</p>

Take the tequila trail

Travel back in time and discover how Mexico’s most famous tipple was originally made during a tour on the Tequila Express . During the expedition, you’ll hear about the distilling process and be serenaded by Mariachi musicians, while passing through fields of blue agave plants. The tour starts at Guadalajara station at 10.15am at weekends, and booking is essential.

<p>One of Mexico’s most famous Maya sites, the magnificent Chichen Itza in the Yucatan dates back to around AD 800. The focal point is the 78-foot-high (24m) Temple of Kukulkan, also known as El Castillo (pictured). Created as a physical calendar, it aligns with the sun so perfectly that on the spring and summer equinox, it creates a shadow of a serpent slithering down the steps. </p>  <p><strong><a href="https://www.loveexploring.com/galleryextended/157264/inside-the-ancient-temples-of-the-americas?page=1">See inside the other ancient temples of the Americas</a></strong></p>

Explore the ancient Chichen Itza

One of Mexico’s most famous Maya sites, the magnificent Chichen Itza in the Yucatan dates back to around AD 800. The focal point is the 78-foot-high (24m) Temple of Kukulkan, also known as El Castillo (pictured). Created as a physical calendar, it aligns with the sun so perfectly that on the spring and summer equinox, it creates a shadow of a serpent slithering down the steps. 

See inside the other ancient temples of the Americas

<p>Eat like the locals in Mexico City and tuck into the array of world-class street foods on offer. Start your day with tamales – Mexico’s favorite breakfast. These consist of dough wrapped around meat, vegetables and fruit, served in a banana leaf. Just make sure you order by 10am as they often sell out early. You’ll also find tortillas, tacos, burritos and enchilada stalls (and holes in the wall) throughout the city.</p>

Try authentic Mexican street food

Eat like the locals in Mexico City and tuck into the array of world-class street foods on offer. Start your day with tamales – Mexico’s favorite breakfast. These consist of dough wrapped around meat, vegetables and fruit, served in a banana leaf. Just make sure you order by 10am as they often sell out early. You’ll also find tortillas, tacos, burritos and enchilada stalls (and holes in the wall) throughout the city.

<p>One of Mexico’s greatest natural wonders, the Copper Canyon is an immense series of valleys and ridges covering 25,000 square miles (64,000sq km). That’s four times larger than the Grand Canyon. Take a scenic tour through this spectacular landscape aboard the <a href="https://www.coppercanyon.com/index.php/train">Copper Canyon Train</a>. The four-hour journey between Los Mochis and Chihuahua operates one train daily in each direction. You must buy tickets in advance. </p>

See the Copper Canyon from the tracks

One of Mexico’s greatest natural wonders, the Copper Canyon is an immense series of valleys and ridges covering 25,000 square miles (64,000sq km). That’s four times larger than the Grand Canyon. Take a scenic tour through this spectacular landscape aboard the Copper Canyon Train . The four-hour journey between Los Mochis and Chihuahua operates one train daily in each direction. You must buy tickets in advance. 

One of the 16 boroughs of Mexico City, Coyoacan is popular with tourists thanks to its historic center and art scene. Take some time to wander the streets and plazas, admire the architecture and lounge by the fountain. To experience a typical Mexican market, stop by Mercado de Coyoacan where you’ll be able to pick up some local handicrafts, souvenirs and street food.

Wander the streets of Coyoacan

<p>An adventure park may not seem particularly unique, but there aren’t many places you can explore caves, swim through underground rivers covered in stalactites and stalagmites <em>and</em> glide across the jungle on a zip line. <a href="http://www.xplor.travel/">Xplor Park</a> is one of Cancun's most popular and highly-rated attractions, open Monday to Saturday only.</p>

Get the adrenalin pumping at Xplor Park

An adventure park may not seem particularly unique, but there aren’t many places you can explore caves, swim through underground rivers covered in stalactites and stalagmites and  glide across the jungle on a zip line. Xplor Park is one of Cancun's most popular and highly-rated attractions, open Monday to Saturday only.

Considered one of the most beautiful places to go diving in Mexico, the Palancar Reef in Cozumel is home to sea turtles, barracudas, stingrays, lobsters and countless varieties of colorful fish. Confident scuba divers can venture out to caves and tunnels but there are plenty of easier-access snorkeling areas to enjoy for the less experienced.

Go diving at the Palancar Reef

<p>The largest known vertical shaft in the world, the 1,200-feet-deep (366m) Cave of Swallows is so big you could fit the Eiffel Tower inside – or the Statue of Liberty twice. Located in San Luis Potosi, in central Mexico, it’s home to thousands of birds and in recent years has become popular with base jumpers. Local guides offer tours but you may not be allowed to enter in wet weather, so it's best visited during the dry season.</p>  <p><a href="https://www.loveexploring.com/galleries/141742/jawdropping-caves-you-can-visit-in-north-america?page=1"><strong>Now read on for more of North America's most breathtaking caves</strong></a></p>

Admire the scale of the Cave of Swallows

The largest known vertical shaft in the world, the 1,200-feet-deep (366m) Cave of Swallows is so big you could fit the Eiffel Tower inside – or the Statue of Liberty twice. Located in San Luis Potosi, in central Mexico, it’s home to thousands of birds and in recent years has become popular with base jumpers. Local guides offer tours but you may not be allowed to enter in wet weather, so it's best visited during the dry season.

Now read on for more of North America's most breathtaking caves

More for You

State of Georgia v. Donald John Trump, in Atlanta

Trump co-defendant warned he could be removed from court after laughing at testimony

police car

Montana Air Force Base Active Shooter Alert: What We Know

What hiring Mike McCarthy as offensive assistant means for the Patriots

What hiring Mike McCarthy as offensive assistant means for the Patriots

Twitter Files Journo Matt Taibbi Posts Unhinged Message From Elon Musk

Twitter Files Journo Matt Taibbi Posts Unhinged Message From Elon Musk

Tuna casserole in cast iron

Think Twice Before Adding Frozen Veggies To A Casserole

A Shadow of the Black Death Has Reappeared

A Shadow of the Black Death Has Reappeared in the Pacific Northwest

Judge Calls Out Trump and Alina Habba for ‘Entirely Pointless’ Approach in E. Jean Carroll Defamation Case

Trump Granted Access to Confidential Witness Threat Documents in Classified Document Case

Marjorie Taylor Greene

Marjorie Taylor Greene Confronted With Her Own Tweets at Hearing

‘Amazing turn of events’: Raskin reacts to arrest of GOP's Hunter Biden ‘informant’

‘Amazing turn of events’: Raskin reacts to arrest of GOP's Hunter Biden ‘informant’

Chiefs Sign Former Steelers QB

Chiefs Sign Former Steelers QB

Trouble at US space force as multibillion-dollar program cancelled

Trouble at US space force as multibillion-dollar program cancelled

Here's the Average Social Security Benefit at Ages 62, 66, and 70

Here's the Average Social Security Benefit at Ages 62, 66, and 70

Alleged fraudster Charlie Javice loses bid to have JPMorgan pay for counterclaims as legal battle continues

Alleged fraudster Charlie Javice loses bid to have JPMorgan pay for counterclaims as legal battle continues

German Chancellor Olaf Scholz, left, welcomes Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy in front of the chancellory in Berlin, Friday, Feb.16, 2024. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)

Ukraine's Zelenskyy signing security agreements with Germany, France as Kyiv shores up support

New Black woman-owned oyster bar opens in Baltimore

New Black woman-owned oyster bar opens in Baltimore

I’m a Travel Writer, and These Are the 20 Deals I’m Shopping From Amazon’s Presidents Day Sale

I’m a Travel Writer, and These Are the 20 Deals I’m Shopping From Amazon’s Presidents Day Sale

Speaker Mike Johnson Talks to Reporters

House Republicans Fret Over Discharge Petition Against Mike Johnson

Veteran QB retires, takes NFL coaching job

Veteran QB retires, takes NFL coaching job

Judith Martin, Miss Manners

Keep the Story Moving, Please

Luann by Greg Evans

Luann by Greg Evans

Caution October 19, 2023

Worldwide caution, update january 10, 2024, information for u.s. citizens in the middle east.

  • Travel Advisories |
  • Contact Us |
  • MyTravelGov |

Find U.S. Embassies & Consulates

Travel.state.gov, congressional liaison, special issuance agency, u.s. passports, international travel, intercountry adoption, international parental child abduction, records and authentications, popular links, travel advisories, mytravelgov, stay connected, legal resources, legal information, info for u.s. law enforcement, replace or certify documents.

Before You Go

Learn About Your Destination

While Abroad

Emergencies

Share this page:

Travel Advisory August 22, 2023

See state summaries.

Reissued after periodic review with general security updates, and the removal of obsolete COVID-19 page links.

Country Summary: Violent crime – such as homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery – is widespread and common in Mexico. The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in many areas of Mexico, as travel by U.S. government employees to certain areas is prohibited or restricted. In many states, local emergency services are limited outside the state capital or major cities.

U.S. citizens are advised to adhere to restrictions on U.S. government employee travel. State-specific restrictions are included in the individual state advisories below. U.S. government employees may not travel between cities after dark, may not hail taxis on the street, and must rely on dispatched vehicles, including app-based services like Uber, and regulated taxi stands. U.S. government employees should avoid traveling alone, especially in remote areas. U.S. government employees may not drive from the U.S.-Mexico border to or from the interior parts of Mexico, except daytime travel within Baja California and between Nogales and Hermosillo on Mexican Federal Highway 15D, and between Nuevo Laredo and Monterrey on Highway 85D.

Read the  country information page  for additional information on travel to Mexico.

Do Not Travel To:

  • Colima state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Guerrero state  due to  crime .
  • Michoacan state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Sinaloa state due to  crime  and  kidnapping
  • Tamaulipas state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping.
  • Zacatecas  state due to  crime  and  kidnapping .

Reconsider Travel To:

  • Baja California  state due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Chihuahua state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Durango state  due to  crime .
  • Guanajuato state  due to  crime and kidnapping .
  • Jalisco state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Morelos state  due to  crime .
  • Sonora state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .

Exercise Increased Caution When Traveling To:

  • Aguascalientes  state due to  crime .
  • Baja California Sur state  due to  crime .
  • Chiapas state  due to  crime .
  • Coahuila state  due to  crime .
  • Hidalgo state  due to  crime .
  • Mexico City  due to  crime .
  • Mexico State  due to  crime .
  • Nayarit state  due to  crime.
  • Nuevo Leon  state due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Oaxaca state  due to  crime .
  • Puebla state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Queretaro state  due to  crime .
  • Quintana Roo state  due to  crime .
  • San Luis Potosi state  due to  crime and kidnapping .
  • Tabasco state  due to  crime .
  • Tlaxcala state due to  crime .
  • Veracruz state  due to  crime .

Exercise Normal Precautions When Traveling To:

  • Campeche state
  • Yucatan state

Visit our website for  Travel to High-Risk Areas .

If you decide to travel to Mexico:

  • Keep traveling companions and family back home informed of your travel plans. If separating from your travel group, send a friend your GPS location. If taking a taxi alone, take a photo of the taxi number and/or license plate and text it to a friend.
  • Use toll roads when possible and avoid driving alone or at night. In many states, police presence and emergency services are extremely limited outside the state capital or major cities.
  • Exercise increased caution when visiting local bars, nightclubs, and casinos.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)  to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on  Facebook  and  Twitter .
  • Follow the U.S. Embassy on Facebook and Twitter .
  • Review the  Country Security Report  for Mexico.
  • Mariners planning travel to Mexico should check for U.S. maritime  advisories  and  alerts , which include instructions on reporting suspicious activities and attacks to Mexican naval authorities.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the  Traveler’s Checklist .
  • Visit the CDC page for the latest travel health information related to your travel. 

Aguascalientes state – Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

Criminal activity and violence may occur throughout the state.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Aguascalientes state.

Baja California state – Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime and kidnapping.

Transnational criminal organizations compete in the border area to establish narco-trafficking and human smuggling routes. Violent crime and gang activity are common. Travelers should remain on main highways and avoid remote locations. Of particular concern is the high number of homicides in the non-tourist areas of Tijuana. Most homicides appeared to be targeted; however, criminal organization assassinations and territorial disputes can result in bystanders being injured or killed. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

U.S. government employees must adhere to the noted restrictions:

  • Mexicali Valley:  U.S. government employees should avoid the Mexicali Valley due to the heightened possibility of violence between rival cartel factions.  The boundaries of the restricted area are: to the east, the Baja California/Arizona and Baja California/Sonora borders; to the south, from La Ventana (on Highway 5) due east to the Colorado River; to the west, Highway 5; and to the north, Boulevard Lazaro Cardenas/Highway 92/Highway 1 to Carretera Aeropuerto, from the intersection of Highway 1 and Carretera Aeropuerto due north to the Baja California/California border, and from that point eastward along the Baja California/California border.
  • Travelers may use Highways 2 and 2D to transit between Mexicali, Los Algodones, and San Luis Rio Colorado during daylight hours. Travelers may also use Highways 1 and 8 to transit to and from the Mexicali Airport during daylight hours.  Travel on Highway 5 is permissible during daylight hours.

There are no other travel restrictions for U.S. government employees in Baja California state. These include high-traffic tourism areas of border and coastal communities, such as  Tijuana ,  Ensenada , and  Rosarito .

Baja California Sur state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Baja California Sur state.

Campeche state – Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Campeche state.

Chiapas state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Chiapas state.

Chihuahua state – Reconsider Travel

Violent crime and gang activity are common. Most homicides are targeted assassinations against members of criminal organizations. Battles for territory between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens and U.S. government employees, including restaurants and malls during daylight hours. Bystanders have been injured or killed in shooting incidents. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

U.S. government employee travel is limited to the following areas with the noted restrictions:

  • Ciudad Juarez:  U.S. government employees may travel to the area of Ciudad Juarez bounded to the east by Bulevar Independencia; to the south by De los Montes Urales/Avenida Manuel J Clouthier/Carretera de Juárez; to the west by Via Juan Gabriel/Avenida de los Insurgentes/Calle Miguel Ahumada/Francisco Javier Mina/Melchor Ocampo; and to the north by the U.S.-Mexico border.  Direct travel to the Ciudad Juarez airport (officially called the Abraham González International Airport) and the factories located along Bulevar Independencia and Las Torres is permitted.  Travel to San Jerónimo is permitted only through the United States via the Santa Teresa U.S. Port of Entry; travel via Anapra is prohibited.

U.S. government employees may only travel from Ciudad Juarez to the city of Chihuahua during daylight hours via Federal Highway 45, with stops permitted only at the Guardia Nacional División Caminos station, the Umbral del Milenio overlook area, the border inspection station at KM 35, and the shops and restaurants on Federal Highway 45 in the city of Ahumada.

  • U.S. government employees may travel between Ciudad Juarez and Ascension via Highway 2.
  • Nuevo Casas Grandes Area (including Nuevo Casas Grandes, Casas Grandes, Mata Ortiz, Colonia Juárez, Colonia LeBaron, Paquimé and San Buenaventura):  U.S. government employees may travel to the Nuevo Casas Grandes area during daylight hours via Mexico Federal Highway 2, and subsequently Federal Highway 10, to Nuevo Casas Grandes.  Employees are permitted to stay overnight in the cities of Nuevo Casas Grandes and Casas Grandes only.
  • City of Chihuahua:  U.S. government employees may travel at any time to the area of the city of Chihuahua bounded to the north by Avenida Transformación; to the east by Avenida Tecnológico/Manuel Gómez Morín/Highway 16/Blvd.José Fuentes Mares; to the west by the city boundary; and to the south by Periférico Francisco R. Almada.
  • U.S. government employees may travel on Highways 45, 16, and 45D through the city of Chihuahua and to the Chihuahua airport (officially called the General Roberto Fierro Villalobos International Airport). 
  • U.S. government employees may travel to Santa Eulalia to the east of the city of Chihuahua, as well as to Juan Aldama via Highway 16 to the northeast.
  • U.S. government employees may travel south of the city of Chihuahua on Highway 45 to the southern boundary of Parral, including each town directly connected to Highway 45, including Lázaro Cárdenas, Pedro Meoqui, Santa Cruz de Rosales, Delicias, Camargo, Ciudad Jiménez, and Parral itself.
  • U.S. government employees may only travel on official business from the city of Chihuahua on Highway 16 to Ciudad Cuauhtémoc bounded by Highway 21 to the north and east, Highway 5 to the west, and Bulevar Jorge Castillo Cabrera to the south. 
  • Ojinaga:  U.S. government employees must travel to Ojinaga via U.S. Highway 67 and enter through the U.S. Port of Entry in Presidio, Texas.
  • Palomas:  U.S. government employees may travel to Palomas via U.S. highways through the U.S. Port of Entry in Columbus, New Mexico, or via Highway 2 in Mexico.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of Chihuahua, including  Copper Canyon .

Coahuila state – Exercise Increased Caution

Violent crime and gang activity occur in parts of Coahuila state. 

U.S. government employees must adhere to the following travel restrictions:

  • Zaragoza, Morelos, Allende, Nava, Jimenez, Villa Union, Guerrero, and Hidalgo municipalities : U.S. government employees may not travel to these municipalities.
  • Piedras Negras and Ciudad Acuña:  U.S. government employees must travel directly from the United States and observe a curfew from midnight to 6:00 a.m. in both cities.

There are no other restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Coahuila state.

Colima state – Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime and kidnapping.  

Violent crime and gang activity are widespread. Most homicides are targeted assassinations against members of criminal organizations. Shooting incidents between criminal groups have injured or killed bystanders. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.  

Travel for U.S. government employees is limited to the following areas with noted restrictions: 

  • Manzanillo:   U.S. government employee travel is limited to the tourist and port areas of Manzanillo.  
  • Employees traveling to Manzanillo from Guadalajara must use Federal Toll Road 54D during daylight hours.  

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of Colima state. 

Durango state – Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime.

Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Durango state.

  • West and south of Federal Highway 45:  U.S. government employees may not travel to this region of Durango state.

There are no other restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Durango state.

Guanajuato state – Reconsider Travel

Gang violence, often associated with the theft of petroleum and natural gas from the state oil company and other suppliers, occurs in Guanajuato, primarily in the south and central areas of the state.  Of particular concern is the high number of murders in the southern region of the state associated with cartel-related violence. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Areas south of Federal Highway 45D:  U.S. government employees may not travel to the area south of and including Federal Highway 45D, Celaya, Salamanca, and Irapuato.

There are no other restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Guanajuato state, which includes tourist areas in:  San Miguel de Allende ,  Guanajuato City , and  surrounding areas.

Guerrero state – Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime.

Crime and violence are widespread. Armed groups operate independently of the government in many areas of Guerrero. Members of these groups frequently maintain roadblocks and may use violence towards travelers. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping in previous years.

Travel for U.S. government employees is limited to the following area with the noted restrictions:

  • Taxco:  U.S. government employees must use Federal Highway 95D, which passes through Cuernavaca, Morelos, and stay within downtown tourist areas of Taxco. Employees may visit Grutas de Cacahuamilpa National Park during the day with a licensed tour operator.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of the state of Guerrero, including to tourist areas in  Acapulco ,  Zihuatanejo , and  Ixtapa .

Hidalgo state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Hidalgo state.

Jalisco state – Reconsider Travel

Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Jalisco state. In Guadalajara, territorial battles between criminal groups take place in tourist areas. Shooting incidents between criminal groups have injured or killed innocent bystanders. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Jalisco-Michoacan border and Federal Highway 110:  U.S. government employees may not travel to the area between Federal Highway 110 and the Jalisco-Michoacan border, nor travel on Federal Highway 110 between Tuxpan, Jalisco, and the Michoacan border.
  • Federal Highway 80:  U.S. government employees may not travel on Federal Highway 80 south of Cocula.

There are no other restrictions on travel for U.S government employees in Jalisco state which includes tourist areas in:  Guadalajara Metropolitan Area ,  Puerto Vallarta (including neighboring Riviera Nayarit) ,  Chapala , and  Ajijic .

Mexico City (Ciudad de Mexico) – Exercise Increased Caution

Both violent and non-violent crime occur throughout Mexico City. Use additional caution, particularly at night, outside of the frequented tourist areas where police and security patrol more routinely. Petty crime occurs frequently in both tourist and non-tourist areas.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Mexico City.

Mexico State (Estado de Mexico) – Exercise Increased Caution

Both violent and non-violent crime occur throughout Mexico State. Use additional caution in areas outside of the frequented tourist areas, although petty crime occurs frequently in tourist areas as well.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Mexico State.

Michoacan state – Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime and kidnapping.

Crime and violence are widespread in Michoacan state. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

Travel for U.S. government employees is limited to the following areas with the noted restrictions:

  • Federal Highway 15D:   U.S. government employees may travel on Federal Highway 15D to transit the state between Mexico City and Guadalajara.
  • Morelia:  U.S. government employees may travel by air and by land using Federal Highways 43 or 48D from Federal Highway 15D.
  • Lazaro Cardenas:  U.S. government employees must travel by air only and limit activities to the city center or port areas.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of the state of Michoacan, including the portions of the  Monarch Butterfly Reserve  located in Michoacan.

Morelos state – Reconsider Travel

Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Morelos state.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Morelos state.

Nayarit state – Exercise Increased Caution

Criminal activity and violence may occur throughout Nayarit state.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S government employees in Nayarit state.

Nuevo Leon state – Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime and kidnapping.

Criminal activity and violence may occur throughout the state. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Nuevo Leon state.

Oaxaca state – Exercise Increased Caution

Criminal activity and violence occur throughout the state.

U.S. travelers are reminded that U.S. government employees must adhere to the following travel restrictions:

  • Isthmus region:  U.S. government employees may not travel to the area of Oaxaca bounded by Federal Highway 185D to the west, Federal Highway 190 to the north, and the Oaxaca-Chiapas border to the east.  This includes the cities of Juchitan de Zaragoza, Salina Cruz, and San Blas Atempa.  
  • Federal Highway 200 northwest of Pinotepa:  U.S. government employees may not use Federal Highway 200 between Pinotepa and the Oaxaca-Guerrero border.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees to other parts of Oaxaca state, which include tourist areas in:  Oaxaca City ,  Monte Alban ,  Puerto Escondido,  and  Huatulco .

Puebla state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Puebla state.

Queretaro state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Queretaro state.

Quintana Roo state – Exercise Increased Caution

Criminal activity and violence may occur in any location, at any time, including in popular tourist destinations.  Travelers should maintain a high level of situational awareness, avoid areas where illicit activities occur, and promptly depart from potentially dangerous situations. 

While not directed at tourists, shootings between rival gangs have injured innocent bystanders.  Additionally, U.S. citizens have been the victims of both non-violent and violent crimes in tourist and non-tourist areas.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Quintana Roo state. However, personnel are advised to exercise increased situational awareness after dark in downtown areas of Cancun, Tulum, and Playa del Carmen, and to remain in well-lit pedestrian streets and tourist zones.

San Luis Potosi state – Exercise Increased Caution

Criminal activity and violence may occur throughout the state.  U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in San Luis Potosi state.

Sinaloa state – Do Not Travel

Violent crime is widespread. Criminal organizations are based in and operating in Sinaloa. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Mazatlan:  U.S. government employees may travel to Mazatlan by air or sea only, are limited to the Zona Dorada and historic town center, and must travel via direct routes between these destinations and the airport and sea terminal.
  • Los Mochis and Topolobampo:  U.S. government employees may travel to Los Mochis and Topolobampo by air or sea only, are restricted to the city and the port, and must travel via direct routes between these destinations and the airport.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of Sinaloa state.

Sonora state – Reconsider Travel

Sonora is a key location used by the international drug trade and human trafficking networks. Violent crime is widespread. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping. Travelers should maintain a heightened level of awareness of their surroundings in all their travels in Sonora.  Security incidents may occur in any area of Sonora.

  • Travel between Hermosillo and Nogales:  U.S. government employees may travel between the U.S. Ports of Entry in Nogales and Hermosillo during daylight hours via Federal Highway 15 only. U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures. Travelers should exercise caution and avoid unnecessary stops as security incidents, including sporadic, armed carjackings, and shootings have been reported along this highway during daylight hours. Travelers should have a full tank of gas and inform friends or family members of their planned travel.
  • Nogales:  U.S. government employees may not travel in the triangular area north of Avenida Tecnologico, west of Bulevar Luis Donaldo Colosio (Periferico), nor east of Federal Highway 15D (Corredor Fiscal). U.S. government employees also may not travel in the residential and business areas to east of the railroad tracks along Plutarco Elias Calle (HWY 15) and Calle Ruiz Cortino, including the business area around the Morley pedestrian gate port-of-entry. U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications in Nogales due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures and the danger of kidnapping and other violent crimes.  
  • Puerto Peñasco:  U.S. government employees may travel between Puerto Peñasco and the Lukeville-Sonoyta U.S. Port of Entry during daylight hours via Federal Highway 8 only. They may not travel on any other route to Puerto Peñasco. U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications in Puerto Peñasco. due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures and the danger of kidnapping and other violent crimes.
  • Triangular region near Mariposa U.S. Port of Entry:  U.S. government employees may not travel into or through the triangular region west of the Mariposa U.S. Port of Entry, east of Sonoyta, and north of Altar municipality.
  • San Luis Rio Colorado, Cananea, and Agua Prieta : U.S. government employees may travel directly from the nearest U.S. Port of Entry to San Luis Rio Colorado, Cananea (via Douglas Port of Entry), and Agua Prieta, but may not go beyond the city limits. Travel is limited to daylight hours only. Travel between Nogales and Cananea via Imuris is not permitted. U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications in these cities due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures and the danger of kidnapping and other violent crimes.
  • Eastern and southern Sonora (including San Carlos Nuevo Guaymas and Alamos):  U.S. government employees may not travel to areas of Sonora east of Federal Highway 17, the road between Moctezuma and Sahuaripa, and State Highway 20 between Sahuaripa and the intersection with Federal Highway 16. U.S. government employees may travel to San Carlos Nuevo Guaymas and Alamos; travel to Alamos is only permitted by air and within city limits.  U.S. government employees may not travel to areas of Sonora south of Federal Highway 16 and east of Federal Highway 15 (south of Hermosillo), as well as all points south of Guaymas, including Empalme, Guaymas, Obregon, and Navojoa.  U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications in these areas due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures and the danger of kidnapping and other violent crimes.

U.S. government employees may travel to other parts of Sonora state in compliance with the above restrictions, including tourist areas in: Hermosillo , Bahia de Kino , and Puerto Penasco .

Tabasco state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Tabasco state.

Tamaulipas state – Do Not Travel

Organized crime activity – including gun battles, murder, armed robbery, carjacking, kidnapping, forced disappearances, extortion, and sexual assault – is common along the northern border and in Ciudad Victoria. Criminal groups target public and private passenger buses, as well as private automobiles traveling through Tamaulipas, often taking passengers and demanding ransom payments.

Heavily armed members of criminal groups often patrol areas of the state and operate with impunity particularly along the border region from Reynosa to Nuevo Laredo.  In these areas, local law enforcement has limited capacity to respond to incidents of crime. Law enforcement capacity is greater in the tri-city area of Tampico, Ciudad Madero, and Altamira, which has a lower rate of violent criminal activity compared to the rest of the state.

U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Matamoros and Nuevo Laredo:  U.S. government employees may only travel within a limited radius around and between the U.S. Consulates in Nuevo Laredo and Matamoros, their homes, the respective U.S. Ports of Entry, and limited downtown sites, subject to an overnight curfew.
  • Overland travel in Tamaulipas:  U.S. government employees may not travel between cities in Tamaulipas using interior Mexican highways. Travel between Nuevo Laredo and Monterrey is limited to Federal Highway 85D during daylight hours with prior authorization.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other parts of Tamaulipas state.

Tlaxcala state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Tlaxcala state.

Veracruz state – Exercise Increased Caution

Violent crime and gang activity occur with increasing frequency in Veracruz, particularly in the center and south near Cordoba and Coatzacoalcos. While most gang-related violence is targeted, violence perpetrated by criminal organizations can affect bystanders. Impromptu roadblocks requiring payment to pass are common.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Veracruz state.

Yucatan state – Exercise Normal Precautions

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Yucatan state, which include tourist areas in:  Chichen Itza ,  Merida ,  Uxmal , and  Valladolid .

Zacatecas state – Do Not Travel

Violent crime, extortion, and gang activity are widespread in Zacatecas state. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Zacatecas City : U.S. government employee travel is limited to Zacatecas City proper, and employees may not travel overland to Zacatecas City.
  • U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of Zacatecas state.

Embassy Messages

View Alerts and Messages Archive

Quick Facts

Passport must be valid at time of entry

One page per stamp

Yes, if visiting for more than 180 days

See Travelers’ Health section

Embassies and Consulates

EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE FOR U.S. CITIZENS IN MEXICO From Mexico: 800-681-9374 or 55-8526-2561 From the United States: 1-844-528-6611

U.S. Citizen Services Inquiries: Contact Form

U.S. Embassy Mexico City

Paseo de la Reforma 305 Colonia Cuauhtémoc 06500 Ciudad de México

U.S. Consulate General Ciudad Juarez

Paseo de la Victoria #3650 Fracc. Partido Senecú 32543 Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua

U.S. Consulate General Guadalajara

Progreso 175 Colonia Americana 44160 Guadalajara, Jalisco

U.S. Consulate General Hermosillo

Monterey, Esqueda 141 El Centenario 83260 Hermosillo, Sonora

U.S. Consulate General Matamoros

Constitución No. 1 Colonia Jardín 87330 Matamoros, Tamaulipas

U.S. Consulate General Merida

Calle 60 No. 338-K x 29 y 31 Colonia Alcalá Martin 97050 Mérida, Yucatán

U.S. Consulate General Monterrey

Avenida Alfonso Reyes 150 Colonia Valle del Poniente 66196 Santa Catarina, Nuevo León

U.S. Consulate General Nogales

Calle San José s/n Fracc. Los Álamos 84065 Nogales, Sonora

U.S. Consulate General Nuevo Laredo

Paseo Colon 1901 Colonia Madero 88260 Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas

U.S. Consulate General Tijuana

Paseo de las Culturas s/n Mesa de Otay Delegación Centenario 22425 Tijuana, Baja California

Consular Agencies

Acapulco Hotel Continental Emporio Costera M. Alemán 121 – Office 14 39670 Acapulco, Guerrero Cancun

Blvd. Kukulcan Km 13 ZH Torre La Europea, Despacho 301 77500 Cancún, Quintana Roo

Los Cabos Las Tiendas de Palmilla L-B221, Km. 27.5 Carretera Transpeninsular 23406 San José del Cabo, Baja California Sur

Playa Gaviotas 202, Local 10 Zona Dorada 82110 Mazatlán, Sinaloa

Oaxaca Macedonio Alcalá 407, Office 20 68000 Oaxaca, Oaxaca

Piedras Negras Abasolo 211, Local 3, Centro 26000 Piedras Negras, Coahuila

Playa del Carmen Plaza Progreso, Local 33 Carretera Federal Puerto Juarez-Chetumal, Mz. 293 Lt. 1. 77710 Playa del Carmen, Quintana Roo

Puerto Vallarta

Paradise Plaza, Paseo de los Cocoteros 85 Sur, Local L-7 63732 Nuevo Nayarit, Nayarit

San Miguel de Allende Plaza La Luciérnaga, Libramiento Jose Manuel Zavala 165, Locales 4 y 5 Colonia La Luciérnaga 37745 San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato

Destination Description

See the  State Department’s Fact Sheet on Mexico  for more information on U.S.-Mexico relations.

Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

A valid passport book is required to enter Mexico by air, and those attempting to enter at an airport with a U.S. passport card only may be denied admission.

Review the Mexican government’s most current  entry, exit, and visa requirements  ( Spanish only ) or visit the  Embassy of Mexico  in Washington, D.C., for more information.

For travelers entering Mexico by air only, Mexican immigration authorities implemented a process to replace the previous paper Forma Migratoria Multiple or FMM with a Forma Migratoria Multiple Digital or FMMD.  The FMMD process is in place at all 66 international airports in Mexico.  Upon arrival at an airport, Mexican immigration authorities will determine a traveler’s authorized length of stay and either place a date stamp in the traveler’s passport or direct the traveler through a self-service electronic gate (E-Gate) that will generate a printed receipt with QR code. Air travelers who wish to download a record of their FMMD or find more information on the FMMD process may visit the National Migration Institute’s (INM) website .

Travelers entering Mexico by land should have a valid passport book or card.  If you enter Mexico by land and plan to travel beyond the immediate border area (approximately 12 miles or 20 kilometers into Mexico), you must stop at an INM office to obtain an entry permit (Forma Migratoria Multiple or FMM), even if not explicitly directed to do so by Mexican officials.  INM may opt to allow tourists entry of up to 180 days without a visa or may limit authorized stays to shorter periods at their discretion; visitors should confirm the specific length of authorized stay written on the entry permit (FMM) or by the stamp in their passport. Mexican immigration authorities could ask you to present both your passport and entry permit if applicable at any point and may detain you while they review your immigration status if you are not carrying your passport and proof of legal status in Mexico, or if you have overstayed your authorized stay. Immigration check points are common in the interior of Mexico, including in popular tourist areas far from the border.  

You will also need a temporary vehicle import permit to bring a U.S.-registered vehicle beyond the border zone. These permits are processed through Banjercito and require a deposit that will be refunded once the vehicle leaves Mexico.  For more information, visit the  Banjercito  website ( Spanish only ).

Baja California, Baja California Sur, and Sonora have a “hassle-free” zone that allows cars traveling without an entry permit or car registration within the zone. 

Mexican authorities can impound a vehicle that enters the country without a valid U.S. registration, a vehicle driven by a Mexican national who is not resident in the United States, or a vehicle found beyond the border zone without the temporary import permit.

Mexican law permits Mexican immigration authorities to deny foreigners entry into Mexico if they have been charged with or convicted of a serious crime in Mexico or elsewhere.

Travelers bringing in goods beyond their personal effects worth $300.00 or more must declare those goods with Mexican customs (SAT) Mexican customs  ( Spanish only ) or risk having them confiscated. This also applies to used goods or clothing, including items for donation. U.S. citizens driving such items into Mexico without declaring them or without sufficient funds to pay duty fees are subject to having their vehicle seized by Mexican customs authorities. For further information about customs regulations, please read our  customs information page .

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents in Mexico.

A parent or legal guardian departing Mexico with minor children should carry a notarized consent letter from the other parent if traveling separately. INM requires at least one parent to complete a  SAM  ( Formato de Salida de Menores, Spanish only ) for all Mexican or foreign minors with Temporary Resident, Temporary Student Resident, or Permanent Resident status departing Mexico alone or with a third party.  Further information about the  prevention of international parental child abduction  is available on our website.

Find information on dual nationality , and customs regulations on our websites. Both Mexico and the United States allow dual nationality.

Safety and Security

Travelers are urged to review the  Mexico Travel Advisory  for information about safety and security concerns affecting the country on a state-by-state basis.

U.S. citizens traveling to and residing in Mexico should not expect public health and safety standards like those in the United States. Even where such standards exist, enforcement varies by location. Travelers should mitigate the risk of illness or injury by taking standard health and safety precautions.

The phone number to report emergencies in Mexico is “911.”  Although there may be English-speaking operators available, it is best to seek the assistance of a Spanish speaker to place the call.

Crime:  Crime in Mexico occurs at a high rate and can be violent, from random street crime to cartel-related attacks. Over the past year, Mission Mexico has assisted U.S. citizens who were victims of armed robbery, carjacking, extortion, homicide, kidnapping, pick-pocketing, and sexual assault. Increased levels of cartel-related violence have resulted in territorial disputes and targeted killings, injuring or killing innocent bystanders. Travelers who find themselves in an active shooter scenario should flee in the opposite direction, if possible, or drop to the ground, preferably behind a hard barrier.

Drivers on roads and highways may encounter government checkpoints, which often include National Guard or military personnel. State and local police also set up checkpoints in and around cities and along the highways to deter criminal activity and enforce traffic laws. In some parts of Mexico, criminal organizations and other non-governmental actors have been known to erect unauthorized checkpoints and have abducted or threatened violence against those who fail to stop and/or pay a “toll.” When approaching a checkpoint, regardless of whether it is official, cooperate and avoid any actions that may appear suspicious or aggressive.

While Mexican authorities endeavor to safeguard the country’s major resort areas and tourist destinations, those areas have not been immune to the types of violence and crime experienced elsewhere in Mexico. In some areas of Mexico, response time of local police is often slow. In addition, filing police reports can be time consuming. See our  Mexico Travel Advisory  for more information.

Demonstrations  occur frequently.  They may take place in response to political or economic issues, on politically significant holidays, and during international events.  Protesters in Mexico may block traffic on roads, including major thoroughfares, or take control of toll booths on highways.  Travelers who encounter protesters who demand unofficial tolls are generally allowed to pass upon payment.  U.S. citizens should avoid participating in demonstrations or other activities that might be deemed political by authorities, as Mexican law prohibits political activities by foreign citizens and such actions may result in detention or deportation.

  • Demonstrations can be unpredictable, avoid areas around protests and demonstrations.  
  • Past demonstrations have turned violent.
  • Check local media for updates and traffic advisories.  

International Financial Scams:  See the  Department of State  and the  FBI  pages for information.  

Internet romance and financial scams are prevalent in Mexico. Scams are often initiated through Internet postings/profiles or by unsolicited emails and letters. Scammers almost always pose as U.S. citizens who have no one else to turn to for help. Common scams include:   

  • Romance/Online dating 
  • Money transfers 
  • Lucrative sales 
  • Grandparent/Relative targeting 
  • Free Trip/Luggage 
  • Inheritance notices 
  • Bank overpayments 

Mexico’s consumer protection agency,  PROFECO  (Procuraduría Federal del Consumidor, Spanish only), can sometimes  provide assistance  (Spanish only) to victims of such scams. In addition, there have been allegations of banking fraud perpetrated by private bankers against U.S. citizens. U.S. citizens who believe they have been victims of fraud can file a police report  file a complaint  (Spanish only) with the Mexican banking regulatory agency, CONDUSEF  (Comision Nacional para la Proteccion y Defensa de los Usuarios de Servicios Financieros, Spanish only), or consult with an attorney.

Victims of Crime:  U.S. victims of sexual assault are encouraged to contact the U.S. Embassy or nearest Consulate for assistance.  Report emergencies to the local police at 911, report crimes already committed to the Ministerio Publico, and contact the Embassy or Consulate at +52-55-85262561.  Remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting crimes.

U.S. citizen victims of crime should contact the local authorities to file a Mexican police report before departing Mexico. In most instances, victims of crime will file reports with the Ministerio Publico (equivalent to the office of public prosecutor or district attorney in the United States) and not with police first responders. U.S. citizens should also inform the  U.S. Embassy or nearest consulat e . 

See our webpage on  help for U.S. victims of crime overseas .    We can:

  • help you find appropriate medical care,
  • assist you in reporting a crime to the police,
  • contact relatives or friends with your written consent,
  • provide general information regarding the victim’s role during the local investigation and following its conclusion, 
  • provide a list of local attorneys,
  • provide information on  victim’s compensation programs in the United States ,
  • provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution,
  • help you find accommodation and arrange flights home,
  • replace a stolen or lost passport.

Domestic Violence:  U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence are encouraged to contact the  U.S. Embassy or nearest consulate  for assistance.

Kidnapping:  Mexico experiences very high rates of kidnapping.  If you believe you or your U.S. citizen or Lawful Permanent Resident (LPR) relative has been kidnapped, please contact the U.S. Embassy or nearest consulate immediately.

Robbery:  Mexico experiences robberies, typically in cities, in which abductors force victims to use their debit or credit card to withdraw money from ATMs in exchange for their release. Perpetrators commonly work in cooperation with, or pose as, taxi drivers. To minimize the risk of such robberies:

  • Only use a reputable taxi company or a trusted ride-sharing app.
  • Book taxis through your hotel or an authorized taxi stand.

Extortion:  Extortion schemes are common in Mexico.  In a typical scheme known as a virtual kidnapping, criminals convince family members that a relative has been abducted, when, in fact, the person is safe but unreachable.  The purported abductors will often use threats to persuade victims to isolate themselves, making communication with family members less likely.  Unable to reach their loved ones, family members often consent to paying the “ransom” demand.  Criminals use various means to gather information about potential victims, including monitoring social media sites, eavesdropping on conversations, or using information taken from a stolen cell phone.  Some of these extortions have been conducted from Mexican prisons.  You can reduce the risk of falling victim to this type of extortion through the following:

  • Do not discuss travel plans, your room number, or any other personal information within earshot of strangers.
  • Do not divulge personal business details to strangers in person or over the phone, especially when using hotel phones.
  • If you are threatened on the phone, hang up immediately.

Sexual Assault:  Rape and sexual assault are serious problems in some resort areas. Many of these incidents occur at night or during the early morning hours, in hotel rooms, on hotel grounds, or on deserted beaches. In some cases, assailants drug the drinks of victims before assaulting them. Pay attention to your surroundings and to who might have handled your drink.

Credit/Debit Card “Skimming:”  There have been instances of fraudulent charges or withdrawals from accounts due to “skimmed” cards. If you choose to use credit or debit cards, you should regularly check your account to ensure there are no unauthorized transactions. Travelers should limit the amount of cash they carry in public, exercise caution when withdrawing cash from ATMs, and avoid ATMs located in isolated or unlit areas.

Alcohol:  If you choose to drink alcohol, it is important to do so in moderation and to stop and seek medical attention if you begin to feel ill. There have been reports of individuals falling ill or blacking out after consuming unregulated alcohol. The Mexican Federal Commission for the Protection against Sanitary Risk,  COFEPRIS  ( Comision Federal para la Proteccion contra Riesgos Sanitarios, Spanish only ), is responsible for inspecting hotels, restaurants, and other establishments for health violations, including reports of unregulated alcohol. Please email COFEPRIS at  [email protected]  for more information or if you wish to file a report. You can file a report online (Spanish only) via the COFEPRIS website, by calling the COFEPRIS call center at 800 033 50 50 (from Mexico) or +52 (55) 5080-5425 (from the United States), or by scheduling an appointment  (Spanish only)  to visit a COFEPRIS office.

There have also been instances of criminals drugging drinks to rob or sexually assault victims. Additionally, if you feel you have been the victim of unregulated alcohol or another serious health violation, you should notify the U.S. Embassy or nearest consulate . You may also contact the U.S. Department of State – Bureau of Consular Affairs in Washington, D.C. at 1-888-407-4747 (toll-free in the United States and Canada) or 1-202-501-4444 (from all other countries).

Drug Smuggling:  Mexican criminal organizations are engaged in a violent struggle to control trafficking routes. Criminal organizations smuggling drugs into the United States have targeted unsuspecting individuals who regularly cross the border. Frequent border crossers are advised to vary their routes and travel times and to closely monitor their vehicles to avoid being targeted.

Tourism:  In major cities and resort areas, the tourism industry is generally well-regulated.  Best practices and safety inspections are regularly enforced.  Hazardous areas and activities are identified with appropriate signage, and professional staff is typically on hand in support of organized activities.  In the event of an injury, appropriate medical treatment is widely available throughout the country.  Outside of a major metropolitan center, it may take more time for first responders and medical professionals to stabilize a patient and/or provide life-saving assistance.  In smaller towns and areas less commonly frequented by foreign tourists, the tourism industry is unevenly regulated, and safety inspections for equipment and facilities do not commonly occur.  Hazardous areas/activities are not always identified with appropriate signage, and staff may not be trained or certified either by the host government or by recognized authorities in the field.  In the event of an injury, appropriate medical treatment is typically available only in or near major cities.  First responders are generally unable to access areas outside of major cities to provide urgent medical treatment.  U.S. citizens are encouraged to purchase medical evacuation insurance. See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage .

Since 2016, Mexico has opened seven multilingual Centers for the Care and Protection of Tourists (CAPTA) and Tourist Assistance Centers (CATTAC) in Los Cabos, La Paz, Acapulco, Playa del Carmen, Mazatlan, Ciudad Madero, and Queretaro. These offices have proven helpful assisting U.S. citizen visitors in resolving disputes with merchants and government entities, filing criminal reports, securing needed services, and locating special needs accommodations. 

Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties:  You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. Individuals establishing a business or practicing a profession that requires additional permits or licensing should seek information from the competent local authorities prior to practicing or operating a business.

Furthermore, some laws are also prosecutable in the United States, regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on  crimes against minors abroad  and the  Department of Justice  website.

Arrest Notification:  If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy or nearest consulate immediately. See our  webpage  for further information.

The Mexican government is required by international law to contact the U.S. Embassy or consulate promptly when a U.S. citizen is arrested if the arrestee so requests.  This requirement does not apply to dual nationals.  

Firearms and Other Weapons:  Weapons laws in Mexico vary by state, but it is generally illegal for travelers to carry weapons of any kind including firearms, knives, daggers, brass knuckles, as well as ammunition (even used shells). Illegal firearms trafficking from the United States to Mexico is a major concern, and the Department of State warns all U.S. citizens against taking any firearm or ammunition into Mexico. If you are caught entering Mexico with any type of weapon, including firearms or ammunitions, you likely will face severe penalties, including prison time. U.S.-issued permits allowing an individual to carry weapons are not valid in Mexico.  Visit the Department’s  Traveling Abroad with Firearms webpage .

Vessels entering Mexican waters with firearms or ammunition on board must have a permit previously issued by a Mexican embassy or consulate.

Drugs:  Drug possession and use, including medical marijuana, is illegal in Mexico and may result in a lengthy jail sentence or fines.  

Electronic Cigarettes (Vaping Devices):  It is illegal for travelers to bring electronic cigarettes (vaping devices) and all vaping solutions to Mexico. Customs will confiscate vaping devices and solutions and travelers could be fined or arrested. Avoid delays and possible sanctions by not taking these items to Mexico. 

Real Estate and Time Shares:  U.S. citizens should exercise caution when considering time-share investments or purchasing real estate and be aware of the aggressive tactics used by some sales representatives. Before initiating a real estate purchase or time-share investment, U.S. citizens should consult with a Mexican attorney to learn about important regulations and laws that govern real estate property.

Mountain Climbing and Hiking:  The Mexican government has declared the area around the Popocatepetl and the Colima volcanoes off limits. In remote rural areas, there can be limited cell phone coverage and internet connectivity, and it may be difficult for rescue teams and local authorities to reach climbers and hikers in distress.

Potential for Natural Disasters:  Mexico is in an active earthquake zone. Tsunamis may occur following significant earthquakes. For information concerning disasters, see:

  • U.S. Embassy Mexico City website
  • Civil Protection  ( Proteccion Civil, Spanish only ) provides information from the Mexican Government about natural disaster preparedness
  • U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)  provides general information about natural disaster preparedness
  • U.S. Geological Survey  provides updates on recent seismic and volcanic activity

Storm Season:  Tropical storms in the Gulf of Mexico or along the Caribbean and Pacific Coast between May and November can produce heavy winds and rain. Please visit our  Hurricane Season  webpage for more information.

Spring Break:  Millions of U.S. citizens visit Mexican beach resorts each year, especially during “ spring break ” season. The legal drinking age in Mexico is 18. See the “Alcohol” section above to learn more about the risks associated with drinking, as well as reports of illnesses associated with the possible consumption of unregulated alcohol.

Resort Areas and Water Activities:  Beaches in Mexico may be dangerous due to strong currents, rip tides, and rogue waves. Warning notices and flags on beaches should be taken seriously. Not all hazardous beaches are clearly marked. If black or red warning flags are up, do not enter the water. Strong currents can lead to dangerous conditions for even the most experienced swimmers. U.S. citizens simply walking along the shore or wading have been swept out to sea by rogue waves, and some citizens have drowned or disappeared at Mexican beaches. Avoid the consumption of alcohol while engaging in water activities and do not swim alone. 

Boats used for excursions may not be covered by accident insurance and sometimes lack adequate life jackets, radios, and tools to make repairs.  Participation in adventure sports may not be covered by accident insurance and safety protections and regulations for these activities may differ from U.S. standards.  Visit  our website  and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website for more information about adventure travel.

Counterfeit and Pirated Goods:  Although counterfeit and pirated goods are prevalent in many countries, they may still be illegal according to local laws. You may also be subject to fines or forced to relinquish the goods if you bring them back to the United States. See the  U.S. Department of Justice website  for more information.

Faith-Based Travelers:  See the following webpages for details:

  • Faith-Based Travel Information
  • International Religious Freedom Report  – see country reports
  • Human Rights Report  – see country reports
  • Hajj Fact Sheet for Travelers
  • Best Practices for Volunteering Abroad

LGBTQI+ Travelers:  There are no legal restrictions on same-sex sexual relations or on the organization of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, or Intersex (LGBTQI+) events in Mexico. However, due to sporadic reports of violence targeting LGBTQI+ individuals, U.S. citizens should exercise discretion in identifying themselves publicly as LGBTQI+. See our LGBTQI+ Travel Information page and Section 6 of the  Department of State’s Human Rights Report for Mexico  for further details.

Travelers with Disabilities:   Mexican law prohibits discrimination against persons with physical, sensory, intellectual, or mental disabilities.  Social acceptance of persons with disabilities in public is not as prevalent as in the United States.  The most common types of accessibility may include accessible facilities, information, and communication/access to services/ease of movement or access.  Expect accessibility to be limited in public transportation, lodging, communication/information, and general infrastructure in more rural and remote parts of the country, and more common in public transportation, lodging, communication/information, and general infrastructure in major cities.  U.S. citizens with disabilities should consult individual hotels and service providers in advance of travel to ensure they are accessible.

Students:  See our  Students Abroad  page and  FBI travel tips .

Women Travelers:  There were several reports of sexual assault or domestic violence involving U.S. citizen women over the past year. See our travel tips for  Women Travelers .

Excellent health facilities are available in Mexico City and other major cities. Ambulance services are widely available, but training and availability of emergency responders may be below U.S. standards. Injured or seriously ill travelers may prefer to take a taxi to a health provider. Mexican facilities often require payment “up front” before providing medical care, and most hospitals in Mexico do not accept U.S. health insurance. A list of doctors and hospitals is available on the U.S. Embassy or consulate website.

U.S. citizens have lodged complaints against some private hospitals in Cancun, the Riviera Maya, and Los Cabos to include exorbitant prices and inflexible collection measures.  Travelers should obtain complete information on billing, pricing, and proposed medical procedures before agreeing to any medical care in these locations.  Be aware that some resorts have exclusive agreements with medical providers and ambulance services, which may limit your choices in seeking emergency medical attention.  Some hospitals in tourist centers utilize sliding scales, deciding on rates for services based on negotiation and on the patient’s perceived ability to pay.  In some instances, providers have been known to determine the limits of a patient’s credit card or insurance, quickly reach that amount in services rendered, and subsequently discharge the patient or transfer them to a public hospital.

Visit the  U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  website for information on Medical Tourism.

For emergency services in Mexico, dial  911 .  Although there may be English-speaking operators available, it is best to seek the assistance of a Spanish speaker to place the call.

Ambulance services are: 

  • widely available in major cities but training and availability of emergency responders may be below U.S. standards,
  • not present in many remote and rural areas of the country,   
  • not equipped with state-of-the-art medical equipment.  
  • Injured or seriously ill travelers may prefer to take a taxi or private vehicle to the nearest major hospital rather than wait for an ambulance.  

We do not pay medical bills:  Be aware that U.S. Medicare/Medicaid does not apply overseas.  Most hospitals and doctors overseas do not accept U.S. health insurance.  

Medical Insurance:  Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas.  Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments. See  our webpage  for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage. Visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for more information on type of insurance you should consider before you travel overseas. 

We strongly recommend  supplemental insurance  to cover medical evacuation as well.

Always carry your prescription medication in original packaging, along with your doctor’s prescription.  Check the Mexican government’s Drug Schedule to ensure the medication is legal in Mexico. 

Vaccinations:  Be up-to-date on all  vaccinations  recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further health information :

  • World Health Organization
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  (CDC)

Air Quality: Visit AirNow Department of State for information on air quality at U.S. Embassies and Consulates.

The U.S. Embassy maintains a list of doctors and hospitals .  We do not endorse or recommend any specific medical provider or clinic. 

Medical Tourism and Elective Surgery: 

  • U.S. citizens have suffered serious complications or died during or after having cosmetic or other elective surgery.   
  • Medical tourism is a rapidly growing industry. People seeking health care overseas should understand that medical systems operate differently from those in the United States and are not subject to the same rules and regulations.  Anyone interested in traveling for medical purposes should consult with their local physician before traveling and visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website for more information on Medical Tourism.  
  • Visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website for information on Medical Tourism, the risks of medical tourism, and what you can do to prepare before traveling to Mexico. 
  • We strongly recommend supplemental insurance  to cover medical evacuation in the event of unforeseen medical complications.  
  • Your legal options in case of malpractice are very limited in Mexico.  Several foreigners have successfully enlisted the support of  PROFECO  (Spanish only) in order to resolve disputes over medical services.
  • Although Mexico has many elective/cosmetic surgery facilities that are on par with those found in the United States, the quality of care varies widely.  If you plan to undergo surgery in Mexico, make sure that emergency medical facilities are available and professionals are accredited and qualified.  

Pharmaceuticals

  • Exercise caution when purchasing medication overseas.  Pharmaceuticals, both over the counter and requiring prescription in the United States, are often readily available for purchase with little controls.  Counterfeit medication is common and may prove to be ineffective, the wrong strength, or contain dangerous ingredients.  Medication should be purchased in consultation with a medical professional and from reputable establishments.  
  • The Drug Enforcement Agency reports counterfeit prescription pills are sold by criminals on both sides of the border. These pills are sometimes represented as OxyContin, Percocet, Xanax, and others, and may contain deadly doses of fentanyl. Counterfeit pills are readily advertised on social media and can be purchased at small, non-chain pharmacies in Mexico along the border and in tourist areas.  U.S. citizens have become seriously ill or died in Mexico after using synthetic drugs or adulterated prescription pills.
  • U.S. Customs and Border Protection and the Food and Drug Administration are responsible for rules governing the transport of medication back to the United States.  Medication purchased abroad must meet their requirements to be legally brought back into the United States.  Medication should be for personal use and must be approved for usage in the United States.  Please visit the U.S. Customs and Border Protection and the Food and Drug Administration websites for more information.   
  • Visit the  Mexican Health Department  website (Spanish only) or contact the  Embassy of Mexico  in Washington, D.C., for more information about obtaining a permit to import medicine into Mexico.
  • For a list of controlled substances in Mexico, visit the  COFEPRIS  website (Spanish only) and the  Mexican Drug Schedule  (Spanish only). U.S. citizens should carry a copy of their prescription or doctor’s letter, but it is still possible that they may be subject to arrest for arriving in Mexico with substances on these lists. Note that a medicine considered “over the counter” in some U.S. states may be a controlled substance in Mexico. For example, pseudoephedrine, the active ingredient in Sudafed, is considered a controlled substance in Mexico. For more information, contact the  Embassy of Mexico  in Washington, D.C.

Assisted Reproductive Technology and Surrogacy  

  • If you are considering traveling to Mexico to have a child through use of assisted reproductive technology (ART) or surrogacy, please see our ART and Surrogacy Abroad page . 
  • Surrogacy is legal for foreigners in most of Mexico, in some states surrogacy is either not legal or is not governed by regulation. 
  • If you decide to pursue parenthood in Mexico via assisted reproductive technology (ART) with a gestational mother, be prepared for long and unexpected delays in documenting your child’s citizenship. 
  • Make sure you understand Mexican law, which can vary from state to state and is ambiguous in its treatment of non-Mexican or same-sex intending parents. Mexican courts, for example, may fail to enforce surrogacy agreements between non-Mexican or same-sex intending parents and gestational mothers.
  • Gestational mothers are normally treated as the child’s legal parent with full parental rights in most states. The gestational mother’s name is typically listed on the Mexican state-issued birth certificate.  In Mexico City, the intended parents may be listed on the Mexican birth certificate if they can demonstrate a valid surrogacy agreement was in place regarding the child’s birth.
  • Be aware that individuals who attempt to circumvent local law risk criminal prosecution.  Mexican authorities have made arrests stemming from surrogacy cases.

Carbon Monoxide

  • Many hotels and other lodgings are not equipped with carbon monoxide detectors, even if they contain sources of this potentially lethal gas. U.S. citizens have died as a result of carbon monoxide poisoning throughout Mexico. If your lodging is not equipped with a carbon monoxide detector, consider traveling with a portable one.

Water Quality: 

  • In many areas in Mexico, tap water is not potable. Bottled water and beverages are safe, although you should be aware that many restaurants and hotels serve tap water unless bottled water is specifically requested. Be aware that ice for drinks might be made using tap water.

Altitude: 

  • Many cities in Mexico, such as Mexico City, are at high altitude, which can lead to altitude illness. Visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website for more information about  Travel to High Altitudes .

Adventure Travel

  • Participation in adventure sports and activities may not be covered by accident insurance and safety protections and regulations for these activities may differ from U.S. standards.  Visit  our website  and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website  for more information about adventure travel.

General Health

The following diseases are prevalent:

  • Typhoid Fever
  • Travelers’ Diarrhea
  • Chikungunya
  • Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
  • Parasitic Infections
  • Chronic Respiratory Disease
  • Visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website for more information about Resources for Travelers regarding specific issues in Mexico.   

Air Quality

  • Air pollution is a significant problem in several major cities in Mexico. Consider the impact seasonal smog and heavy particulate pollution may have on you and consult your doctor before traveling if necessary.

For further health information, go to:

  Private Residential Treatment Facilities: 

  • These facilities provide care to U.S. citizens throughout Mexico and include child behavior modification facilities, rehabilitation facilities, and assisted living centers. 
  • There is a wide range in standards for education, safety, health, sanitation, immigration, and residency.  Staff licensing may not be strictly enforced or meet the standards of similar facilities in the United States.  
  • The State Department has received reports of abuse, negligence, or mismanagement at some of these facilities. U.S. citizens should exercise due diligence and do extensive research before selecting a residential treatment facility.

Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety:  Motor vehicle accidents are a leading cause of U.S. citizen deaths in Mexico. If you have an emergency while driving, dial “911.” If you are driving on a toll highway (“ cuota ”) or any other major highway, you may contact the Green Angels ( Spanish only ), a fleet of trucks with bilingual crews, by dialing 078 from any phone in Mexico.  Generally, individuals involved in an accident who do not require immediate medical care should contact their insurance providers, who may come to the site to provide an immediate assessment.

Avoid driving on Mexican highways at night. Travel with a charged and functional cell phone capable of making calls in Mexico. Travelers should exercise caution at all times and should use toll (“ cuota ”) roads rather than the less secure free (“ libre ”) roads whenever possible. Do not hitchhike or accept rides from or offer rides to strangers anywhere in Mexico. Travelers encountering police or security checkpoints should comply with instructions.

Road conditions and maintenance across Mexico vary with many road surfaces needing repair. Travel in rural areas poses additional risks to include spotty cell phone coverage and delays in receiving roadside or medical assistance.

Vehicular traffic in Mexico City is subject to restriction Monday through Saturday, according to the license plate number, in order to reduce air pollution. For additional information, refer to the  Hoy No Circula website  ( Spanish only ) maintained by the Mexico City government. See our  Road Safety Page  for more information.  Also, visit  Mexico’s national tourist office website , MexOnline, and Mexico’s customs website  Importacion Temporal de Vehiculos  ( Spanish only ) for more information regarding travel and transportation.

Traffic Laws:   U.S. driver’s licenses are valid in Mexico. Mexican law requires that only owners drive their vehicles or that the owner be inside the vehicle. Failing to abide by this law may lead to impoundment and a fine equal to the value of the vehicle.

Mexican citizens who are not also U.S. citizens or LPRs may not operate U.S.-registered vehicles in Mexico. Mexican insurance is required for all vehicles, including rental vehicles. Drivers involved in accidents, even minor incidents, may be subject to arrest if they are found to be driving without proper insurance, regardless of whether they were at fault. Driving under the influence of alcohol, using a mobile device while driving, and driving through a yellow light are all illegal in Mexico.

If you drive your vehicle into Mexico beyond the immediate border area (approximately 12 miles into Mexico), you must apply for a temporary vehicle import permit with Mexican customs, Banjercito , or at some Mexican consulates in the United States. The permit requires the presentation of a valid passport and a monetary deposit that will be returned to you upon leaving Mexico before the expiration of the permit. Failing to apply for a temporary vehicle import permit may lead to impoundment and a fine equal to the value of the vehicle. 

Vehicles crossing into Mexico must have a valid license plate and registration sticker. Mexican authorities will often refuse to admit vehicles with temporary or paper license plates. Vehicles with expired registration or unauthorized plates will likely be confiscated and the operator could be charged with a fine equal to the value of the vehicle.

The Mission Mexico Vehicle Recovery Unit  assists with the return of stolen U.S. vehicles recovered by Mexican authorities.

If you have an emergency while driving, dial “911.” If you are driving on a toll highway (“cuota”) or any other major highway, you may contact the Green Angels (Spanish only), a fleet of trucks with bilingual crews, by dialing 078 from any phone in Mexico.  Generally, individuals involved in an accident who do not require immediate medical care should contact their insurance providers, who may come to the site to provide an immediate assessment.

Public Transportation/Taxis:  Security on public buses varies throughout the country but is considered a relatively safe transportation option in Mexico City and other major tourist centers. Passengers should protect their personal possessions at all times as theft is common. Intercity bus travel should be conducted during daylight hours in preferably first-class buses using toll roads.

Robberies and assaults on passengers in taxis not affiliated with a taxi stand (known as “libre” taxis) are common. Avoid taking any taxi not summoned by telephone or contacted in advance, including “libre” taxis. When in need of a taxi, telephone a radio taxi or “sitio” (regulated taxi stand) and ask the dispatcher for the driver’s name and the taxi’s license plate number. Application-based car services such as Uber and Cabify are available in many Mexican cities, and generally offer another safe alternative to taxis. Official complaints against Uber and other drivers do occur, however, and past disputes between these services and local taxi unions have occasionally turned violent, resulting in injuries to U.S. citizens in some instances.

See our Road Safety page for more information. 

Aviation Safety Oversight:  The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the Government of Mexico’s Civil Aviation Authority as not being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Mexico’s air carrier operations. Further information may be found on the  FAA safety assessment page .

Maritime Travel:  Mariners planning travel to Mexico should also check for U.S. maritime advisories and alerts .  Information may also be posted to the  U.S. Coast Guard homeport website , and the NGA broadcast warnings .

If you enter by sea, review the Mexican boating permit requirements  prior to travel or contact the  Embassy of Mexico  in Washington, D.C., for more information.

Maritime Safety Oversight:  The Mexican maritime industry, including charter fishing and recreational vessels, is subject solely to Mexican safety regulations.  Travelers should be aware that Mexican equipment and vessels may not meet U.S. safety standards or be covered by any accident insurance.

For additional travel information

  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)  to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Call us in Washington, D.C. at 1-888-407-4747 (toll-free in the United States and Canada) or 1-202-501-4444 (from all other countries) from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).
  • See the  State Department’s travel website  for the  Worldwide Caution  and  Travel Advisories .
  • Follow us on  Twitter  and  Facebook .
  • See  traveling safely abroad  for useful travel tips.

Review information about International Parental Child Abduction in Mexico . For additional IPCA-related information, please see the International Child Abduction Prevention and Return Act ( ICAPRA ) report.

Travel Advisory Levels

Assistance for u.s. citizens, learn about your destination, enroll in step.

Enroll in STEP

Subscribe to get up-to-date safety and security information and help us reach you in an emergency abroad.

Recommended Web Browsers: Microsoft Edge or Google Chrome.

Check passport expiration dates carefully for all travelers! Children’s passports are issued for 5 years, adult passports for 10 years.

Afghanistan

Antigua and Barbuda

Bonaire, Sint Eustatius, and Saba

Bosnia and Herzegovina

British Virgin Islands

Burkina Faso

Burma (Myanmar)

Cayman Islands

Central African Republic

Cote d Ivoire

Curaçao

Czech Republic

Democratic Republic of the Congo

Dominican Republic

El Salvador

Equatorial Guinea

Eswatini (Swaziland)

Falkland Islands

France (includes Monaco)

French Guiana

French Polynesia

French West Indies

Guadeloupe, Martinique, Saint Martin, and Saint Barthélemy (French West Indies)

Guinea-Bissau

Isle of Man

Israel, The West Bank and Gaza

Liechtenstein

Marshall Islands

Netherlands

New Caledonia

New Zealand

North Korea (Democratic People's Republic of Korea)

Papua New Guinea

Philippines

Republic of North Macedonia

Republic of the Congo

Saint Kitts and Nevis

Saint Lucia

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Sao Tome and Principe

Saudi Arabia

Sierra Leone

Sint Maarten

Solomon Islands

South Africa

South Korea

South Sudan

Switzerland

The Bahamas

Timor-Leste

Trinidad and Tobago

Turkmenistan

Turks and Caicos Islands

United Arab Emirates

United Kingdom

Vatican City (Holy See)

External Link

You are about to leave travel.state.gov for an external website that is not maintained by the U.S. Department of State.

Links to external websites are provided as a convenience and should not be construed as an endorsement by the U.S. Department of State of the views or products contained therein. If you wish to remain on travel.state.gov, click the "cancel" message.

You are about to visit:

2 women on cruise out of Florida reported being drugged, raped in Bahamas. What we know

State department warns violent crimes, including sexual assaults, occur in tourist and non-tourist areas in the bahamas..

  • The two women had gone on a Carnival cruise that left Jacksonville, Florida..
  • The women told authorities a resort employee allegedly gave them drinks spiked with a cocktail of drugs.
  • The Level 2 travel advisory warns travelers to exercise increased caution due to crime.

A couple of weeks after the U.S. Department of State issued a travel warning for the Bahamas , two Kentucky women reported being drugged and sexually assaulted .

The two women were on a Carnival cruise that left Jacksonville and said they were unaware of the travel warning and "not aware of any warnings given by Carnival," according to their Miami-based attorney, Nicholas Gerson.

Carnival offers cruises out of four Florida ports, and the Bahamas is one of several destinations offered.

Two women reported being drugged, raped on Bahamas beach. What happened?

The women, two mothers from Kentucky, told  News Nation 's Chris Cuomo they were "relaxing on a Grand Bahama beach" when a resort employee allegedly gave them drinks spiked with a cocktail of drugs, including benzodiazepines.

"They were given drinks — a coconut and pineapple drink — spiked with a series of drug and narcotics," Gerson told the USA TODAY. "They became inebriated and were both taken away and raped."

One of the women told Cuomo she and her friend went to look for seashells for their children with "a male resort employee" and the next thing she remembered she "was waking up while she was being assaulted by a uniformed male resort staffer."

Toxicology results found little if no alcohol in women but they tested positive for benzos and other drugs, including cocaine, according to Gerson.

What are benzodiazepines or benzos?

Benzodiazepines , also known as benzos, are depressants that slow down activity in your brain and nervous system, according to Cleveland Clinic .

They can cause extreme drowsiness, confusion , impaired coordination, decreased reflexes, respiratory depression, coma, and possible death.

The most common benzodiazepines are the prescription drugs Valium, Xanax, Halcion, Ativan, and Klonopin, according to the DEA .

Where did the recent attacks take place in the Bahamas?

According to a preliminary report from the   Royal Bahamas Police Force , the attacks took place shortly after noon Feb. 4 while the two women visited a beach in Central Grand Bahama.

Gerson said on the day of the alleged assaults, his clients went on an excursion called "Pirate's Cove Beach Getaway" and were taken to the island by a shuttle arranged by Carnival.

Was anyone arrested in the Bahamas attack on 2 women?

Police in the Bahamas have arrested two people on sexual assault charges.

"Quick response," by officers in  Grand Bahama , the northernmost island of the Bahamas in the Atlantic Ocean, resulted in the arrest of a 54-year-old man of Eight Mile Rock and a 40-year-old man of South Bahamia, after they allegedly sexually assaulted two women on Sunday, the  Royal Bahamas Police Force  said.

What did Carnival have to say about the attacks?

Carnival released the following statement to USA TODAY:

"While ashore in Freeport, Bahamas on an independent shore excursion, two guests on Carnival Elation reported to Bahamian police that they were sexually assaulted at a local beach. Our onboard Care Team provided support for the two guests as they sailed back to Jacksonville. Bahamian police are investigating the matter and Carnival is providing our full cooperation."

How did Pirates Cove Zipline and Water Park respond to reports of an attack?

"At Pirates Cove, the safety of our guests and team members is always paramount," a spokesperson for Pirates Cove Zipline and Water Park said in an email.

"We regret that our guests experienced this incident, and we remain steadfast in our commitment to aid police in the collection of evidence in response to these allegations, including providing police access to video from the 16 cameras around the beach facility where the assault of the two guests allegedly occurred.

"We take great pride in ensuring our guests have a safe and enjoyable experience when visiting Pirates Cove. In addition to having safety personnel and CCTV surveillance throughout the park, employees and vendors of Pirates Cove must follow strict guidelines when interacting with guests. We have a zero-tolerance policy for fraternizing with guests or behaving in a manner that is unsafe.

"While there is an active police investigation into these serious allegations, we have terminated the employment of the two accused, as the behavior seen on tape by management indicates that at a minimum, they violated our zero-tolerance policy."

What is the travel warning for the Bahamas?

The  United States Department of State  issued a  Level 2 travel advisory  for travelers heading to the Bahamas in January.

The  advisory warns travelers  to "exercise increased caution" due to crime, specifically on the islands of New Providence, which includes Nassau, and Grand Bahama, which includes Freeport.

"Violent crime —  such as burglaries, armed robberies, and sexual assaults —  occur in both tourist and non-tourist areas. Be vigilant when staying at short-term vacation rental properties where private security companies do not have a presence, " the State Department said.  

Bahamas travel warning: Heading to the Bahamas? Here's what you should know about travel warning

Carnival sails out of four Florida ports

Carnival offers tours out of four Florida locations : Jacksonville, Port Canaveral, Miami and Tampa.

Carnival Elation sails out of Jacksonville, offering tours to the Bahamas and Caribbean.

Five ships — Mardi Gras,Vista, Freedom, Glory, Liberty — sail out of Cape Canaveral . Destinations depend on the ship and range from the Bahamas and Caribbean to transatlantic cruises and the Panama Canal.

Six ships — Celebration, Spirit, Horizon, Sunrise, Magic, and Conquest — sail out of Miami . Destinations depend on the ship and range from the Bahamas and Caribbean to Alaska, transatlantic cruises and the Panama Canal.

Five ships — Spirit, Miracle, Legend, Paradise and Price — sail out of Tampa . Destinations depend on the ship and range from the Bahamas and Caribbean to Alaska, Seattle, Greenland, Canada, Mexico, transatlantic cruises and the Panama Canal.

Top Carnival destinations from Florida ports

The top destinations for a Carnival cruise out of Florida are:

  • Caribbean and Mexico: Ports of call include Celebration Key; Cozumel; Grand Cayman; Nassau; Freeport; Belize; Mahogany Bay; St. Thomas; Bimini; Progreso, Yucatan; San Juan; Key West; Half Moon Cay; St. Maarten; St. Kitts; Montego Bay; Ocho Rios; St. Lucia; Grand Turk; Barbados; Curacao; Costa Maya; La Romana; Princess Cays; Falmouth; Antigua; Bonaire; Bermuda; Grenada; Amber Cove; Dominca; Santa Marta; Miami; Galveston; Port Canaveral; New Orleans; Tampa; Charleston, South Carolina; Baltimore, Maryland; New York City; Mobile.
  • Bahamas: Ports of call include Celebration Key; Nassau; Bimini; Freeport; Baltimore; Charleston; Half Moon Cay; Jacksonville; Miami; Norfolk; Port Canaveral; Princess Cays.
  • Panama Canal: Destinations include Panama Canal transit; Panama Canal partial transit; Cartagena; Limon; Celebration Key; Cozumel; Ocho Rios; Grand Turk; Half Moon Cay; Amber Cove; Aruba; Bonaire; Montego Bay; Puntarenas; Colon; Santa Marta; Curacao; Huatulco; Grand Cayman; Puerto Quetzal; Cabo San Lucas; Seattle; Baltimore; Tampa; Miami; Galveston; New Orleans.
  • Transatlantic: Ports of call include Funchal, Madeira; Celebration Key; Grand Turk; La Coruna; Las Palmas; Praia Da Vitoria, Azore; Malaga; Tenerife; Valencia; Lisbon; Vigo; Gibraltar; Bermuda; Halifax, Nova Scotia; Ponta Delgada; Alicante; Barcelona; Southhampton, London; Tampa; Miami.

Mexico, Caribbean travel advisories: Many Caribbean islands have travel advisories, so here are 10 Florida islands for vacation

US Embassy, State Department offer these tips if you go to the Bahamas

  • Exercise extreme caution in the eastern part of New Providence Island (Nassau).
  • Use caution when walking or driving at night.
  • Keep a low profile.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Review your personal security plans.
  • If you decide to travel to The Bahamas,  do not answer your door at your hotel/residence unless you know who it is.  

Read the Latest on Page Six

latest in US News

House panel subpoenas Harvard, Penny Pritzker over ‘failure’ to comply with antisemitism probe

House panel subpoenas Harvard, Penny Pritzker over ‘failure’...

Video shows heavy equipment dangling off seven-story parking garage after it tipped over while clearing snow

Video shows heavy equipment dangling off seven-story parking...

Tax refunds are much smaller so far this year, IRS says

Tax refunds are much smaller so far this year, IRS says

Matisyahu accuses two venues of antisemitism for canceling concert as venues blame ‘safety concerns’

Matisyahu accuses 2 venues of antisemitism for canceling concert...

High school seniors earn scholarships to play cornhole in college: 'I'm shocked'

High school seniors earn scholarships to play cornhole in...

'terrified' vegas judge breaks her silence month after viral....

Flyer slips past Nashville airport checkpoint, boards American Airlines flight to LA without ticket

Flyer slips past Nashville airport checkpoint, boards American...

Republican Rep. Matt Rosendale ends short-lived Montana Senate bid after Trump endorses rival

Republican Rep. Matt Rosendale ends short-lived Montana Senate...

Sex-crazed tourists filmed making whoopie on thailand beach as others look on and laugh.

  • View Author Archive
  • Email the Author
  • Get author RSS feed

Contact The Author

Thanks for contacting us. We've received your submission.

Thailand’s Sin City beach is once again living up to its lascivious reputation , as yet another couple of tourists were caught taking advantage of the picturesque shore as the spot for a passionate round of lovemaking.

Months after another couple outraged officials with some sandy hanky panky, the latest naked pair were spotted blatantly fornicating under the streetlights at Pattaya Beach, a popular tourist destination dubbed “Sin City” for its bawdy bars and massage parlors.

The couple seemed unbothered in the 1-minute video as other beachgoers — seen sitting just yards away from the pair — look on and laugh.

“Is this normal in Pattaya?” the original video, shared to Facebook Wednesday, read.

It provoked shocked comments such as: “Why not go to a hotel with such performances?” and “What kind of people are these?”

The perverted rendevous occurred on a strip of Jomtien Beach, home to high-rise condominiums, hotels and restaurants, and not far from the Pattaya Water Sports Complex, according to Pattaya Mail.

The popular strip is flooded with locals and tourists at all hours of the day and late into the night, including the estimated 2 a.m. to 4 a.m. timeframe police estimate the sex-crazed pair engaged in their affair.

It is also a well-known spot for public lovemaking, despite such acts being illegal.

The city’s Tourist Police is investigating the incident, but fear the perverted pair may be long gone — while the video was only shared this week, it appears to have been filmed as long as three months earlier, Khaosod English reported.

Two people having sex on Pattaya beach at night while other people nearby watch in outrage.

Tents were seen strewn near the part of the beach the pair was seen lying on, which lifeguard officials told police were removed in December.

Sexual acts in public are illegal in Thailand — and are punishable by up to five years behind bars — but the rules have done little to stop offenders from blatantly engaging in the past.

In May of last year, a woman was caught performing oral sex on a man under a street light on a public sidewalk as workers set up a stage nearby.

Aerial view of Pattaya Beach.

Months earlier, a “disgusting foreigner” was caught having sex with a prostitute during an all-night booze bender on Christmas Day.

The blond tourist even waved to a bystander who had stopped to film the salacious sexcapade on his phone.

Share this article:

travel video of mexico

2 Kentucky women say they were drugged, raped by Bahamas resort staffers, suspects arrested

travel video of mexico

Police in the Bahamas this week arrested two people on sexual assault charges after two American women on a Carnival cruise said they were drugged and raped while in the country.

The report comes on the heels of the United States Department of State issuing a travel advisory for the Bahamas − a popular for cruises and spring break vacations.

A "quick response" by officers in Grand Bahama , the northernmost island of the Bahamas in the Atlantic Ocean, resulted in the arrest of a 54-year-old man of Eight Mile Rock and a 40-year-old man of South Bahamia after they allegedly sexually assaulted two women on Sunday, the Royal Bahamas Police Force reported.

According to a preliminary report from the department, the attacks took place shortly after noon on Sunday while two females visited a beach in Central Grand Bahama.

The women, two mothers from Kentucky who identified themselves as Amber Shearer and Dongayla Dobson, told News Nation 's Chris Cuomo they were "relaxing on a Grand Bahama beach" when a resort employee allegedly gave them drinks spiked with a cocktail of drugs including benzodiazepines.

"They were given drinks – a coconut and pineapple drink − spiked with a series of drug and narcotics," the women's Miami-based attorney, Nicholas Gerson told USA TODAY Thursday. "They became inebriated and were both taken away and raped."

At the time of the reported attacks, Gerson said his clients, both 31, were unaware of the recent travel warning and "not aware of any warnings given by Carnival."

When reached by phone on Thursday, Dobson's husband told USA TODAY he and his wife live in Lancaster, Kentucky, a small city about 35-miles south of Lexington.

He also said his wife and Shearer are childhood friends who both grew up in Danville, Kentucky, a town about 10 miles west of Lancaster and deferred additional questions to his wife's lawyer.

'A two-for-one drink deal'

Gerson said on the day of the alleged assaults, his clients went on an excursion called "Pirate's Cove Beach Getaway" and were taken to the island by a shuttle arranged by Carnival.

There, the attorney said, a resort staffer offered them a two-for-one drink deal, and after taking just a few sips, they realized something was off with the beverage.

Dobson told Cuomo the friends went to look for seashells for their children with "a male resort employee" and the next thing she remembered "was waking up while she was being assaulted by a uniformed male resort staffer."

“I came to in the process of my rape,” Dobson told Cuomo. “I want people to be safe... Two’s not enough." She said they "thought as best friends … that we could protect each other and to be safe."

That wasn't enough, she said.

Shortly after the reported rapes, both women told Cuomo, local authorities and other staff at the resort were able to identify the men accused of sexually assaulting the women through video surveillance.

The women took toxicology tests when they returned to the ship and reported the rapes, Gerson said

Toxicology results, he said, found little if no alcohol in his clients' systems, but the women tested positive for benzos and other drugs including cocaine.

Rape settlement: Teen worker raped by McDonald's manager receives $4.4 million

'Support for the two guests'

Carnival released the following statement to USA TODAY on Thursday:

"While ashore in Freeport, Bahamas on an independent shore excursion, two guests on Carnival Elation reported to Bahamian police that they were sexually assaulted at a local beach. Our onboard Care Team provided support for the two guests as they sailed back to Jacksonville. Bahamian police are investigating the matter and Carnival is providing our full cooperation."

As of Thursdays police had not released the names of the men they arrested.

The department's daily crime report log posted online showed the case remained open and under investigation.

A spokesperson for Pirate's Cove shared a statement with USA TODAY late Thursday afternoon that said managers took swift action as soon as the incident was reported and the business is cooperating with investigators.

"We regret that our guests experienced this incident, and we remain steadfast in our commitment to aid police in the collection of evidence in response to these allegations, including providing Police access to video from the sixteen cameras around the beach facility where the assault of the two guests allegedly occurred," the statement read. "Accusations of any kind are always thoroughly investigated by Pirates Cove management and, when warranted, the organization calls in local authorities.

Level 2 travel advisory

Last month, the Department of State issued a  Level 2 travel advisory  for the Bahamas.

The advisory, posted on Jan. 26, warns travelers to "exercise increased caution" because of crime on the islands of New Providence including Grand Bahama, Nassau, and Freeport.

A security alert posted by the  U.S. Embassy in the Bahamas  on Jan. 24 also reported that 18 murders have taken place in Nassau since the start of the year.

The alert warns that murders have occurred at all hours including in broad daylight on the streets.

"Retaliatory gang violence has been the primary motive in 2024 murders," the embassy wrote.

Gerson said Carnival did not warn his clients about the travel advisory.

"The cruise line has a legal obligation to warn their passengers about danger they may know about and it applies to places passengers are visiting or expected to visit," Gerson said.

Contributing: Gabe Hauari

Natalie Neysa Alund is a senior reporter for USA TODAY. Reach her at [email protected] and follow her on X @nataliealund.

IMAGES

  1. 25 Best Places to Visit in Mexico

    travel video of mexico

  2. Best Places to Visit in Mexico

    travel video of mexico

  3. 25 Best Places to Visit in Mexico

    travel video of mexico

  4. Mexico City : Travel Guide: Mexico City Vacation + Trip Ideas

    travel video of mexico

  5. Mexico City Travel Guide

    travel video of mexico

  6. The Greatest Things To Do in Mexico City

    travel video of mexico

VIDEO

  1. Must visit places in Mexico! #mexico #visitméxico

  2. Mexico Travel Warning After Americans Kidnapped

  3. 5 Things to Know Before Visiting Mexico

  4. Top 5 #mexico Travel Destinations #shorts

  5. 10 best places to visit in Mexico

  6. TRAVEL TO MEXICO CITY IN 4 DAYS

COMMENTS

  1. 10 Best Places to Visit in Mexico

    36K 893K views 3 years ago Check out all the places seen in this video: https://www.touropia.com/best-places-... Gorgeous beaches, a delicious culinary scene, festive culture and ancient pyramids...

  2. Amazing Places to visit in Mexico

    Amazing Places to visit in Mexico - Travel Video Joyous Travel 156K subscribers Subscribe Subscribed 11K 121K views 1 year ago #Mexico #Places #Travel When looking for a destination to...

  3. All of our Mexico Travel Videos

    Shuffle Let's experience Mexico together! Join us on all of our adventures as we travel around this beautiful country!

  4. The Ultimate Mexico Travel Guide • The Blonde Abroad

    Yucatan View all Highlight Best Time To Visit Like plenty of other places in the world, the best time to visit Mexico depends on your final destination. The country is made up of 5,800 miles of beaches, yet the interior is made up of desert, thick jungle, mountain ranges, and everything in between!

  5. 15 best places to visit in Mexico

    Oct 9, 2023 • 14 min read Explore Mexico's stunning landscape and see the best the country has to offer © Thomas Barwick / Getty Images Cantinas and cathedrals. Art and archaeology. Mariachis and mountains. Ruins and rainbow reefs. Mexico makes a mesmerizing escape for lovers of adventure, romance, history, culture, food, and fiery festivals.

  6. Best Travel YouTube Channels on Mexico

    Best Travel YouTube Channels on Mexico If you have ever looked online for some travel inspiration, you most likely have found a lot of travel YouTube channels. There are lots of them on the subject. It doesn't matter if you're looking for info on Europe, Latin America, Asia, you name it. You will always find videos on your desired destinations.

  7. Video

    Destinations North America Mexico Mexico Main Articles Photos Video Mexico Video Showing 1 - 18 of 120 results Tour Mexico City 02:53 Bert's Cancun outtakes 01:12 Cabo Dolphin Experience 02:00 POV: Bert's Cancun 00:27 Bikini Blast: Mexico 00:49 Fast and Furious Cabo 02:34 Rev's Top 5: Mexico City 02:32 Cancun's Hotel Zone 02:57

  8. Complete guide to Mexico

    01 / Attractions Must-see attractions for your itinerary Tulum Ruins Tulum Tulum is one of the most visited archaeological zones in Mexico and for good reason: it's sublime. The ruins sit on seaside cliffs, high above turquoise… Parque Nacional Isla Contoy Cancún A white sand beach with manta rays gliding through the shimmering turquoise waters.

  9. 17 Best Places to Visit in Mexico (+Map)

    2. Tulum. 1. Chichen Itza. Mexico Travel Video. 17. Puebla. Founded in 1531, Puebla, in central Mexico, is the fifth largest city in the country with over 2 million inhabitants. Its strategic location, halfway between the port of Veracruz and Mexico City, made it an important city.

  10. Mexico City Vacation Ideas for Planning an Itinerary

    Let the travel guide video show you the best Mexico City attractions where the Latin American spirit shines brightest, the parks grow greenest, and the landmarks are the oldest. Zocalo (1:35 in the video) This main square of Mexico City is formally known as Plaza de la Constitución, but you will always hear it referred to as Zocalo. The square ...

  11. Mexico Travel Guide (Updated 2024)

    Mexico Travel Costs. Accommodation - In Mexico, hostels start at 250 MXN per night for a dorm bed, but average closer to 300 MXN. Private hostel rooms cost anything from 600-1,900 MXN per night. Prices are usually a bit lower in the low-season or shoulder-season.

  12. Best Places to Visit in Mexico for 2023-2024

    Best Places to Visit in Mexico for 2023-2024 By Erin Evans | Reviewed by Elizabeth Von Tersch | Last updated on Oct. 10, 2023 With year-round warm weather and diverse destinations ranging from...

  13. Ultimate MEXICO Tour in 8K ULTRA HD

    654 59K views 1 year ago #8K #MEXICO #TOUR Beautiful MEXICO Tour in 8K ULTRA HD - Travel to Best Places in Mexico with Relaxing Music 8K TV High-Quality Mexico Tour from the World Video...

  14. Mexico Travel Guide

    View CNN's Mexico Travel Guide to explore the best things to do and places to stay. Plus, get insider tips, see video and read inspiring narratives.

  15. Homeschooling Mexico: Virtual Tour of Mexico with Kids: Mexico Global

    by Preethi Are you looking forward to learning about Mexico with kids but can't travel there quite yet? Come join us as we travel on a virtual visit with our homeschooling Mexico unit! This post may contain affiliate links, which means I may earn a small commission if you click my link but does not change your price. See my affiliate policy here.

  16. The 27 Best Travel Youtube Channels To Follow

    10. Mind Boggler channel. You might want to skip this one if you have a fear of heights. In case it doesn't bother you at least to watch a video, this is a spectacular video on the most terrifying bridges of the world. If you are not too sensitive, the scenes are indeed spectacular and worth watching.

  17. Is It Safe to Travel to Mexico? Here's What You Need to Know

    The conflict generated widespread attention after a video of taxi drivers forcing a Russian-speaking ... The U.S. State Department provides state-by-state information about travel risks in Mexico ...

  18. 30 Incredible Things To See And Do In Mexico

    One of Mexico's greatest natural wonders, the Copper Canyon is an immense series of valleys and ridges covering 25,000 square miles (64,000sq km). That's four times larger than the Grand Canyon.

  19. Mexico Travel Advisory

    Exercise increased caution due to crime. Both violent and non-violent crime occur throughout Mexico City. Use additional caution, particularly at night, outside of the frequented tourist areas where police and security patrol more routinely. Petty crime occurs frequently in both tourist and non-tourist areas.

  20. Mexico Vacation Travel Video Guide

    Travel video about destination Mexico. Mexico, land of the Maya and Aztec, temples and beaches and with a population of twenty-six million the bubbling metropolis of Mexico City is a maze...

  21. Video: Teacher takes students on 'trip' to Mexico. See how airline

    First graders' mock trip to Mexico leads to actual airplane adventure. CNN's Jeanne Moos reports on the "best teacher ever."

  22. Mexico International Travel Information

    Call us in Washington, D.C. at 1-888-407-4747 (toll-free in the United States and Canada) or 1-202-501-4444 (from all other countries) from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays). See the State Department's travel website for the Worldwide Caution and Travel Advisories.

  23. Bahamas travel warning 2024: 2 women attacked on cruise out of Florida

    Mexico, Caribbean travel advisories:Many Caribbean islands have travel advisories, so here are 10 Florida islands for vacation US Embassy, State Department offer these tips if you go to the Bahamas

  24. Video of sex-crazed tourists having sex on Pattaya Beach in Thailand

    A couple of tourists took advantage of the "family-friendly" shores of a coastal Thailand city as the spot for a passionate round of lovemaking.

  25. Mexico City Vacation Travel Video Guide

    0:00 / 25:35 Travel video about destination Mexico City in Mexico.Mexico City is a vivid metropolis and cosmopolitan city situated on a plateau in the central highlands a...

  26. Amber Shearer and Dongayla Dobson said they were raped in the Bahamas

    Police in the Bahamas this week arrested two people on sexual assault charges after two American women on a Carnival cruise said they were drugged and raped while in the country. The report comes ...

  27. Tangerine Travels

    From dirty cops, to taxi scams and car rental scams, this video is going to help you out a lot on your next trip to Cancun and surrounding areas like Playa Del Carmen, Tulum, Puerto Morelos,...

  28. Kentucky women raped in Bahamas warn others of travel dangers

    "The majority of crime occurs on New Providence (Nassau) and Grand Bahama (Freeport) islands," the State Department's Bureau of Consular Affairs said in the latest Travel Advisory. "In Nassau, practice increased vigilance in the 'Over the Hill' area (south of Shirley Street) where gang-on-gang violence has resulted in a high homicide rate primarily affecting the local population."