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48 VISA-FREE Countries for US Green Card Holders [2024 Edition]

Updated: February 3, 2024 8 Comments

VISA-FREE countries for US Green Card holders

A US green card not only lets you reside in the US but also offers you visa-free access to many countries and territories. As of 2024, there are about 48 visa-free countries for US green card holders. 

A US green card is a pathway to a US passport. While you wait for your US passport, your US green card is already making your current passport strong . Not as strong as a US passport but quite strong. You already have visa-free access to 48 additional countries.

Table of Contents

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER Visa requirements change constantly but we make every effort to keep the information accurate and up to date. We provide links to official sources wherever necessary, so you can conduct your own due diligence to verify the visa requirements before planning your trip. We shall not be held liable for any damages incurred as a result of using the information in this article. Refer to our full disclaimer for more information.

Why are there VISA-FREE countries for US green card holders?

US passport (and US citizenship) is considered one of the strongest in the world. A US green card is a pathway to US citizenship. Many countries believe that someone with a US green card will not jeopardize their chances of becoming a US citizen by remaining illegally in another country. 

Working towards acquiring a US green card requires remaining several years in the US or investing enormous amounts of cash or building very strong family ties with the US. It’s silly for someone to let go of years of valuable time and millions of dollars of investments just to stay illegally in another country. Therefore, countries trust US green card holders as genuine travelers and treat them almost like someone with a strong passport. So, these countries offer visa-free access to US green card holders. 

How many countries can you visit with a US green card?

As of 2024, there are 48 countries and territories that you can visit with a US green card. This list of countries for US green card holders includes visa-free, visa on arrival and e-visa countries. Japan is the new addition to the list with the option to apply for e-visa without needing to go to the embassy.

Let’s look at what these countries are in detail.

Where can green card holders travel without a visa?

As of 2024, these are the 48 countries where green card holders can travel without a visa.

  • Anguilla (British Territory)
  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Bermuda (British Territory)
  • Bonaire (Dutch Territory)
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • British Virgin Islands (British Territory)
  • Cayman Islands (British Territory)
  • Dominican Republic
  • El Salvador
  • Philippines
  • Saudi Arabia
  • Sint Maarten
  • South Korea
  • Turks and Caicos (British Territory)
  • United Arab Emirates
  • United Kingdom
  • US territories

Let’s look into the entry requirements of each of these countries in detail.

RELATED: 53 countries you can visit VISA-FREE with US visa in 2024

North America

Mexico Entry Stamp - Enter Mexico with US visa

  • Eligible nationalities: All nationalities
  • Entry granted: 180 days
  • Entry rule: Entry into Canada is only allowed if you present a valid passport from the country of nationality along with a green card.
  • Official source: Government of Canada Immigration and Citizenship

Read more about traveling to Canada with US green card . This article will guide you through the requirements and border procedure when entering Canada with your US green card.

  • Entry granted: Varies depending on the itinerary
  • Entry rule: Green card must be valid for the entire stay in Mexico
  • Official source: National Institute of Migration, Mexico

Read more about traveling to Mexico with a US green card . This article will help you understand the requirements and entry procedures at the airport when traveling to Mexico with your US green card.

03. United States Territories

  • Includes the US territories: US Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, Northern Mariana Islands, and Guam
  • Excludes the US territories: American Samoa (American Samoa has its own immigration rules and does not honor US tourist visa )
  • Official source: American Samoa Visitors Bureau   and Department of Legal Affairs  

RELATED: 38 countries you can visit VISA-FREE with Canada visa in 2023

Central America

Travel Non-Schengen Countries VISA-FREE with Schengen Visa - San Pedro Belize

  • Entry granted: 30 days
  • Official source: Embassy of Belize in Washington DC, USA

05. Costa Rica

  • Entry rule: US green card must be valid for at least 3 months from the day of arrival
  • Official source: Embassy of Costa Rica in Washington DC, USA

06. El Salvador

  • Burkina Faso
  • Central African Republic
  • Côte d’Ivoire
  • Equatorial Guinea
  • Guinea-Bissau
  • Papua New Guinea
  • Turkmenistan
  • Entry granted: 90 days
  • If entering by air, a fee of $12 USD will be charged for a tourist card
  • If you have already entered Guatemala or Honduras, you can enter El Salvador from Guatemala or Honduras by land without any additional visa requirements as per CA-4 Border Control Agreement
  • Official source: IATA Travel Centre

07. Guatemala

  • Côte d´Ivoire
  • Entry rule: If you have already entered Honduras or El Salvador, you can enter Guatemala from Honduras or El Salvador by land without any additional visa requirements as per CA-4 Border Control Agreement.
  • Official source: Consulate of Guatemala in New York, USA

08. Honduras

  • Cote d’Ivoire
  • South Sudan
  • Entry rule: If you have already entered Guatemala or El Salvador, you can enter Honduras from Guatemala or El Salvador by land without any additional visa requirements as per CA-4 Border Control Agreement.

09. Nicaragua

  • Afghanistan
  • Congo, Dem Rep of
  • Congo, Rep of
  • Sierra Leone
  • Timor-Leste
  • Visa is NOT EXEMPT, but are eligible to obtain Visa ON ARRIVAL
  • VOA fee is 50 USD, payable in USD, valid for 30 days, single-entry only
  • Besides VOA fee, there is 10 USD tourist card fee, 2 USD land border migration fee (for land border only) and 1 USD municipality tax (for land border only) (payable in USD only)
  • Green card must be valid for at least 6 months from the day of arrival
  • Must show proof of economic solvency for a minimum of 500 USD
  • Official source: Embassy of Panama in the USA

RELATED: 40 countries you can travel VISA-FREE with UK visa in 2023

Beach of Catalina Island in Dominican Republic

11. Anguilla (British Territory)

  • Official source: Anguilla Tourist Board, entry requirements

12. Antigua and Barbuda

  • Visa is NOT EXEMPT, but green card holders are eligible to obtain a Visa ON ARRIVAL (VOA)
  • VOA fee is $100 USD, valid for 30 days, single-entry only
  • Official source: Consulate General of Antigua and Barbuda in NYC, USA
  • Official source: Netherlands Worldwide

14. Bahamas

  • Official source: Bahamas Ministry of Tourism

15. Bermuda (British Territory)

  • Entry rule: Green card must be valid for a minimum of 45 days beyond the date of departure from Bermuda
  • Official source: Government of Bermuda

16. Bonaire (Dutch Territory)

17. british virgin islands (british territory).

  • Entry rule: Must arrive directly from the US
  • Official source: Government of Virgin Islands (British)

18. Cayman Islands (British Territory)

  • Entry rule: Must present a return ticket back to the US on arrival
  • Official source: Cayman Islands Customs and Border Controls

19. Curaçao

20. dominican republic.

  • Entry rule: If arriving by land or sea, must purchase a Tourist Card on arrival for 20 USD. If arriving by air, the tourist card is included in the airfare.
  • Official source: Embassy of the Dominican Republic in the US

21. Sint Maarten

22. turks and caicos (british territory).

  • Official source: Ministry of Border Control of Turks and Caicos

RELATED: 51 non-Schengen countries you can travel VISA-FREE with Schengen visa in 2023

South America

Travel Countries VISA-FREE with Canada Visa - Chile, Valparaiso

24. Colombia

  • Official source : Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Colombia
  • Official source: Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Peru

RELATED: How to book flight tickets with 24 hour FREE cancellation on Expedia – A step-by-step guide

Georgia entry and exit stamps in India passport

26. Albania

  • Eligible Nationalities: All nationalities
  • Official source: Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Albania

27. Armenia

  • Marshall Islands
  • Saint Kitts and Nevis
  • Saint Lucia
  • Solomon Islands
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • Entry granted: 21 or 120 days
  • Visa is NOT EXEMPT, but green card holders are eligible to obtain Visa ON ARRIVAL
  • VOA fee is 3,000 AMD, valid for 21 days, single-entry (OR) 15,000 AMD, valid for 120 days, single-entry
  • Official source: Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Armenia

28. Bosnia and Herzegovina

  • Eligible nationalities: All nationalities, except Kosovo
  • Official source: Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Bosnia and Herzegovina

29. Georgia

  • Entry rule: The total duration of consecutive stays must not exceed 90 days in any 180-day period
  • Official source: Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Georgia

30. Moldova

  • São Tomé and Príncipe
  • South Africa
  • Official source: Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Moldova

31. Montenegro

  • Official source: Government of Montenegro
  • Official source: Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Serbia
  • Algeria (those aged 15-18 and 35-65)
  • North Korea
  • Visa is NOT EXEMPT, but green card holders are eligible to apply for Turkey e-Visa online
  • E-Visa fee is $43 USD, validity is 180 days, and single-entry only
  • Official source: Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Turkey

If you hold a US green card and are eligible to apply for a Turkey e-Visa, read this step-by-step guide to  apply for Turkey e-Visa . This step-by-step guide has instructions and screenshots to guide you in filling out the application and downloading your approved e-Visa.

34. United Kingdom

  • Entry granted: 24 hours only (Transit Without Visa)
  • Visa is NOT EXEMPT, but green card holders are eligible to request a 24-hour entry at London (LHR) or Manchester (MAN) airports
  • Must be traveling to or from the US only
  • Must arrive and depart by air only
  • Must hold the boarding pass for the onward flight
  • Onward flight must be within 24 hours (on the same day or the next day before midnight)
  • Granting 24-hour entry into the UK with a green card is at the sole discretion of the immigration officer
  • Official source: GOV.UK

RELATED: How to turn your weak passport into a strong passport (with examples)

Middle East

Dubai Global Village at Night

35. Bahrain

  • Entry granted: 14 days or 30 days
  • Visa is NOT EXEMPT, but are eligible to obtain Visa ON ARRIVAL or Bahrain eVisa
  • Single-entry VOA fee is 5 BD, valid for 14 days, entry up to 14 days
  • Single-entry eVisa fee is 9 BD, valid for 14 days, entry up to 14 days
  • Multiple-entry VOA fee is 12 BD, valid for 3 months, entry up to 30 days
  • Multiple-entry eVisa fee is 16 BD, valid for 1 month, entry up to 14 days
  • For VOA, the green card must be valid for the entire stay in Bahrain
  • For eVisa, the green card must be valid for at least 6 months from the day of arrival
  • Official source: Bahrain eVisa Portal
  • Congo, Dem. Rep. of
  • Guinea Bissau
  • Visa is NOT EXEMPT, but green card holders are eligible for Jordan e-Visa
  • Official source: Jordan E-Visa
  • Entry granted: 10 or 30 days
  • Visa is NOT EXEMPT, but green card holders are eligible to obtain Oman 26M or 26N Tourist Visa online
  • 26M eVIsa fee is 20 OMR, valid for 30 days, single-entry only
  • 26N eVIsa fee is 5 OMR, valid for 10 days, single-entry only
  • Official source: Sultanate of Oman, Royal Oman Police
  • Visa is NOT EXEMPT, but are eligible to apply for A3 Visa online on the Hayya Portal
  • A3 Visa fee is QAR 100, valid for 30 days, single-entry only
  • Must provide hotel booking for the entire stay reserved through the Discover Qatar website
  • Green card must be valid on the day of A3 Visa application
  • Official source: Qatar Tourism Board

39. Saudi Arabia

  • Visa is NOT EXEMPT, but are eligible to obtain Visa ON ARRIVAL or Saudi Arabia eVisa
  • VOA or eVisa fee is 300 SAR, valid for 1 year, multiple-entry (plus service fee and insurance fee)
  • Official source: Saudi Arabia Tourism Authority

40. United Arab Emirates

  • Eligible Nationalities: India passport holders only
  • Entry granted: 14 days
  • Visa is NOT EXEMPT, but green card holders are eligible to obtain Visa ON ARRIVAL at UAE airports
  • VOA fee is 100 AED, valid for 14 days, single-entry only
  • Official source: UAE Government Portal

RELATED: 5 ways to get proof of onward travel for your next trip

Old Medina Marrakech Morocco

41. Morocco

  • Visa is NOT EXEMPT, but green card holders are eligible to apply for Morocco e-Visa online
  • E-Visa fee is 770 MAD, valid for 180 days, single-entry only
  • Green card must be valid for at least 90 days from the day of arrival
  • Official source: Morocco E-Visa Portal

Isla de Gigantes in the Philippines

  • Visa is NOT EXEMPT, but green card holders are eligible to apply for Japan eVisa
  • E-Visa fee is JPY 3,000, valid for 90 days, single-entry only
  • Must submit proof of residence to prove that you reside in those countries
  • Must show the visa issuance confirmation via the eVisa website on your phone at the immigration (Prints and PDFs are not accepted)
  • Must enter Japan by flight only
  • Official source: Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan

43. Malaysia (Currently suspended)

  • Entry granted: 120 hours (5 days)
  • Visa is NOT EXEMPT but green card holders are eligible to obtain Transit Without Visa (TWOA) at the VOA counter
  • TWOA is free of charge, valid for 120 hours (5 days), single-entry only
  • TWOA is available at Kuala Lumpur Airport (KLIA1 and KLIA2 terminals) only
  • Issuing of TWOA is at the discretion of the immigration offices at Kuala Lumpur Airport
  • Official source: High Commission of Malaysia in New Delhi, India

44. Philippines

  • Green card must be valid for the entire duration of the stay
  • Passport must be valid for at least 6 months beyond the date of departure
  • Official source: Embassy of the Philippines in India

45. Singapore

  • Entry granted: 96 hours (4 days)
  • Visa is NOT EXEMPT but are eligible to obtain Visa Free Transit Facility (VFTF) upon arrival
  • Must be traveling to or from the country of passport. Example: Must be traveling to a third country from India via Singapore or traveling to India from a third country via Singapore. An example itinerary would be India-Singapore-Bali or Bali-Singapore-India.
  • Both arriving and departing flights in Singapore must be on the same itinerary
  • Green card must be valid for at least 1 month at the time of arrival
  • Official source: Singapore Immigration & Checkpoints Authority

46. South Korea

  • Eligible nationalities: All nationalities (except these 23 countries – Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Cameron, Cuba, Egypt, Gambia, Ghana, Iran, Iraq, Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria, Pakistan, Palestine, Senegal, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syria, Uzbekistan and Yemen)
  • Entry rule: Must be traveling to/from the US through South Korea (OR)
  • Official source: South Korea Embassy in Washington DC, USA
  • Visa is NOT EXEMPT but are eligible to apply for ROC Travel Authorization Certificate online
  • ROC Travel Authorization Certificate is free of charge, valid for 90 days, multiple-entry
  • If using an EXPIRED US green card, the green card must have expired in the last 10 years only
  • Official source: Bureau of Consular Affairs of Republic of China (Taiwan)

48. Thailand

  • Entry granted: 60 days
  • Visa is NOT EXEMPT, but are eligible to apply for Thailand e-Visa online
  • E-Visa fee is 40 USD, valid for 90 days or 180 days, single or multiple-entry
  • Official source: Thailand e-Visa Portal

There are about 48 countries green card holders can travel without visa. US green card holders had to invest enormous amounts of money and time to acquire the green card, which will eventually lead to US citizenship. Therefore, countries believe that US green card holders will not jeopardize their chances of becoming US citizens by remaining illegally in another country. They consider green holders as genuine travelers and provide them with VISA-FREE access.

There you go, guys! Those are the 48 countries you can visit with a green card without a visa. If you know any country that I haven’t listed, let me know in the comments below.

Change history: For those who are interested, here are the changes to this list.

03 Feb 2024

  • Added:  El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, British Virgin Islands, Colombia, Moldova, Saudi Arabia

WRITTEN BY THIRUMAL MOTATI

Thirumal Motati

Thirumal Motati is an expert in tourist visa matters. He has been traveling the world on tourist visas for more than a decade. With his expertise, he has obtained several tourist visas, including the most strenuous ones such as the US, UK, Canada, and Schengen, some of which were granted multiple times. He has also set foot inside US consulates on numerous occasions. Mr. Motati has uncovered the secrets to successful visa applications. His guidance has enabled countless individuals to obtain their visas and fulfill their travel dreams. His statements have been mentioned in publications like Yahoo, BBC, The Hindu, and Travel Zoo.

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LEGAL DISCLAIMER We are not affiliated with immigration, embassies or governments of any country. The content in this article is for educational and general informational purposes only, and shall not be understood or construed as, visa, immigration or legal advice. Your use of information provided in this article is solely at your own risk and you expressly agree not to rely upon any information contained in this article as a substitute for professional visa or immigration advice. Under no circumstance shall be held liable or responsible for any errors or omissions in this article or for any damage you may suffer in respect to any actions taken or not taken based on any or all of the information in this article. Please refer to our full disclaimer for further information.

AFFILIATE DISCLOSURE This post may contain affiliate links, which means we may receive a commission, at no extra cost to you, if you make a purchase through a link. Please refer to our full disclosure for further information.

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Traveling Outside the U.S. as a Green Card Holder

Requirements for traveling abroad as a u.s. permanent resident.

Travel outside U.S. with a green card

In this guide

  • Can I travel outside the U.S. with a green card?
  • Required Documents
  • Applying for a Reentry Permit
  • Related Information

Yes, you can travel abroad as a green card holder — that’s one of the many benefits of being a permanent resident . However, your trip must be temporary and you cannot remain outside the United States for more than 1 year. If the Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officer believes you do not intend to continue living permanently in the United States, they could revoke your status as a permanent resident.

In this guide, we’ll go over which documents you’ll need and provide tips for traveling outside the United States as a permanent resident.

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When you leave.

You’ll want to be absolutely sure you have the necessary documents when leaving the country. Most green card holders will need to present the passport from the country where they’re a citizen, or in some cases, their refugee travel document.

You should also be sure to have your green card on you for the duration of the trip. And remember different countries have different requirements for entry. You may find that some countries require you to have a visa upon arrival. It’s a good idea to contact the embassy for the country you intend to visit.

Check out the U.S. Department of State’s “ Before You Go” webpage for general information on traveling abroad.

when you come back

When returning to the United States, you’ll need your green card (officially called Form I-551 , Permanent Resident Card ) and your passport. You may also present other identifying documents such as a U.S. driver’s license or a foreign national I.D. The CBP officer will look over these documents to determine whether or not you can reenter the country.

Boundless can help you obtain a green card. We make it easy to complete your green card application and avoid common problems . Learn more about what Boundless does , or start your application today .

If your trip will be longer than a year, it’s a good idea to submit Form I-131 (officially called “Application for Travel Document”) in order to apply for a reentry permit . With this permit, you can be admitted into the United States, and you won’t need to obtain a returning resident visa from the U.S. Embassy. While this document doesn’t guarantee successful admittance into the U.S., it can serve as evidence demonstrating your intent to live permanently in the United States.

It’s important to note that the reentry permit expires after 2 years. So if you think you might be out of the country for longer, you can apply for an SB-1 (officially called a “ Returning Resident Visa ”). To do this, you can go to the local U.S. Embassy or consulate. As a part of the application process, you’ll need to get a medical exam and demonstrate your eligibility to receive an immigrant visa.

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If this happens, you can file Form I-131A (officially called “Application for Travel Document (Carrier Documentation)”). With the carrier documentation you should be able to fly back to the United States without receiving any sort of penalty. Form I-131A may also be helpful if you’ve been away for more than 2 years and you’ve lost your reentry permit.

Traveling abroad will, in most cases, have little to no impact on your permanent resident status. That being said, your trip must be temporary, and you must have every intention of returning to the United States. If the CBP officer suspects you do not intend to live permanently in the U.S., they could revoke your status as a permanent resident. When making their decision, the officer may consider whether:

  • You’ve been gone for more than a year
  • You still have a job in the U.S.
  • You still have connections to friends and family in the United States
  • You’ve filed income taxes as a resident of the United States
  • You intended to take a temporary trip abroad
  • You’ve previously communicated your intention to continue living permanently in the United States
  • You have U.S. bank accounts
  • You own property or manage a business in the U.S.
  • You have a U.S. driver’s license
  • You have a U.S. mailing address

This list is not exhaustive. The CBP officer may consider other documentation when determining whether you truly intended to take a temporary trip abroad.

If you’re out of the country for 6 months or longer, you may have issues satisfying the continuous residency requirement. If you plan on leaving the country for more than a year, you can submit Form N-470 (officially called “Application to Preserve Residence for Naturalization Purposes”).

As a reminder, as part of the naturalization process , you have to show one of the following:

  • That you have resided continuously in the United States for 5 years prior to submitting the application
  • That you have resided continuously in the United States for 3 years (for qualified spouses of U.S. citizens)

Immigration guides

  • When to Get a Work or Travel Permit
  • Establishing a Domicile for Your Green Card Application
  • Informing USCIS About a Change of Address
  • The Naturalization Timeline
  • Naturalization Mistakes and How to Avoid Them
  • Traveling Abroad While Your Adjustment of Status Is Pending

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  • US green card holder visa free countries

38 VISA-FREE countries for US Green Card holders in 2024

Travel insurance quote form, do you want to insure trip cost as well as the health of the traveler, please click here to buy travel insurance for quarantine coverage, travel insurance with trip protection coverage - highlights, trip cancellation.

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Travel medical insurance with no trip protection - Highlights

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Importance of travel insurance for Green card holders

Traveling while exciting, usually involves some risk. The high cost of health care and unexpected travel emergencies makes good travel insurance invaluable. The cost of travel insurance typically costs around 5% of the total trip cost, and is easily worth the investment given the value it provides. US Green card holders traveling both within and outside of the US borders need the best travel insurance as regular US health insurance provides little health insurance coverage when you are outside US borders.

US residents traveling within the US but beyond the radius of 100 miles from their residence are eligible for domestic travel insurance along with for all overseas travel for which there is international travel insurance.

International travel has been severely disrupted due to the Covid pandemic, the war in Ukraine, hurricanes and extreme weather conditions, shortage of staff in airlines and airports, long airport security checks, delayed or cancelled flights, lost or delayed baggage, Coronavirus sickness and Quarantine requirements.

All of these factors often result in forced changes to travel plans often resulting in huge financial loss, especially if there is an expensive vacation planned with connecting airline tickets, hotels or cruise bookings. Buying the best Cruise travel insurance is recommended for cruise vacations.

Sometimes there are situations like work related problems, travelers or family members health conditions, that bring in change in travel plans that are outside of the traveler’s control. Travel insurance with cancel for any reasons coverage for such situations and provides complete flexibility in travel plans to cover the trip itself.

While traveling along with the investment in the journey itself, the most important part of the travel is the health of the traveler. One can buy US travel insurance which focuses on the investment on the trip costs, or travel health insurance which is designed more for the health of the traveler.

All of these expenses can be covered by the best US travel insurance. US travel insurance plans offers coverage to minimize the traveler’s expenses especially since US Medicare and other domestic health insurance provide little or no coverage outside the US borders. Travel insurance is crucial and becomes the main insurance coverage for US citizens when they lack other health insurance.

Visa free countries for US Green card holders

A US green card not only lets you reside in the US but also provides you with VISA-FREE access to many countries and territories. Currently, there are about 38 VISA-FREE countries for US green card holders.

A US green card is a pathway to a US passport. While you wait for your US passport, your US green card is already making your current passport strong. Not as strong as a US passport but quite strong. You will gain 38 additional VISA-FREE countries.

Why are there VISA-FREE countries for US green card holders?

The need of buying travel insurance.

  • Financial Protection : Travel insurance safeguards you against unexpected expenses that may arise during your trip. It covers a wide range of scenarios such as trip cancellation or interruption, medical emergencies, lost or delayed baggage, and even emergency evacuation. These incidents can result in significant financial burdens, and having travel insurance ensures that you are protected and reimbursed for eligible expenses.
  • Medical Emergencies : Travel insurance often includes coverage for medical emergencies, which is crucial when visiting another country. Even if you have health insurance in the US as a green card holder with access to great healthcare benefits, they may not fully cover medical expenses incurred abroad. Travel insurance can cover medical treatments, hospitalizations, medications, and emergency medical evacuation, offering peace of mind and financial protection in case of unexpected illnesses or injuries.
  • Trip Cancellation or Interruption : Life is unpredictable, and sometimes you may need to cancel or cut short your trip due to unforeseen circumstances such as illness, injury, or family emergencies. Travel insurance can reimburse you for non-refundable trip expenses, such as flight tickets, accommodation, and prepaid activities. This helps minimize financial losses and allows you to reschedule or plan another trip without significant financial setbacks.
  • Lost or Delayed Baggage : Travel insurance often covers the loss, theft, or damage of your baggage and personal belongings. If your luggage is delayed, travel insurance can provide coverage for essential items you need to purchase during the delay period. This ensures you are not left stranded without necessary clothing or toiletries while waiting for your baggage to be returned.
  • Ease of Buying : Buying travel insurance is very easy, convenient and accessible on American Visitor insurance . We offer the plans of the best US travel insurance companies and Green card holders can easily compare different plans, coverage options, and prices. You can customize your policy based on your specific needs and travel destinations and the application process is simple, with instant quotes and quick issuance of insurance documents.

Can all Green Card Holders travel abroad without a visa?

International travel using your Green Card is limited to countries that grant the same privileges to U.S. Green Card holders as they do to American citizens. Essentially, if a country's visa policy designates U.S. citizens and permanent residents (Green Card holders) as visa-exempt, you can travel there with your Green Card.

  • Countries that are mandatory for Visa
  • Best Travel medical for Green card holders
  • Covid travel insurance for Green Card holders

However, most countries will consider your nationality (i.e. your passport) when you travel, so, If a visa is usually required for your nationality to visit a specific destination, then you will need a visa even if you have a Green Card.

38 VISA-FREE countries for US Green Card holders

North america.

  • US territories

Central America

South america.

  • Bosnia and Herzegovina

Middle East

  • United Arab Emirates
  • Philippines
  • South Korea
  • Anguilla (British Territory)
  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Bermuda (British Territory)
  • Bonaire (Dutch Territory)
  • Cayman Islands (British Territory)
  • Dominican Republic
  • Sint Maarten
  • Turks and Caicos (British Territory)

Travel insurance for green card holders

Senior citizen travel insurance.

Travel medial insurance for a senior citizen green card holders.

Pre-existing conditions travel insurance

Compare best pre-existing condition coverage for green card holders.

Annual travel insurance

Annual travel insurance for individuals who take multiple trips within a year.

Factors that determine the cost of US health insurance for green card holders

Age of the green card holder.

The cost of US health insurance is directly proportional to the age of the green card holder. The older the green card holder and greater will be the cost of the US health insurance.

Types of US Green card holder travel insurance

Comprehensive travel insurance which provide exhaustive coverage are more expensive than fixed benefit travel insurance.

Medical maximum coverage and deductible options

The price of medical insurance is directly dependant on the maximum medical coverage and inversely proportional to the deductible of the plan chosen.

Region of coverage

Travel insurance for US Green card holder depends on the coverage region. The cost for health insurance for the United States is most expensive.

Duration of US visa insurance for Green card holder

The longer the duration of medical insurance required, the higher will be the cost.

Best green card insurance - FAQ's

01. how many countries can you visit with a us green card.

A US green card not only lets you reside in the US but also provides you with VISA-FREE access to many countries and territories. Currently, there are about 38 visa free countries for green card holders.

02. Which are the plans ideal for US green card holders?

Patriot America Plus and Patriot Platinum America can be used by green card holders as long as they maintain a residence outside the US. These plans offered by IMG are specifically designed for short term travel to USA. The policy covers "acute onset of pre-existing conditions" up to the maximum of the plan purchased for persons under 70 years of age.

The company recently added the benefit of copays of $25 for urgent care centers and $15 for walk-in clinics which are paid INSTEAD of the deductible each time these facilities are used. Persons under 70 years of age can get up to $1 million maximum coverage. These plans also covers COVID19 illness up to the maximum of the policy.

INF offers two fixed benefit plans namely INF premier insurance and INF standard insurance and two comprehensive benefit plans namely INF Elite Network insurance and INF Traveler USA insurance . Green Card holders can buy INF plans as long as they have a residence outside the US.

03. Can a green card holder intending to reside permanently in the US going forward buy the INF plans? Can they put down an US address?

Yes. INF insurance s provides coverage for many green card holders, especially those who are above age 65. INF insurance plans also offer ancillary benefits such as dental and telemedicine which are usually separate policies under domestic US health insurance. Following are the list of US travel insurance plans:

  • Fixed benefit or Limited coverage
  • Comprehensive Coverage
  • Coverage for Pre-existing conditions

04. Can green card holders buy Patriot America plus insurance?

Patriot America Plus and Patriot Platinum America plans are based on the primary residence country that the member lists on the application. The Green Card holders can buy Patriot America Plus insurance for coverage in the US, as long as their primary residence is outside the US. There is no set amount of time they have to purchase.

However, if they establish a permanent residence in the US, they are not eligible. So if they have a home (purchased or renting) here in the US, they can’t get our coverage. Provided they are eligible, if/when they submit a claim for treatment in the US, we will ask for their proof of residency in another country (renters agreement, bills to that address, etc) Just something showing that they live anywhere else.

05. How long can an INF plan be renewed? This is important since Green card holders are not eligible for Medicare for 5 years after they enter the US?

Green Card holders can enroll in INF plans initially for up to 1 year at a time. They can then renew their policy. There is no "term limit" for INF plans.

06. Can non citizens get Medicare?

To qualify for Medicare, you must have worked in the US for 40 quarters (10 years) or have a Green card for at least 5 years.

07. Can a green card holder already in the USA buy INF plan?

They must go through special membership approval for INF Elite / Premier / Standard / Traveler USA for Greencard holders.Green Card holders can buy INF plans as long as they have a residence outside the US.

08. Can a new immigrant in the US buy INF plans?

Yes, they can buy INF travel insurance.

09. Can a green card holders buy INF insurance?

Yes, they can buy INF travel insurance as long as they have a residence outside the US.

10. Can a green card holder get medical insurance?

Yes, Green card holders can get the medical insurance that we offer if they have a permanent address outside the US. Green card holders can get medical insurance quotes and buy the insurance on our website. The short term medical insurance will cover unanticipated medical conditions, but will not cover preventive care and regular treatment for pre-existing conditions. Getting a medical insurance quote is easy by providing the age of the Green card holder and the dates that they need the insurance coverage. We display the different medical insurance for Green card holders and you can compare the different plans based on price as well as the coverage benefits. After choosing the best Green card holder insurance for your needs, you can complete the application online and buy it using a credit card. The policy will be emailed immediately after completing the transaction.

11. Do Green card holders need health insurance?

The Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) had made it mandatory for all US residents to have health insurance, however the compulsory insurance requirement has been waived and it is now no longer mandatory to have health insurance. However, given the very high cost of US healthcare, where a regular Doctor’s consultation can take hundreds of Dollars, and Hospitalization overnight can involve thousands, or even tens of thousands of Dollars, it is very risky to be living in the US without any health insurance. Green card holders can buy the health insurance on American Visitor Insurance if they do not have group health insurance from any employer, or if they are not yet eligible for US Medicare or for other domestic health insurance. The medical insurance for Green card holders that we offer will however not cover preventive care and has limited coverage for pre-existing medical conditions.

12. Why American visitor insurance?

American Visitor Insurance works with reputed US travel insurance providers to give green card holders in USA a wide range of health insurance options. We have nearly two decades experience in understanding the diverse requirements of new immigrants and green card holders in US and in offering appropriate medical insurance options to them.

Our licensed dedicated customer support team provide service at all times helping customers find the most appropriate green card health insurance for their needs as well as guide them when using the insurance in the event of a medical or travel emergency.

We also provide answers to all health insurance for green card holders questions, reviews of different products, testimonials for customers as well as provide an user friendly US health insurance comparison tool where green card holders can compare different products based on price as well as the coverage benefits. All of these tools help green card holders make an informed decision while buying US health insurance.

13. Do US green card holders need visa for Europe?

US green card holders may or may not need a visa to travel to Europe, depending on their nationality. Schengen visa requirements depend on the nationality of the traveler and not on his residence, so the US Green card has no bearing on the Schengen visa requirements. However, if one needs the Schengen visa, one of the requirements of the Schengen visa application is travel insurance. Green Card holders can buy Schengen visa insurance on American Visitor Insurance as mandated by Schengen consulates. However, even if one is not required to apply for a Schengen visa, it is still prudent to buy good international travel insurance given the high cost of healthcare when traveling in Europe.

14. Can All Green Card Holders Travel Abroad Without a Visa?

No, not all green card holders can travel abroad without a visa, while green card holders have the right to live and work in the United States permanently, they still need to follow the visa requirements of their destination country. Some countries allow visa-free entry to US green card holders based on bilateral agreements or other factors, but other countries may require a visa or travel authorization before entry. It's important to check the visa requirements of the country you're traveling to before you plan your trip. Irrespective of whether one needs to apply for a visa or not, it is important to buy good international travel insurance to be safe and have a good trip when traveling outside the US.

15. Where Can Green Card Holders Travel Without a Visa?

There are many countries which offer visa-free travel for US green card holders. These include Canada, Mexico, the Bahamas, Bermuda and many other countries listed here. However, it's important to note that visa-free access is not an absolute right, and countries may change their visa policies at any time based on their national interests and security concerns.

16. Can Everyone Travel to Mexico with a Green Card?

US Green card holder will need a valid passport and green card and may need to obtain a Mexican visa depending on their purpose and length of stay. It's important to check the Mexican government's website or consult with an immigration attorney before planning a trip. Irrespective of whether one needs to apply for a Mexican visa or not, it is important to buy the best US travel insurance to be safe and have a good trip when traveling to Mexico.

17. How many days can a green card holder stay outside US?

Green card holders can stay outside of the USA for up to 6 months without losing their permanent resident status. If however, they plan to stay longer, they should obtain a reentry permit. However, other factors may impact their ability to reenter the US after an extended absence.

Popular travel insurance providers

You can find reliable US insurance providers like International Medical Group(IMG), Seven Corners, WorldTrips, Global Underwriters, Travel Insure and INF insurance.

US visitors insurance providers

Ask me a question, more international travel insurance categories.

Visitors insurance USA

USA New immigrant Insurance

US visa health insurance

Senior Citizen travel insurance

Pre-existing visitors insurance

J1 Visa health insurance

International student Insurance

Green Card medical insurance

International Medical Insurance

Cruises Travel Insurance

  •  Call: (877)-340-7910
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Visa Guide World

Visa free countries that us green card holders can visit.

Visa-Free countries for US Green Card Holders

Being a US green card holder opens up a world of travel opportunities without the hassle of obtaining visas. It’s like having a key to a treasure chest full of exciting destinations waiting to be explored. Just imagine the freedom and convenience of packing your bags and embarking on an international adventure without the bureaucratic red tape of visa applications.

With your green card in hand, you become part of a special group of travelers who are welcomed with open arms in many countries. It’s a testament to the recognition and value of your permanent residency status in the United States. Whether you’re a nature enthusiast, a history buff, or a food lover, there are countless places where you can quench your thirst for new experiences.

So where can I travel with my green card?

Let’s take a look at some of the countries where you can travel with your green card hassle-free.

Canada

Canada, our friendly neighbor to the north, warmly welcomes US green card holders to experience its wonders visa-free. From the picturesque Rocky Mountains to the charming coastal towns, Canada boasts an incredible range of natural beauty. Lace up your hiking boots and embark on breathtaking trails, witness the majestic Niagara Falls up close, or cruise through the pristine waters of the Canadian Rockies. And let’s not forget about the vibrant cities like Toronto, Vancouver, and Montreal, where you can immerse yourself in multicultural neighborhoods, indulge in diverse culinary delights, and soak up the lively arts and entertainment scenes.

Canada offers a perfect blend of outdoor adventures, urban sophistication, and warm hospitality, making it an ideal destination for green card holders seeking unforgettable experiences.

Mexico city

For a taste of vibrant culture, rich history, and stunning beaches, Mexico is an excellent choice for US green card holders. With visa-free access, you can explore this colorful country to your heart’s content. From the ancient ruins of Teotihuacan and Chichen Itza to the bustling markets of Mexico City and the vibrant nightlife of Cancun, Mexico offers an enticing blend of past and present. Indulge in mouthwatering street tacos, sip on refreshing margaritas, and dance to the lively rhythms of mariachi music. Whether you’re seeking relaxation on the white sandy beaches of the Riviera Maya or diving into the vibrant underwater world of Cozumel, Mexico will captivate your senses at every turn.

With its warm climate, friendly locals, and rich cultural heritage, Mexico invites US green card holders to create unforgettable memories in this enchanting land.

United Kingdom

London UK

The United Kingdom, with its timeless charm and captivating heritage, eagerly invites US green card holders to discover its treasures visa-free. From the bustling streets of London to the mystical landscapes of the Scottish Highlands, the UK offers a tapestry of experiences. Immerse yourself in the grandeur of Buckingham Palace, witness the changing of the guards at Windsor Castle, or stroll through the historic streets of Edinburgh. Uncover the secrets of Stonehenge, marvel at the stunning architecture of Bath, or embark on a scenic drive along the rugged coastlines of Wales.

With its rich history, literary traditions, and vibrant cultural scene, the United Kingdom promises an unforgettable journey through time. Whether you’re sipping afternoon tea, exploring ancient castles, or enjoying a pint in a cozy pub, the UK offers a captivating blend of tradition, modernity, and natural beauty that will leave you enchanted.

Ireland

Ireland, the land of legends and natural beauty, extends a warm welcome to US green card holders, allowing visa-free entry to explore its magical landscapes. Immerse yourself in the rolling green hills, ancient castles, and rugged coastline that have made Ireland an iconic destination. Traverse the breathtaking Cliffs of Moher, sip on a pint of Guinness in a cozy pub while tapping your foot to traditional Irish music, or embark on a journey along the stunning Ring of Kerry. Ireland’s charm lies not only in its stunning scenery but also in the friendly and welcoming nature of its people. Experience the vibrant atmosphere of Dublin, explore the historical sites of Galway, or delve into the mystical legends of the Giant’s Causeway.

Caribbean Islands

Escape to paradise in the Caribbean Islands, where US green card holders are granted visa-free access to a slice of heaven. From the sun-kissed shores of the Bahamas to the rhythmic beats of reggae in Jamaica, the Caribbean offers a blissful escape from the everyday. Picture yourself lounging on white sandy beaches, diving into vibrant coral reefs teeming with marine life, or sipping on a refreshing rum punch while swaying to the laid-back rhythms of calypso music. Whether you choose to explore the historic sites of Barbados, indulge in the vibrant culture of Trinidad and Tobago, or simply relax in the idyllic surroundings of the Dominican Republic, the Caribbean islands promise an enchanting retreat filled with warmth, beauty, and unforgettable experiences.

Costa Rica

This Central American gem is a haven for nature lovers, boasting an incredible array of wildlife and breathtaking landscapes. Immerse yourself in lush rainforests teeming with exotic flora and fauna, hike through misty cloud forests, and witness the power of majestic volcanoes. Costa Rica offers exhilarating activities for the adventurous souls, from zip-lining through the treetops to catching the perfect wave while surfing along the Pacific coast. Discover hidden waterfalls, relax in natural hot springs, and immerse yourself in the vibrant culture of the Ticos.

Singapore

Indulge in the dynamic energy of Singapore, where US green card holders are granted visa-free entry for up to 30 days. This bustling city-state in Southeast Asia seamlessly blends the best of the modern world with rich cultural heritage. Marvel at the iconic skyline adorned with futuristic skyscrapers, immerse yourself in the bustling street markets of Chinatown, and sample an array of delectable cuisines in the hawker centers that offer a culinary journey like no other. Explore the beautiful Gardens by the Bay, visit the renowned Sentosa Island for a dose of entertainment, or delve into the city’s vibrant arts scene at the National Gallery or Esplanade – Theatres on the Bay.

South Korea

South Korea

US green card holders can explore this captivating country visa-free for up to 90 days. From the bustling streets of Seoul to the serene beauty of Jeju Island, South Korea offers a harmonious blend of ancient traditions and modern marvels. Dive into the rich history of Gyeongbokgung Palace, stroll through vibrant markets like Namdaemun or Myeongdong, and indulge in mouth-watering street food delights like bibimbap and kimchi. Immerse yourself in the captivating energy of K-pop and experience the lively atmosphere of the bustling shopping districts like Gangnam or Hongdae. For nature enthusiasts, the stunning landscapes of the Korean countryside, with its picturesque mountains and peaceful temples, provide a tranquil escape.

Japan temple

US green card holders can travel to Japan for up to 90 days without a visa. Step into a world where ancient traditions seamlessly blend with cutting-edge technology, where serene temples coexist with bustling metropolises. Marvel at the iconic cherry blossoms in spring, visit historic landmarks like Kyoto’s golden Kinkaku-ji Temple, and immerse yourself in the vibrant energy of Tokyo’s bustling streets. Indulge in exquisite sushi, soak in traditional hot springs, and witness the artistry of ancient tea ceremonies. From the tranquil beauty of Mount Fuji to the captivating streets of Osaka, Japan offers a rich tapestry of experiences that will leave you enchanted.

Australia and New Zealand

Australia

While not strictly visa-free, both Australia and New Zealand extend their warm welcome to US green card holders through convenient visa-waiver programs. These programs streamline the entry process, making it easier for you to embark on unforgettable journeys to these stunning destinations. Whether you choose to roam the vast outback of Australia, dive into the vibrant underwater world of the Great Barrier Reef, or explore the enchanting landscapes of New Zealand’s South Island, these countries promise awe-inspiring adventures.

Can US green card holders work in these visa-free countries?

Visa-free entry generally allows US green card holders to visit these countries for tourism or business purposes. However, working or engaging in employment activities usually requires a work visa or permit. It is essential to consult the immigration authorities or embassy of the country you plan to visit for accurate information on work-related activities.

Do US green card holders need any additional documents to travel to these visa-free countries?

While a visa may not be required, US green card holders should ensure that their green card is valid and up to date before traveling. Additionally, it is advisable to carry a valid passport and any other supporting documents, such as proof of sufficient funds, return tickets, and travel insurance, as immigration authorities may require them for entry.

Are there any restrictions or specific entry requirements for US green card holders in these visa-free countries?

Each country has its own entry requirements and regulations. Some countries may impose restrictions or additional entry requirements, such as proof of vaccination, health insurance, or a return ticket. It is crucial to research and familiarize yourself with the specific entry requirements of the country you plan to visit before traveling.

Can US green card holders apply for citizenship or permanent residency in these visa-free countries?

Visa-free entry does not automatically grant the right to apply for citizenship or permanent residency in these countries. The rules for acquiring citizenship or permanent residency vary from country to country and generally involve specific eligibility criteria, including residency requirements. If you are interested in obtaining citizenship or permanent residency, it is recommended to consult the immigration authorities of the respective country for detailed information on their specific processes and requirements.

It’s important to note that visa-free travel allowances can change over time, so it’s always a good idea to verify the current requirements and restrictions with the embassies or consulates of the countries you plan to visit. Additionally, some countries may require you to obtain an electronic travel authorization (ETA) or pay a fee upon arrival.

Remember to carry your valid green card, passport, and any other necessary documents during your travels. Enjoy the freedom and opportunities that come with being a US green card holder as you explore the diverse destinations that await you around the world.

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Fast Track Immigration

VISA-FREE countries for US Green Card holders

Living in the United States as a green card holder opens up a realm of opportunities not only within the nation’s borders but beyond. Being a permanent resident in the U.S. paves the way for a more accessible world, as several countries offer visa-free or visa-on-arrival entry to U.S. green card holders. This article explores an array of destinations where U.S. green card holders can travel without the need for a visa, making spontaneous exploration a tangible reality.

The Perks of Holding a U.S. Green Card

The U.S. green card is more than just a permit to reside and work in the United States; it’s a ticket to a more accessible world. With it, certain travel restrictions are eased, thanks to the bilateral or multilateral agreements the U.S. shares with other nations.

Visa-Free Accessible Countries

Canada and mexico:.

Being neighbors, Canada and Mexico offer easy entry to U.S. green card holders for short visits, usually without requiring a visa.

Caribbean Nations:

Many Caribbean nations welcome U.S. green card holders with open arms, often without the necessity of a visa for short stays.

Central and South American Countries:

Countries in Central and South America, such as Costa Rica and Peru, also extend a warm welcome to U.S. green card holders under specific conditions.

Visa-on-Arrival Destinations

Some nations offer the privilege of obtaining a visa upon arrival, facilitating spontaneous travel plans while minimizing pre-trip paperwork.

Asian Countries:

Certain Asian countries like Cambodia and Maldives provide visa-on-arrival facilities, making them attractive destinations for U.S. green card holders.

African Nations:

Some African countries, including Kenya and Tanzania, also offer visa-on-arrival services, broadening the horizon for adventure and exploration.

Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA) and e-Visa Countries

In some cases, while a traditional visa might not be required, an Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA) or an e-Visa may be necessary. Countries like Australia and Sri Lanka have such systems in place to expedite the entry process while maintaining security protocols.

Preparing for the Journey: Documentation and Other Requirements

Apart from the green card, travelers must carry their valid passport from their country of origin. It’s also prudent to check the latest travel advisories and health guidelines, especially in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The world is vast, and for U.S. green card holders, many borders are open to be crossed without the bureaucratic hurdle of obtaining a visa. This privilege not only enriches the personal experiences of the individuals but also fosters a spirit of global community and understanding. So, with a U.S. green card in your pocket, the world is indeed your oyster, ready to be explored and appreciated.

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Compare U.S. green card paths

Traveling internationally as a green card holder here’s what you need to know.

By Annie Blay

Leaving and reentering the U.S. as a green card holder is relatively straightforward for short trips. If you plan to leave the U.S. for an extended time, there are a few things to consider.

green card travel to other countries

Traveling internationally as a green card holder

The ability to travel internationally with ease is one of the benefits of having a green card. However, if you stay outside the U.S. for too long (more than a year), U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) will consider your permanent residence status ”abandoned.”

You can generally stay outside the U.S. for up to six months yearly without problems.

If you stay outside the U.S. between six months and a year, you will most likely be subject to questioning from CBP at the U.S. port of entry. However, you should still be able to reenter.

Reentering the U.S. becomes challenging if you stay outside the country for more than a year. You can reenter with a Re-entry Permit (more on below), but you can only apply for a Re-entry Permit from within the U.S.

Another option for reentering the U.S. if you have been gone for more than a year is to apply for a returning resident visa at a U.S. embassy or consulate.

Also consider: staying outside the U.S. for more than a year as a green card holder can slow down the process of becoming a U.S. citizen. You can become a naturalized citizen after 3-5 years as a permanent resident.

However, if you are outside the U.S. for over a year, the 3-5 year timeline will restart. Under certain circumstances, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services ( USCIS ) may approve a request to preserve residence for naturalization purposes .

Best practices for international travel for U.S. permanent residents

green card travel to other countries

1. If possible, spend at least half of the year in the U.S.

Being physically present in the U.S. for at least six months per year is the best practice for green card holders.

2. Know the risks of long-term travel

Perhaps you need to care for family members in a foreign country, or you want to travel extensively for pleasure.

Regardless of your reasons for travel, there are risks you should understand when considering a lengthier trip.

The best practice is to limit your international travel to under six months, but you can travel for up to a year without needing a re-entry permit.

If you stay outside the U.S. for over a year and do not have a re-entry permit, CPB may consider your green card “abandoned”. In other words, your

Whether you have a re-entry permit or not, staying outside the U.S. for more than a year will also restart the clock for becoming a naturalized citizen.

3. If necessary, apply for a re-entry permit before you leave the U.S.

You cannot apply for a re-entry permit from outside the U.S.

If you know you will be traveling outside the U.S. for more than a year, apply for a re-entry permit before you leave.

To get a re-entry permit, you must file Form I-131, Application for Travel Document .

Upon approval, your re-entry permit will be valid for up to two years.

4. Pack the documents you need for re-entry

Before you leave the U.S., ensure you have all the documents you’ll need to reenter, including a valid passport, green card, and a re-entry permit (if necessary). If you came to the U.S. as a refugee, you will also need to bring your refugee travel document .

5. If you are unsure about your case, check with an immigration lawyer

If you have any doubts about your unique situation, consider speaking to a trusted immigration law firm for legal advice.

Traveling internationally with a pending green card application

green card travel to other countries

If you don’t have an approved green card yet, you may still be able to travel internationally while your application is pending.

How to travel internationally on a dual intent visa with a pending green card

If you are in the U.S. on a valid dual intent nonimmigrant visa (such as H-1B or L-1), you can travel internationally throughout the green card application process.

How to travel internationally with a pending green card if you don’t have a dual intent visa

If you are in the U.S. on a single intent nonimmigrant visa (such as TN or E-3) or have a pending asylum case, you cannot travel internationally while your green card is processed unless you get an Advance Parole travel document .

To request Advance Parole, file Form I-131 when you file your green card application or after the application has been submitted.

It will likely take several months for your Advance Parole application to be approved. If you need it approved more quickly for emergency reasons, you can submit an expedite request.

Upon approval of your Advance Parole, you can leave the U.S. and reenter with the approved travel document.

Frequently asked questions about travel on a green card

Do lawful permanent resident and green card holder have the same meaning?

Yes. Lawful permanent resident (LPR) and green card holder both refer to foreign nationals who hold green cards (also called permanent resident cards).

What is the difference between Form I-485 and Form I-140 ?

Form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status, is the green card application.

Form I-140, Immigrant Petition for Alien Worker, is a petition that qualifies a foreign national for a green card based on their employment.

Read more about the difference between Form I-1485 and Form I-140 .

Do I need a travel document if I have a green card?

No. If you have an approved green card, you do not need a travel document (Advanced Parole) to leave and reenter the U.S.

Can I travel inside the U.S. with a green card?

Yes, you can travel from state to state with a green card.

How does the U.S. government determine whether you have abandoned your permanent resident status?

There are a few factors the U.S. government considers when determining green card abandonment:

  • How long you spent outside the U.S.
  • Your purpose for traveling outside the U.S.
  • Whether you intend to return to the U.S. as an LPR
  • Whether you have continued ties to the U.S. as your permanent home

What happens if you abandon your green card?

If the U.S. government determines that you have abandoned your green card, your green card will no longer be valid. To become a permanent resident again, you must restart the green card application process.

How do I achieve lawful permanent resident status through employment?

Permanent residency eligibility can be based on family, employment, or humanitarian reasons.

To become a permanent resident via employment, you’ll first need to file an immigrant visa application, such as an EB-1A or EB-2 PERM . Your immigrant visa application will include legal forms, a copy of your passport and any prior U.S. visa stamps, and other supporting documents.

Depending on your country of birth, you may be able to file your green card application right away, or you may need to wait until you become “ current .”

After filing your green card application, USCIS will ask you to submit a medical exam and attend a biometrics appointment at a nearby USCIS office.

Customized support on your immigration journey

An experienced immigration attorney can simplify the complexities of immigration law and the green card process. Reach out to our team for customized support on your immigration journey.  

About the author:

green card travel to other countries

Content Marketing Specialist

Before joining the marketing team, Annie helped over 60 Legalpad clients navigate U.S. immigration on the client services team.

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Can Green Card Holders Travel Outside the U.S.?

  • By Immigration Direct
  • June 2, 2022
  • Immigration Articles

Table of Contents

As a green card holder, leaving the U.S. to travel abroad is a huge perk of being a permanent resident. However, unforeseen circumstances could arise, leaving you to travel outside the U.S. for extended periods of time or even leave you stuck outside the U.S., unable to return back for countless reasons.

This begs the question of how long can a green card holder stay outside the U.S. Unfortunately, there isn’t a simple answer to this question. Luckily, this article will focus on everything a green card holder needs to know, before traveling outside of the U.S.

Determining Your Eligibility

The good news is that if you are a permanent resident by way of a green card, you are allowed to travel outside of the U.S. at any given time. Ultimately, a green card is just another document to help prove a legal residence in the U.S. and will also allow you to leave and re-enter the country easily, similar to any other U.S. resident.

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There are a few travel documents required for green card holders to fill out before a trip, which will be explained more in the sections below.

Steps to Be Followed Before Traveling

If you are traveling outside the U.S. briefly, your permanent resident status will not be affected. As a permanent resident, travel restrictions aren’t as strict. However, it’s important to note that as a green card holder, you can leave the country as many times as you wish, but are not allowed to stay abroad for more than a year.

If you do intend to stay outside the U.S. for longer periods of time, it’s mandatory for you to apply for a re-entry permit prior to your trip. To get reentry permit to the U.S., file I-131 Form, Application for Travel Document . In some cases, upon re-entry following many months abroad, it can be determined that you have abandoned your permanent residence or did not intend on making the U.S. your permanent home, leaving customs to revoke your green card.

How Long Can a Green Card Holder Stay Outside the U.S.?

A green card enables you to work legally in the country, live in the country as a permanent resident, and travel outside of the country, similar to any other U.S. citizen. However, if a green card holder stays outside of the country for any amount of time longer than one year, they will lose their green card.

This is likely the case in almost all scenarios. But as extenuating circumstances arise, new questions are brought to light. For example, can green card holders travel back to the U.S. during COVID if they have been abroad for over a year?

Unfortunately, there are no new rules outlined for situations such as this, and at the current time, there is no clause that will automatically allow re-entry if you are stuck abroad due to covid. However, the requirements for re-entering the U.S. after an extended time abroad are sometimes flexible.

Staying Outside of the U.S. for Too Long

When it comes to green card travel, it’s allowed, but regulations are apparent. Below, we will go over the requirements and documents needed to travel without any re-entry setbacks.

Requirements for Re-Entry

Upon re-entry into the country after time abroad, it is solely up to the customs officers if you are allowed back in or not. When re-entering the country, you will present all green card holder travel documents for a customs inspection.

Likely, you will be asked questions about your travels, and your life in the U.S. Ultimately, your ties to the U.S. will be tested. If you are someone who holds a job in the country, owns land and property, or has local bank accounts, you are viewed as someone who has strong ties, which will make your re-entry back into the country easy.

Note: If you hold an expired old reentry permit you need to apply for the new one. The reentry permit cannot be extended. If your reentry permit was lost, destroyed or stolen, intimate this information on your application while applying for new permit.

If the customs officer doesn’t believe that you are living in the country or that you don’t have strong enough ties, they may:

  • Take your green card away. If this is the case, you will need to appear in an immigration court. From there, you must present your evidence and all ties you have to the U.S., in order to prove that you did not abandon your permanent residence while spending extended time aboard.
  • Ask you to forfeit your green card. In this situation, the customs officer will urge you to give up your green card, and return back to your home country.
  • Give you a serious warning for future travel, but allow re-entry. In some cases, the customs officer will allow your re-entry but make sure to emphasize the importance of remaining in the U.S. more frequently and limiting future travel.

180-Day Portability Rule

As stated above, there are certain documents that are required for green card holders to show to customs upon re-entry. But, you may be asking, what is considered a travel document for a green card holder?

Simply put, the documents that are typically required for green card holders to present while coming back into the U.S. include:

  • A re-entry permit
  • Your passport
  • A green card

Additionally, proving that you have strong ties to the U.S. will include showing bank account information, property ownership, and proof of a legal job. If in the case there is a recent career change, the 180-day portability rule will apply.

This rule states that if an individual has already submitted an application to adjust their residency status under one job, they are able to change careers within the same field, and not have to worry about losing their green card. Additionally, showing all necessary documentation that the 180-day portability rule mandates will ensure smooth re-entry into the U.S.

Do You Have to Return to the U.S. Every Six Months of Travel?

The short answer to this question is no. However, if you are traveling outside of the U.S. for extended periods of time, you must obtain the proper documentation for re-entry.

Only traveling outside the country for periods of time under six months will help your permanent residence status and reduce questioning at customs when re-entering. Additionally, it’s important to know your exact dates of travel.

If you’re wondering how to get travel history as a green card holder, you can access all the information needed online. All you need to provide will be:

  • Your full name
  • Your passport number
  • Your birth date
  • Your original country of citizenship

The Procedure to Return to the U.S. After Traveling Abroad

Even though, as a legal green card holder, you have the right to travel abroad freely, it does not mean that re-entry is automatically granted. Prior to traveling outside of the U.S. on a green card, there are the necessary travel documents to fill out in order to re-enter the U.S.

Valid Entry Documents

Here are the necessary documents for a green card holder to travel outside the U.S. and re-enter with ease.

  • Your passport from your native country: Even though you are a permanent resident of the U.S., you will need to hand in your original passport to customs in order to re-enter.
  • Your valid green card: You will be expected to show your valid, and unexpired green card to customs upon re-entry. In the case where you haven’t received your physical green card yet, you are allowed to present an I-551 stamp in your passport to customs in its place.
  • A re-entry permit : This permit is only required for extended trips abroad. Generally, you will need to apply and prepare this pre-travel for all trips that are longer than a year.

Applying for a Re-entry Permit

Listed above are required documents to obtain if planning to travel outside the U.S. for extended periods of time. Even if you aren’t outside of the U.S. for as long as a year, you can still be denied entry if you don’t apply for a re-entry permit.

The question of how many months a green card holder can stay abroad varies, but in general, travel greater than a year and one day is grounds to have permanent residency taken away.

What to Do if Your Green Card Expires While Traveling

Holding an expired green card while traveling outside of the country will cause issues, and sometimes, even delay re-entry while arriving at customs. Additionally, re-entering with an expired green card might lead to significant fines and various immigration problems.

In order to re-enter the U.S. with an expired green card, there are a few ways to acquire proof of permanent residence without your physical green card:

  • Completing and filing Form I-90 : This form is known commonly as a simple application to replace a permanent resident card, and costs around $540. This is made payable to the USCIS and will be approved or denied depending on the case within two to four weeks.
  • A receipt of acceptance from your I-90 form: If your form gets approved, you will receive a receipt in the mail. From here, you will need to schedule an appointment with the USCIS at your earliest convenience.
  • Attending an appointment with USCIS: You will need to appear at your local USCIS office. Be sure to bring with your most recent green card, any required forms, and the evidence of urgent need. Some approved urgent need documents include airline tickets, doctors’ letters, or death certificates.

Frequently Asked Questions

1. Can I Travel While Waiting for My Green Card Renewal?

Simply put, yes, you can travel while waiting for your green card renewal. The USCIS can give you temporary proof of status, which is a sticker placed in your passport that will extend your green card’s validity for as long as a year. This sticker will ensure swift entry back into the U.S.

2. What Happens if a Green Card Holder Stays Out of the Country for More Than One Year?

Living abroad, or traveling outside of the U.S. for more than a year, may result in the loss of your green card. Of course, each case will be different, but the longer you are outside of the U.S., the harder it will be to re-enter.

Currently, with the pandemic onsetting many travel issues for those abroad, re-entry to the U.S. due to COVID has been weighing on people’s minds. Even though there hasn’t been any new announcements regarding extended travel outside the U.S. on a green card due to COVID, an SB-1 Returning Resident Visa can sometimes be applied for to make re-entry a bit smoother.

When it comes to common questions like, “Can I travel while waiting for my green card renewal?” or, “What is traveling with a green card like?” speaking with a skilled immigration lawyer can be of great help.

With temporary green card travel restrictions and the global pandemic making things difficult for those traveling abroad, there are always updates and new regulations to abide by. Luckily, our team can provide you with the support you need and any paperwork that is required. Contact us today for more information.

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Green Card Holder Travel Abroad: Restrictions and Rules for Extended Periods Explained

Green card holders can travel abroad for extended periods, but there are certain restrictions. learn the rules regarding green card travel and the conditions of traveling abroad as a green card holder., key takeaways:.

  • Green Card holders must be aware of travel regulations to avoid jeopardizing their permanent resident status.
  • Conditional Green Card holders can travel abroad, but must adhere to specific guidelines and avoid extended absences.
  • Maintaining strong ties to the US, filing taxes, and having documentation are essential for safeguarding US residency while traveling.

Understanding Green Card Travel Restrictions : What Every Holder Should Know

Being a Green Card holder comes with certain responsibilities, especially if you plan to travel abroad. Whether you are a new recipient of a Green Card via marriage to a US citizen or you’ve been enjoying the benefits for some time, understanding the rules involving travel outside the United States is crucial. In this article, we will explore green card holder travel abroad rules, highlighting what you need to know about traveling for extended periods.

Green Card Holder Travel Abroad: Restrictions and Rules for Extended Periods Explained

Green Card Holder’s Guide to Abroad Travel

If you’re a Green Card holder through marriage to a US citizen, it’s crucial to stay informed about the travel regulations to avoid jeopardizing your permanent resident status. The Green Card serves as your permit to live and work permanently in the US, but it does come with certain travel conditions.

Travel Abroad with a Conditional Green Card

Initially, your Green Card through marriage might be conditional, meaning it is valid only for two years. During this time, you can travel abroad, but you must adhere to specific guidelines. Fail to follow the rules, and you could find yourself with issues renewing or transitioning your status later on.

Can Green Card Holders Travel Outside the US for Extended Periods?

So, what happens if you want to leave the country for 2-3 months each year? Is that considered an extended period? Can green card holders travel outside the US for extended periods without repercussions?

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As a rule of thumb, Green Card holders should not be absent from the United States for more than six months. However, trips that are shorter than six months can still raise questions upon your return, especially if they are frequent. Traveling abroad for 2-3 months every year is likely to be fine, but you must be aware of the signals it sends to immigration officers. Your pattern of travel should not suggest that you’ve abandoned your residency in the United States.

Keeping Your US Resident Status Safe While Traveling

The US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) monitors the travel activities of Green Card holders. While traveling abroad for a couple of months per year can be acceptable, it’s critical to take actions that clearly indicate the US is your primary residence. Here’s how you can safeguard your status:

  • Maintain Ties to the US : Keep your job, property, and family connections, demonstrating strong ties to the US.
  • File Taxes : You must continue to file US taxes as a resident.
  • Keep Documentation : Have documentation to support your temporary travel purpose if asked upon re-entry to the US.

Applying for Re-Entry Permits

In circumstances where you need to be outside the United States for more than six months, consider applying for a Re-entry Permit using Form I-131. This is a preventive measure that could provide peace of mind if travel is necessary for an extended time.

Adjusting Your Conditional Status: The I-751 Petition

Two years after receiving your conditional Green Card, you’ll need to apply for the I-751, Petition to Remove Conditions. This step is a vital part of maintaining your status. Making sure to file within the 90 days before your card expires is crucial to avoid status issues.

What Happens if You Fail to Meet Travel Restrictions?

The gravest outcome of extensive travel without the necessary precautions could be losing your Green Card. If the government believes you have abandoned your residency, you might face the revocation of your status. Ensuring your travel patterns are punctuated by significant periods of living and engaging with the US community can help counteract this perception.

Planning for Full Citizenship

Looking forward, you may decide to apply for full US citizenship. The naturalization process typically requires continuous residence in the US for at least 5 years before the date of your application. Absences of more than six months can disrupt the continuity required, pushing back your eligibility date.

Final Thoughts: Secure Your Residency While Exploring the World

In conclusion, traveling for 2-3 months a year as a Green Card holder is generally acceptable. However, the balance between maintaining residency and the liberty to travel requires careful management. Always ensure the US remains your home base, keep records, and stay informed about your immigration obligations.

It is advisable to consult with an immigration attorney or check the USCIS website for updates on policies related to Green Card holders and international travel. Planning ahead and understanding the nuances of green card travel restrictions are the keys to enjoying the privileges of permanent residency without unintended consequences.

Still Got Questions? Read Below to Know More

“is there a limit on how many times i can enter and leave the u.s. with my green card each year.

As a green card holder, also known as a lawful permanent resident, you are generally not restricted by a specific number of times you can enter and leave the U.S. within a year. However, it’s important to understand that there are rules regarding the length of time you can spend outside the United States. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) provides some guidance on this:

“A permanent resident or conditional resident who has remained outside the United States for longer than one year, or beyond the validity period of a Re-entry Permit, will require a new immigrant visa to enter the United States and resume permanent residence.”

To maintain your status as a permanent resident, you should ensure that you: 1. Do not stay outside the U.S. for more than one year without obtaining a re-entry permit. 2. Maintain ties to the U.S. such as a home, job, or family which demonstrate that you have not abandoned your resident status. 3. File income taxes as a resident.

To keep your green card valid, a re-entry permit is needed if you plan to stay outside the U.S. for more than one year but less than two. This can be applied for before you leave the country. For extended absences or multiple long trips, immigration authorities may determine you’ve abandoned your permanent resident status. It’s always good to consult the official USCIS website or speak to an immigration attorney if you plan on making frequent or extended trips outside the U.S.

For more information on traveling as a green card holder, visit the USCIS website on International Travel as a Permanent Resident: USCIS – International Travel as a Permanent Resident .

“What if my job requires me to travel abroad a lot, does it affect my Green Card status?

Certainly, if your job requires you to travel abroad frequently, it is important that you understand how this can affect your Green Card status. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) considers a Green Card holder, or Lawful Permanent Resident (LPR), to maintain their status as long as they do not abandon their U.S. residence. However, certain patterns of travel could be interpreted as evidence of abandonment. Here are some key points to consider:

  • Length of Absence: Being outside of the U.S. for an extended period, typically more than 6 months, can lead to the presumption that you’ve abandoned your residency. If you have a job that requires you to be out of the country for significant time, this could raise questions upon re-entry to the U.S.
  • Maintaining Ties: You should maintain strong ties to the U.S. during your travels. This includes maintaining a U.S. home, paying taxes, having a U.S. bank account, and family ties among others. If the government believes you do not maintain sufficient ties, they might determine you’ve abandoned your Green Card status.
  • Re-Entry Permits: If you must be out of the U.S. for extended periods, look into getting a Re-Entry Permit before you leave. This document allows a Green Card holder to stay out of the country for up to two years without losing LPR status.

Here’s a statement from the USCIS itself: “A Permanent Resident Card (Green Card) is issued to all permanent residents as evidence of alien registration and their permanent status in the United States. If you remain outside of the United States for more than 1 year, or beyond the validity period of a Re-Entry Permit, you may be considered to have abandoned your permanent resident status.”

For more detailed guidance, please refer to the official USCIS website on International Travel as a Permanent Resident: USCIS – International Travel as a Permanent Resident . If you frequently travel abroad for work, it may be beneficial to consult an immigration attorney to ensure your status remains secure.

“Do I need a special visa to visit Canada or Mexico if I have a U.S. Green Card?

If you are a U.S. Green Card holder, which means you are a lawful permanent resident of the United States, you do not need a visitor visa to travel to Canada. You must carry proof of your status, such as your Green Card (officially known as a Permanent Resident Card). However, it’s important to note that when flying to or transiting through a Canadian airport, you will need an Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA). You can apply for an eTA online, and it is a simpler and quicker process than getting a visa.

For traveling to Mexico, as a U.S. Green Card holder, you generally do not need a special visa for a short visit (up to 180 days for tourism purposes). You will need to present your Green Card and a valid passport at the point of entry. According to the National Immigration Institute (INM) of Mexico, foreign visitors, including U.S. Green Card holders, will get a tourist card upon entry that must be kept safe as it should be returned when leaving the country.

Remember to carry your Green Card with you at all times when traveling, as you will need it to re-enter the United States. Always check the latest entry requirements for Canada and Mexico before your trip, as immigration policies can change. For Canada’s official guidance visit the Government of Canada’s immigration and citizenship page , and for Mexico’s immigration policies, you can check with a Mexican consulate or the INM website .

“I have a Green Card, but my family lives overseas. How often can I visit them without issues?

As a Green Card holder, commonly known as a lawful permanent resident (LPR) of the United States, you have the freedom to travel outside the U.S. and visit your family overseas. However, it’s important to understand the following guidelines to avoid issues with maintaining your permanent resident status:

  • Duration of Trips : You can travel and visit your family as often as you like, but you should not stay outside of the U.S. for more than six months (180 days) at a time. Trips longer than this can lead to questioning at the port of entry upon your return by a Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officer about whether you intended to abandon your U.S. residency.
  • Maintenance of Residence : You must maintain your residence in the U.S. This means you should keep ties such as a home, job, or family (like a spouse or children) in the States.
  • Extended Absences : If you know you will need to be out of the country for more than six months, it’s advisable to apply for a Reentry Permit using Form I-131 before you leave. This document serves as evidence that you did not intend to abandon your status and allows you to return to the U.S. after being away for up to two years.

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) website provides further details:

“If you are a permanent resident on a trip outside the United States, you should carry evidence that you are returning to the United States to resume your residence. Evidence of ties to the United States includes but is not limited to the following: a home lease or mortgage, a driver’s license or state ID card, a job or business, family.”

For more information, visit the Travel Documents page of the official USCIS website: Travel Documents for Permanent Residents

Remember, trips that exceed one year without a Reentry Permit can result in a loss of permanent resident status. Always consider the length and purpose of your trip, maintain ties to the U.S., and have the proper documentation to ensure a smooth return to the country.

“Can I still travel internationally if I haven’t got my Green Card renewal yet but already applied?

Yes, you can still travel internationally if you have applied for your Green Card (Permanent Resident Card) renewal and have not received the new card yet. However, there are a few important things to keep in mind:

  • Make sure you have a valid Form I-551, Permanent Resident Card, with you when you travel. Even if it’s expired, it may be acceptable along with the Form I-797, Notice of Action, which you receive when you file for renewal. The USCIS states, “If you applied for a Green Card renewal before your card expired, you can continue to work and travel.”
  • Before traveling, it is recommended to also obtain an ADIT stamp (also known as an I-551 stamp), which serves as temporary proof of your lawful permanent resident status. You can get this stamp by scheduling an appointment at a local USCIS office.

It is vital to verify all information directly from the USCIS before you plan any international travel. Ensure you have all the necessary documents, and it’s always best to travel with caution and knowledge of your status. For more detailed information, refer to the official USCIS website at USCIS International Travel as a Permanent Resident .

Remember that if you have applied for naturalization or any other changes in your status, different rules might apply. Always consult the latest USCIS guidelines or speak directly with an immigration attorney to clarify your individual circumstances before you make any travel plans. Here is a link to schedule an appointment with the USCIS: USCIS Infopass Appointment .

Learn Today:

Glossary or Definitions:

  • Green Card: A Green Card, officially known as a Permanent Resident Card, is a document issued by the U.S. government to foreign nationals who are authorized to live and work permanently in the United States.
  • Green Card Holder: A Green Card holder, also known as a Permanent Resident, is an individual who holds a valid Green Card and is authorized to live and work permanently in the United States.
  • Travel Abroad: Refers to the act of leaving the United States to visit a foreign country or countries.
  • Conditional Green Card: A Green Card that is initially granted for a period of two years to individuals who obtained their Green Card through marriage to a U.S. citizen . It is conditional upon meeting certain requirements and must be converted to a permanent (unconditional) Green Card before expiration.
  • Reentry Permit: A document issued by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) that allows a Green Card holder to travel outside of the United States for extended periods without jeopardizing their permanent resident status.
  • I-131 Form: The form required to apply for a Reentry Permit, officially known as Form I-131, Application for Travel Document.
  • I-751 Petition: The petition, officially known as Form I-751, Petition to Remove Conditions on Residence, that must be filed two years after receiving a conditional Green Card to remove the conditions and obtain a permanent (unconditional) Green Card.
  • Resident Status: The status of being a lawful permanent resident of the United States, commonly referred to as having a Green Card.
  • Abandonment: The act of voluntarily giving up or relinquishing one’s residency or status as a Green Card holder. Abandonment of residency can lead to the revocation of a Green Card.
  • Naturalization: The process by which a foreign national becomes a U.S. citizen through meeting certain eligibility criteria, such as continuous residence and physical presence in the United States, passing a citizenship exam, and taking an oath of allegiance.
  • Continuous Residence: Refers to the requirement for an individual seeking naturalization to have maintained a permanent residence and physical presence in the United States for a specified period of time without any significant interruptions.
  • Immigration Attorney: A lawyer who specializes in immigration law and provides legal advice and assistance to individuals and businesses regarding immigration matters.
  • USCIS: The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, a government agency responsible for administering and enforcing immigration laws in the United States.
  • Revocation: The cancellation or annulment of a Green Card or immigration status by the U.S. government. Revocation can occur if an individual is found to have violated immigration laws or if it is determined that their residency or status was obtained fraudulently or through misrepresentation.

So there you have it, a comprehensive guide to understanding green card travel restrictions! Remember, as a green card holder, it’s crucial to stay informed about the rules and regulations surrounding travel outside the US. Whether you’re planning a short trip or an extended stay, make sure to keep the US as your primary residence and maintain ties to the country. And if you want to dive deeper into immigration-related topics, head over to visaverge.com for more valuable information. Happy travels and stay green card savvy!

This Article in a Nutshell:

Green Card holders should understand travel restrictions to avoid jeopardizing their permanent resident status. A conditional Green Card is valid for two years, with rules for travel abroad. Trips shorter than six months are generally fine, but maintain ties to the US and file taxes. Consult an immigration attorney for updates.

Robert Pyne

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Can you go on a cruise with a green card? What US permanent residents need to know about travel documents

Megan duBois

Taking a cruise is relaxing, but making sure all your documents are in order for your sailing can be challenging, even more so for United States permanent residents who have a green card. The good news is that if you are a lawful permanent resident of the U.S., you are allowed to travel outside the country and can go on a cruise with your green card.

According to U.S. Customs and Border Protection , "If you are a Lawful Permanent Resident (LPR) of the United States, the U.S. government does not require you to have a passport for any travel, including air, land, or sea travel, however, you are even more likely to be required by your destination country to have one."

If you're a lawful permanent resident, you're cleared for foreign travel, but the documents you need for a cruise vacation might vary based on your departure port and destinations visited.

For cruise news, reviews and tips, sign up for TPG's cruise newsletter .

Here are the key points you need to know about travel documents if you'd like to go on a cruise as a green-card holder or other non-citizen resident of the U.S.

Does a green card count as a passport?

green card travel to other countries

A green card and a passport are not the same. While both documents are proof of identity, a passport is evidence of your citizenship while a green card shows that you are legally permitted to live and work in the U.S. as a foreign national.

Can I cruise from the US with just a green card?

As a lawful permanent resident going on a cruise from and back to U.S. home ports, you will need your green card to prove your identity and citizenship status so you can reenter the U.S. at the end of your sailing. You'll have to show the card during the boarding process and again when you reenter the U.S. at the end of your sailing.

Whether you also need a passport from your home country depends on your exact itinerary and the cruise line you're sailing.

"A green card holder can sail on closed-loop sailings without a passport," a representative from Carnival Cruise Line explained, referencing round-trip cruises that begin and end in the same U.S. city that only visit nearby countries in the Western Hemisphere (e.g., the Bahamas and Caribbean islands).

However, there are exceptions. For example, permanent residents must bring their home country passport if their cruises stop in Canada, Colombia, Bermuda or Greenland. A closed-loop cruise visiting ports in Mexico might require a passport, another cruise line representative told us, so double-check if you're cruising to Puerto Vallarta or Cozumel.

Transatlantic and transpacific cruises and sailings that start in one U.S. city and end in another one (such as full Panama Canal transits) also require green-card holders to carry a passport.

Additionally, some cruise lines might require permanent residents to carry a passport regardless of itinerary, so make sure you check the policy of the line you intend to sail. It's generally a good idea, especially if something goes wrong on your vacation and you have to disembark early and fly home.

You might also need a tourist visa to enter the port depending on that country's rules for travel for citizens of your home country. If you need a visa, you typically will need to carry your home country passport as well.

To determine which ports require visas or passports to enter, you can enquire with your travel adviser or head to the government website or embassy of each country your cruise visits to research visa requirements, forms, information and fees for your nationality.

Related: What documents do you need for a cruise? From passports to printouts, here's what to take

Can I cruise internationally with a green card?

green card travel to other countries

Lawful permanent residents are not limited to cruises from U.S. ports; they can book sailings in Europe, Asia, South America and other international destinations.

To enter another country by air, you will need a passport from your country of citizenship and potentially some travel visas. You'll need your green card to return to the U.S.

For example, if you're taking an Alaska cruise that departs from Vancouver, British Columbia, you will need a home country passport and a green card to go through international customs at the airport. If you're taking a cruise through Europe, you will need your green card, home passport and a visa.

All green-card users should contact the embassy or consulate of the countries on the itinerary to learn about the travel documents that are required. Depending on the ports of call, you might also need a Schengen visa , which allows entry and transit through 26 countries in Europe that are part of the Schengen Agreement. These countries include popular cruise destinations like France, Greece, Italy, Norway and Spain.

Related: Do I need a passport for a cruise?

What if I don't have a green card but want to travel under the Visa Waiver Program?

For those who are not U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents, taking a cruise is still possible. If you are traveling under the Visa Waiver Program, you can use the immigration stamp (I-94W) that you were given when you first entered the U.S. to reenter the country at the end of a cruise. Just be sure that your cruise ends before the 90-day admission period that you were originally given with the stamp.

Additionally, if you're using an immigration stamp to reenter the U.S., you will need to be sure that your cruise isn't too far away, is only visiting nearby islands or the contiguous country, and that the trip does not take you outside the U.S. for more than 30 days.

If your cruise goes beyond the 90-day admission time, you will need to apply for a new admission period. You will also have to talk to the Customs and Border Protection officer about how you were not using the cruise to get around the time limit for Visa Waiver Program travelers.

How do I reenter the US with a green card?

green card travel to other countries

Reentering the U.S. with a green card is simple. You will need your current, unexpired permanent resident card or green card to give to the Customs and Border Protection officer. Additionally, if you have any other documents that prove your identity, such as a U.S. driver's license, a foreign national ID card or a passport, give those to the officer as well. The officer will use the documents to verify your identity and immigration status.

Does cruise travel outside the US affect permanent resident status?

If you are a permanent resident, you can travel outside the country for brief travel and it usually does not impact your status. This can change if you travel outside the U.S. for more than a year, but you're likely not cruising for that long.

Bottom line

If you're ready to book a cruise but only have your green card as a lawful permanent resident, you don't need to worry because you can set sail on the high seas without a U.S. passport. However, you often need a passport from your home country and possibly visas to enter ports of call. You will also need to prove your identity upon returning to the U.S. with your green card and a second form of identification, such as a home country passport.

A select few closed-loop, round-trip cruises sailing from a U.S. port only require you to sail with your green card and not a home country passport, but you must make sure your itinerary qualifies otherwise you can get turned away for having missing documentation. It's always safer to travel with your home country passport, even if it's not required.

Even if you don't have a green card and you only have an immigration stamp under the Visa Waiver Program, you can still take a cruise as long as it's within the 90-day admission period. For either an immigration stamp or green card, it's important to note the length of the cruise and where it goes. You don't want to get held at Customs and Border Protection upon reentering the U.S. for going outside the travel parameters of the type of citizen identification you have.

Planning a cruise? Start with these stories:

  • The 5 most desirable cabin locations on any cruise ship
  • A beginners guide to picking a cruise line
  • The 8 worst cabin locations on any cruise ship
  • The ultimate guide to what to pack for a cruise
  • A quick guide to the most popular cruise lines
  • 21 tips and tricks that will make your cruise go smoothly
  • Top ways cruisers waste money
  • The ultimate guide to choosing a cruise ship cabin

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As A US Permanent Resident, Can I Travel with a Green Card and No Passport?

Can I Travel with a Green Card and No Passport?

As a US permanent resident, you may be wondering whether you can travel outside of the US with your green card and no passport. The short answer is: maybe .

In this guide, I will discuss how to travel using your green card and no passport by using a reentry permit instead of a passport. I will also discuss the benefits of having a reentry permit.

If you have any questions, feel free to email me directly at [email protected] .

1. What Documents do I Need to Travel Outside of the US?

2. how can i travel with a green card and no passport, 3. what are the requirements to get a reentry permit, 4. how long can i leave the us as a permanent resident, 5. how can a reentry permit help me, 6. what are the limitations of a reentry permit, 7. what are some ways to protect my status as a permanent resident, 8. conclusion.

  • As a US permanent resident (green card holder) you are allowed to travel outside of the US.
  • To travel outside of the US you will need 3 documents: 1) your permanent resident card; 2) your passport; and 3) any visas that are required by the foreign country you are travelling to.
  • The laws of the United States do not require a lawful permanent resident to have a passport to enter the United States. However, you will likely need a passport to enter another country .
  • Also, the airline that you’re travelling with may require you to have a passport.
  • If you don’t have a passport, I’ll explain how you may still be able to travel below.

Even if you do not have a valid passport, you may still be able to travel using your green card and a reentry permit. Here’s how:

  • Many US permanent residents do not have a valid passport from their country of citizenship. In many cases, they are either unable to get a passport or it would be extremely difficult to get a passport.
  • In these situations, a lawful permanent resident can apply for a reentry permit .
  • A reentry permit is a travel document. It is a small booklet which has an identification page and also has many blank pages for stamps and visas.
  • When a permanent resident cannot get a passport from their country of citizenship, a reentry permit can substitute for the passport.
  • Many countries allow a reentry permit to be used in-place of a passport.
  • The reentry permit can be stamped like a passport and can have visas attached to it like a passport would.
  • However, you have to make sure that the country you intend to visit will accept a reentry permit in-place of a passport. This is ultimately up to the country you intend to visit.
  • The reason why my answer in the introduction is “maybe” is because whether you can travel without a passport will depend on whether the country you are travelling to will allow you to use a reentry permit instead of a passport.

To get a reentry permit, there are 5 main requirements:

  • You must be a US permanent resident
  • You must submit a Form I-131 with USCIS with some supporting documentation
  • You must be physically present in the US when your reentry permit application is filed and accepted by USCIS
  • You must attend a biometrics (digital fingerprinting) appointment in the US
  • You must intend to depart the United States temporarily . This means that at the time you leave the US until the time you return, you must maintain the intent to return to the US as your home.
  • As a US permanent resident, you can leave the US for up to 1 year and use your permanent resident card (Form I-551) to reenter the US.
  • However, once you’re out of the US for more than 6 months, you are eligible for additional immigrant inspection procedures. Immigration officials may question you to determine whether you have abandoned your green card based on your absence. Below, I’ll explain how a reentry permit can help in this situation.
  • If you’re outside of the US for longer than 1 year, your green card (Form I-551) can no longer be used to reenter the US. You will either need a valid reentry permit to reenter the US or you will need to apply for a returning resident visa (SB1 visa).

A reentry permit has 3 main benefits:

  • Travel Document : If you cannot get a passport, you may be able to use your reentry permit instead of a passport (if the countries you plan to visit will accept the reentry permit as a valid form of travel document).
  • Protect Status : As I mentioned above, if you leave the US for over 6 months, you are eligible for additional inspection upon your return to the US. Immigration officials are checking if you’ve abandoned your permanent resident status. A reentry permit creates a legal presumption that you did not intend to abandon your green card.
  • US Entry Document : If you leave the US for longer than 1 year, your green card (Form I-551) is no longer valid to reenter the US. A reentry permit is valid for up to 2 years from the day it is issued and can be used to reenter the US as long as it is still valid.
  • If you are using a reentry permit instead of a passport, you can only do so if the country you plan to visit accepts a reentry permit as a valid substitute to a passport .
  • A reentry permit does not guarantee that you will be admitted to the US. A reentry permit creates a legal presumption that you did intend to maintain your permanent resident status. However, USCIS can still overcome this legal presumption if there is enough evidence.
  • If you are leaving the US for longer than 6 months, get a reentry permit;
  • Maintain strong ties to the US;
  • Filing taxes as a US resident;
  • Maintaining a US address;
  • Maintaining a valid driver’s license;
  • Owning property in the US;
  • Owning a US-based business;
  • Having a US bank account;
  • To the extent possible, maintain records and documents showing that your travel outside of the US was temporary.

As a US permanent resident, you are allowed to freely travel outside of the US. To travel, you usually need your permanent resident card, a valid passport, and whatever visas are required by the country you intend to visit.

While the US does not require permanent residents to have a valid passport to re-enter the US, foreign countries and airlines require you to have a passport.

If you do not have a valid passport and you cannot get one, you may be able to use a reentry permit instead of a passport.

As a US immigration lawyer , I can prepare and file your reentry permit application for you. If you have any questions, or if you’d like my help, please email me directly at [email protected] . I’d be happy to help you.

  • Reentry Permit Guide: Everything to Know to Get Your Reentry Permit
  • U.S. Customs and Border Protection – Traveling Outside of the U.S. – Documents Needed for Lawful Permanent Residents (LPR)/Green Card Holders
  • USCIS – International Travel as a Permanent Resident

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Michael Ashoori, Esq.

U.s. immigration lawyer.

I’m a U.S. immigration lawyer and I help families, professionals, investors, and entrepreneurs get visas, green cards, and citizenship to the United States.

Since starting my law firm, I’ve helped hundreds of people from all over the world with their immigration needs. I’m very passionate, hard-working, and committed to my clients.

Got a question?  Send me an email.

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Travel Eligibility for Green Card Holders: Understanding the Timeline

Green Card holders in the United States have the privilege of living and working in the country permanently, but what about traveling outside of the U.S.? As a Green Card holder, it’s important to understand the timeline for travel eligibility and the rules and regulations surrounding it. In this article, we’ll break down the key information you need to know to ensure you stay within the bounds of the law and don’t risk losing your Green Card status.

Understanding Travel Restrictions and Requirements After Receiving a Green Card

After receiving a Green Card, it is important to understand the travel restrictions and requirements that come with it. Failure to comply with these regulations can result in serious consequences, including jeopardizing your permanent residency status.

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Travel Restrictions:

  • Conditional permanent residents cannot travel outside of the U.S. for more than 6 months without obtaining a re-entry permit.
  • Permanent residents who have been outside of the U.S. for more than 1 year without obtaining a re-entry permit may be considered to have abandoned their permanent residency status.
  • Green Card holders who are outside of the U.S. for more than 6 months may be subject to questioning by immigration officials upon their return.

Travel Requirements:

  • Carry your Green Card with you at all times when traveling outside of the U.S.
  • Ensure that your Green Card is valid and will not expire while you are traveling.
  • Obtain a re-entry permit if you plan to travel outside of the U.S. for more than 6 months.
  • Report any changes in your personal information, such as your address or employment, to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

It is important to keep in mind that the rules and regulations surrounding travel for Green Card holders can be complex and confusing. If you have any questions or concerns about your travel plans, it is recommended that you consult with an experienced immigration attorney.

Example: John is a permanent resident of the U.S. who has just received his Green Card. He is planning to take a 9-month trip to Europe to visit his family. Before leaving, John needs to obtain a re-entry permit to ensure that he can return to the U.S. without jeopardizing his permanent residency status.

Understanding the Six-Month Rule for U.S. Green Card Holders: A Comprehensive Guide

Becoming a U.S. green card holder is a significant milestone in the life of an immigrant. It offers the opportunity to live and work in the United States permanently. However, maintaining the green card requires following certain rules and regulations. One of the most important rules that green card holders should be aware of is the six-month rule.

What is the six-month rule?

The six-month rule stipulates that a green card holder who stays outside of the United States for more than six months risks abandoning their permanent residency status. In other words, if a green card holder stays outside of the United States for more than six months, they may be denied entry into the country and may lose their green card status.

How does the six-month rule work?

The six-month rule is triggered when a green card holder departs the United States. The clock starts ticking on the day they leave the country. If they stay outside of the United States for less than six months, they can return to the country without any issues. However, if they stay outside of the United States for more than six months, they may be questioned about their intentions and may be denied entry into the United States.

Exceptions to the six-month rule

  • Other reasons: In certain cases, a green card holder may be able to provide evidence to show that they did not intend to abandon their permanent residency status, despite staying outside of the United States for more than six months. This evidence may include proof of family ties, property ownership, and business activities in the United States.

Understanding the six-month rule is crucial for green card holders who plan to travel outside of the United States. It is important to keep in mind that staying outside of the United States for more than six months may jeopardize their permanent residency status. However, there are exceptions to the rule, and green card holders who plan to travel outside of the United States for an extended period of time should consult with an immigration attorney to determine the best course of action.

Example: John is a green card holder who wants to travel to his home country for eight months to take care of his sick mother. To avoid losing his green card status, John should apply for a re-entry permit before leaving the United States.

Understanding Travel Restrictions for Green Card Holders: Exploring Your Options

As a green card holder, it’s essential to understand the travel restrictions that affect your ability to travel outside of the United States. These restrictions vary based on a few factors, including your country of origin, your current immigration status, and the purpose of your trip.

Restrictions for Green Card Holders

One of the most significant restrictions for green card holders is the possibility of losing your status if you stay outside of the United States for more than 6 months. If you are planning a trip that will last longer than 6 months, you may need to apply for a re-entry permit to protect your status and ensure your ability to return to the US.

Travel restrictions also apply to green card holders who have criminal records or who have violated immigration laws in the past. If you fall into either of these categories, you may be barred from re-entering the US after traveling abroad.

Exploring Your Options

If you are a green card holder who wants to travel outside of the United States, there are a few options available to you:

  • Apply for a re-entry permit: If you plan to stay outside of the United States for more than 6 months, you can apply for a re-entry permit before you leave. This will allow you to maintain your status and return to the US when you are ready.
  • Apply for a waiver: If you have a criminal record or have violated immigration laws in the past, you may be able to apply for a waiver that will allow you to re-enter the US after traveling abroad.
  • Apply for citizenship: If you are a green card holder who has lived in the US for at least 5 years, you may be eligible to apply for citizenship. This will give you more flexibility when it comes to traveling outside of the US.

It’s essential to consult with an experienced immigration lawyer before making any travel plans as a green card holder. They can help you understand the restrictions that apply to your specific situation and explore your options for traveling outside of the United States.

As a green card holder, it’s important to be aware of the travel restrictions that affect your ability to travel outside of the United States. By understanding these restrictions and exploring your options, you can travel with confidence and ensure your ability to return to the US.

Remember to consult with an immigration lawyer before making any travel plans and to always follow the rules and regulations that apply to your specific situation.

Example: John is a green card holder who wants to travel to his home country to visit his family for 8 months. He consults with an immigration lawyer who advises him to apply for a re-entry permit before he leaves to protect his status and ensure his ability to return to the US. John follows this advice and is able to travel and return to the US without any issues.

Legal Implications of Traveling with Less than Six Months Validity on Green Card in the United States

Green Card holders in the US are allowed to travel outside the country and return, but there are certain requirements that must be met. One of those requirements is having a valid Green Card, which means it has not expired or is about to expire soon. Traveling with less than six months validity on your Green Card can have legal implications that you should be aware of.

Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers have the authority to deny entry to any Green Card holder who has less than six months validity on their card. This means that if you are traveling outside the US and your Green Card is close to expiring, you may be denied re-entry. This could result in being stuck in another country or being sent back to your home country.

Renewing your Green Card while outside the US can be a difficult and complicated process. It is best to renew your Green Card before traveling if it is close to expiring. If you are already outside the US and your Green Card is close to expiring, you should contact the nearest US embassy or consulate for assistance.

It is important to note that the six-month validity rule does not apply to US citizens or those with dual citizenship. If you are a Green Card holder with dual citizenship, it is recommended that you travel with both passports to avoid any confusion or issues at the border.

Consequences of violating the six-month validity rule

If you are a Green Card holder and travel with less than six months validity on your card, you may face the following consequences:

  • Being denied entry into the US by CBP officers.
  • Being sent back to your home country at your own expense.
  • Losing your Green Card status if you remain outside the US for more than one year.
  • Having difficulty re-entering the US in the future, even if your Green Card is valid at the time.

Traveling with less than six months validity on your Green Card can have serious legal implications . It is important to renew your Green Card before traveling if it is close to expiring. If you are already outside the US and your Green Card is close to expiring, contact the nearest US embassy or consulate for assistance.

Remember, it is always better to be safe than sorry when it comes to your legal status in the US.

Example: John is a Green Card holder who is planning to travel to his home country for three weeks. His Green Card is set to expire in four months. John should renew his Green Card before traveling to avoid any legal implications when he returns to the US.

Related Posts:

  • Eligibility for U.S. Citizenship: Requirements for Green Card Holders
  • International Travel Restrictions for Green Card Applicants: What You Need to Know
  • Travel Restrictions for Green Card Applicants: Navigating the Interview Waiting Period.
  • Green Card Eligibility for Spouses of U.S. Citizens: Timeline and Requirements
  • Understanding the Travel Restrictions for Spouses Waiting for Green Card Approval in the US
  • Immigration Law: Duration of Stay in the US for Non-Green Card Holders
  • Green Card Holders and Sponsorship Requirements: Understanding the Basics.
  • Employment Eligibility After Obtaining a Green Card in the US
  • Understanding the Timeline for Obtaining a Green Card Through Marriage to a US Citizen
  • Understanding the Eligibility Criteria for US Citizenship: Minimum Duration of Green Card Holding
  • Green Card Acquisition Timeline for Spouses of U.S. Citizens
  • Understanding the Duration of Stay in the US without a Green Card: A Comprehensive Guide
  • Understanding the Eligibility Requirements for a Green Card after 10 Years of Residency in the United States
  • Understanding the Timeline for Green Card Issuance After a Successful Interview
  • Understanding the Permissible Duration of Stay in the U.S. During Green Card Processing
  • Self-Sponsorship for U.S. Green Card: Understanding the Eligibility Requirements
  • Immigration Law: Exploring Living in the US without a Green Card
  • Immigration Law: Eligibility for a Green Card based on Length of Work in the U.S.
  • Exploring Paths to Legal Residency for Undocumented Immigrants: A Comprehensive Analysis of Green Card Eligibility
  • How long does it take to get a green card legally?
  • Legal Analysis: Eligibility of U.S. Citizens to Sponsor Green Card for Friends
  • Immigration Law: Eligibility of Millionaires for Green Card in the USA
  • Traveling Abroad While Awaiting Permanent Residency: Understanding Your Rights and Limitations as a Green Card Applicant in the U.S.
  • Understanding the Potential Risk of Deportation After Obtaining a Green Card in the United States
  • Exploring the Feasibility of Obtaining a Green Card within 3 Months
  • Corporate Sponsorship for Green Card: Exploring Eligibility of Self-Sponsorship
  • Understanding the Legal Implications of Purchasing a Green Card in the United States
  • Understanding the Legal Implications of Remaining in the US While Awaiting Green Card Interview
  • Green Card Through Marriage: Do You Need a Lawyer?
  • Green Card Waiting Period: Understanding the 10-Year Rule
  • Understanding the Financial Obligations of Green Card Acquisition for Immigrants
  • Understanding the Consequences of an Expired Green Card: Deportation Risks Explained
  • Navigating Unemployment on a Green Card: What You Need to Know.
  • Exploring the Feasibility of Obtaining a Green Card within a 2-Month Timeframe: An Overview of the Relevant Factors and Limitations
  • Immigration Law: Spousal Green Card and the Ability to Remain in the US During Processing

Can Green Card Holders Travel to Other Countries?

Introduction: can green card holders travel to other countries, the benefits of having a green card, the process of applying for a green card, the different types of green cards, the cost of a green card, the timeline for a green card, the renewal process for a green card, the impact of a green card on travel, the pros and cons of holding a green card, conclusion: can green card holders travel to other countries.

If you are a Green Card holder, you may travel to other countries and return to the United States as long as you have a valid Green Card.

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As a permanent resident or green card holder, you are free to travel outside the United States. However, there are a few things you should keep in mind before leaving the country:

-You must have a valid green card. If your green card will expire while you are outside the United States, you will need to renew it before returning. -You should carry your passport with you when traveling. While your green card grants you permission to live and work in the United States, it is not an official travel document. -You may be required to obtain a visa to enter some countries. For example, Canada and Mexico have special agreements with the United States that allow green card holders to enter without a visa, but other countries will require one. -If you plan to be away for an extended period of time, you should notify the USCIS of your plans. They may require you to submit an Application for Travel Document (Form I-131). -You should check the requirements of the country you are visiting before you leave. Each country has its own entry requirements that may change without notice.

A Green Card holder (permanent resident) is someone who has been granted authorization to live and work in the United States on a permanent basis. As proof of that status, they are given a permanent resident card, commonly called a “Green Card.”

Although mostly associated with the right to live and work in the U.S., a Green Card also confers certain travel benefits. For example, Green Card holders do not need visas to enter most Western Hemisphere countries, as well as many other countries around the world. In addition, Green Card holders are able to apply for passports from their country of citizenship.

Of course, there are some restrictions on travel for Green Card holders. For example, they may not stay outside of the United States for more than one year at a time without jeopardizing their status. In addition, they may be required to obtain visas if they plan to travel to countries that have strict entry requirements, such as Iran or North Korea.

Overall, however, the benefits of having a Green Card far outweigh the drawbacks. If you’re considering applying for one, be sure to consult with an experienced immigration attorney who can help you navigate the process and avoid any pitfalls along the way.

Applying for a green card can be a long and complex process, but it is important to remember that having a green card does not guarantee entry into every country. There are a number of factors that will affect your ability to travel, including your country of origin, your criminal history, and the purpose of your travel.

Before you begin the process of applying for a green card, it is important to consult with an experienced immigration attorney to discuss your specific situation. The immigration process is constantly changing, and an attorney can help ensure that you are taking all the necessary steps to maximize your chances of success.

There are several types of green cards that allow a person to live and work permanently in the United States. The most common are: -EB-1: Priority Workers -EB-2: Professionals with Advanced Degrees or Exceptional Ability -EB-3: Skilled Workers, Professionals, and Unskilled Workers -EB-4: Special Immigrants -EB-5: Investors

A green card holder (permanent resident) is someone who is authorized to live and work in the United States on a permanent basis. As a permanent resident, you are given many of the same rights as a U.S. citizen, but there are some important differences. For example, you can be deported if you violate certain U.S. laws, and you are not allowed to vote in U.S. elections.

You may also travel outside the United States, but there are some important things to keep in mind before you do so:

You must have a valid green card (also called an Permanent Resident Card or Form I-551) to return to the United States after traveling abroad.

You will need a passport from your country of citizenship (and possibly a visa) to enter another country.

If you plan to be away from the United States for more than one year, you will need a Returning Resident Visa (SB-1) to re-enter the United States.

If your green card expires while you are outside the United States, you will need to apply for a new Green card when you return.

There is a common misconception that once you have a green card, you can travel freely to any country you please. Unfortunately, that is not the case. While Holders of a Green Card are exempt from needing a visa to enter the United States, they are still subject to the requirements of other countries.

In order to ensure that you are able to travel to the country of your choice, it is important to check the requirements well in advance of your trip. For example, many countries require that your passport be valid for at least six months after your planned return date. Additionally, some countries have specific requirements for vaccinations or other medical tests.

It is also worth noting that while you may not need a visa to enter a country, you may still need one to exit. This is the case for many countries in Europe which require a Schengen visa for entry and exit. In short, there is no one-size-fits-all answer when it comes to travel for Green Card holders. However, by doing your research and planning ahead, you can ensure that you have a smooth and enjoyable trip.

As a green card holder, you are legally allowed to travel outside of the United States. However, you will need to go through a renewal process if you want to re-enter the country. The renewal process can take several months, so it’s important to start the process as early as possible.

Here are some things you need to know about renewing your green card:

· You will need to fill out an application form and submit it to the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). · You will need to provide proof of your residency in the United States, such as a lease or utility bill. · You will need to provide proof of your identity, such as a passport or birth certificate. · If you have changed your name since you last applied for a green card, you will need to provide proof of your new name. · You will need to submit a new photo that meets USCIS requirements. · You may need to attend an interview with USCIS officials. · Once your application is approved, you will receive a new green card that is valid for 10 years.

A green card allows an individual to live and work permanently in the United States. However, a green card does not guarantee entry into other countries.

Other countries have their own immigration policies and requirements that must be met in order for an individual to be granted entry. For example, most countries will require a green card holder to have a valid passport from their country of citizenship. Additionally, some countries may require a visa even for green card holders.

It is important to research the immigration policies of any country you plan to visit before traveling. You can find this information on the website of the embassy or consulate of the country you are interested in visiting.

A Green Card holder (permanent resident) is someone who has been granted authorization to live and work in the United States on a permanent basis. As proof of that status, they are given a Permanent Resident Card, commonly called a Green Card.

The rights and privileges that come with a Green Card are many. However, there are also some limitations. For example, Green Card holders cannot vote, run for public office, or serve on a jury. Also, if they leave the United States for an extended period of time, they may lose their Green Card status.

There are some pros and cons to consider before deciding whether or not to apply for a Green Card. Below is a list of some of the key points to keep in mind.

Pros: -You will be able to live and work in the United States on a permanent basis. -You will be able to apply for citizenship after five years. -You will have access to social services and benefits, such as education and healthcare. -You will be protected from deportation if you meet the requirements for legal permanent residency.

Cons: -You may be required to serve in the military if you are male and between the ages of 18 and 26. -You may lose your Green Card status if you leave the United States for an extended period of time. In order to maintain your status, you must file an application for reentry permit before leaving the country. If you do not do this, you will need to apply for a new Green Card when you return. This can be a lengthy and expensive process

Yes, green card holders are allowed to travel to other countries. However, they may need to obtain a travel visa for the country they wish to visit. They should also check with the embassy or consulate of the country they wish to visit to make sure there are no other requirements for entry.

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Make purchases like you normally do and eligible charges will be automatically added to your Pay Over Time balance, up to your Pay Over Time Limit. You can choose whether you want to pay your balance in full each month or carry a balance with interest.

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Send money or split purchases with any other Venmo or PayPal user right from the American Express® App.

You spend with Amex, and now you can send with Amex. Pay any other Venmo or PayPal user with the flexibility of American Express. When you pay friends with Amex, there’s no standard Venmo or PayPal credit card fee and you can even do it right from the Amex App.

Seamlessly split any pending or posted Amex charge with other Venmo or PayPal users right from the American Express® App and get paid back directly to your Card as a statement credit. Best part? You'll be the one to earn all the rewards for the Amex purchases you split.

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A quick and secure way to pay for everyday purchases, from your morning coffee to grocery runs. Simply look for the contactless symbol at checkout at participating merchants and you can tap or hold your Card or device within a few inches of the terminal.*

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Unlike a traditional credit card, your Card has no preset* spending limit. Plus, as a Card Member, you can quickly and easily check your spending capacity to find out instantly if your purchases will be approved** by using our Check Spending Power tool.

*No preset spending limit does not mean unlimited spending. Purchasing power adjusts with your use of the Card, your payment history, credit record and financial resources known to us, and other factors.

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Eligible Charges Purchases (along with any associated foreign transaction fees) and Annual Membership Fees are eligible. For some accounts, a charge must also be equal to or more than a specified dollar amount (not including any foreign transaction fees) in order to be eligible. To obtain that amount, if there is one for your account, please call the number on the back of your Card. The following types of charges are ineligible: Cash Advances, including cash and other cash equivalents, certain insurance premiums, and any other fees owed to American Express.

Pay Over Time The Pay Over Time feature on your account has two settings: Active and Inactive. If the Pay Over Time feature is active at 8 p.m. Eastern Time on the transaction date provided by the merchant or on the date when an eligible Annual Membership Fee is charged to your Account, then we will automatically add the charge to your Pay Over Time balance. The transaction date provided by the merchant may differ from the date you made the purchase if, for example, there is a delay in the merchant submitting the transaction to us or if the merchant uses the shipping date as the transaction date. If the Pay Over Time feature is inactive at 8 p.m. Eastern Time, no new charges will automatically be added to your Pay Over Time balance. To view or change your Pay Over Time setting, visit your online account or call the number on the back of your Card. (If you are enrolled in Pay Over Time Select, call the number on the back of your Card for information on eligible purchases, available limit and APR, and assistance moving purchases into your Pay Over Time Select balance.)

Pay Over Time Limit We assign a Pay Over Time Limit to your Account. The Pay Over Time Limit applies to the total of your Pay Over Time, Cash Advance, and Plan balances. Your Pay Over Time balance cannot exceed your Pay Over Time Limit. When there is a delay in posting cash advances or plans to your Account, the total of your Pay Over Time, Cash Advance, and Plan balances may exceed your Pay Over Time Limit. We may approve or decline a charge regardless of whether your Card account balance exceeds or does not exceed your Pay Over Time Limit. This is not a spending limit. You must pay at least the Minimum Payment Due by the Payment Due Date each month. The Minimum Payment Due includes all charges that were not added to a Pay Over Time and/or Cash Advance or Plan balance, plus a portion of your Pay Over Time and/or Cash Advance balance, any interest accrued, and any Plan Payment Due.

Interest on Your Pay Over Time Balance(s) For charges added automatically to a Pay Over Time balance, we will charge interest beginning on the date of each charge. We will not charge interest on charges automatically added to your Pay Over Time balances if you pay your Account Total New Balance by the Payment Due Date each month. However, if at the time you activate Pay Over Time you’re already carrying a Pay Over Time Select balance from your last billing period, you’ll be charged interest on new eligible charges added to a Pay Over Time balance starting on the transaction date. You must pay in full, by the Payment Due Date, all charges that are not added to a Pay Over Time, Cash Advance, or Plan balance. We will begin charging interest on cash advances on the transaction date.

Pay It Pay It ® is only available in the American Express App ® for your eligible Account. With the Pay It feature, you can make a payment equal to the amount of a billed purchase less than $100. Payments made with Pay It are not applied to that billed purchase but to your outstanding balance in accordance with how we apply payments.

Your Account is eligible for Pay It if you are a Basic Card Member or Additional Card Member of a Card account issued by a U.S. banking subsidiary of American Express that is not canceled, excluding Accounts that do not have either a Credit Limit or the Pay Over Time feature. Prepaid Cards and products, American Express Corporate Cards, American Express Small Business Cards and American Express-branded Cards or account numbers issued by other financial institutions are not eligible.

Plan It With Plan It ® , you can create up to 10 active payment plans, each subject to a plan fee. The plan fee is a fixed finance charge that will be charged each month that the corresponding plan is active. You will be offered 1-3 plan duration options for the qualifying purchase. The plan duration options can vary based on a variety of factors such as the purchase amount, your Account history and your creditworthiness. If you are enrolled in an intro or promotional APR, you may see limited plan duration options during the intro or promotional period when you use Plan It on your Account. If you create a plan during an introductory or promotional APR period, your plan fee will be based on the introductory or promotional APR as long as the plan is created before 11:59pm MST on the last day of the introductory or promotional period.

To create a plan, select qualifying purchases of $100 or more and a plan duration. If you have a Card with a Credit Limit, you may also be able to select a qualifying amount of $100 or more and a plan duration. When creating a plan for purchases, you may select up to 10 qualifying purchases for each plan that you create in your American Express online Account. However, you may select only one qualifying purchase for each plan that you create in the American Express App. Qualifying purchases will be identified in your American Express online Account and American Express App. Qualifying purchases (or a qualifying amount, if you have a Card with a Credit Limit) do not include purchases of cash or cash equivalents, balance transfers (if offered), purchases subject to Foreign Transaction Fees, or any fee owed to us, including Annual Membership fees. Unless you are creating a plan at checkout, please allow 2-3 days for your purchase to post to your Account. Once your purchase posts and is no longer pending, you can create a plan for that purchase.

Your ability to create plans will be based on a variety of factors such as your creditworthiness, and your Credit Limit or Pay Over Time Limit, as applicable. The Pay Over Time Limit applies to the total of your Pay Over Time, Cash Advance, and Plan balances. You may not be able to create a plan if it would cause you to exceed your Pay Over Time Limit or cause your Plan balance to exceed 95% of your Account Total New Balance on your last billing statement. You will not be able to create plans if your Pay Over Time feature is suspended or your Account is canceled. You will also not be able to create plans if one or more of your American Express Accounts is enrolled in a payment program, has a payment that is returned unpaid, or is past due. The number and length of plan duration options offered to you, the number of active plans you can have at a time, and your ability to include multiple qualifying purchases in a single plan, will be at our discretion and will be based on a variety of factors such as your creditworthiness, the purchase amount(s), and your Account history. After a plan is paid in full, it will be removed from your Account in the next billing period.

Plan It is available on Card Accounts issued by a U.S. banking subsidiary of American Express, excluding Accounts that do not have either a Credit Limit or the Pay Over Time feature. Only the Basic Card Member or Authorized Account Managers on the Account can create a plan. Prepaid Cards and products, American Express Corporate Cards, American Express Small Business Cards and American Express-branded Cards or Account numbers issued by other financial institutions are not eligible.

Send & Split ® is only available in the American Express ® App (“Amex App”) to Card Members with an eligible Card. Eligible Cards are US-issued Basic Consumer Cards that are issued by American Express National Bank and are not cancelled. Prepaid Cards, American Express Corporate Cards, American Express Small Business Cards, American Express-branded cards or account numbers issued by other financial institutions and American Express Cards issued outside of the United States are not eligible Cards. To use Send & Split, you must first have an email address on file, enroll in Send & Split® in your American Express Online Account (“Online Account”) and open an Amex Send ® stored balance account in the Amex App (“Send Account”). Send & Split allows you to: (i) send a person-to-person payment from your Send Account to Venmo and PayPal users (“Send”) and (ii) split a Card purchase (“Split”) and receive funds to your Card account as a statement credit or to your linked Venmo or PayPal account. You may use Send & Split ® with an Additional consumer Card that is issued in the US by American Express National Bank and is not cancelled if you also have an eligible Card in the same Online Account and that Online Account is enrolled in Send & Split. You must have or create an account with Venmo or PayPal and link your Online Account to your PayPal or Venmo account to use Send & Split. You must add money to your Send Account from your eligible Card(s) to Send to a Venmo or PayPal recipient. The money you add will be reflected in your Send Account balance. The charge on your Card for an Add Money transaction does not earn rewards and is subject to the Card’s purchase APR. Once the Send from your Send Account is available in the recipient’s Venmo or PayPal account, you do not have the ability to cancel the transaction. There is no fee to Send to US recipients. PayPal charges a fee to Send to non-US recipients. With Split, you can split pending or posted purchases that are made with your eligible Card in your Amex App. Once you select a purchase to Split, select the contacts you want to request to Split with. You can choose to get paid back as a statement credit to your Card account (a Split credit) or to your linked Venmo or PayPal account. Split credits to your Card account apply when we receive confirmation that the Split request was completed but may take 24-36 hours to post to your Card account. You are still responsible to pay the full purchase amount charged to your Card, regardless of whether you are paid back via Split. You earn rewards for purchases that you split in the same way that you earn rewards for other purchases. Other eligibility and restrictions apply. For complete details visit americanexpress.com/sendandsplitterms to view Terms & Conditions. Send Account issued by American Express National Bank.

Additional Card Members do not have accounts with us but can use your Account subject to the terms of the Card Member Agreement. They must be at least 13 years of age and never had a defaulted account with American Express. You are responsible for the activity and use of your Account by Additional Card Members. You must pay for all charges they make.

Terms and Conditions for the Membership Rewards ® program apply. Visit membershiprewards.com/terms for more information. Participating partners and available rewards are subject to change without notice. The value of Membership Rewards points varies according to how you choose to use them. To learn more, go to www.membershiprewards.com/pointsinfo .

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Guidance and Resources for Government Agencies

At times, government agencies are asked to provide information and support to applicants or petitioners filing for immigration benefits, or the agencies may directly petition for such benefits. We created this page to assist government agencies with finding and using available resources, options, and information.

EB-2 National Interest Waivers – Background

The lawful permanent resident process involves 2 or 3 steps, depending on the employment-based immigrant visa classification being sought. In general, most petitioners filing second preference (EB-2) petitions must first file an Application for Permanent Employment Certification, commonly known as a permanent labor certification, with the Department of Labor before filing an immigrant petition with USCIS.

However, persons of exceptional ability or members of the professions holding advanced degrees seeking second preference (EB-2) immigrant visa classification may be eligible for a waiver of the job offer and, thus, the permanent labor certification requirement. This waiver is known as the national interest waiver. An employer on behalf of a beneficiary, or a self-petitioner with or without a job offer, may file an EB-2 immigrant petition seeking a national interest waiver without a labor certification. The petitioner seeking a waiver of the job offer must not only demonstrate eligibility for the classification, but also that the waiver itself is in the national interest. We may grant a national interest waiver as a matter of discretion if the petitioner demonstrates eligibility by a preponderance of evidence based on the following 3 elements:

  • The person’s proposed endeavor has both substantial merit and national importance;
  • The person is well-positioned to advance the proposed endeavor; and
  • On balance, it would be beneficial to the United States to waive the job offer and thus the permanent labor certification requirements.

For more information, please see the  Employment-Based Immigration: Second Preference EB-2 webpage.

For more information about national interest waivers, please see  Volume 6, Part F, Chapter 5 of the USCIS Policy Manual .

Interested Government Agency Letters in Support of National Interest Waivers

Interested government agencies or quasi-governmental entities may provide letters in support of petitions seeking a national interest waiver. For example, federally funded research and development centers could be interested government agencies. Such letters are not required, but they may serve as helpful evidence. For example, such letters could be favorable for purposes of the first element listed above if they establish that the agency or entity has expertise in the proposed endeavor and it promises to advance a  critical and emerging technology (PDF) or is otherwise important for purposes of maintaining the United States’ technological prominence.

Detailed letters of government or quasi-governmental interest that provide relevant information about how well-positioned the person is to advance the endeavor are valuable for purposes of assessing the second element. Finally, an interested government agency or quasi-governmental entity can help explain how granting the waiver may outweigh the benefits of the job offer and thus the labor certification requirement by explaining a particular urgency. See  Volume 6, Part F, Chapter 5 of the USCIS Policy Manual .

An interested government agency or quasi-governmental entity providing such letter of support may make an express claim that an individual’s work is in the national interest, or they may choose to limit the letter to statements of fact or provisions of data about the individual’s work or credentials. We make the final determination of national interest in the adjudication process. Interested government agencies and quasi-governmental entities may provide letters in support of national interest waivers in accordance with their own policies and signatory requirements.  Any such letter of support should be provided to the petitioner for the petitioner to submit to us as a supporting document.

An exchange visitor (J-1), and in some cases their spouse, former spouse, or child (J-2) who is subject to the 2-year foreign residence requirement, may apply for a waiver of that requirement. One of the 5 waivers available involves an interested government agency (IGA). Any U.S. IGA may request a waiver if they demonstrate that either the J-1 exchange visitor’s departure would be detrimental to one of its programs or the exchange visitor’s stay in the United States is vital to one of its programs. To be eligible for an IGA waiver, a determination must be made that it is in the public interest for the exchange visitor to remain in the United States. The head of the agency (or their designee) must sign the letter requesting the waiver and submit it to the U.S. Department of State’s Waiver and Review Division, which, after reviewing the program, policy, and foreign relations aspects of the case, transmits its recommendation to USCIS. For more information about IGA waivers, please see  Volume 2, Part D, Chapter 4 of the USCIS Policy Manual .  See also the Department of State’s  Waiver of the Exchange Visitor Two-Year Home-Country Physical Presence Requirement webpage for more information about the 2-year foreign residence requirement and J-1 waiver bases and processes.

One of the criteria or circumstances that we may consider in determining whether to grant an expedite request involves government interests. This includes cases identified as urgent by the government (federal, state, tribal, territorial, or local government of the United States) because they involve public interest, public safety, national interest, or national security interests. The request must be made by a person who has authority to represent the agency or department, such as an official, manager, supervisor, or tribal leader, on the matter for which expedited treatment is being requested. The request must demonstrate that the interests are pressing and substantive.

Where a federal agency or department identifies an articulable federal government interest in accordance with these criteria, we generally defer to that federal agency or department’s assessment.

For more information about expedite requests, please see  Volume 1, Part A, Chapter 5 of the USCIS Policy Manual along with the  Expedite Requests webpage.

Federal agencies work together to ensure compliance with federal, state, and local labor and employment standards. This ongoing cooperative relationship helps protect U.S. and noncitizen workers and improves overall protection of the American labor market, the conditions of the American worksite, and the dignity of the individual.

Multiple mechanisms in our immigration laws can provide employment authorization to noncitizen workers and protect them from removal, including discretionary relief (such as deferred action or parole in place). Labor and employment agencies can seek DHS support in an ongoing investigation or enforcement action by emailing  [email protected] and including a “statement of interest.” This email may also be used if a labor agency would like more information before submitting a statement of interest. For more information, please see  DHS Support of the Enforcement of Labor and Employment Laws .

The  Options for Noncitizen STEM Professionals to Work in the United States webpage provides an overview of some of the temporary and permanent pathways for noncitizens to work in the United States in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields. This guide also highlights some of the most important considerations for STEM professionals contemplating working in the United States, and the various roles of government agencies. For more detailed information, please see the webpages  Immigrant Pathways for STEM Employment in the United States and  Nonimmigrant Pathways for STEM Employment in the United States .

For questions specific to state, local, tribal, territorial, and other federal government partners, please email  [email protected] .

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COMMENTS

  1. 48 VISA-FREE Countries for US Green Card Holders [2024 Edition]

    As of 2024, there are about 48 visa-free countries for US green card holders. A US green card is a pathway to a US passport. While you wait for your US passport, your US green card is already making your current passport strong. Not as strong as a US passport but quite strong. You already have visa-free access to 48 additional countries.

  2. International Travel as a Permanent Resident

    If you lose your Green Card or reentry permit or it is stolen or destroyed while you are abroad, you may need to file a Form I-131A, Application for Travel Document (Carrier Documentation). This carrier documentation will allow an airline or other transportation carrier to board a lawful permanent resident bound for the United States without ...

  3. Where Can Green Card Holders Travel? Visa-Free Map

    With your green card, you can travel to a number of countries without a visa. The United States has an agreement known as a "good neighbor policy" with Canada and Mexico. With this policy, as a green card holder, you don't need to obtain a visa before traveling to any of these two countries. You will, however, need to present your ...

  4. THESE are the countries can you visit with a green card [2024]

    Travelers from various global locations are eligible for entry. This includes those from Aruba and Curaçao, as well as other parts of the Dutch Caribbean, Canada, Costa Rica, Georgia, and Mexico. Additionally, Indian or Chinese nationals with a U.S. Green Card can enter from Peru. The same group of nationals can also transit through Singapore ...

  5. List of Visa-Free Countries for Green Card Holders in 2024

    US citizens can travel without a visa to more than 140 countries worldwide. Because of this, many places have extended the same privilege to holders of the US permanent residence permit (Green Card). There are several countries that you can visit with your Green Card, that you otherwise may not be able to. Neighbouring Mexico and Canada are ...

  6. Traveling Outside the U.S. as a Green Card Holder

    Yes, you can travel abroad as a green card holder — that's one of the many benefits of being a permanent resident. However, your trip must be temporary and you cannot remain outside the United States for more than 1 year. If the Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officer believes you do not intend to continue living permanently in the ...

  7. 38 VISA-FREE countries for US Green Card holders in 2024

    Travel insurance for Green Card holders traveling outside the US is important aspect of any trip, especially for green card holders who are traveling visa-free to other countries. Good US travel insurance provides financial protection and assistance in case of unforeseen events or emergencies including medical-evacuation during your overseas ...

  8. List of Visa-Free countries for US Green Card Holders

    Mexico. For a taste of vibrant culture, rich history, and stunning beaches, Mexico is an excellent choice for US green card holders. With visa-free access, you can explore this colorful country to your heart's content. From the ancient ruins of Teotihuacan and Chichen Itza to the bustling markets of Mexico City and the vibrant nightlife of ...

  9. Travel Documents

    USCIS issues 5 types of travel documents: Advance parole document; Refugee travel document; Re-entry permit; TPS travel authorization; and. Carrier documentation. If you have an emergency and need to travel outside the United States, read our Emergency Travel page for additional information.

  10. VISA-FREE countries for US Green Card holders

    The Perks of Holding a U.S. Green Card. The U.S. green card is more than just a permit to reside and work in the United States; it's a ticket to a more accessible world. With it, certain travel restrictions are eased, thanks to the bilateral or multilateral agreements the U.S. shares with other nations. Visa-Free Accessible Countries

  11. Traveling Internationally as a Green Card Holder? Here's ...

    1. If possible, spend at least half of the year in the U.S. Being physically present in the U.S. for at least six months per year is the best practice for green card holders. 2. Know the risks of long-term travel. Perhaps you need to care for family members in a foreign country, or you want to travel extensively for pleasure.

  12. Green Card Travel Outside The U.S.: Requirements & Rules

    Here are the necessary documents for a green card holder to travel outside the U.S. and re-enter with ease. Your passport from your native country: Even though you are a permanent resident of the U.S., you will need to hand in your original passport to customs in order to re-enter. Your valid green card: You will be expected to show your valid ...

  13. For U.S. Citizens/Lawful Permanent Residents

    USCIS Extends Green Card Validity Extension to 24 Months for Green Card Renewals You may show your expired green card and your receipt notice as evidence of continued status or valid passport that contains a valid USCIS ADIT Stamp or valid USCIS Form I-94 with ADIT stamp, DHS seal, and printed photo of the LPR (aka USCIS Mail Delivery Process) to return back into the United States.

  14. Can I Travel Outside of the U.S. With a Green Card?

    A U.S. green card is not sufficient by itself as a document for world travel, though it is enough to get you back into the United States. You will still need something with which to gain entry to other countries, most likely your passport (from your home country) and a visa, if required by the countries to which you are traveling.

  15. Green Card Holder Travel Abroad: Restrictions and Rules for Extended

    Green Card holders should understand travel restrictions to avoid jeopardizing their permanent resident status. A conditional Green Card is valid for two years, with rules for travel abroad. Trips shorter than six months are generally fine, but maintain ties to the US and file taxes. Consult an immigration attorney for updates.

  16. Can you go on a cruise with a green card? What US permanent residents

    All green-card users should contact the embassy or consulate of the countries on the itinerary to learn about the travel documents that are required. Depending on the ports of call, you might also need a Schengen visa , which allows entry and transit through 26 countries in Europe that are part of the Schengen Agreement.

  17. THIS is how long you to stay outside the US on a green card [2024]

    Green card holders can stay outside of the United States for as long as they want, as long as they avoid being seen as having abandoned their lawful permanent resident (LPR) status. To re-enter the U.S. without trouble, they must have been outside the U.S. for less than 180 days and maintain the U.S. as their primary home.

  18. US Green Card Holders Can Travel to These Countries Visa-Free

    If you're a green card holder, you can travel visa-free to any country in the world that has a visa waiver agreement with the United States. There are currently 38 countries on this list, including popular destinations like Australia, France, Germany, and Japan. Keep in mind that while you won't need a visa to enter these countries, you ...

  19. As A US Permanent Resident, Can I Travel with a Green Card and No

    As a US permanent resident (green card holder) you are allowed to travel outside of the US. To travel outside of the US you will need 3 documents: 1) your permanent resident card; 2) your passport; and 3) any visas that are required by the foreign country you are travelling to. The laws of the United States do not require a lawful permanent ...

  20. Can a Person With a Green Card Travel Outside the United States?

    The reentry permit will also allow you to return to the U.S. without obtaining a returning resident visa from the U.S. Consulate or U.S. Embassy. If you started the green card application process but are not yet a holder, you must file Form I-131 if you want to travel outside the United States. This will serve as an advance parole document and ...

  21. Travel Eligibility for Green Card Holders: Understanding the Timeline

    The six-month rule stipulates that a green card holder who stays outside of the United States for more than six months risks abandoning their permanent residency status. In other words, if a green card holder stays outside of the United States for more than six months, they may be denied entry into the country and may lose their green card status.

  22. Can You Travel to Other Countries with a Green Card?

    You can also travel to other countries with a Green Card, but there are some restrictions that you should be aware of before you travel. How to Get a Green Card. A Green Card, also known as a Permanent Resident Card, is an identification card that proves that you are authorized to live and work in the United States on a permanent basis.

  23. Can Green Card Holders Travel to Other Countries?

    Introduction: Can Green Card Holders Travel to Other Countries? As a permanent resident or green card holder, you are free to travel outside the United States. However, there are a few things you should keep in mind before leaving the country:-You must have a valid green card. If your green card will expire while you are outside the United ...

  24. Green Card Through the Diversity Immigrant Visa Program

    The Diversity Immigrant Visa Program (DV Program) makes up to 50,000 immigrant visas available annually, drawn from random selection among all entries to individuals who are from countries with low rates of immigration to the United States. The DV Program is administered by the U.S. Department of State (DOS). Most lottery winners reside outside ...

  25. American Express® Green Card Membership Guide

    Only the Basic Card Member or Authorized Account Managers on the Account can create a plan. Prepaid Cards and products, American Express Corporate Cards, American Express Small Business Cards and American Express-branded Cards or Account numbers issued by other financial institutions are not eligible.

  26. Guidance and Resources for Government Agencies

    One of the criteria or circumstances that we may consider in determining whether to grant an expedite request involves government interests. This includes cases identified as urgent by the government (federal, state, tribal, territorial, or local government of the United States) because they involve public interest, public safety, national interest, or national security interests.