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star trek enterprise song singer

Who sang the Enterprise theme ...

Question: Who sang the Enterprise theme song, "Faith of the Heart"? It wasn't Rod Stewart, but could it have been Scott Bakula, aka Captain Jonathan Archer?Answer: It could've been, I suppose. But it wasn't. "Faith of the Heart," written by Diane Warren and originally performed by Rod Stewart for the Patch Adams soundtrack, was sung by rising U.K. opera star Russell Watson during the show's opening credits. Watson comes from humble beginnings, initially earning a living as a bolt fitter in Manchester and practicing his singing on the side. From there, "The People's Tenor" (I love that name — a tenor for the rest of us) has come into his own as a best-selling singer and was even named a Goodwill Ambassador to the United Nations. Now, if only one could say the same for the song itself, which creat

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Question: Who sang the Enterprise theme song, "Faith of the Heart"? It wasn't Rod Stewart , but could it have been Scott Bakula , aka Captain Jonathan Archer?

Answer: It could've been, I suppose. But it wasn't.

"Faith of the Heart," written by Diane Warren and originally performed by Rod Stewart for the Patch Adams soundtrack, was sung by rising U.K. opera star Russell Watson during the show's opening credits. Watson comes from humble beginnings, initially earning a living as a bolt fitter in Manchester and practicing his singing on the side. From there, "The People's Tenor" (I love that name a tenor for the rest of us) has come into his own as a best-selling singer and was even named a Goodwill Ambassador to the United Nations.

Now, if only one could say the same for the song itself, which created quite a storm in the Trek community. It's tough to find a fan who's ambivalent about it. (Admittedly, it's tough to find a Trek fan who's ambivalent about anything .) Those who hated the song started petition drives to get it dumped, while those who championed it screamed just as loudly to have it left alone.

Memory Alpha

Where My Heart Will Take Me

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" Where My Heart Will Take Me " is the main title song of Star Trek: Enterprise played over the opening title sequence . Originally titled " Faith of the Heart ", it was written by Diane Warren and originally performed by Rod Stewart for the 1998 movie Patch Adams .

At the conclusion of ENT Season 1 , Brannon Braga acknowledged fan feedback on the theme song ("some love it, some hate it... [but] it's staying.") " I think the song is cheesy, but I like cheesy things. We wanted a sentimental theme song with just the right lyrics that obliquely capture the spirit of human exploration. I feel the song nails it. " ( Star Trek: The Magazine  Volume 3, Issue 2 , p. 11)

In In Conversation: Rick Berman and Brannon Braga , a bonus feature available on ENT Season 1 Blu-ray , Rick Berman describes himself as having been "grilled over the coals" for the theme song. He states that he cannot blame Brannon for that one. He continues that all of the previous series and films had big sweeping orchestral scores with one major theme and that he thought it would be cool if they were doing something new and different to find a song to put over an opening credit that would show a history of flight and even before. He interviewed a number of songwriters before discovering Diane Warren and felt the song fit perfectly into what the show was about and what it meant. He describes the decision to remix the song in the third season as being Paramount 's decision, but the ultimate result being a "bust."

  • 1 Song history
  • 2.1 Full length version
  • 2.2 Star Trek: Enterprise version
  • 3 Other versions
  • 5 External link

Song history [ ]

The version for Enterprise was performed by Russell Watson . It remains the only Star Trek theme song besides Star Trek: The Original Series that is not completely an instrumental, orchestral piece, the only theme to have sung lyrics, and is the only theme that is not a composition original to the franchise.

"Where My Heart Will Take Me" was played for the crew of the space shuttle Discovery as their morning wake-up call on 2 August 2005. [1] The song was also used as a wake-up call for the crew of the Endeavour during STS-118 on 9 August 2007. [2] The song was used again for the STS-125 Hubble Telescope repair crew on board Space Shuttle Atlantis on 24 May 2009. [3] In December 2014, Russell Watson recorded a special version of the song to help wake the New Horizons space probe from hibernation prior to the craft performing the first flyby of Pluto. [4]

Three versions of the theme were recorded: one for the entire full length song and two for the opening credits of Enterprise , with a revised arrangement being introduced in Season 3:

  • Full length version  file info
  • Season 1 & 2 version  file info
  • Season 3 & 4 version  file info

Full length version [ ]

It's been a long road , getting from there to here. It's been a long time , but my time is finally near. And I can feel a change in the wind right now. Nothing's in my way. And they're not gonna hold me down no more. No they're not gonna hold me down. Cause I've got faith of the heart . I'm going where my heart will take me. I've got faith to believe. I can do anything. I've got strength of the soul . No one's gonna bend or break me. I can reach any star . I've got faith. I've got faith, faith of the heart. It's been a long night, trying to find my way. Been through the darkness. Now I'll finally have my day. And I will see my dream come alive at last. I will touch the sky. And they're not gonna hold me down no more. No they're not gonna change my mind. Cause I've got faith of the heart. I'm going where my heart will take me. I've got faith to believe. I can do anything. I've got strength of the soul. No one's gonna bend or break me. I can reach any star. I've got faith. Faith of the heart. I've known the wind so cold, and seen the darkest days. But now the winds I feel are only winds of change. I've been through the fire and I've been through the rain. But I'll be fine. Cause I've got faith of the heart. I'm going where my heart will take me. I've got faith to believe. I can do anything. I've got strength of the soul. No one's gonna bend or break me. I can reach any star. I've got faith. I've got faith of the heart. I'm going where my heart will take me. I've got strength of the soul, and no one's gonna bend or break me. I can reach any star. I've got faith. I've got faith, faith of the heart. It's been a long road.

Star Trek: Enterprise version [ ]

It's been a long road, getting from there to here. It's been a long time, but my time is finally near. And I will see my dream come alive at last. I will touch the sky. And they're not gonna hold me down no more, no they're not gonna change my mind. Cause I've got faith of the heart. I'm going where my heart will take me. I've got faith to believe. I can do anything. I've got strength of the soul. And no one's gonna bend or break me. I can reach any star. I've got faith. I've got faith, faith of the heart.

Other versions [ ]

During previews for Enterprise on UPN , the song " Wherever You Will Go ", performed by the musical group The Calling , was played instead of the regular theme song.

A unique one-off instrumental version of the song "Where My Heart Will Take Me" plays over the closing credits of " Broken Bow ".

  • In the LD : " No Small Parts " episode, Captain William T. Riker was seen quoting the lyrics to Deanna Troi aboard the USS Titan .

External link [ ]

  • " Where My Heart Will Take Me " at Wikipedia
  • 2 USS Enterprise (NCC-1701-G)
  • 3 Star Trek: The Next Generation

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Faith Of The Heart by Rod Stewart

star trek enterprise song singer

Songfacts®:

  • This song was written by accomplished American songwriter Diane Warren. It was originally recorded by Stewart for the 1998 Robin Williams movie Patch Adams , where it fit with the theme of believing in yourself.
  • In 2001, the song was re-recorded by British opera singer Russell Watson under the title "Where My Heart Will Take Me," to be used as the theme song for Enterprise , the fifth TV series in the Star Trek franchise and a prequel to the original series. Like many other aspects of the Enterprise series, the choice of this song as the theme music became a point of controversy among longtime Star Trek devotees. In 2003, Watson's version was remixed to coincide with the show's rebranding as Star Trek: Enterprise . Ironically, this livelier mix of the theme song came as the plot of the series itself took a darker turn.
  • Watson performed a slightly edited version of the song during the opening ceremony of the 2002 Commonwealth Games in Manchester, UK. >> Suggestion credit : Joshua - Twin Cities, MN, for all above
  • More songs from Rod Stewart
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  • Lyrics to Faith Of The Heart
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Comments: 1

  • Diane from Walnut Grove, Al I am looking for both Sheet Music and CD for the song: "Faith of the Heart" by Rod Stewart. I would love to find a dependable/honest/reasonable site to purchase this song with Sheet Music and CD Can anyone help me??????

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Why Star Trek: Enterprise Had THAT Terrible Theme Song

"Where My Heart Will Take Me," the opening theme to Star Trek: Enterprise, had reason to be scorned. Over time, however, its reputation has improved.

Among Star Trek: Enterprise ’s more contentious quirks was its opening theme song: a reworked version of Rod Stewart’s “Faith of the Heart” entitled “Where My Heart Will Take Me.” It’s very much a product of its time, and in the ensuing years has become something of a guilty pleasure among the Star Trek faithful. It’s the kind of infectious earworm that takes days to get rid of, and it’s definitely an anomaly among Star Trek themes. Fans at the time did not take it well.

Before Enterprise , Star Trek shows stuck resolutely to classic orchestral themes. That started with Alexander Courage’s iconic introduction to the original Star Trek , and was emulated by The Next Generation, Deep Space 9 and Voyager. Star Trek: The Next Generation appropriated Jerry Goldsmith’s theme from Star Trek: The Motion Picture, which is telling: all of them aimed for an operatic sound indicative of epic theatrical films. When Enterprise began, the producers wanted to break from that tradition in a big way.

RELATED:  Star Trek's Longest Running Series, Revealed

It Was Supposed to Help Enterprise Bridge Our Present with Trek’s Future

Enterprise was posited as a prequel to the original series: detailing the early days of humanity’s exploration of the stars, and the eventual formation of the Federation. Producer Brannon Braga told Starlog magazine that he felt the era had more unexplored dramatic potential than something closer to the original series, and that the characters would respond to challenges differently than the characters in other Trek series had. The song was intended as part of that principle: a firm break from what Trek had become, but also a link between the present day and the bright future the franchise promised.

That, however, could have found better expression elsewhere. The song adopted a soft-rock power ballad format, presumably in order to reach as wide an audience demographic as possible. But the supposedly inspiring lyrics fell flat against Enterprise’s impressive visual title montage of real-life heroes like Amelia Earhart and Gus Grissom. And while the orchestral scores from earlier Trek shows felt evergreen, this one dated itself almost as soon as it had dropped.

RELATED:  Star Trek: The Next Generation - Why the Beloved Series Ended

The Song Itself Had a Difficult Background

The choice of song was strange too. Rather than commissioning their own, the producers simply reskinned the Stewart song with new lyrics, giving it the air of a cheap knock-off. Stewart himself – a notorious womanizer – left his second wife less than a month before the song hit the charts, rendering its heartfelt tone disingenuous from the start. A few hastily added lyrics weren’t going to change that. Furthermore, Stewart wrote it for Patch Adams , the infamous Robin Williams tearjerker reviled for its excess sentimentalism.

In short, it felt very corporate: assembled for reasons that had little to do with Star Trek and presented as a change of pace that went badly off the mark. Trekkies responded as Trekkies sometimes do: with anger, rejection and organized demands to replace the song with something else. Enterprise stuck with it, however, and kept it as part of the opening credits for the whole of its run.

The song has since attained a kind of scruffy charm among the Trek faithful, and an apt companion to Enterprise, which similarly took some time for parts of the Star Trek community to warm to. Today the two are intertwined, and the high quality of the show itself lends the comparatively clunky theme song an affection it might otherwise merit. It even earned a playful dig on Star Trek:  Lower Decks   -- as sure a sign as ever that Trekkies are ready to forgive if not forget.

KEEP READING:  Why Star Trek: Enterprise's Series Finale Is So Hated by Fans

Soundtrack Information

Star Trek: Enterprise

Star Trek: Enterprise

Limited Edition of 3,000 Units

La-La Land Records (LLLCD 1330)

Release Date: December 2, 2014

  • Star Trek: Enterprise (2001) [TV Series]
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  • John Frizzell
  • Kevin Kiner
  • Dennis McCarthy
  • Mark McKenzie
  • Brian Tyler

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Star Trek: Enterprise Theme Song Lyrics

The Best Singers In Star Trek's Subspace Rhapsody, Ranked From Uhura To Worst

Strange New Worlds Subspace Rhapsody

Season 2 of "Star Trek: Strange New Worlds" is almost over and it didn't miss a chance to leave its mark on "Star Trek" history. The ninth and penultimate episode, "Subspace Rhapsody," is the first "Star Trek" musical episode. Like any good musical, it opens with a group number, branches off into solos, and then reunites the cast for a grand finale.

But wait, you might ask, how does the show justify such an odd premise? "Strange New Worlds" is the show that, back in season 1's "The Elysian Kingdom," turned the Enterprise crew into characters out of a child's fairy tale. A musical episode is well within the show's tonal range and ability to excuse.

At the start of the episode, the Enterprise is investigating a "naturally-occurring subspace fold" — Starfleet hopes the fold can be harnessed to enable faster communication. When Uhura and Spock send a song into it hoping for a response, it responds by altering probability to turn the Enterprise into a reflection of a musical universe. Long story short? The cosmic phenomenon of the week is making the Enterprise act like they're in a musical, so just go with it.

Every cast member, main and recurring, gets at least one moment singing. Musical episodes on TV will always put a cast out of their elements; they signed up to act, not sing and dance. How do the respective musical talents of the cast of "Strange New Worlds" compare?

1. Ensign Nyota Uhura

Taking the crown as best singer on the Enterprise is Nyota Uhura (Celia Rose Gooding). As the ship's communications officer and polyglot, it's only natural that's she also skilled in song. The final solo of the episode, "Keep Us Connected," is hers. It's basically a musical recap of her character arc; she sings about how she's been alone since her family's death. That is, until she came to the Enterprise and found friends who had faith in her.

Even before "Subspace Rhapsody," Uhura was canonically a good singer. In "Star Trek: The Original Series" episode "Charlie X," she sings for the rest of the crew. Nichelle Nichols' singing was high energy but her voice was soft and melodic like a lullaby. Gooding, on the other hand, goes loud. Once Uhura has the engine room to herself, she belts her heart out, singing at the top of her lungs, yet stays perfectly in tune with the strumming instrumentals. 

Gooding is not just an actor, they're a Broadway star too; they first broke out from the 2018-2020 runs of the rock musical "Jagged Little Pill." That theatrical spirit hasn't left Gooding; while singing as Uhura, they animate their body and project their voice like a stage performer. The results are enrapturing.

2. Lieutenant La'an Noonien Singh

La'an Noonien Singh, the Enterprise's uptight security chief, is played by Christina Chong. On top of her acting, Chong is a singer with the solos "Twin Flames," "No Blame," and "Can't Show Love" to her name. Surprise, surprise — the other trained musician among the cast gets second place as the show's best singer.

After spotting Una (Rebecca Romijn) and Jim Kirk (Paul Wesley) hitting it off, La'an retreats to her quarters and breaks out into a solo ballad, scored to a sad piano melody. La'an is usually rather stoic and closed off from others. Her song, "How Would That Feel," from the isolated setting to the lyrics, is all about that. She asks herself if she should "change her paradigm" and open herself up to others — but in turn, if she could manage to "fly blind" in her life.

The blocking reflects the song's theme of self-reflection — there's a shot of La'an standing in front of a mirror and then out a window. Most of the shots, though, are still close-ups of her as she sings. Rather than a theater star, Chong feels like someone most used to singing in place before a fixed microphone. It works, though, thanks to her expressive face (that she finally gets to put to full use) and how she keeps hitting higher and higher notes as the song goes on.

3. Lieutenant Commander Spock

Spock (Ethan Peck) has always shown some musical inclinations, even back during "The Original Series." He plays a Vulcan lute in his spare time; this season revealed that it was prescribed to him as a coping method for his emotions. We've never seen Spock singing along as he plucks the lute's strings, but "Subspace Rhapsody" reveals that isn't due to lack of talent.

Spock is the first crew member to break out into song during the first group number, "Status Report." Seeing an emotionally-restrained Vulcan singing underlines the surreality of the musical; normally, Spock would be the least likely to express himself so overtly.

He gets a solo later in the episode, right before Uhura's: "I'm The X." The title's meaning is twofold. For one, Spock is the ship's science officer, so he's always trying to solve the unknown like an equation. It's also a pun on how Christine Chapel (Jess Bush) has chosen her career over continuing their relationship. Spock's feelings of betrayal tie the meanings together; he's decided that giving over to his emotions yielded disastrous consequences so he will return to cold analysis.

"I'm The X" is one of the calmest heartbreak songs I've ever heard. Underscored by a dour electronic tune, Peck maintains a strong and even timbre while moving his face as little as possible; Spock's shields haven't dropped even under these circumstances. Yet somehow, you can still feel the rawness in his voice.

4. Captain Christopher Pike

A plot point in "Subspace Rhapsody" is that the musical behavior is causing the Enterprise crew to reveal information they'd rather keep secret. Captain Pike (Anson Mount) gets the worst of it. His partner Captain Marie Batel (Melanie Scrofano) calls after the music plague spreads to her own ship. She and Pike get caught in a duet where they have "A Private Conversation" about the relationship, their frustrations with one another laid bare for the Enterprise bridge crew to see. 

The one thing that isn't embarrassing? Pike's singing ability. Scrofano is a capable scene partner, but Mount steals the scene for himself with a smooth, mellifluous baritone — exactly the kind of voice you'd picture coming out of his handsome face.  

Since "A Private Conversation" is the most comedic of the setlist, it has a playful orchestral tune, like something out of "Peter and the Wolf." Tragically, it's cut short when La'an disconnects the transmission. We do get to hear a bit more of Pike singing in supporting parts during "Status Report" and "We Are One." Pike might've been uncomfortable singing, but I was eating it up.

5. Commander Una Chin-Riley and 6. Lieutenant James T. Kirk

Back in episode 6, "Lost In Translation," it was revealed that Kirk (Paul Wesley) has been promoted to First Officer of his current ship, The USS Farragut. So, he spends some time on the Enterprise shadowing Una (Rebecca Romijn), an experienced First Officer. Their duet, "Connect To Your Truth," is about this new mentor-student relationship; Una explains how to best be a starship second-in-command.

Naturally, Commander Chin-Riley takes the lead in the duet. "Connect To Your Truth" boasts some of the most complex lyrics and creative rhyming schemes in the song's tracklist; from the wordplay to the flighty mood it often feels like a "Star Trek" themed "Mary Poppins" song. The nature of the song also evokes "My Fair Lady" (or rather, "My Fair First Officer"). Romijn understands how to handle this, drawing out some of her line deliveries even if her singing voice doesn't quite escape the confines of her normal one. Wesley handles himself just fine but definitely cedes the spotlight to his costar.

Romijn must have been eager to sing; she  was  a Music major before becoming an actress and model. Thus, Una also gets a solo — "Keeping Secrets" — a follow-up to La'an's "How Would That Feel" as the Commander advises her younger friend. Una confesses that "in another life, [she] could see herself on a stage." By enthusiasm alone, I could see her getting there.

7. Nurse Christine Chapel

Back in "Charades," Nurse Christine Chapel had been rejected from a scientific fellowship. In "Subspace Rhapsody," she's applied to another one and gets it — but that means she'll have to leave the Enterprise. Spock confronts her about it while she's toasting to her success and the number makes it clear where her priorities are. "I'm Ready" is all about how Christine's been working so hard to get to the top of the scientific field; she can't even bother paying attention to Spock, so focused on her own dreams and ambitions.

The music is a poppy dance song, with everyone in the bar joining in and swaying back and forth; only Christine's voice is clearly audible but there's some background vocal harmonizing too. "I'm Ready" has the most extras and complex choreography of any "Subspace Rhapsody" sequence. Some of those extras take turns carrying Christine around as she dances around the room, climbing onto the bar and some tables along the way.

Sadly, the most underwhelming part of the scene is Jess Bush's own singing. From my own ear, it sounded like her voice had been auto-filtered. It might have been a creative choice, whether to have her voice match the upbeat mood of the song or to show that Christine's not her usual, more reserved self. I'm not convinced it was the right one, though.

8. Lieutenant Erica Ortegas and 9. Dr. Joseph M'Benga

Musical TV episodes always reveal which cast members are comfortable/capable with singing and which aren't. Those in the latter category for "Strange New Worlds" appear to have been Melissa Navia (Erica Ortegas) and Babs Olusanmokun (Dr. M'Benga). Neither one gets a solo song, whether due to runtime constraints, the actors' disinterest, or something else altogether. As a result, it's hard to judge these two against their castmates.

Both Ortegas and M'Benga do sing during the group numbers. M'Benga's parts in both songs feature him harmonizing with Chapel (they both work in Sick Bay, after all), so it's especially hard to get a read on his own voice.

Ortegas, though, does get a brief solo as part of "Status Report." The song features a bridge of the Enterprise Bridge crew describing their stations on ready; Ortegas does so for the ship's helm. Navia's voice sounded good, to the point where I'm puzzled why they didn't give Ortegas more material . She's generally a comic relief character, so a funny song would fit her like a glove. Maybe "Strange New Worlds" season 3 will have to feature "Subspace Rhapsody II" to give Ortegas a moment at the mic.

"Star Trek: Strange New Worlds" is streaming on Paramount+.

/Film

The Enterprise Episode That Shattered Star Trek Canon – But Did Right By A Classic Villain

"Star Trek: Enterprise" soldiered on for four seasons, but really, the death knell happened early in season 2. The season's ratings peaked with its fifth episode, "A Night In Sickbay," at 6.26 million — and apparently, that infamous episode drove off potential audiences since the ratings on "Enterprise" never reached those same heights.

This might be why the tail end of season 2 features an obvious ratings stunt (and one that seemed destined to drive canon-obsessed Trekkies up the wall). "Regeneration" (season 2, episode 23) features the Borg as the villains. Contemporary promos warned viewers to, "Prepare for Enterprise's first encounter with — The Borg!" and emphasized how terrifying the cyborg hive mind is. The network definitely  wanted people to know the Borg would be showing up ahead of time.

Did it work? Well, "Regeneration" pulled in 4.12 million viewers — the highest ratings since "Future Tense" (season 2, episode 16)  and higher than the season's remaining episodes. But was this short bump worth it?

Frankly, the Borg should not have been showing up on "Enterprise," which is a prequel set in the 22nd century. The Borg were introduced on "The Next Generation" as a terrifying new threat; why should Starfleet be encountering them two centuries early? "Enterprise" pulled something similar in season 1 with "Acquisition," which saw the titular ship hijacked by Ferengi pirates decades before the Federation was supposed to make first contact with them.

"Enterprise" remains a contentious entry in the "Star Trek" canon — is "Regeneration" a reason why? Nope, because the (shockingly good) episode overcomes its shaky foundations.

Read more: What Went Wrong With Star Trek: Nemesis, According To Jonathan Frakes

First Contact With The Borg On Star Trek

Here's the history of the Borg onscreen in "Star Trek," at least as it's relevant to "Regeneration." They were introduced in "Next Generation" season 2, episode 16, "Q Who." Q (John de Lancie) throws the Enterprise-D into the far reaches of space to teach Captain Picard (Patrick Stewart) a lesson in humility.

The Enterprise-D soon meets the Borg, who from the beginning are a terrifying force; trying to negotiate with them is like doing so with a hurricane. The barren planets of star system J-25, marked by craters where cities once stood, are a sign of the Borg's ravenous drive to consume. Season 3 finale "The Best of Both Worlds" then establishes the Borg don't just consume technology, they assimilate other beings into their hive mind; Picard is kidnapped and briefly made Locutus of Borg.

In the second "TNG" movie, 1996's "First Contact," the Borg are the villains. They travel back in time to 2063, attempting to stop Zefram Cochrane (James Cromwell) from making, well, first contact with the Vulcans. That way, they can assimilate Earth and prevent the Federation from ever forming. The Enterprise destroys the time-traveling Borg's ship (a sphere-shaped vessel) in orbit of Earth.

To include the Borg, "Regeneration" reveals some of the Borg Sphere's wreckage landed in the Arctic. In 2153, three scientists discover this, alongside two hibernating drones. Soon, a mini Borg collective is carving its way through space.

Producer Brannon Saga said that he thought the Borg appearing on "Enterprise" would be a "cheap trick" until a colleague suggested tying it into "First Contact." "It was such a great concept I couldn't resist it," Braga recounted.

Abiding By Star Trek History

"Regeneration" was co-written by Mike Sussman and Phyllis Strong. Sussman has said , "I consider myself something of a 'continuity hound'" and he worked to ensure "Regeneration" fit. For instance, he points to implications that the Borg knew about the Federation before the events of "Q Who."

In the "TNG" season 1 finale, "The Neutral Zone," Federation and Romulan colonies are found destroyed, with land appearing to have been "scooped up" off the planets' surfaces. No culprit is identified by the episode's end. In "Q Who," Data (Brent Spiner) notes the damage on the J-25 planets is similar. Ergo, it was the Borg all along. Sussman said he asked himself, "What made [the Borg] interested in our part of the galaxy? Did the Collective have some kind of 'inside information' about Earth or the Federation?"

He used "Regeneration" to offer a "possible answer." In the episode's final scene, Captain Archer (Scott Bakula) and T'Pol (Jolene Blalock) discuss how the Borg sent a message (containing Earth's location) into the galaxy's Delta Quadrant before they were destroyed. They assume this is the species' native region (and we know it is), but the message will take 200 years to arrive. Archer pointedly declares his crew has only postponed an invasion until the 24th century.

When Was First Contact?

Even with Sussman's careful hand, "Regeneration" can't help but feel awkward in places. With all the evidence left over from this taste of the Borg's unrelenting power, you'd think Starfleet would've been more prepared for these mysterious invaders to come knocking back on their front door, even centuries later.

A galling example of this concerns Dr. Phlox (John Billingsley). Halfway through "Regeneration," he's injected with Borg nanites, their go-to method of assimilation. Rather than infecting him instantly like usual, they move slowly (evidently due to a quirk of his alien biology) and he devises a method of destroying them. How was this lost to time?

Archer also finds an old speech that Cochrane gave at the 2064 Princeton commencement, where he (drunkenly) told the truth about what happened during "First Contact" and the alien cyborgs out to enslave humanity. Cochrane is said to have recanted the story, but "Regeneration" would, in-universe, prove its veracity. This ties the episode closer to "First Contact" but is too clever by half. Apparently, knowledge of the Borg on Earth was first recorded not two, but three hundred years before "Q Who."

More generally, the characters can't learn who the Borg are. So, no one ever says or hears the name "Borg." When Enterprise hails the Borg ship and gets the canned "You shall be assimilated, resistance is futile" speech, the Borg noticeably don't introduce themselves.

And yet, this winds up working in the episode's favor by keeping the Borg mysterious and scary. The Enterprise crew doesn't have time to understand them (they never quite put together that their foes are a hive mind) because they must focus on defeating them.

Regeneration Of The Borg

"Regeneration" takes "Enterprise" close to horror the way the Borg's early appearances did to "The Next Generation." Braga even confirmed the episode's arctic set opening is an homage to John Carpenter's "The Thing." This portion of the episode closes with Rooney (Bonita Friedericy) turning around to come face-to-face with the reawakened Borg drone. The shot-reverse-shot (a close-up of Rooney's terrified face and then one of the advancing drone) is right out of a horror movie.

We know how the Borg operate and what they want, but the characters don't. Thus, the Enterprise crew has to learn on the fly and adapt to this new foe before they grow too powerful to overcome. This dramatic irony could be tedious, and indeed, the opening scenes of "Regeneration" are the clunkiest because the dialogue is mostly exposition that the audience doesn't need.

Once the action takes off, though, the characters' metaphorical blindfold makes the episode more thrilling and meaningful. Archer initially wants to save the assimilated people, but we know that's impossible. He only realizes this when he guns down a drone and discovers it was once Rooney.

The layers of the Borg had been peeled back too far by this point, so "Regeneration" could never rival the horror of "Q Who." But it comes as close as it could. The episode even directly mirrors the Borg's debut in some scenes. For instance, Lieutenant Reed (Dominic Keating) and his security team discover a drone tampering with the Enterprise's computers. It doesn't respond to their calls to surrender and then they discover their weapons are ineffective. This is a near recreation of how "Q Who" introduces the first onscreen Borg drone (minus a deity whispering taunts in the Starfleet officers' ears about how screwed they are).

Director David Livingston brings the "Regeneration" script to life with perfect momentum; every moment is slow-building terror or action that leaves the good guys on the run. Braga also praised composer Brian Tyler's score for the episode, and rightfully so. Part of what made the Borg scary in "Q Who" and "The Best of Both Worlds" was Ron Jones' ominous music; Tyler's work for "Regeneration" echoes those leitmotifs.

Had "Enterprise" gone to season 5, husband and wife writing pair Judith and Garfield Reeves-Stevens had a "Regeneration" sequel in mind. Alice Krige, who played the Borg Queen in "First Contact," would return to explore the character's origin. In this episode (which never got further than a pitch), Krige would have played a Starfleet medical officer who encounters leftover drones from "Regeneration" and becomes their Queen.

Frankly, I think this episode is best left unmade. Making the Borg Queen a human renders the "Trek" universe insular. Plus, it would've been pushing the show's luck to bring the Borg back again.

"Star Trek: Enterprise" is filled with stumbles, especially in seasons 1-2. Somehow, though, "Regeneration" is a bad idea that the show pulled off well.

Read the original article on /Film .

Star Trek Enterprise Regeneration Borg drone

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‘Alien Nation,’ ‘Star Trek: Enterprise’ actor Gary Graham dies

Gary Graham

Gary Graham FILE PHOTO: MOONLIGHTING - "Gunfight at the So-So Corral" - Airdate: March 5, 1985. Gary Graham died at the age of 73. (ABC Photo Archives/Disney General Entertainment Con)

Hollywood actor Gary Graham has died.

He was 73 years old.

>> Read more trending news

Variety reported that Graham’s ex-wife Susan Lavelle confirmed his death, adding that the actor’s current wife, Becky Hopkins, was at his side at the time of his passing.

She did not give a cause of death, Deadline reported, but said that his death was “sudden.”

Graham and Lavelle met when he starred on the television show “Alien Nation,” which was based on the feature film of the same name, Variety reported.

He appeared in about 100 other shows and movies including “ JAG ,” “ M.A.N.T.I.S. ” and “ All the Right Moves ,” starring alongside a young Tom Cruise. Graham played Ambassador Soval on “ Star Trek: Enterprise .”

Graham leaves behind his wife and daughter, Variety reported.

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  • David Gail, ‘Port Charles’, ‘Beverly Hills, 90210’ actor, dead at 58
  • Bill Iffrig, knocked down by blast near finish of 2013 Boston Marathon, dead at 89
  • Marlena Shaw, ‘California Soul’ singer, dead at 81

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William Shatner as Kirk and Leonard Nimoy as Spock in Star Trek

Before Captains Kirk and Pike, there was Captain Robert April. Although he is a highly decorated Starfleet captain, NBC wrote him out of the original “Star Trek.”

He debuted in 1974's “Star Trek: The Animated Series,” then didn’t appear again for almost 50 years. Only in 2022 did he finally achieve live-action status on “Strange New Worlds.”

In “Strange New Worlds,” April (Adrian Holmes) is an admiral, having been promoted after his five-year mission on the USS Enterprise, and he eventually earns the rank of commodore.

April's retirement is the impetus for his inclusion in “The Animated Series,” which sees him and his wife save the USS Enterprise from a universe where time flows backward.

It's a safe bet that April will return since he was involved in the ending of “Strange New Worlds” Season 2. Season 3 is expected to pay off on that cliffhanger.

Screen Rant

Every star trek actor who won an oscar.

Many award-winning actors have joined the Star Trek franchise, while others have used their Trek roles as a stepping stone to Oscar gold.

  • Many award-winning actors have been drawn to Star Trek, enticed by the nuanced scripts and rich characters.
  • Several Star Trek movies have been nominated for Oscars, but none of the lead actors have been nominated.
  • Star Trek has had Oscar-winning actors in guest roles, including Joel Grey, Louise Fletcher, and Paul Williams.

Many award-winning actors have been drawn to the Star Trek franchise, while other stars have used their roles as a stepping stone to Oscar gold. While only a handful of Oscar-winning actors have appeared in Star Trek movies and shows before and after their win, many more have been nominated. For example, Star Trek: First Contact 's James Cromwell and Alfre Woodard had both previously been nominated for an Academy Award, for their roles in Babe and Cross Creek , respectively.

Sadly, none of the Star Trek movies have ever seen their lead actors nominated for an Oscar, perhaps due to the Academy's snobbery toward franchise films. While the Academy may look down on the Star Trek franchise, the same can't be said for those actors who have won an award. Many Oscar-winning actors have been drawn to Star Trek over the years, usually enticed by the nuanced scripts and rich characters that they're being asked to play. While Star Trek: Deep Space Nine 's cast featured an Oscar-winning actress in a regular role, Star Trek: Voyager managed to secure the services of two Oscar winners in guest roles.

Only 1 Star Trek Movie Won An Oscar (But Many Were Nominated)

7 joel grey - caylem in star trek: voyager, best actor in a supporting role - cabaret, 1973.

Star Trek: Voyager guest actor Joel Grey had won an Oscar for his role as the Master of Ceremonies in 1972's Cabaret . The Master of Ceremonies was Joel Grey's breakthrough role, leading to an illustrious career on stage and screen. The Voyager production team was keen to reunite Joel Grey and Kate Mulgrew after they'd starred together in the movie Remo Williams: The Adventure Begins . After repeated attempts to cast the Cabaret star, it was the script for the heartbreaking episode "Resistance" that finally convinced Grey to accept a guest role.

Joel Grey also appeared alongside Star Trek: The Next Generation 's Patrick Stewart in the TV movie adaptation of Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol .

6 Louise Fletcher - Kai Winn in Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Best actress - one flew over the cuckoo's nest, 1976.

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine 's Louise Fletcher won the Best Actress Oscar for her role as Nurse Ratched in 1975's One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest . Fletcher was one of six Star Trek actors in the Oscar winning movie , which also starred Jack Nicholson and Danny DeVito. Louise Fletcher also won a Golden Globe in the US, and a BAFTA in the UK for her performance as the chilling psychiatric nurse. Over a decade later, Louise Fletcher brought some of Ratched's chilly inscrutability to the role of religious fundamentalist villain Kai Winn in DS9 .

5 Paul Williams - Koru in Star Trek: Voyager

Best music, original song - a star is born, 1977.

Paul Williams is best known as an Oscar winning composer and songwriter, whose original song "Evergreen (Love Theme from A Star Is Born)" won an Oscar in 1977. However, Paul Williams also has a long list of acting credits to his name, including a role as Koru in the appropriately musical Star Trek: Voyager episode, "Virtuoso". As an Oscar winning musician, Paul Williams was perfectly cast as the alien who took an interest in the musical talents of Voyager 's Doctor (Robert Picardo).

4 F. Murray Abraham - Ru'afo in Star Trek: Insurrection

Best actor in a leading role - amadeus, 1985.

Decades before playing the villainous Ru'afo in Star Trek: Insurrection , F. Murray Abraham won an Oscar for his role as frustrated composer Antonio Salieri in Amadeus . Abraham was unforgettable as the unreliable narrator of the story of Salieri's rivalry with Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Tom Hulce). The later scenes in which F. Murray Abraham wears a latex mask to play the older Salieri was a neat bit of foreshadowing for the heavily made-up ageing Star Trek villain Ru'afo from Insurrection .

Like Star Trek: Deep Space Nine 's Louise Fletcher, F. Murray Abraham won his Oscar in a movie directed by the great Miloš Forman.

Patrick Stewart Doesn't Like Star Trek: Insurrection & Nemesis Either

3 whoopi goldberg - guinan in star trek: the next generation, best actress in a supporting role - ghost, 1991.

Whoopi Goldberg was nominated for Best Actress in a Leading Role for The Color Purple in 1986, the year before Star Trek: The Next Generation premiered. Because of her Oscar nomination, TNG 's producers thought Goldberg was joking when she lobbied for a role in the Star Trek show. Five years later, Whoopi Goldberg had taken time out from playing Guinan in TNG to play the similarly clairvoyant Oda Mae Brown in Ghost . It was her role in Ghost that would win Whoopi Goldberg a Best Actress in a Supporting Role Oscar in 1991 .

2 Christopher Plummer - General Chang in Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country

Best performance by an actor in a supporting role - beginners, 2012.

Christopher Plummer made a huge impression as the Shakespeare-loving Klingon, General Chang in Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country . Despite a career littered with great performances, Christopher Plummer wasn't nominated for an Oscar until 2010. Two years later, Plummer won the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor in the Ewan McGregor movie Beginners in which he played a terminally ill museum director who only came out to his son toward the end of his life. Plummer was again nominated for an Oscar for his performance as J. Paul Getty, which was slotted into Ridley Scott's already-completed All the Money in the World after the disgraced actor Kevin Spacey was removed.

1 Michelle Yeoh - Emperor Philippa Georgiou in Star Trek: Discovery

Best performance by an actress in a leading role - everything everywhere all at once, 2023.

Star Trek 's Michelle Yeoh won an Oscar in 2023 for her role as Evelyn Wang in the mind-bending sci-fi action epic Everything Everywhere All at Once . Incredibly, in the Oscar's 94-year history up to that point, Michelle Yeoh was the first Asian woman to win an Oscar for lead actress . Yeoh has been able to use her Oscar win and her increased profile to drive the Philippa Georgiou spinoff movie Star Trek: Section 31 into production. While Section 31 won't be eligible for the Academy Awards, it proves that the Star Trek franchise continues to attract Oscar-winning talent.

Legendary Singer Dead at 84: Marlena Shaw's Passing Confirmed by Her Daughter

The 'California Soul' singer 'went listening to some of her favorite songs,' her daughter, Marla Bradshaw, announced.

By Allison Schonter - January 24, 2024 09:17 am EST

Marlena Shaw, the legendary jazz singer known for her songs "California Soul" and "Woman of the Ghetto," has died. Shaw's daughter, Marla Bradshaw, announced her mother's passing in a video posted to the singer's Facebook page on Friday, sharing "with a very heavy hear...our beloved mother, your beloved icon and artist Marlena Shaw has passed away today." Shaw was 84, according to her daughter.

Bradshaw did not disclose the singer's cause of death, saying that she was not going to share "too many details" about her mother's passing, adding, "When it's needing to be known, it will be." She did, however, share that Shaw "went very peacefully... She went listening to some of her favorite songs." She added, "We were at peace... I just want to thank you all for being on her page. Thank you for being a part of her life. Especially these last three years, which made her very happy."

So sorry to hear that Jazz icon Marlena Shaw has passed away. What a powerhouse of soul, sass and tenderness! Such a powerful legacy she leaves behind. Deepest condolences to her family and loved ones. pic.twitter.com/JLKRcFhI2X — Sister Sledge (@SisterSledge_) January 20, 2024

Born in in New Rochelle, New York in 1939, Shaw began her career in the 1960s after she was noticed by the Chess Records label, according to The Hollywood Reporter . Under the label's subsidiary Cadet Records, she released several albums, including Out of Different Bags (1967) and The Spice of Life (1969), which featured her version of Ashford & Simpson's "California Soul" and "Woman of the Ghetto." She went on to sign with Universal Music Group's Blue Note in 1972, making history as their first female vocalist. While with Blue Note, she released a total of five albums – including Marlena , From the Depths of My Soul , and Just a Matter of Time – and several singles, according to their biography of her , which said Shaw "dazzled audiences with her intoxicating blend of straight-ahead jazz, soul, pop, and classic R&B." In total, Shaw toured for more than 50 years and put out 17 albums across eight different labels.

"We are saddened by the passing of Marlena Shaw, a wonderful singer whose 'California Soul' is as popular today as it ever was and whose album It Is Love: Recorded Live at Vine St. helped relaunch the Verve label in 1987," Verve Records, who worked with Shaw in 1987, shared in a statement .

In the Facebook video announcing her mother's passing, Bradshaw said, "thank you in advance for your prayers and comfort for our family," sharing a P.O. Box address where fans can send their condolences. She concluded, "thank you all for being on her [Facebook] page, thank you for being a part of her life. Especially these last three years, which made her really happy."

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IMAGES

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  2. Star Trek Enterprise Theme Tune 'Faith of the heart'

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  5. Star Trek Enterprise Official Theme Song in HD

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  6. Star Trek Enterprise

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COMMENTS

  1. Faith of the Heart

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  3. Who sang the Enterprise theme ...

    Who sang the Enterprise theme ... Question: Who sang the Enterprise theme song, "Faith of the Heart"? It wasn't Rod Stewart, but could it have been Scott Bakula, aka Captain Jonathan...

  4. Enterprise (soundtrack)

    The song was written by Diane Warren and sung by Russell Watson. A version of the song that had been re-recorded for Watson's album Encore appeared alongside the version that accompanied the opening credits of the television series.

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    ...more Show Enterprise: Season 1 : Broken Bow, Pt. 1 Extended version of the Star Trek - Enterprise opening theme.

  6. Russell Watson

    Russell Watson (born 24 November 1966; age 57) is an English vocalist and tenor who sang the opening theme song from Star Trek: Enterprise entitled "Where My Heart Will Take Me", which was originally recorded as "Faith of the Heart" by Rod Stewart for the film Patch Adams. The song was remixed with a faster beat for Enterprise's third season. Hailing from Salford, Greater Manchester, England ...

  7. Where My Heart Will Take Me

    Song history []. The version for Enterprise was performed by Russell Watson.It remains the only Star Trek theme song besides Star Trek: The Original Series that is not completely an instrumental, orchestral piece, the only theme to have sung lyrics, and is the only theme that is not a composition original to the franchise. "Where My Heart Will Take Me" was played for the crew of the space ...

  8. Faith Of The Heart by Rod Stewart

    In 2001, the song was re-recorded by British opera singer Russell Watson under the title "Where My Heart Will Take Me," to be used as the theme song for Enterprise, the fifth TV series in the Star Trek franchise and a prequel to the original series.

  9. Theme from Star Trek

    The " Theme from Star Trek " (originally scored under the title "Where No Man Has Gone Before") [1] is an instrumental musical piece composed by Alexander Courage for Star Trek, the science fiction television series created by Gene Roddenberry that originally aired between September 8, 1966, and June 3, 1969. History

  10. Star Trek: Enterprise Music

    Main Theme for the mirror universe intro (In a Mirror, Darkly, Part 1).Composed by Dennis McCarthy

  11. Where My Heart Will Take Me (Theme From "Enterprise")

    Now I finally have my day. And I will see my dream come alive at night. I will touch the sky. And they're not gonna hold me down no more. No they're not gonna change my mind. [Refrain] Cause I've ...

  12. The Story Behind 'Star Trek: Enterprise' and Its Infamous Intro Song

    The song was initially performed by Rod Stewart. They hired British pop singer Russell Watson to record the "Star Trek" version of the song. "We recorded the song and put it to the...

  13. The Story Behind The Star Trek Franchise's Most Controversial Theme Song

    Russell Watson began his singing career as a mere lad and began winning radio singing contests in his 20s. In 1999, he sang "God Save the Queen" at the rugby Challenge Cup Final at Wembley Stadium,...

  14. Why Star Trek: Enterprise Had THAT Terrible Theme Song

    TV News Why Star Trek: Enterprise Had THAT Terrible Theme Song By Robert Vaux Published Apr 4, 2021 "Where My Heart Will Take Me," the opening theme to Star Trek: Enterprise, had reason to be scorned. Over time, however, its reputation has improved.

  15. Every 'Star Trek' Theme Song Ranked

    But this time "Where My Heart Will Take Me" was sung by British opera tenor Russell Watson instead of Rod Stewart. The discordance was clearly no accident. Enterprise was meant to stand apart...

  16. Star Trek: Enterprise Soundtrack (2001)

    Star Trek: Enterprise soundtrack from 2001, composed by Paul Baillargeon, David Bell, Velton Ray Bunch, Jay Chattaway, John Frizzell, Kevin Kiner, Dennis McCarthy, Mark McKenzie, Brian Tyler. Released by La-La Land Records in 2014 (LLLCD 1330) containing music from Star Trek: Enterprise (2001).

  17. Star Trek: Enterprise Theme Song Lyrics

    I will see my dream come alive at last. I will touch the sky. An' they're not gonna hold me down no more. No they're not gonna change my mind. No they're not gonna hold me down. 'Cause I've got faith of the heart. I'm going where my heart will take me. I've got faith to believe.

  18. "We Hate The Enterprise Theme Song": Star Trek's Dr. Phlox Actor

    John Billingsley recalls fans protesting Star Trek: Enterprise's theme song, "Where My Heart Will Take Me," shortly after 9/11. The theme song and series finale of Enterprise continue to be widely disliked by fans. Despite the controversy, the show has gained new appreciation and a more appreciative audience through streaming.

  19. Star Trek Enterprise Full Theme Song

    1.5K 220K views 13 years ago Star Trek Enterprise theme in full. Song by Russel Watson- "Where My Heart Will Take Me". ...more ...more Star Trek Enterprise theme in full. Song by...

  20. The Best Singers In Star Trek's Subspace Rhapsody, Ranked From ...

    La'an Noonien Singh, the Enterprise's uptight security chief, is played by Christina Chong. On top of her acting, Chong is a singer with the solos "Twin Flames," "No Blame," and "Can't Show Love ...

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    Warning: contains spoilers for Star Trek #15!. Scotty has named the Star Trek: The Next Generation hero who best embodies the original Enterprise spirit. Scotty, the chief engineer of the Enterprise under Captain Kirk, has joined Sisko and the crew of the Theseus, which also includes Doctor Beverly Crusher and Tom Paris.Now, in Star Trek #15, Scotty confesses that one of his Theseus crewmates ...

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    Subspace Rhapsody Brought Music Back to Star Trek . Star Trek: Strange New Worlds ... Taking place 20 years after we last saw Captain Jean-Luc Picard command the U.S.S. Enterprise, Star Trek: ...

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    "Star Trek: Enterprise" soldiered on for four seasons, but really, the death knell happened early in season 2. The season's ratings peaked with its fifth episode, "A Night In Sickbay," at 6.26 ...

  24. 'Alien Nation,' 'Star Trek: Enterprise' actor Gary Graham dies

    Variety reported that Graham's ex-wife Susan Lavelle confirmed his death, adding that the actor's current wife, Becky Hopkins, was at his side at the time of his passing. She did not give a ...

  25. Star Trek: Enterprise theme song

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  26. Star Trek: What Happened To The Enterprise Captain Before Pike ...

    He debuted in 1974's "Star Trek: The Animated Series," then didn't appear again for almost 50 years. Only in 2022 did he finally achieve live-action status on "Strange New Worlds."

  27. Every Star Trek Actor Who Won An Oscar

    Star Trek: Voyager guest actor Joel Grey had won an Oscar for his role as the Master of Ceremonies in 1972's Cabaret.The Master of Ceremonies was Joel Grey's breakthrough role, leading to an illustrious career on stage and screen. The Voyager production team was keen to reunite Joel Grey and Kate Mulgrew after they'd starred together in the movie Remo Williams: The Adventure Begins.

  28. Star Trek: Enterprise Music

    Music from the ending of These Are The Voyages series finale - "Heroic / Trek Theme Montage". Composed by Dennis McCarthy, Kevin Kiner, Alexander Courage and...

  29. Legendary Singer Dead at 84: Marlena Shaw's Passing Confirmed by Her

    Marlena Shaw, the legendary jazz singer known for her songs "California Soul" and "Woman of the Ghetto," has died. Shaw's daughter, Marla Bradshaw, announced her mother's passing in a video posted to the singer's Facebook page on Friday, sharing "with a very heavy hear...our beloved mother, your beloved icon and artist Marlena Shaw has passed away today."