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Trippin Meaning: What’s the Definition of this Slang Term?

Trippin’ is a slang term that’s been around for decades, and it’s used to describe someone who is acting in a foolish or irrational manner. It can also refer to the experience of being under the influence of a mind-altering substance, particularly hallucinogens like LSD or mushrooms.

Overall, trippin’ is a versatile term that can be used in a variety of contexts. While it’s often associated with drug use, it can also be used to describe someone who is acting foolishly or irrationally for other reasons. Whether you’re trying to understand the meaning of a slang term or you’re just curious about the language that people use, learning about the meaning of trippin’ can be a fun and interesting experience.

Trippin Meaning

Trippin Meaning: What's the Definition of this Slang Term?

What Does Trippin Mean?

Trippin is a slang term that is often used to describe someone who is acting irrationally, or who is under the influence of hallucinogenic drugs. The term has become popular in recent years, particularly among young people, and is often used in casual conversation.

When someone is trippin, they might be acting in a foolish or irrational manner. They might be saying things that don’t make sense, or doing things that seem strange or out of character. In some cases, they might be experiencing hallucinations or other effects of a mind-altering substance.

Here are some examples of how the term trippin might be used in conversation:

  • “Why are you trippin? I didn’t mean anything by it.”
  • “Man, I was really trippin last night. I don’t even remember what happened.”
  • “Don’t worry, I’m not trippin. I know what I’m doing.”

The term trippin is often associated with the use of hallucinogenic drugs, particularly LSD or acid. When someone is trippin on these substances, they might experience vivid hallucinations, altered perceptions of reality, or other unusual effects. However, it’s important to note that not everyone who uses these drugs will experience these effects, and that they can be dangerous if not used responsibly.

Origin of Trippin

The origins of the term “trippin'” are somewhat unclear, but it’s likely that it evolved from the idea of taking a trip, which was a popular term for getting high in the 1960s. Over time, the term has taken on a broader meaning and is now used to describe a wide range of behaviors and experiences. Whether you’re feeling a little out of control or you’re just having a good time, you might find yourself using the term “trippin'” to describe your state of mind.

Usage of Trippin in Different Contexts

Trippin in music.

Trippin is a slang term that has been used in music for decades. It is a popular term in hip-hop and rap music, often used to describe being under the influence of drugs. In this section, we will explore how the term “trippin” has been used in music and provide some examples.

One of the most famous songs that uses the term “trippin” is “Trippin’ On A Hole In A Paper Heart” by Stone Temple Pilots. The song was released in 1996 and features the lyrics “I’m not dead and I’m not for sale, hold me closer and I’ll nail ya”. The song is about addiction and the struggles that come with it.

Another song that uses the term “trippin” is “Trippin'” by Toni Braxton. The song was released in 2005 and features the lyrics “I’m trippin’, I’m caught up in the moment, right now, right now”. The song is about being infatuated with someone and feeling like you’re losing control.

In hip-hop, the term “trippin” is often used to describe being under the influence of drugs. For example, in the song “Trippin'” by Future, he raps “I’m trippin’, I’m trippin’, I’m trippin’ off the lean”. In this context, “lean” refers to a mixture of cough syrup and soda that is often used as a recreational drug.

Trippin in Film and Television

Trippin is a term that has been featured in various movies and TV shows. It is often used to describe characters who are under the influence of drugs or are acting crazy. Here are some examples of how the term has been used in popular media:

  • In the 1999 comedy movie “Trippin,” four high school students go on a wild adventure after they accidentally ingest a drug that they thought was aspirin. The movie follows their misadventures as they try to make it back home before their parents find out what they have been up to.
  • In the TV show “Breaking Bad,” the character Jesse Pinkman often uses the term “trippin” to describe his state of mind when he is under the influence of drugs. The term is also used by other characters in the show to describe Jesse’s erratic behavior.
  • In the movie “Pineapple Express,” the characters played by Seth Rogen and James Franco go on a crazy adventure after they witness a murder and are chased by drug dealers. The term “trippin” is used to describe their state of mind as they try to navigate their way out of danger.

As you can see, the term “trippin” is often used in movies and TV shows to add humor or drama to a scene. It is a slang term that is commonly used to describe someone who is acting crazy or is under the influence of drugs.

Trippin in Literature

Trippin has been a popular slang term for decades, and it has found its way into various forms of literature. From song lyrics to novels, trippin has been used to describe a wide range of experiences, both good and bad.

In the novel “On the Road” by Jack Kerouac, the protagonist Sal Paradise goes on a road trip across America with his friend Dean Moriarty. Throughout the book, Sal and Dean are often trippin on various drugs, including marijuana and Benzedrine. The use of trippin in this context represents the freedom and rebellion of the Beat Generation.

In the song “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds” by The Beatles, the lyrics describe a trippy, psychedelic experience. The use of trippin in this song represents the mind-altering effects of LSD and the counterculture movement of the 1960s.

In the poem “Howl” by Allen Ginsberg , trippin is used to describe the madness and chaos of modern society. The use of trippin in this context represents the disorientation and confusion of the Beat Generation.

Trippin in Internet Culture

Trippin has become a widely used term in internet culture. It is often used to describe a situation where someone is acting irrational or crazy. It can also be used to describe someone who is under the influence of drugs or alcohol. In some cases, it can even be used to describe a situation where someone is experiencing a hallucination.

The term is often used in online forums and social media platforms. It is commonly used as a hashtag or in captions for photos or videos. For example, someone might post a photo of themselves at a party and caption it “Trippin with my friends tonight!”.

In addition to its use in social media, the term is also used in online gaming communities. For example, if someone is playing a game and makes a mistake, they might say “Sorry guys, I’m trippin tonight!”.

Misunderstandings and Misuses of Trippin

Trippin is a slang term that has become increasingly popular in recent years, especially among young people. However, with its growing popularity, there have been some misunderstandings and misuses of the term. Here are some common misconceptions about trippin:

  • Trippin always refers to being high on drugs. While trippin can refer to being under the influence of drugs, it can also be used to describe someone who is acting crazy or irrational. For example, if someone is overreacting to a situation, you might say, “You’re trippin, calm down.”
  • Trippin only refers to hallucinogenic drugs. Trippin is often associated with hallucinogenic drugs like LSD or mushrooms, but it can also refer to being under the influence of other substances or even just being in a heightened emotional state.
  • Trippin is always negative. While trippin is often used to describe negative behavior, it can also be used in a positive context. For example, if you’re having a great time at a party, you might say, “I’m trippin, this is so much fun!”

It’s important to understand the different ways in which trippin can be used in order to avoid misunderstandings. Whether you’re using it to describe someone’s behavior or your own state of mind, be sure to use it in the appropriate context.

Frequently Asked Questions

What does ‘trippin’ mean in slang?

In slang, ‘trippin’ means that someone is acting foolishly, thinking crazy thoughts, or being extremely high. It can also mean that someone is overreacting or talking nonsense. For example, if someone says, “You’re trippin, man,” they are telling that person to calm down or stop acting crazy.

What’s the meaning of ‘I’m not trippin’?

‘I’m not trippin’ is a phrase used to say that you are not worried or bothered by something. It can also mean that you are not under the influence of drugs or alcohol. For example, if someone says, “I’m not trippin over that,” they are saying that they are not concerned about that particular issue.

What’s the difference between ‘trippin’ and ‘drippin’?

‘Trippin’ and ‘drippin’ are two different slang terms. ‘Trippin’ means acting foolishly or being extremely high, while ‘drippin’ means wearing expensive or fashionable clothing. For example, if someone says, “You’re trippin, man,” they are telling that person to stop acting crazy. If someone says, “I’m drippin in this outfit,” they are saying that they are wearing an expensive or fashionable outfit.

What does ‘trippin for someone’ mean?

‘Trippin for someone’ means that someone has a crush or is infatuated with someone else. For example, if someone says, “I’m trippin for her,” they are saying that they have a crush on her.

What’s the slang meaning of ‘jit trippin’?

‘Jit trippin’ is a slang term that means someone is acting foolishly or being extremely high. ‘Jit’ is a slang term for a young person or someone who is inexperienced. For example, if someone says, “That jit is trippin,” they are saying that the young person is acting foolishly.

What’s the meaning of ‘trippin on skies’ in slang?

‘Trippin on skies’ is a slang term that means someone is hallucinating or having a psychedelic experience. It is often used to describe the effects of drugs like LSD or shrooms. For example, if someone says, “I’m trippin on skies right now,” they are saying that they are having a psychedelic experience.

Last Updated on October 31, 2023

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Trippin’ Meaning: Understanding the Slang Term

By: Author English Study Online

Posted on Last updated: November 1, 2023

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If you’ve ever heard someone say “you trippin’,” you might be wondering what they mean. The slang term “trippin'” has been around for decades, but its meaning has evolved over time. Today, it’s commonly used to describe someone who is overreacting or acting irrationally.

Trippin’ Meaning

Trippin' Meaning: What Does It Really Mean?

Table of Contents

What Does Trippin’ Mean?

Trippin’ is a slang term that has several meanings depending on the context it is used in. Here are some of the most common interpretations of the term:

  • Overreacting: One of the most common meanings of trippin’ is when someone is overreacting or getting worked up over something minor. It is often used to advise someone to calm down or not make a big deal out of something.
  • Under the influence of hallucinogenic drugs: Another meaning of trippin’ is to be under the influence of hallucinogenic drugs. When someone is trippin’ in this context, they may experience altered perceptions of reality, such as seeing things that are not there or hearing sounds that do not exist.
  • Acting foolishly: Trippin’ can also mean that someone is acting foolishly or making irrational decisions. This interpretation of the term is often used in situations where someone is making poor choices or behaving in a way that is not typical for them.
  • Being in a daze: Trippin’ can also refer to being in a daze or feeling disconnected from reality. This interpretation of the term is often used to describe someone who is daydreaming or lost in thought.

Origins of Trippin’

Trippin’ is a slang term used to describe someone who is acting foolishly or thinking crazy thoughts. It can also refer to someone who is under the influence of drugs, particularly psychedelic drugs like LSD or mushrooms. The origins of the term are somewhat unclear, but it likely comes from the idea of taking a trip, or journey, while on drugs.

The term trippin’ first appeared in the 1960s and 1970s, during the height of the counterculture movement. At this time, many young people were experimenting with drugs and exploring new ways of thinking and living. Trippin’ became a popular term among this group, as it captured the sense of adventure and exploration that many were feeling.

Over time, the term trippin’ has become more mainstream, and is now used by people of all ages and backgrounds. It has also taken on a broader meaning, and can be used to describe anyone who is acting strangely or out of character. For example, you might say that someone is trippin’ if they are overreacting to a minor issue or behaving irrationally.

Despite its somewhat ambiguous origins, trippin’ remains a popular and widely used term in contemporary slang. Whether you’re talking about drugs or just someone who is acting a little crazy, trippin’ is a versatile and useful term that has stood the test of time.

Usage of Trippin’ in Different Contexts

Trippin’ has been a popular slang term in American culture for many years. It has been used in various forms of entertainment, including music, movies, and television. Here are some examples of how trippin’ has been used in popular culture.

Trippin’ in Music

Trippin’ has been used in many songs across different genres. It is often used to describe someone who is acting crazy or out of control. For example, in the song “Trippin'” by Toni Braxton, she sings about a guy who is acting crazy and making her feel like she’s losing her mind. Another example is the song “Trippin’ on a Hole in a Paper Heart” by Stone Temple Pilots, which is about someone who is struggling with addiction and the effects it has on their life.

Trippin’ in Movies

Trippin’ has been used in several movies over the years. It is often used to describe someone who is under the influence of drugs or alcohol. For example, in the movie “Half Baked,” the character Thurgood Jenkins says, “I’m trippin’, man,” after smoking weed laced with PCP. Another example is the movie “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas,” which is about two guys who take a trip to Las Vegas and get into all sorts of crazy situations while under the influence of drugs.

Trippin’ in Television

Trippin’ has also been used in many television shows. It is often used to describe someone who is acting crazy or out of control. For example, in the TV show “Breaking Bad,” Jesse Pinkman says, “I’m trippin’, man,” after taking drugs and hallucinating. Another example is the TV show “Atlanta,” where the character Darius says, “You’re trippin’,” to someone who is acting paranoid and delusional.

Trippin’ in Internet

Trippin’ is a popular slang term used in internet communication. It has become a part of the modern lexicon and is widely used on social media platforms, chat rooms, and online forums. The term is used to describe various situations and emotions, and its meaning can vary depending on the context.

Here are some common uses of trippin’ in internet slang:

  • Acting Irrationally: When someone is overreacting or behaving in an irrational manner, they are said to be trippin’. For example, “Why are you trippin’ over such a small thing?”
  • Under the Influence: Trippin’ is often used to describe someone who is under the influence of hallucinogenic drugs. For example, “He was trippin’ on acid last night.”
  • Being Paranoid: When someone is overly suspicious or paranoid, they are said to be trippin’. For example, “Why are you trippin’ about me talking to her? She’s just a friend.”
  • Being Amazed: Trippin’ can also be used to describe a feeling of amazement or awe. For example, “I was trippin’ when I saw the view from the top of the mountain.”

In internet slang, trippin’ is often used in casual conversations and can be a way to express a wide range of emotions and experiences. It is a versatile term that can be used to describe both positive and negative situations.

Variations of Trippin’

When it comes to slang, there are often multiple variations of a word or phrase. Trippin’ is no exception. Here are a few variations of trippin’ that you may come across:

  • Trippin’ out: This variation of trippin’ is often used to describe someone who is “freaking out” or “being extremely high.” For example, “Dude, I took way too much of that edible and now I’m trippin’ out.”
  • Set trippin’: This variation of trippin’ is often used in gang culture to describe someone who is starting trouble or “acting up” within their own gang or another gang’s territory. For example, “Don’t mess with him, he’s set trippin’ and looking for a fight.”
  • Sweatin’: This variation of trippin’ is often used to describe someone who is worrying or stressing out about something. For example, “Why are you sweatin’ so hard about that test? You studied all week.”
  • Geekin’: This variation of trippin’ is often used to describe someone who is acting strange or “out of it.” For example, “Why is he laughing so hard at that joke? He must be geekin’.”
  • Turnt: This variation of trippin’ is often used to describe someone who is extremely excited or hyped up about something. For example, “I’m so turnt for this concert, I can’t wait!”

As you can see, there are many variations of trippin’ that can be used in different contexts. It’s important to understand the context in which the word is being used to fully grasp its meaning.

Global Influence of Trippin’

Trippin’ is a slang term that has gained popularity across the globe, especially among the younger generation. It is used to describe someone who is acting foolishly or is under the influence of hallucinogenic drugs. The term has become a part of everyday language in many countries and is often used in movies, TV shows, and music.

In the United States, trippin’ has been a popular slang term since the 1990s. It has been used in rap songs and has become a part of the hip-hop culture. The term has also spread to other parts of the world, including Europe, Asia, and Australia. It is now commonly used in everyday conversations and social media posts.

In Australia, trippin’ is often used to describe someone who is overreacting or being overly dramatic. It has become a popular term among young people and is often used in casual conversations. The term has also been used in Australian movies and TV shows, further contributing to its popularity.

In Europe, trippin’ has become a part of the youth culture and is often used in music and social media. It is commonly used to describe someone who is acting crazy or is under the influence of drugs. The term has become so popular that it has been included in some European dictionaries.

Controversies and Criticisms about Trippin’

When it comes to slang, there are always controversies and criticisms surrounding certain words or phrases. Trippin’ is no exception. Some people argue that the term is offensive and derogatory, especially when used to describe someone who is acting crazy or irrational. They believe that it is a form of ableism that perpetuates negative stereotypes about mental health issues.

Others argue that the term is harmless and simply a part of modern slang. They point to the fact that many slang terms have origins in offensive language but have evolved over time to take on different meanings. They also argue that using the term trippin’ to describe someone who is acting crazy or irrational is not necessarily a negative thing, as it can also be used in a playful or lighthearted way.

Ultimately, whether or not you choose to use the term trippin’ is up to you. It is important to be aware of the potential controversies and criticisms surrounding the term, but ultimately, the decision to use it or not is a personal one.

If you do choose to use the term, it is important to be mindful of the context in which you are using it. Using it to describe someone who is struggling with mental health issues or to perpetuate negative stereotypes is not acceptable. However, using it in a playful or lighthearted way among friends may be more acceptable.

In any case, it is important to remember that slang is always evolving and changing. What may be considered acceptable today may not be tomorrow, and vice versa. It is important to stay informed and aware of the potential controversies and criticisms surrounding slang terms like trippin’.

Frequently Asked Questions

What does it mean when someone says “I ain’t trippin’?”

When someone says “I ain’t trippin’,” it means they are not bothered or concerned about something. It’s a way of saying that they are not letting something affect them or get in the way of their happiness. For example, if someone cancels plans last minute, you might say “I ain’t trippin’, we can reschedule.”

What does it mean when someone is “trippin’ for someone?”

When someone is “trippin’ for someone,” it means they have a strong interest or infatuation with that person. It’s often used in a romantic context, and can mean that the person is obsessing over the other person or acting in a way that seems irrational. For example, if someone is constantly talking about and trying to impress their crush, you might say “they’re really trippin’ for them.”

What does it mean when a woman is “trippin’?”

When a woman is “trippin’,” it can mean a few different things depending on the context. It can mean that she is overreacting or being overly emotional about something, or it can mean that she is acting in a way that is irrational or nonsensical. For example, if a woman is upset because her partner didn’t text her back right away, you might say “she’s really trippin’ over nothing.”

What does it mean when a guy says “you’re trippin’?”

When a guy says “you’re trippin’,” it means that he thinks you’re acting crazy or irrational. It’s often used when someone is upset or overreacting about something that seems trivial or unimportant. For example, if you’re upset because your friend didn’t invite you to a party, your friend might say “you’re trippin’, it’s not a big deal.”

What does “stop trippin'” mean?

“Stop trippin'” is a way of telling someone to calm down and stop overreacting or being irrational. It’s often used in a lighthearted or joking way, and can be a way of diffusing tense situations. For example, if someone is upset because they lost a game, you might say “stop trippin’, it’s just a game.”

What is another word for “trippin’?”

Another word for “trippin'” is “freaking out.” It has a similar meaning and is often used in the same context. For example, if someone is upset because they lost their phone, you might say “they’re freaking out over nothing.”

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When someone says \"I ain't trippin',\" it means they are not bothered or concerned about something. It's a way of saying that they are not letting something affect them or get in the way of their happiness. For example, if someone cancels plans last minute, you might say \"I ain't trippin', we can reschedule.\"

"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"What does it mean when someone is \"trippin' for someone?\"","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

When someone is \"trippin' for someone,\" it means they have a strong interest or infatuation with that person. It's often used in a romantic context, and can mean that the person is obsessing over the other person or acting in a way that seems irrational. For example, if someone is constantly talking about and trying to impress their crush, you might say \"they're really trippin' for them.\"

"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"What does it mean when a woman is \"trippin'?\"","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

When a woman is \"trippin',\" it can mean a few different things depending on the context. It can mean that she is overreacting or being overly emotional about something, or it can mean that she is acting in a way that is irrational or nonsensical. For example, if a woman is upset because her partner didn't text her back right away, you might say \"she's really trippin' over nothing.\"

"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"What does it mean when a guy says \"you're trippin'?\"","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

When a guy says \"you're trippin',\" it means that he thinks you're acting crazy or irrational. It's often used when someone is upset or overreacting about something that seems trivial or unimportant. For example, if you're upset because your friend didn't invite you to a party, your friend might say \"you're trippin', it's not a big deal.\"

"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"What does \"stop trippin'\" mean?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

\"Stop trippin'\" is a way of telling someone to calm down and stop overreacting or being irrational. It's often used in a lighthearted or joking way, and can be a way of diffusing tense situations. For example, if someone is upset because they lost a game, you might say \"stop trippin', it's just a game.\"

"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"What is another word for \"trippin'?\"","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

Another word for \"trippin'\" is \"freaking out.\" It has a similar meaning and is often used in the same context. For example, if someone is upset because they lost their phone, you might say \"they're freaking out over nothing.\"

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Green’s Dictionary of Slang

Set trip v..

1. ( US gang ) to attack another gang; thus as n.

2. ( US prison ) to move from one gang to another.

America’s 10 Most Commonly Misunderstood Slang Terms

By ellen gutoskey | may 13, 2024.

Blucifer, anyone?

It’s no surprise that a country as large as the United States is teeming with terms that aren’t understood from coast to coast. Preply recently set out to determine which ones cause the most confusion.

First, researchers used data from two sites, OnlyInYourState and EnjoyTravel.com , to create a list of state-specific terms. They then asked 1028 U.S. residents to guess what they thought each one meant. The 10 terms that were wrongly defined most frequently are listed below (along with some entertaining honorable mentions).

There are a few things to note before you dive in. For one, state slang is a lot like state food in that it doesn’t exactly adhere to state boundaries. Many of the terms below can be heard outside the states associated with them in this single study.

For another, the study positions all the terms as slang —but some of them might be more aptly classified as regionalisms. Slang is typically very informal and mostly confined to informal spaces (e.g. on social media or in conversations with friends). Regionalisms aren’t necessarily unofficial; their defining characteristic is just that they’re specific to a certain region. For example, the term borrow pit , which refers to an excavation ditch, boasts an entry in the dictionary and is featured on Montana’s state website .

Lastly, what survey respondents thought a given term meant wasn’t always “wrong,” per se; it was often just an alternate (and more common) definition for that term. But they did invent a few funny definitions when no other well-known options came to mind.

You can explore more takeaways from Preply’s study here .

Tavern // South Dakota

Right out straight // maine, carry // mississippi, grill // new york, gnarly // california, dirty bird // kentucky, grinds // hawaii, borrow pit // montana, put out // missouri, blucifer // colorado, honorable mentions.

In South Dakota, a tavern isn’t always—as most survey participants assumed—a bar. Sometimes, it’s a ground-beef sandwich similar to a sloppy joe. There’s a contingent of people who feel strongly that the difference between a sloppy joe and a tavern is tomato: Sloppy joes feature a tomato-based sauce , and taverns typically don’t. But there are tavern recipes that call for some form of tomato ( ketchup , for example).

Preply’s survey-takers generally thought right out straight involved telling the truth—perhaps influenced by straight in the “honorable” and “upstanding” sense. (Not to mention the phrase give it to me straight .) If you’re right out straight in Maine, though, it means you’re really busy .

The common assumption was that carry in Mississippi meant “to have a gun on your person.” And it does mean that—but it can also mean “to drive (someone),” in the same way you might say, “I have to take my mom to the airport.”

group of people staring right at the camera

The New York–specific definition of grill is “to stare rudely.” Most respondents identified its not-so-regional meaning: “to ask a lot of questions.”

Gnarly is such a classic bit of ’80s slang that you can’t fault respondents for assuming it’s a synonym for cool . If a Californian (or any surfer) calls a wave “gnarly,” though, they probably mean it’s huge and daunting.

KFC logo showing Colonel Sanders on a red background

Using dirty bird to describe “an unappealing individual,” per Green’s Dictionary of Slang, dates back to the mid-20th century. Many survey participants correctly named that as a possible definition, but they didn’t realize that Kentuckians also use it to mean “ KFC .”

Respondents assumed grinds means the same thing in Hawaii as it does everywhere else: “works really hard.” But it’s actually slang for food , often spelled with a z : grindz .

water-filled ditch beside a tree-lined road

A borrow pit is a pit formed when material is excavated (i.e. borrowed) from it and relocated somewhere else. It can also refer to a drainage ditch beside a road. Respondents unfamiliar with the term dreamed up a pretty creative definition of their own: “donation box.”

Survey participants defined put out as a somewhat vulgar euphemism for agreeing to have sex. In Missouri, though, it’s often not something you do, but something you are: angry or peeved .

a massive blue fiberglass mustang, with glowing red eyes, standing on its hind legs

If you’ve never heard the term Blucifer before, you might do what Preply’s respondents did and assume it’s another term for blue devil . (That said, it’s unclear what kind of blue devil people were picturing: It’s Duke University’s mascot , the sobriquet of a U.S. infantry division active in both world wars, and also an old-timey expression for a bout of depression .) But Blucifer is actually the colloquial nickname for the seemingly sinister 32-foot-tall fiberglass blue horse that looms over Denver International Airport. The official name of the statue, created by Luis Jiménez, is simply Mustang .

These five terms weren’t misunderstood by quite enough people to make the top 10, but we still think they deserve a shout-out.

Learn More Regional Slang Terms Here:

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Decoding Street Slang: What Does ‘DP’ Mean?

SlangSensei

March 24, 2024

Introduction to Street Slang and ‘DP’

Welcome to the vibrant world of street slang! Have you ever come across the acronym ‘DP’ and wondered what it means? Well, get ready for an exciting journey as we decode this intriguing piece of urban lingo. Street slang is like a rich tapestry that expresses the unique language and culture of different communities. It’s a secret code that connects people, signaling belonging and understanding. In this blog post, we will unravel the meaning and origins of ‘DP’, explore its various contexts, and even dive into some jaw-dropping examples of how it’s used in everyday conversations. Are you ready to unlock the hidden depths of street slang? Let’s dive right in!

‘DP’ Meaning and Origins

‘DP’, in the realm of street slang, stands for a captivating phrase with a multitude of meanings. Originating from the vibrant streets and diverse subcultures, ‘DP’ is like an ever-evolving linguistic puzzle that keeps us on our toes. As slang words often take on different interpretations depending on their context, ‘DP’ is no exception. While it may hint at one idea for some individuals, others might associate it with an entirely different concept altogether.

The origins of ‘DP’ remain somewhat elusive, as is the case with many slang terms that emerge and spread organically within various communities. It’s believed to have emerged from the inventive minds and spirited conversations between individuals who sought a unique way to express themselves outside of formal language boundaries.

This seemingly innocent combination of two simple letters has showcased incredible versatility over time. Depending on who you ask or where you encounter it, ‘DP’ can signify anything from “double penetration” in certain adult contexts to “display picture” or “profile picture” in online communication platforms such as social media.

Understanding the true meaning behind ‘DP’ requires more than just deciphering its surface-level definition; it entails delving into subcultures, examining social contexts, and embracing linguistic fluidity. So buckle up as we navigate through this intriguing world where slang becomes a language all its own!

Usage and Context of ‘DP’

The usage and context of ‘DP’ vary greatly depending on the social setting and the individuals involved. This versatile term has infiltrated different aspects of modern communication, leaving its mark in various online platforms, casual conversations, and even certain subcultures. Let’s explore how ‘DP’ finds its way into everyday language and the nuanced contexts it can inhabit.

In online interactions, particularly on social media platforms, ‘DP’ often refers to a person’s profile picture or display picture. It’s a convenient shorthand used to discuss someone’s visual representation without explicitly saying “profile picture.” As our digital presence becomes increasingly important in today’s world, understanding this usage is crucial for effective communication within these virtual spaces.

However, it must be noted that ‘DP’ can extend beyond the realm of innocent profile pictures. In certain adult contexts or explicit conversations, it may carry a more provocative meaning referring to “double penetration,” an intimate act between consenting adults. This particular usage is explicit in nature and reserved for specific situations where mature content is openly discussed among like-minded individuals.

It’s essential to navigate these waters with caution and always consider the appropriate context when using or encountering ‘DP’. Being mindful of one another’s comfort levels is key to fostering inclusive and respectful dialogue within diverse communities.

So whether you come across ‘DP’ while browsing through profiles or engaging in lively banter with friends online, remember that understanding its nuanced usage plays a vital role in effective communication within different social landscapes.

Variations and Synonyms of ‘DP’

When it comes to street slang, ‘DP’ is just the tip of the iceberg. This colorful world of linguistic creativity is filled with variations and synonyms that add flavor to conversations and keep the language alive. Let’s explore some of the alternative expressions and synonymous terms that exist alongside ‘DP’.

One common variation you may encounter is “avi,” short for avatar, which can be used interchangeably with ‘DP’ in online contexts. Both terms refer to a person’s displayed image or photo on social media platforms or forums.

In certain subcultures or regional dialects, street slang enthusiasts often come up with unique twists on existing phrases. Some playful variations include “pic” (short for picture) or even “profpic” (a contraction of profile picture), which serve as alternatives to ‘DP’. These variations allow individuals to inject their own flair into their conversations while maintaining a shared understanding.

Additionally, within specific communities or social circles, unique jargon may emerge as synonyms for ‘DP’. For example, some individuals might use “headshot” when referring to a profile picture or employ terms like “pfp,” an abbreviation for “profile picture.” These synonymous expressions contribute to the ever-evolving nature of slang words and foster a sense of camaraderie among those who use them.

As language continuously adapts and evolves within different cultural contexts, these variations and synonyms provide us with fascinating insights into how people creatively express themselves through urban lingo. Embracing this dynamic lexicon allows us to fully engage with diverse communities and appreciate the rich tapestry of street slang in all its vibrant forms.

Examples of ‘DP’ in Conversations

To truly grasp the versatility of ‘DP’, let’s delve into some engaging examples of its usage in everyday conversations. These instances provide glimpses into how ‘DP’ seamlessly integrates itself into various dialogues, showcasing its adaptability within different contexts.

In a casual online exchange, you might come across a conversation where someone compliments another person’s profile picture by saying, “Love your new DP! You look stunning!” Here, ‘DP’ serves as an abbreviation for “display picture” or “profile picture,” allowing individuals to express their admiration concisely.

Within social media communities dedicated to photography or art, you might stumble upon discussions like: “Which DP captures your creativity the best?” Here, ‘DP’ functions as a collective term for the visual representations shared by artists and photographers on their profiles.

Conversely, it’s important to recognize that certain explicit contexts exist where ‘DP’ takes on a more provocative meaning. For instance, in an adult-oriented discussion forum or chat room, you may see users openly discussing fantasies involving “DP,” referring to engaging in simultaneous penetration during intimate activities. These instances illustrate how language evolves and adopts different meanings within specific communities.

These examples highlight just a fraction of the countless ways that ‘DP’ finds its place within conversations both online and offline. Regardless of its intended interpretation – whether innocent or suggestive – understanding the multifaceted nature of this street slang term allows us to navigate diverse linguistic landscapes with confidence and embrace the vibrant language that connects us all.

Conclusion: Embrace the Vibrant Language of Street Slang

In conclusion, the world of street slang is a dynamic tapestry, and ‘DP’ is just one intriguing thread within this vibrant linguistic landscape. Through our exploration of its meaning, origins, usage, variations, and examples in conversations, we’ve gained insight into how slang words like ‘DP’ enrich our language and facilitate connection within diverse communities.

From the virtual realm of online profiles to lively discussions among like-minded individuals, ‘DP’ serves as a shorthand for expressing visual representation or can even delve into more explicit contexts. Understanding its nuanced usage allows us to engage in effective communication while navigating various social settings with respect and understanding.

As we embrace the colorful language of street slang, let’s also appreciate the ever-evolving nature of this lexicon. Variations and synonyms like “avi,” “pic,” or “headshot” demonstrate how individuals infuse their own creativity into conversations while maintaining shared meanings.

So don’t be afraid to dive deeper into street slang. Embrace its intricacies and explore other fascinating terms that exist within this expressive world. Engage with different communities, listen attentively to their linguistic cues, and expand your understanding of cultural diversity through language.

Now it’s time for you to take this newfound knowledge out into the wild – apply it in your online interactions or engage in spirited conversations where street slang thrives. Join the ongoing dialogue that celebrates linguistic innovation while staying mindful of context and inclusivity.

Embrace the vibrant language of street slang as an avenue for connection and self-expression. So go ahead – add a little flair to your vocabularies!

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Pack Your Bags! 6 Current Travel Slang Terms To Take On Your Next Trip

Have you been feeling wanderlust lately? If so, you are not alone. Lots of people are looking to hit the road and travel as pandemic restrictions slowly lessen across the world. All of this vacationing and globetrotting is likely to lead to a whole bunch of trendy new travel jargon—either organically or as marketing pushes by a travel industry hungry for all those new travelers. While you start prepping for your own big trip, here are some examples of modern travel slang that you can stuff into your suitcase.

The word baecation simply refers to any vacation spent with your bae , your romantic partner. Baecation is often used in travel marketing and advertising of romantic getaways or destinations known as lands of love.

Baecation is a hybrid construction that combines the word bae with the end of the word vacation . The fact that baecation rhymes with vacation is an added marketing bonus. Baecation is formed similarly to the word staycation –meaning a vacation where someone stays home– which has become a mainstay of travel lingo.

friendcation

As you might have guessed, the term friendcation refers to a vacation spent with friends. A friendcation could refer to any type of vacation as long as you bring a buddy or two along. In marketing and social media, friendcation is often used to refer to vacation spots that feature group activities, such as hang gliding or nightclub-hopping.

As with baecation , friendcation is simply a hybrid construction that combines the word friend with the ending of the word vacation .

eduvacation

You know something that goes great with a vacation? Learning! The term eduvacation refers to a vacation or trip that involves learning about things. The term is broadly used and could refer to a wide variety of vacation destinations and activities, such as a trip to a famous museum, a tour of a cultural historic site, or a safari that teaches about animals.

The word eduvacation is a combination of the words education and vacation . Unlike baecation and friendcation , the entire word vacation makes an appearance because without the whole thing you would just have … education.

A familymoon is a vacation for a newly married couple—and their children. The term is used to refer both to couples that have had children with each other prior to getting married and to couples who had children from previous relationships. As you’d expect, familymoon is used in advertising and social media when referring to travel spots that are kid-friendly and have plenty of things for children to do.

The word familymoon is based on the word honeymoon , a trip taken by newly married couples. The family in familymoon refers to the couples’ children—their family. A similar word that uses the -moon suffix based on honeymoon is the fairly well-known term babymoon . A babymoon is a vacation that a couple takes to celebrate (and rest before) the upcoming birth of a baby.

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It is time to bridge the generational divide and go gramping . The word gramping refers to grandparents and their grandchildren going on vacation together. While this term can refer to camping trips, it is also used more broadly to refer to any kind of trip or travel that grandchildren spend with their grandparents. Similar to familymoon , gramping is often used to refer to places that are accessible to both children and older people and have plenty of things they can do together.

The word gramping is a hybrid combination of the word camping with the prefix grand- found in both grandparent and grandchild(ren) . It is formed similarly to the popularly used travel word glamping , which refers to glamorous camping in which a person brings luxuries on a camping trip.

Let’s get down to business and … go on vacation? The word bleisure is often used in the phrase “bleisure travel” to refer to a combination of business and leisure travel . The term is often used to refer to business trips that involve some form of enjoying oneself. This could involve things such as making time for a hiking trip, fitting in some sightseeing, or bringing the kids along to have fun in between video conferences. Bleisure travel has become increasingly popular in recent times due to large numbers of people having to work remotely during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The word bleisure is an oxymoronic mashup of the words business and leisure . Bleisure is used to refer to trips that in some way combine getting work done while finding time to relax or do something fun.

These travel terms, as well as many others, are often driven by travel marketing. For example, you may see the newer travel term open-jaw flight , meaning a flight that leaves from a different city from the one that a person arrived in, alongside the well-known term red-eye flight , which refers to a flight taken during the sleep hours.

Given that it is in travel agencies’ best interest to come up with snappy, marketable ways to sell vacation packages, don’t be surprised if we continue to see plenty of new travel lingo to get us all gallivanting across the globe.

If you're planning to travel somewhere sizzling, include these words in your vocabulary bag.

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No Limit Texas Holdem Strategy

Sets vs. Trips

By Greg Walker

For a guide to getting the most from hand when you flop either a set or trips, check out this Trips and Sets strategy video by SplitSuit.

If you've been playing poker for long enough, you will have heard of a “full house” being referred to as a “boat” from time to time. It's just another one of those slang terms in poker.

Similarly, you will probably have heard “3-of-a-kind” being referred to as a “set” or “trips”.

However, what you might not know is that “set” and “trips” aren't just nicknames; they actually describe the 2 different ways you can make 3-of-a-kind in Texas Hold'em .

What's the difference between trips and sets?

  • Trips = 3-of-a-kind using 1 of your holecards and 2 cards from the board.
  • Set = 3-of-a-kind using 2 of your holecards and 1 card from the board.

The Difference Between Sets and Trips

Sets and trips are the two separate ways of making three of a kind in Texas Hold'em.

So basically, a set is when you make 3-of-a-kind when you're holding a pocket pair .

Odds of hitting trips and sets on the flop.

  • Odds of hitting a trips on the flop = 73.2 to 1 (1.35%)
  • Odds of hitting a set on the flop = 8.3 to 1 (10.78%)

Note: These odds are for hitting a set or trips exactly , not a set or trips at least .

This information doesn't really add much or lead on to anything in this set vs. trips article , but I thought I'd go ahead and list them here anyway. It's interesting to note that it's 9 times harder to make 3-of-a-kind without a pocket pair on the flop than it is to make 3-of-a-kind with a pocket pair.

The gap between the odds is large because it's obviously much easier to hit 1 card out of 2 than 2 cards out of 3 over three trials (the flop).

Sets win money, trips lose money.

There is a saying in Texas Hold'em that “sets win money and trips lose money”. This isn't a massively popular theorem, nor can I find any articles mentioning it, but it does get thrown about on the odd occasion.

Just like any piece of poker strategy advice that's confined to one line, it's not something that you're going to want to set your watch to. However, this sweeping statement does have enough merit to it to make it worth talking about.

If you like short strategy tidbits, check out these poker theorems .

Here's a quick explanation of why sets are awesome and why trips are its disappointment of a brother.

Why sets win money.

Sets are hidden.

In fairness, even good players will struggle to avoid losing money in a hand like that (in fact, you would be have played too passively if you didn't lose at least 20% of your stack). However, the point is that sets are not always accounted for like pairs, flushes and straights are.

The fact sets are harder to spot means that you can usually expect to win a sizeable amount of your opponent's stack when you make 3-of-a-kind in this way.

Fact: The high implied odds of sets is the reason why it makes calling preflop with small pocket pairs so profitable.

Why trips lose money.

Trips are not hidden.

Bet you didn't see that one coming.

Trips are not necessarily a -EV made hands, but in general trips are far less profitable than sets because they are far easier to spot. Players are more cautious if they have a hand like top pair if the board is paired than if the board isn't paired.

As a result, if an opponent is happy to put lots of money in to the pot on a paired board, they're obviously very happy with the strength of their hand given the circumstances. If you don't have a big kicker to go with your trips, you could well be in trouble.

Obviously a lot depends on the type of player you're up against and your history (see poker metagame ), but in general you should be able to see why trips aren't as effective at extracting money from opponents like sets are. You should also be able to see how getting stuck with the second best 3 of a kind hand can prove to be costly.

Sets are ninjas. Trips are liabilities.

Sets and trips in poker conclusion.

  • A set is when you make 3 of a kind when you hold a pocket pair. They are great for making money.
  • Trips is when you make 3 of a kind when you don't hold a pocket pair, which means the board needs to pair instead. They are generally not as cool/profitable as sets.

If you talking to someone about strategy or about a specific hand history, you should avoid saying “three of a kind” when referring to a made hand. “Three of a kind” could mean either a set or trips, and both of these can have a drastic effect on the way a hand is played, so be specific and say what type of 3-of-a-kind instead.

I think that just about covers everything about trips and sets in poker (or the most important stuff at least).

This has turned in to quite a lengthy article considering I only intended to explain the subtle difference between two commonly used terms to describe 3-of-a-kind, so I'll wrap it up here. Hopefully you learnt a little something extra on the way.

Even if you didn't, at least you have something new to correct people on when they get out of line and start to use “set” and “trips” interchangeably on poker forums.

Go back to the interesting Texas Hold'em Articles .

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Top 57 Slang For Set – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to talking about groups or collections of things, there’s a whole new language out there that’s constantly evolving. From slang terms to trendy phrases, staying up-to-date with the latest “Slang For Set” is key to sounding in the know. Let us guide you through the coolest and most current set-related lingo that will have you speaking like a pro in no time!

Click above to generate some slangs

A crew refers to a group of people who work together or share a common purpose. It can be used to describe a team working on a project, a group of friends, or a team of performers.

  • For example , “I’m going out tonight with my crew.”
  • In a movie about heists , a character might say, “We need a skilled crew to pull off this job.”
  • A dance group might refer to themselves as a crew , saying, “Our crew is competing in a hip-hop dance competition.”

A squad is a close-knit group of friends or teammates. It often implies a sense of loyalty and camaraderie among its members.

  • For instance , “I’m hanging out with my squad this weekend.”
  • In a sports context , a player might say, “My squad is ready to take on any opponent.”
  • A group of friends might refer to themselves as a squad , saying, “We’re the best squad around.”

A posse is a group of friends or associates who gather together for a specific purpose or to support each other. It often implies a sense of unity and loyalty.

  • For example , “I’m rolling with my posse tonight.”
  • In a Western movie , a character might say, “Let’s round up a posse and track down the outlaw.”
  • A group of friends going out for a night on the town might say , “Our posse is ready to have a great time.”

A gang is an organized group of individuals who engage in criminal activities or have a shared identity. It can also refer to a group of friends who are particularly close or have a strong bond.

  • For instance , “He’s part of a notorious gang in the city.”
  • In a movie about street life , a character might say, “I’ve got my gang watching my back.”
  • A group of friends who are always together might jokingly refer to themselves as a gang , saying, “Watch out for our gang, we’re trouble.”

A team is a group of individuals who work together towards a common goal or objective. It often implies collaboration, cooperation, and a shared sense of purpose.

  • For example , “Our team won the championship.”
  • In a business context , a manager might say, “We have a great team working on this project.”
  • A group of friends participating in a competition might say , “We make a great team, let’s win this!”

In the context of “set,” a “tribe” refers to a group of people who work together or hang out regularly. It can also refer to a close-knit community within a larger group.

  • For example , a dancer might say, “I love my dance tribe. We always support each other.”
  • In a discussion about a film production , someone might mention, “The cast and crew became like a tribe during the shoot.”
  • A person talking about their group of friends might say , “We’re a tight-knit tribe that always has each other’s backs.”

In the context of “set,” a “bunch” refers to a group of people who are together for a specific purpose or activity. It can also refer to a collection of objects or things.

  • For instance , a photographer might say, “I need a bunch of models for this shoot.”
  • In a conversation about a theater production , someone might say, “The cast and crew did a great job. What a talented bunch!”
  • A person organizing an event might say , “We need a bunch of volunteers to help set up.”

In the context of “set,” a “pack” refers to a group of people who work together or hang out regularly. It can also refer to a group of objects or things that are bundled together.

  • For example , a film director might say, “The pack did an amazing job on this scene.”
  • In a discussion about a music tour , someone might mention, “The band and crew are like a pack, always traveling together.”
  • A person talking about a group of friends might say , “We’re a pack of misfits, but we have a great time together.”

9. Ensemble

In the context of “set,” an “ensemble” refers to a group of people who work together to create a performance or a piece of art. It can also refer to a set of matching or coordinated objects.

  • For instance , a theater director might say, “The ensemble cast delivered an outstanding performance.”
  • In a conversation about a fashion show , someone might say, “The models looked stunning in their coordinated ensembles.”
  • A person talking about a music band might say , “The ensemble of musicians creates a unique sound.”

In the context of “set,” a “band” refers to a group of people who play music together. It can also refer to a group of people who work together or hang out regularly.

  • For example , a music producer might say, “This band has a great sound.”
  • In a discussion about a theater production , someone might mention, “The cast and crew worked together like a well-oiled band.”
  • A person talking about their group of friends might say , “We’re a band of misfits, but we always have a good time.”

11. Company

In slang, “company” can refer to a group of people who hang out together or share a common interest. It is often used to describe a close-knit group of friends or associates.

  • For example , “I’m going out with my company tonight. We’re going to have a great time.”
  • A person might say , “I love my company. We always have each other’s backs.”
  • In a conversation about social circles , someone might ask, “Who’s in your company?”

In slang, “unit” can be used to describe a tight-knit group of people who work or socialize together. It often implies a sense of camaraderie and loyalty within the group.

  • For instance , “I’m part of a unit at work. We support each other and get things done.”
  • A person might say , “My unit is like family to me. We’ve been through a lot together.”
  • In a discussion about military service , someone might ask, “What unit were you in?”

In slang, “troop” can refer to a group of friends or associates who hang out together or have a common interest. It is often used to describe a close-knit group that supports and looks out for each other.

  • For example , “I’m going out with my troop tonight. We always have a blast.”
  • A person might say , “My troop has my back no matter what. We’re like family.”
  • In a conversation about social circles , someone might ask, “Who’s in your troop?”

In slang, “flock” can be used to describe a group of people who hang out together or have a common interest. It often implies a sense of unity and loyalty within the group.

  • For instance , “I’m part of a flock of artists. We support and inspire each other.”
  • A person might say , “My flock is always there for me. We’re like a family.”
  • In a discussion about music , someone might ask, “Who’s in your flock?”

In slang, “clan” can refer to a group of people who hang out together or have a common interest. It often implies a strong bond and shared identity within the group.

  • For example , “I’m part of a clan of gamers. We dominate the virtual world.”
  • A person might say , “My clan is like family to me. We’ve been through so much together.”
  • In a conversation about hobbies , someone might ask, “Who’s in your clan?”

16. Collective

This term refers to a group of individuals who work together towards a common goal or purpose. It can be used to describe a group of friends, colleagues, or teammates.

  • For example , a person might say, “I’m going out with my collective tonight.”
  • In a work setting, someone might refer to their team as their collective.
  • A sports commentator might say , “The collective effort of the team led to their victory.”

17. Squadron

This term typically refers to a unit of military aircraft or a group of military personnel. However, it can also be used to describe a close-knit group of individuals who work together or share a common interest.

  • For instance , a person might say, “We’re the best squadron in the company.”
  • In a gaming community, players might form a squadron to compete together.
  • A team leader might say , “The success of our project depends on the collaboration of our squadron.”

This term typically refers to a large group of people, often with a criminal or unruly reputation. It can also be used to describe a tight-knit group of friends or associates.

  • For example , someone might say, “I hang out with my mob every weekend.”
  • In a movie about organized crime, characters might be part of a mob.
  • A person might say , “My mob always has my back.”

This term refers to a small, exclusive group of individuals who share similar interests or social status. It can be used to describe a group of friends or acquaintances who are particularly close.

  • For instance , a person might say, “I’m part of the popular clique at school.”
  • In a workplace, there might be different cliques among employees.
  • A person might say , “The members of our clique have known each other since childhood.”

This term typically refers to a group of people who regularly associate with each other. It can be used to describe a group of friends, colleagues, or acquaintances.

  • For example , someone might say, “I have a tight circle of friends.”
  • In a professional setting , a person might say, “I’m part of the inner circle of decision-makers.”
  • A person might say , “I trust the members of my circle with anything.”

21. Faction

A faction refers to a small, organized group within a larger organization or community that has its own specific goals or beliefs. It can also refer to a dissenting group that breaks away from a larger organization.

  • For example, in a political party, there might be factions that support different policies or candidates.
  • In a video game, players might join a faction to compete against other factions for control.
  • A company might have factions within different departments that have their own unique cultures and ways of working.

22. Coalition

A coalition is a temporary or permanent alliance between different groups or individuals who come together to achieve a common goal or objective. It often involves pooling resources and coordinating efforts.

  • For instance, in politics, multiple parties might form a coalition to gain enough seats to govern.
  • During a crisis, different organizations might form a coalition to provide relief and support.
  • In a business context, companies might form a coalition to tackle industry-wide issues or promote a shared agenda.

23. Alliance

An alliance is a formal or informal agreement between two or more parties to work together for a common purpose. It often involves mutual support and cooperation.

  • For example, countries might form military alliances to defend each other in case of an attack.
  • In a business context, companies might form strategic alliances to combine their strengths and resources.
  • In a video game, players might form alliances to collaborate and achieve shared objectives.

A league refers to a group or association of teams, clubs, or organizations that come together to compete or cooperate in a specific activity or sport.

  • For instance, in professional sports, teams from different cities or regions form leagues to compete against each other.
  • In gaming, players might join a league to participate in organized competitions and tournaments.
  • A group of schools might form a league to organize sports events and promote friendly competition.

A union is an organized group or association of workers who come together to protect and promote their rights and interests in the workplace. It often involves collective bargaining and negotiations with employers.

  • For example, a group of factory workers might form a union to advocate for better working conditions and fair wages.
  • In the entertainment industry, actors and performers might join a union to ensure fair treatment and representation.
  • A union might go on strike to protest against unfair labor practices or to demand better benefits for its members.

26. Association

In slang, “association” can refer to a group of people who are connected by a common interest or purpose. It is often used to describe a close-knit crew or team.

  • For example , a group of friends who always hang out together might be referred to as an “association.”
  • In a conversation about a sports team , someone might say, “The basketball association at our school is really talented.”
  • A person talking about their work colleagues might say , “I have a great association at my job, we all get along really well.”

27. Society

In slang, “society” can be used to refer to a group of individuals who are involved in illegal activities or organized crime. It is often used synonymously with the term “gang.”

  • For instance , someone might say, “He’s a member of a dangerous society.”
  • In a discussion about crime , one might say, “Gangs and societies like these pose a serious threat to our communities.”
  • A person might warn , “Be careful not to get involved with that society, they’re known for their violent activities.”

28. Congregation

In slang, “congregation” can refer to a group of people who regularly gather together, often for a specific purpose or activity. It is often used interchangeably with the term “crew.”

  • For example , a group of friends who always go out partying together might be referred to as a “congregation.”
  • In a conversation about a music band , someone might say, “The lead singer and his congregation put on an amazing show.”
  • A person talking about their workout buddies might say , “I have a great congregation at the gym, we always motivate each other.”

29. Assembly

In slang, “assembly” can refer to a group of people who come together for a common purpose or goal. It is often used synonymously with the term “squad.”

  • For instance , a group of friends who always support each other might be referred to as an “assembly.”
  • In a discussion about a team sport , one might say, “The soccer assembly at our school is really talented.”
  • A person talking about their study group might say , “I have a great assembly for my math class, we always help each other understand the material.”

30. Syndicate

In slang, “syndicate” can refer to a group of individuals who work together, often in organized crime or illegal activities. It is often used interchangeably with the term “crew.”

  • For example , a group of criminals who collaborate on illegal activities might be referred to as a “syndicate.”
  • In a conversation about a heist movie , someone might say, “The main characters form a syndicate to pull off the ultimate robbery.”
  • A person discussing crime organizations might say , “The city is controlled by several powerful syndicates.”

31. Consortium

A consortium refers to a group of individuals or organizations that come together for a common purpose or project. It often involves collaboration and sharing of resources.

  • For example , “The consortium of universities worked together to conduct groundbreaking research.”
  • In a business context , someone might say, “Our company is part of a consortium that aims to improve industry standards.”
  • A person discussing a joint venture might mention , “The consortium of companies pooled their expertise to launch a new product.”

Hive is used to describe a group of people or entities working together towards a common goal or objective. It often implies a sense of collective effort and collaboration.

  • For instance , “The team operated like a well-oiled hive, completing tasks efficiently.”
  • In a creative setting , someone might say, “The hive of artists brainstormed ideas for the project.”
  • A person discussing a community initiative might mention , “The neighborhood came together in a hive to clean up the park.”

33. Cluster

Cluster refers to a gathering or collection of similar things or entities in close proximity. It often implies a concentration or grouping of related items.

  • For example , “The cluster of stars formed a beautiful constellation in the night sky.”
  • In a scientific context , someone might say, “The cluster of cells exhibited a unique behavior.”
  • A person discussing data analysis might mention , “The cluster of data points indicated a specific pattern.”

34. Network

Network refers to a group of interconnected people, organizations, or systems. It often involves communication and the exchange of information or resources.

  • For instance , “The network of professionals helped each other find job opportunities.”
  • In a technological context , someone might say, “The network of devices allowed for seamless connectivity.”
  • A person discussing social relationships might mention , “Building a strong network is essential for career advancement.”

Panel refers to a group of individuals who come together to discuss or provide opinions on a specific topic or issue. It often involves a formal or organized setting.

  • For example , “The panel of experts debated the merits of the proposed policy.”
  • In a conference context , someone might say, “The panel of speakers shared their insights on the future of technology.”
  • A person discussing a jury trial might mention , “The panel of jurors deliberated on the evidence presented.”

36. Brigade

In military terms, a brigade is a unit consisting of several battalions. In slang, “brigade” can refer to a group or crew of people working together or sharing a common interest.

  • For example , “I’m going out with my brigade tonight to celebrate.”
  • In a sports context , a fan might say, “Our brigade is the loudest and most dedicated in the stadium.”
  • A group of friends might refer to themselves as a brigade , saying, “We’ve been a tight-knit brigade since high school.”

37. Platoon

A platoon is a military unit typically consisting of two or more squads. In slang, “platoon” can refer to a small group or squad of people working together or sharing a common goal.

  • For instance , “Our platoon is responsible for organizing the event.”
  • In a work setting , someone might say, “I’m part of the marketing platoon, focused on social media.”
  • A group of gamers might refer to their team as a platoon , saying, “We dominate the battlefield as a platoon.”

38. Division

In military terms, a division is a large unit consisting of several brigades. In slang, “division” can refer to a group or team of people working together or sharing a common purpose.

  • For example , “Our division is responsible for launching new products.”
  • In a school setting , someone might say, “I’m part of the debate division, competing at the regional level.”
  • A group of volunteers might refer to themselves as a division , saying, “Our division is dedicated to community service.”

In military terms, a corps is a large unit consisting of several divisions. In slang, “corps” can refer to a crew or group of people working together or sharing a common interest.

  • For instance , “Our corps is responsible for organizing the music festival.”
  • In a creative field , someone might say, “I’m part of the design corps, working on visual branding.”
  • A group of performers might refer to themselves as a corps , saying, “We’re a tight-knit corps of dancers.”

40. Battalion

In military terms, a battalion is a unit consisting of several companies. In slang, “battalion” can refer to a team or group of people working together or sharing a common objective.

  • For example , “Our battalion is responsible for managing the project.”
  • In a sports context , someone might say, “I’m part of the basketball battalion, competing at the collegiate level.”
  • A group of activists might refer to themselves as a battalion , saying, “We’re a passionate battalion fighting for social justice.”

A fleet refers to a group of ships, vehicles, or aircraft that are operated together for a specific purpose. In slang, it can also refer to a group of people or things working together towards a common goal.

  • For example , a military commander might say, “Send the fleet to patrol the coast.”
  • In a business context , someone might say, “Our sales team is a fleet of top performers.”
  • A sports commentator might say , “The team’s fleet of fast runners dominated the race.”

An armada is a large fleet of ships, typically used to refer to a fleet of warships. In slang, it can also refer to a large group or collection of something.

  • For instance , a historian might say, “The Spanish Armada was defeated by the English navy.”
  • In a gaming community , someone might say, “Join our armada and conquer the virtual world.”
  • A music fan might say , “The festival lineup features an armada of talented artists.”

An armory is a place where weapons are stored or kept. In slang, it can also refer to a collection or stockpile of something.

  • For example , a soldier might say, “I need to retrieve a weapon from the armory.”
  • In a discussion about fashion , someone might say, “Her closet is an armory of designer shoes.”
  • A collector might say , “My garage is an armory of classic cars.”

44. Arsenal

An arsenal is a collection or stockpile of weapons, typically used to refer to a country’s collection of military weapons. In slang, it can also refer to a collection or supply of something.

  • For instance , a military analyst might say, “The country has a vast arsenal of nuclear weapons.”
  • In a cooking context , someone might say, “My kitchen is an arsenal of spices and herbs.”
  • A writer might say , “Her bookshelf is an arsenal of knowledge and inspiration.”

45. Task force

A task force is a temporary team or group of individuals assembled to work on a specific task or mission. In slang, it can also refer to a group or team working together towards a common goal.

  • For example , a police officer might say, “We formed a task force to investigate the recent string of burglaries.”
  • In a business context , someone might say, “Our marketing task force is focused on launching the new product.”
  • A sports coach might say , “We need a task force to improve our team’s defense.”

A troupe is a group of performers or actors who work together and perform together. It is commonly used in the context of theater or dance.

  • For example , “The local theater troupe put on a fantastic production of Hamlet.”
  • In a discussion about dance , someone might say, “I’m auditioning for a spot in the dance troupe.”
  • A theater critic might write , “The troupe’s performance was filled with energy and passion.”

47. Orchestra

An orchestra is a large musical ensemble that typically includes string, brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments. It is led by a conductor and performs symphonies, concertos, and other classical music.

  • For instance , “The orchestra played a beautiful rendition of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9.”
  • In a conversation about music , someone might ask, “Have you ever played in an orchestra before?”
  • A music lover might say , “Attending a live orchestra performance is a breathtaking experience.”

A choir is a group of singers who perform together, usually with multiple voices singing different parts. It is commonly associated with choral music and can range from small vocal ensembles to large choirs.

  • For example , “The church choir sang hymns during the Sunday service.”
  • In a discussion about music education , someone might mention, “I joined the school choir to improve my singing skills.”
  • A choir director might say , “The choir has been practicing diligently for the upcoming concert.”

A chorus is a group of singers who sing together in unison or harmony. It is often used interchangeably with “choir,” but can also refer to a specific section within a larger choir or musical ensemble.

  • For instance , “The chorus joined the soloist in a powerful rendition of the song.”
  • In a conversation about musical theater , someone might ask, “Who’s in the chorus for the upcoming production?”
  • A music teacher might say , “The chorus needs to work on their blend and dynamics.”

50. Dance troupe

A dance troupe is a group of dancers who perform together and choreograph dance routines. It can refer to a professional dance company or a group of dancers who come together for a specific performance or event.

  • For example , “The dance troupe wowed the audience with their synchronized moves.”
  • In a discussion about dance styles , someone might mention, “I’m part of a hip-hop dance troupe.”
  • A dance instructor might say , “The dance troupe has been rehearsing tirelessly for the upcoming competition.”

51. Theater group

A collective of actors, performers, and technicians who work together to produce theatrical performances. A theater group can refer to a professional company or a community-based organization.

  • For example , “The local theater group is putting on a production of Romeo and Juliet.”
  • A theater enthusiast might say , “I’ve been a part of this theater group for five years now.”
  • When discussing the challenges of live theater , someone might mention, “Being a part of a theater group requires teamwork and dedication.”

52. Film crew

The group of individuals involved in the production of a film. This includes the director, cinematographer, sound engineers, and other technical and creative roles.

  • For instance , “The film crew worked tirelessly to capture the perfect shot.”
  • A film enthusiast might say , “Being a part of a film crew requires long hours and attention to detail.”
  • When discussing the collaborative nature of filmmaking , someone might mention, “The film crew brings together different talents and expertise to create a cinematic masterpiece.”

53. Production team

The group of individuals responsible for the overall production of a project, which can include film, theater, television, or other forms of media. The production team oversees all aspects of the production, from planning and budgeting to execution and post-production.

  • For example , “The production team worked together to bring the vision of the director to life.”
  • A producer might say , “Being a part of a production team requires strong organizational and leadership skills.”
  • When discussing the challenges of coordinating a production , someone might mention, “The production team ensures that all the moving parts come together seamlessly.”

54. Workforce

The group of individuals employed by a particular organization or industry. In the context of a set, the workforce refers to the collective group of individuals involved in the production, including actors, crew members, and support staff.

  • For instance , “The workforce on this film set is incredibly talented and dedicated.”
  • A producer might say , “Managing the workforce on a set requires effective communication and coordination.”
  • When discussing the importance of a skilled workforce , someone might mention, “The success of a production relies on the hard work and expertise of the staff.”

A group of individuals who work together towards a common goal. In the context of a set, the staff refers to the collective group of individuals involved in the production, including actors, crew members, and support staff.

  • For example , “The staff on this theater production is incredibly talented and dedicated.”
  • A director might say , “Building a strong team is essential for a successful production.”
  • When discussing the collaboration within a team , someone might mention, “The staff works together seamlessly to bring the vision of the production to life.”

A large group or crowd of people or things. “Horde” is often used to describe a set of people or objects that are gathered together in a chaotic or disorderly manner.

  • For example , during a sale at a store, you might hear someone say, “There was a horde of shoppers trying to grab the best deals.”
  • In a video game , a player might say, “We need to defeat the horde of enemies to progress to the next level.”
  • When talking about a busy event , someone might comment, “There was a horde of people at the concert last night.”

A varied collection or selection of things. “Array” is often used to describe a set of objects, ideas, or options that are arranged in an organized or deliberate manner.

  • For instance , when discussing a buffet, someone might say, “There was an array of delicious food to choose from.”
  • In a clothing store , a customer might comment, “They have a great array of options for different styles.”
  • When talking about a display of artwork , someone might say, “The gallery had an impressive array of paintings and sculptures.”

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set trip slang meaning

Long-term supported distros' kernel policies are all wrong

Or so says ciq, which coincidentally has issues obtaining rhel's kernel sources.

Comment A new hire at Rocky Linux creator CIQ is rocking the LTS-Linux-distro boat – by shining a spotlight on the elephant in the room (or one of the herd).

A recent blog post from Rocky Linux developer CIQ, subtitled Cracks in the Ice , examines "Why a 'frozen' distribution Linux kernel isn't the safest choice for security." The post itself is an executive summary of a study the company conducted comparing the numbers of bugs and bug fixes in RHEL 8's kernel, which it has published in a white paper titled Vendor Kernels, Bugs and Stability .

FOSS software, which provides the building blocks of projects like Linux distributions, is built around community development. The problem is that this is hard to monetize. Some companies have found ways to do this, but they aren't sharing enough of their work, leaving vital parts of the ecosystem starved. There are clearly visible and perfectly feasible ways around this. The snag is that implementing them would mean persuading billion-dollar companies to play nicely together.

The troublemaker behind the blog post is SAMBA co-founder (and regular Register commenter) Jeremy Allison , who recently landed a new job at Rocky Linux developer CIQ, after being laid off from Google last year, in a decision The Reg questioned at the time . (It's not Allison's first such rodeo, as we reported way back in 2001 – when times are hard, even FOSS rock-star developers aren't safe.)

set trip slang meaning

This is not a shocking revelation in and of itself. There is a core problem here, and as is often the case, it has at least two sides to it. The Reg FOSS desk has previously reported on both of them.

One side is that Red Hat has made FOSS software development pay, and pay very well indeed, by producing extremely slowly-changing distros, and then supporting them for a decade or more, which enables large, slow-moving organizations to run the same versions of a distro for years on end. Red Hat is the most visible player, but it isn't the only company doing this: SUSE does it too, and the Debian project does something similar.

The specific aspect of this that CIQ analyzes is that these very long-term enterprise distros pick one specific kernel version, and then keep it on life support for a decade by backporting bug-fixes – and entire new subsystems – from later kernels into it. We reported from last year's DevConf event on a Red Hat kernel developer's account of What it takes to keep an enterprise 'Frankenkernel' alive .

That alone isn't the problem. The problem is that each vendor picks its own kernel version to do this with, and they don't coordinate with the team which develops the kernel. The kernel team has its own set of long-term support releases, which the enterprise vendors essentially ignore. As a result, last year the kernel team cut back its LTS kernel versions harshly, as we reported from the Open Source Summit in September. The overworked and understaffed kernel team is cutting the support lifetime for its LTS kernels from six years to just two. At present, there are six long term releases , one of which goes end-of-life at the end of this year, and another next year.

We feel that we must point out that CIQ does have a reason for highlighting this issue. Its Rocky Linux distro is a third-party rebuild of RHEL, and since Red Hat stopped sharing all its source code with the world in June last year, that means that CIQ can't readily obtain RHEL's kernel source code any more. Although later in June CIQ announced it had a workaround for this , which in early July it described in more detail , questions remain over how long this can work.

So it is perhaps not a big shock that CIQ is now endorsing LTS kernel supremo Greg Kroah-Hartman's advice, which we quoted in our kernel-team story:

You have to take all of the stable/LTS releases in order to have a secure and stable system.

In other words, the kernel team feels that the only really secure option is its LTS options – whereas, as we quoted in the Frankenkernel story, Red Hat's kernel maintainers feel that its kernels are better-tested and safer. When we read this from CIQ, our first thought was Mandy Rice-Davies applies .

If the enterprise Linux industry can somehow be forced to grasp the nettle, there is an obvious answer to this. We pointed it out when we looked at the OpenELA extension of support for 4.14 announced in March.

All that is needed is for the enterprise distro vendors to choose the upstream long term support kernel releases for their long term support distro releases. Then, this problem would effectively go away, replaced by the smaller issue of sharing their bug-fixes upstream.

If Red Hat, SUSE, Debian and the other big distros confined themselves to LTS kernels and shared the burden of maintaining them, it would lower their costs. It wouldn't hurt the bottom line. The customers paying for double-digit years of updates don't care what specific version is supported, just so long as there is a version that keeps getting updates.

  • Red Hat middleware takes a back seat in strategic shuffle
  • Linux kernel 4.14 gets a life extension, thanks to OpenELA
  • Rocky Linux details the loopholes that will help its RHEL rebuild live on
  • Red Hat strikes a crushing blow against RHEL downstreams

There's even an obvious exemption here to aid monetization: exclude subsystem and driver backports from the patches that are shared upstream. If you want to run an old distro but keep getting new functionality and new device support, then you pay for an enterprise distro. If you don't want to pay, then run a newer kernel. It's as easy as that.

We're sure that some commentators will be able to come up with elaborate justifications why this is completely impossible, to which we pre-emptively respond: cui bono? Keeping their kernels in-house is part of how these companies make big money from a free OS. If you want to know why things can't change even if it would help everyone, the answer is, as William Goldman put it, "Follow the money." ®

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General election latest: The battle for your vote begins - as top Tory denies date is 'massive gamble'

Rishi Sunak has announced a general election for 4 July in a statement outside Downing Street - watch and follow live updates and reaction in the Politics Hub.

Thursday 23 May 2024 04:30, UK

Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player

General election announced

  • PM announces 4 July election  |  Watch statement in full
  • 'Who do you trust?' - Sunak addresses first Tory rally
  • PM accused of 'giving up'  |  Starmer welcomes 'moment UK needs '
  • Daily Podcast: What could the next six weeks have in store?

Expert analysis

  • Beth Rigby:  Sunak tries to paint himself as 'the man with a plan'
  • Jon Craig:  PM with reputation for caution turns out to be gambler
  • Ed Conway:  Is now a good time economically to call an election?
  • Sam Coates: This is the gamble of Sunak's political life

Election essentials

  • Key dates you need to know
  • Who's leading in the polls?
  • Is PM keeping his promises?
  • Read more: What happens next? |  Which MPs are standing down?  | Key seats to watch  | How to register to vote  | Check if your constituency's changing

By Professor Michael Thrasher, Sky News election analyst

The electoral geography of the UK is changing.

Following the recommendations of independent Boundary Commissions for England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, the next UK general election - which Sky News understands will be on 4 July - will be fought on new constituency boundaries, replacing those in operation since 2010.

This is the sixth periodic review to be implemented since the war. The next review is not scheduled until October 2031.

Exploring how this movement of voters affects the political makeup of the House of Commons is a task that Colin Rallings and myself have been doing over the past thirty years following previous boundary adjustments.

There are winners and losers in different parts of the UK - read the full analysis here:

As the football season comes to an end - the general election battle is just beginning.

And it's the crossover you didn't know you needed - Sky's Kay Burley kicks out David Jones, Gary Neville and Jamie Carragher from the Monday Night Football studio.

Below, she gives you a first look at our Election Night Live studio, our home for when the results come in from across the United Kingdom.

Have a sneak peak below:

By Becky Johnson , communities correspondent

"Stop the boats" has become one of the phrases we hear most from this government.

The pledge to stop asylum seekers crossing the Channel has become central to Rishi Sunak's premiership.

At vast expense and despite numerous legal challenges the plans are on track, according to the home secretary, for first flights to take off within weeks.

Yet since the Rwanda bill became law there is no sign yet that the numbers crossing the Channel are falling. In fact, record numbers continue to cross.

It meant waiting until the autumn was too risky for the government. What if, by then, regular flights to Rwanda were taking off, but small boat arrival numbers still hadn't fallen? 

Ministers would face the accusation that their central policy on curbing illegal migration had failed. It's hard to see how they could persuade the public otherwise.

A July election, the government will hope, will hit a sweet spot. 

Read the full analysis below:

It's been a historic day in Westminster - four years and five months since the last general election, we now know that the next one will be held on Thursday, 4 July.

Here are some photos from today:

All photos: PA

The prime minister has called a general election for 4 July. It means parliament only has a few days to pass any bills still waiting to become law before MPs leave Westminster to begin campaigning.

On the Sky News Daily , Niall Paterson gets the very latest from our deputy political editor Sam Coates and political correspondent Tamara Cohen on why the election was announced today, and what the next six weeks of campaigning could have in store.

👉   Listen above then tap here to follow the Sky News Daily wherever you get your podcasts   👈

There is always a danger that elections in the UK become too Westminster-focused.

But in the devolved nations, there are critical votes to be won - and politicians facing their own issues.

Here is what is happening in Northern Ireland, Wales, and Scotland - and what it could mean on 4 July:

Rishi Sunak has called a general election for this summer.

The prime minister has been saying for months he would call a vote for the "second half of the year", and he has now confirmed it will be on 4 July.

Under the Dissolution and Calling of Parliament Act 2022, Mr Sunak had until 17 December this year to call an election - as votes must be held no more than five years apart.

Our political reporter Alix Culbertson explains what happens now:

In 1997, Labour told us "Things Can Only Get Better", before Tony Blair won a landslide general election victory.

This year, Rishi Sunak appears to have concluded that things are not going to get any better for the Tories if he delays an election until the autumn.

His dash to the polls on 4 July suggests that a prime minister with a reputation for caution and an obsession with spreadsheets is actually a gambler.

To call a general election with his party consistently trailing Labour by 20 points in the Sky News poll of polls at best looks courageous, at worst reckless.

If he can pull it off, however, he will have achieved the Tories' greatest election win against the odds since John Major won a 21-seat majority in 1992.

Read Jon's full analysis below:

In January 2023, Rishi Sunak made five promises.

Since then, he and his ministers have rarely missed an opportunity to list them. In case you haven't heard, he promised to:

  • Halve inflation
  • Grow the economy
  • Reduce debt
  • Cut NHS waiting lists and times
  • Stop the boats

Now that the general election campaign is under way, see below how he has performed on these goals:

Rishi Sunak has made the calculation that 4 July is, if not the best election date for the Conservatives, then the least worst.

Firstly, he thinks there is a story to tell on the economy - albeit one that is not without peril.

Britain is out of recession, while inflation today is statistically within "normal" levels.

One Tory source told me that the moment they saw that, they knew there wouldn't be further tax cuts and an election would be sooner rather than later.

But more than that, there was a real - perhaps existential - question about how long Sunak could continue to hold it together.

There are revolts in parliament looming - on abortion, on smoking and on shorter prison sentencing. This potentially avoids some of those.

He was also facing questions whether he would have to do a reshuffle after Chris Heaton Harris, Northern Ireland Secretary, announced his departure at the next election. Precedent that should have prompted a reshuffle - perhaps this has avoided that.

There are also claims - that might never be proved one way or another - that more and more Tories wanted him gone and he could have been tiptoeing closer to a vote of no confidence. Only Sir Graham Brady may know the truth of this.

All of that is now in the past. Sunak has gambled, knowing success under any definition is hard.

Be the first to get Breaking News

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set trip slang meaning

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  3. Slang Words: List of 100 Common Slang Words & Phrases You Need to Know

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    set trip slang meaning

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COMMENTS

  1. Urban Dictionary: set trip

    Killing someone in your own gang, but who is in a different set. i.e. a different street but in the same gang

  2. Urban Dictionary: Set Trippin

    A certain 'hood, or block may be refered to as a "Set". "What set you from, Nigga?" Any gang violence or rivalry between "Sets" can be labeled as "Set Trippin".

  3. trippin' Meaning & Origin

    The slang set trippin' surfaced in 1990s West Coast gang culture for "killing a gang rival to show off your power." Set alludes to a subset of a larger gang (e.g., the Pirus are a set of the Bloods) and trip is black slang for "lose control," as we've seen.

  4. What Does Trippin Mean?

    It is a slang term with multiple meanings depending on the context in which it is used, such as overreacting, acting crazy, being under the influence of drugs, expressing dissatisfaction, or being in a daze. flagged-2. Another meaning of trippin is when someone is acting crazy or irrational. It can be used to describe someone who is behaving ...

  5. Urban Dictionary: set trip

    Set tripping is violent results from the confrontation of two rival gangs or gang members. Gang members identify eachother by tattoos, hand signs, and colors worn. Gang members or gangbangers rarley hesitate to attack another gang member who represents a rival gang.

  6. Trippin Meaning: What's the Definition of this Slang Term?

    Trippin is a slang term that is often used to describe someone who is acting irrationally, or who is under the influence of hallucinogenic drugs. The term has become popular in recent years, particularly among young people, and is often used in casual conversation. When someone is trippin, they might be acting in a foolish or irrational manner.

  7. Trippin' Meaning: Understanding the Slang Term

    Trippin' is a slang term used to describe someone who is acting foolishly or thinking crazy thoughts. It can also refer to someone who is under the influence of drugs, particularly psychedelic drugs like LSD or mushrooms. The origins of the term are somewhat unclear, but it likely comes from the idea of taking a trip, or journey, while on ...

  8. set tripping, n.

    set tripping n. [ set trip v.] ( US gang) the attacking of another gang. K. Scott Monster (1994) 207: The Crips [...] were then plagued - indeed, traumatized - by the internal strife of 'set trippin''.

  9. set trip, v.

    set trip v. 1. ( US gang) to attack another gang; thus as n. Snoop Doggy Dogg 'Murder was the Case' 🎵 Just remember who changed your mind / Cuz when you start set-trippin, that ass is mine. Coolio 'Gangsta's Paradise' 🎵 I really hate to trip but I gotta loc / As they croak, I see myself in the pistol smoke.

  10. America's 10 Most Commonly Misunderstood Slang Terms

    Jiffy feet. Florida. Dirty feet from walking around shoeless. Skills on the dance floor. Concrete. Kansas. Frozen custard with mix-ins—so thick it's like concrete (and not unlike a Dairy Queen ...

  11. Decoding Street Slang: What Does 'DP' Mean?

    In a casual online exchange, you might come across a conversation where someone compliments another person's profile picture by saying, "Love your new DP! You look stunning!". Here, 'DP' serves as an abbreviation for "display picture" or "profile picture," allowing individuals to express their admiration concisely.

  12. 6 Current Travel And Vacation Slang Terms

    Baecation is often used in travel marketing and advertising of romantic getaways or destinations known as lands of love. Baecation is a hybrid construction that combines the word bae with the end of the word vacation. The fact that baecation rhymes with vacation is an added marketing bonus. Baecation is formed similarly to the word staycation ...

  13. Sets vs. Trips In Texas Hold'em

    Trips = 3-of-a-kind using 1 of your holecards and 2 cards from the board. Set = 3-of-a-kind using 2 of your holecards and 1 card from the board. Sets and trips are the two separate ways of making three of a kind in Texas Hold'em. So basically, a set is when you make 3-of-a-kind when you're holding a pocket pair.

  14. Urban Dictionary: set tripping

    Set tripping is actually the act of hanging with a set that isnt of your own. Like a 83rd street crip hanging with (and pulling out missions with) a shotgun crip.

  15. Top 20 Slang For Travel

    1. Hit the road. This phrase is used to indicate the beginning of a trip or adventure. It can be used both literally and figuratively. For example, "We packed up the car and hit the road for our cross-country road trip.". Someone might say, "I've been stuck at home for too long, it's time to hit the road and explore.".

  16. Top 20 Slang For Trip

    A person might say, "I'm planning to trek to the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro.". In a travel documentary, the host might document their trek through the Himalayas. See also Top 37 Slang For Personification - Meaning & Usage. 6. Jaunt. A jaunt is a short journey or trip, usually taken for pleasure or leisure.

  17. Urban Dictionary: trip

    the state of acting whack; to overreact or to lose yo cool

  18. The Meaning Behind The Song: Set Trip by ThatGuyBased

    The Meaning of "Set Trip" by ThatGuyBased. "Set Trip" by ThatGuyBased delves into the mindset of individuals involved in gang culture and the consequences they may face. The lyrics paint a vivid picture of the rapper's experiences and observations within this world. The song opens with the line, "I be coolin in the cut where niggas ...

  19. Texas Hold'em Trips In Poker: Meaning, How To Use, & Strategy

    In Texas Holdem, poker Trips are a colloquial term that is commonly used in reference to the holding of a three-of-a-kind. Specifically, when a player makes a three-of-a-kind with only one of his hole cards and a pair from the board, he is said to have made trips in poker. Now, let us understand the meaning of trips in poker better with the ...

  20. A list of related slang terms for "set trip"

    The top five slang terms for "set trip" are: where you from, the Dalights, bangin, set trip, own0rz. Dive in to find more words related to set trip. set trip. set trip set trip set trip set trip set trip set trip. Killing someone in your own gang, but who is in a different set. i.e. a different street but in the same gang.

  21. Set and setting

    The "set" and "setting" are critical to avoid a "bad trip"Set and setting, when referring to a psychedelic drug experience or the use of other psychoactive substances, means one's mindset (shortened to "set") and the physical and social environment (the "setting") in which the user has the experience. Set and setting are factors that can condition the effects of psychoactive substances: "Set ...

  22. Top 57 Slang For Set

    For instance, "He's part of a notorious gang in the city.". In a movie about street life, a character might say, "I've got my gang watching my back.". A group of friends who are always together might jokingly refer to themselves as a gang, saying, "Watch out for our gang, we're trouble.". 5. Team.

  23. Urban Dictionary: set

    Gang, specifically a subsidiary gang. For example, Piru Bloods is a set of the Bloods Gang.

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