How long was Frodo’s journey in ‘The Lord of the Rings’?

We see him and Sam travel for three full movies to get to their destination.

Frodo and Sam

Over the course of three incredible movies, early 2000s audiences were given a glimpse into one of the best fantasy stories ever told.

In the years since their release, the Lord of the Rings films have only grown in popularity. They continue to maintain status as a shining example of everything a film should be, from their actors and direction to their setting, plot, and delivery. Each of the first three films are genuine work of art in the eyes of their fans, successfully carrying three incredible, historic books to a brand-new audience via the big screen.

The story in the trilogy follows an incredible cast of characters, helmed in part by Elijah Wood’s Frodo Baggins. The beloved character is the unassuming hero of the Lord of the Rings trilogy after he successfully carries an impossibly powerful ring from one end of Middle Earth to the next.

Frodo’s journey , alongside his stalwart and endlessly loyal companion Sam Gamgee — played by Sean Astin — takes place over the course of three films. While his journey is captivating throughout, it is technically true to state that, through most of the trilogy’s notably long runtime, all the little Hobbits really do is walk.

Their travels take Frodo and Sam far from their charming homeland, into lands rarely traversed by common folk, and eventually into the desolate land of Mordor. The passage of time is a bit hazy in the films, as is the precise distance of the hardy Hobbits’ journey, leaving many people to wonder how long Frodo and Sam traveled to reach Mount Doom.

How long was Frodo’s journey?

Sam and Frodo in Lord of the Rings

Frodo and Sam’s journey seemingly takes them from one side of the map to the other, and appears to take anywhere from a month to over a year to complete. The nebulous timeline in the films tends to leave viewers confused, as they wonder how long the events they just witnessed took to complete.

Thankfully, J.R.R. Tolkien’s original works are far less ill-defined. In the appendices of the Lord of the Rings books, readers can easily uncover the precise distance between the Shire and Mordor, as well as how long it took Frodo and Sam to make the journey.

Frodo’s departure from Bag End fell on Sep. 23 of TA 3018, just one day after he celebrated his 50th birthday. Within a few days, he and his party — which at this point consisted of Sam, Merry, and Pippin — were headed out of the Shire and into the wide world.

It takes the group around a month to reach Rivendell, where they meet up with Gandalf and participate in the Council of Elrond’s discussion of the ring. They remain in the city for several months — between late October and late December — before departing as the Fellowship of the Ring, several members stronger.

The Fellowship passed through the Mines of Moria a month later, in mid-January, and reached the Elven city of Lothlórien by mid-February. Frodo and Sam officially part ways with the Fellowship ten days later, as February comes to a close, and start their solo journey. From there, it takes them just over one month more to travel the remaining distance and reach Mount Doom. By the time March 25 of TA 3019 comes to a close, Sauron has been defeated and Middle Earth is free once more.

In total, the journey takes just over six months.

Why is this Lord of the Rings timeline surprising?

Lord of the Rings - the Shire

The startlingly short timespan — particularly once you cut out the two-month stint in Rivendell — is shocking to many viewers. The story in Lord of the Rings feels like it takes place over years, rather than months, and this feeling is only intensified by the films, which were released over a span of three years. Tolkien’s timeline is clear, however, and definitively states that Frodo and Sam technically only journey alone for a single month. They also don’t spend the entire six months walking, but rather about half of that, between several stops and layovers along the way.

The Lord of the Rings films never directly address the time that passes between the story’s start and its end, but it does nod to Tolkien’s established timeline in the final moments of Return of the King . As he’s penning his additions to Bilbo’s “There and Back Again,” Frodo notes that “it’s been four years to the day since Weathertop.”

This clearly places the story at four years since the Hobbits and Aragorn faced the Nazgûl atop Weathertop Hill. This indicates that, from start to finish, the movies take place over slightly more than four years in total.

What is the timeline in The Lord of the Rings book?

Elijah Wood as Frodo

In the book, the timeline is slightly different. Frodo still feels the same pain — a token of his confrontation with the Witch King of Angmar — on the annual anniversary of the Weathertop battle, but it is noted over the passage of several years. In 3021, almost exactly three years to the day following his fateful departure from the Shire, Frodo boards a ship headed to the Undying Lands. He departs Middle Earth forever, leaving his friends — and hopefully some of his pain — behind.

In total, Frodo’s journey — from inheriting the ring to destroying it — takes right around 17 years. Things take quite a bit more time in Tolkien’s original version, but we can see how some of the time in between — particularly the years between Bilbo’s birthday and Frodo’s eventual journey — might be boring in film form.

How far was Frodo’s journey?

Frodo's journey - Lord of the Rings

Though now we know how long it took, what about how far Frodo and Sam traveled in the course of their six-month journey?

According to TheOneRing.net , Frodo traverses approximately 1,800 miles throughout his journey. This is nearly twice the distance traveled by his uncle, who traveled a total of 950 miles on his quest to the Lonely Mountain. A breakdown indicates that Frodo and Sam traveled around 9.73 miles per day, but that doesn’t consider the long breaks in Rivendell and Lothlórien. With those in mind, it’s likely Frodo and Sam were forced to cover quite a bit more distance when they were up on their feet, covering close to 20 miles a day for weeks on end.

If you break it down all the way, this likely means that Frodo and Sam were physically walking — or at least traveling — approximately 20 miles a day for three full months, off and on. That is some serious cardio, particularly for a once-contented 50-year-old Hobbit and his portly, 38-year-old former gardener.

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The hero’s journey breakdown: the lord of the rings.

By Ken Miyamoto · November 4, 2019

lord of the rings frodo's journey

How does The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring follow Joseph Campbell’s Hero’s Journey breakdown?

Welcome to another installment of our new series A Hero’s Journey Breakdown where we explore Joseph Campbell’s mythological storytelling structure and how iconic films fit into that mold.

Christopher Vogler’s approach to Campbell’s structure broke the mythical story structure into twelve stages. For this series, we define the stages in simplified interpretations:

  • The Ordinary World : We see the hero’s normal life at the start of the story before the adventure begins.
  • Call to Adventure : The hero is faced with an event, conflict, problem, or challenge that makes them begin their adventure.
  • Refusal of the Call : The hero initially refuses the adventure because of hesitation, fears, insecurity, or any other number of issues.
  • Meeting the Mentor : The hero encounters a mentor that can give them advice, wisdom, information, or items that ready them for the journey ahead.
  • Crossing the Threshold : The hero leaves their ordinary world for the first time and crosses the threshold into adventure.
  • Tests, Allies, and Enemies : The hero learns the rules of the new world and endures tests, meets friends, and comes face-to-face with enemies.
  • The Approach : The initial plan to take on the central conflict begins, but setbacks occur that cause the hero to try a new approach or adopt new ideas.
  • The Ordeal: Things go wrong and added conflict is introduced. The hero experiences more difficult hurdles and obstacles, some of which may lead to a life crisis.
  • The Reward : After surviving The Ordeal, the hero seizes the sword — a reward that they’ve earned that allows them to take on the biggest conflict. It may be a physical item or piece of knowledge or wisdom that will help them persevere.
  • The Road Back : The hero sees the light at the end of the tunnel, but they are about to face even more tests and challenges.
  • The Resurrection : The climax. The hero faces a final test, using everything they have learned to take on the conflict once and for all.
  • The Return : The hero brings their knowledge or the “elixir” back to the ordinary world.

Here we turn to Peter Jackson’s  The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring . This breakdown is unique because the whole journey of the hero (Frodo) is told throughout the course of three films. However, The Hero’s Journey can still be applied to the first installment.

lord of the rings frodo's journey

Note: As with any application of story structure or formula, this is just a hindsight interpretation and implementation of The Hero’s Journey to this cinematic tale. There can and will be variances. 

The Ordinary World

Frodo Baggins is living in the peaceful Shire amongst a village of Hobbits, including his uncle Bilbo and his trusted friend Sam. His good friend Gandalf enters the Shire to celebrate his uncle’s birthday, leading to a fun celebration.

Call to Adventure

Frodo is called to adventure by Gandalf when Gandalf entrusts him with the One Ring after Bilbo leaves the Shire.

Gandalf first asks Frodo to keep the Ring in this possession until he returns. He then returns to the Shire and asks Frodo if the ring is still safe. It is.

Gandalf then requests that Frodo take the Ring to out of the Shire.

Refusal of the Call

Frodo refuses the call to adventure at first, not believing that a simple Hobbit, like himself, can be entrusted. This Refusal of the Call is repeated throughout his journey as he tries to relinquish the responsibility by offering it to Gandalf, Galadriel, and Aragorn.

Crossing the Threshold

Frodo and Sam cross out of the Shire.

Tests, Allies, and Enemies

Frodo and his Hobbit friends face the Ring Wraiths for the first time on their way to meet with Gandalf at Bree.

They survive and manage to make it to Bree.

It’s there that they meet Strider, who will later be revealed as Aragorn.

With Strider’s help, they manage to escape the Ring Wraiths once again.

Frodo is later tested after he has survived what was thought to be a mortal wound. He’s rushed to Rivendell and later reunited with his friends, including Gandalf.

Frodo finally takes on full responsibility as the Ring Bearer. He meets new allies as the Fellowship is formed.

The Approach

The Fellowship struggles to survive the journey through the mountains but is forced into the Mines of Moria. Frodo and Gandalf discuss Gollum and the dangers of the Ring.

The orcs are alerted to the presence of the Fellowship within Moria. Frodo and his friends are forced to fend off hundreds, if not thousands, of orcs — as well as a cave troll. They defeat the cave troll and just as the orcs are about to overrun them, their numbers are scattered as the Balrog appears.

Gandalf fights the Balrog and casts him into a chasm. However, the Balrog drags Gandalf down with him to his apparent death.

Frodo and the rest of the Fellowship mourn the loss of Gandalf.

The Fellowship, now led by Aragorn, reaches Lothlórien, home to elves Galadriel and Celeborn. Galadriel tells Frodo that only he can complete the quest. She then tells him that that one of the Fellowship will try to take the ring from him.

The Fellowship is rewarded with its own bravery for surviving The Ordeal in Moria. But it’s Frodo that receives the knowledge he needs to complete his quest. He knows that only he can take the Ring to where it needs to be destroyed — and that one of his friends will betray him for the Ring.

The Road Back

Saruman has created an army of Uruk-hai to hunt down and kill the Fellowship. Meanwhile, the Fellowship has left Lothlórien by the river.

Frodo wanders off on his own and is later confronted by Boromir. Boromir, seduced by the power of the Ring, tries to take it from Frodo. Frodo escapes.

The Resurrection

Frodo realizes that he must travel to Mordor alone. He will no longer be part of The Fellowship.

The others are ambushed by the Uruk-hai.

Merry and Pippin are taken captive, and Boromir is mortally wounded by the Uruk chieftain, Lurtz. Aragorn appears just in time to kill Lurtz. Boromir dies in Aragorn’s arms.

Sam arrives at the shore as Frodo floats away in a boat. Frodo looks on with longing eyes, knowing that he must go on this adventure alone. However, Sam is having nothing of it. Despite not being able to swim, Sam lunges himself into the river in pursuit of his friend.

When Frodo pulls Sam up into the boat, they’re reunited. We’ve returned to where the adventure started — with Sam and Frodo venturing off on an adventure.

Meanwhile, Aragorn, Legolas, and Gimli go to rescue Merry and Pippin, understanding that it’s Frodo’s destiny to take the Ring alone (and with his dear friend Sam).

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'The Return of the King' Ending Most Lord of the Rings Adaptations Ignore

What really happened to the Hobbits when they returned home to the Shire?

The Big Picture

  • Tolkien's original ending includes the "Scouring of the Shire," a crucial chapter often omitted from adaptations.
  • The chapter showcases hobbits fighting and reclaiming their homeland, completing their character arcs.
  • This ending symbolizes the restoration of the Shire and represents good overcoming the dark, corrupted power.

For many fans who grew up with The Lord of the Rings films, the entire point of the Fellowship's mission was to destroy the One Ring and defeat the titular Dark Lord once and for all. Of course, this is a major part of the narrative and arguably even the most important trial and triumph of Frodo's journey. Yet, there's more to the story than just that. At the end of J.R.R. Tolkien 's The Return of the King , the high fantasy author crafts a different finale to the hobbit's quest that no official adaptation––live-action or otherwise––has properly translated to the screen. If you haven't read Tolkien's epic novels, consider this your final spoiler warning...

lord-of-the-rings-return-of-the-king-movie-poster

The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King

Gandalf and Aragorn lead the World of Men against Sauron's army to draw his gaze from Frodo and Sam as they approach Mount Doom with the One Ring.

J.R.R. Tolkien's Original Ending to 'The Lord of the Rings' Isn't What You'd Expect

If you thought Peter Jackson 's ending to The Lord of the Rings was drawn out, you clearly haven't spent much time with the original text. A master of worldbuilding, Tolkien takes his time with the final chapters of The Return of the King , with five chapters between when Frodo and Sam stand victorious at Mount Doom (with Aragorn and his forces distracting Sauron at the Black Gate) and when the four hobbits––including Merry and Pippin––return to their homeland in the Shire. In that time, ​​​ Aragorn is crowned king , Éowyn and Faramir become an item, Théoden is buried, Éomer becomes king of Rohan, and Aragorn and Arwen are married. The falling action here is spectacular, and even Legolas and Gimli set off on their own post-war adventure. While much of this is covered in the extended edition of the films , the novel's ending isn't quite the blissful and idealistic return home that our heroes would've hoped for. In fact, Frodo and his friends find out that all that was beautiful in the Shire has been turned into something that's even "worse than Mordor."

Called "The Scouring of the Shire," this penultimate chapter echoes the entire Lord of the Rings campaign in one fell swoop. When the hobbits come upon the border of their homeland via the Brandywine Bridge, they meet the new Shiriffs (Tolkien's version of Hobbit sheriffs), who eventually try to arrest the four members of the famed Fellowship of the Ring. Discovering that many of the trees and beautiful aspects of nature have been ripped up in favor of ugly buildings and industrialization, the hobbits decide to overthrow the new government. Under the leadership of a man named "Sharkey," the new government is full of many rules and horrid features. Sam convinces Tom Cotton and his sons to help find like-minded hobbits, and Merry and Pippin (who have since grown into the tallest of the little folk due to drinking from the Ent-draught ) lead their own campaign, the Battle of Bywater, which is successful in overthrowing the ruffians who have come in to enforce Sharkey's law .

Eventually returning to Bag End, which has since been taken over by one of Frodo's turncoat kin, the hobbits encounter Sharkey himself, who turns out to be the former White Wizard Saruman, devoid of most of his power . Aided by Greema Wormtongue, Saruman hoped to turn the Shire into the new Isengard, and he even had Wormtongue kill "Chief" Lotho Sackville-Baggins. While the hobbits debate what to do with him, Frodo tells Saruman to leave, only for the former Wizard to attempt to kill the young Hobbit. Thankfully, Frodo's chain-mail breaks Saruman's knife, but even then, Frodo (who never engaged in the battle to reclaim the Shire, instead letting Merry lead) tells Sam not to kill him. He even tells Wormtongue he can stay. But after bad-mouthing his servant, Saruman calls Wormtongue to his side, only for the man to slaughter the Wizard (and then be killed by archers himself).

"The Scouring of the Shire" Was Inspired by Tolkien's Childhood Experiences

The Scouring of the Shire as seen in 'The Lord of the Rings'

Now, that may seem like a more depressing way to end The Lord of the Rings , but the story doesn't quite end there. The hobbits immediately get to work at remaking the Shire as it was meant to be . "The clearing up certainly needed a lot of work, but it took less time than Sam had feared," the opening line of the final chapter, "The Grey Havens," notes. After that, much of what we know from the film adaptations comes to pass. Sam is married to Rosie Cotton (though their love story is better set up in "The Scouring of the Shire" chapter), Merry and Pippin become pillars of the community, and Frodo leaves Middle-earth for the Gray Havens (alongside Bilbo and Gandalf). All is well, and thus ends The Lord of the Rings . But if that's how it was going to end anyway, why did J.R.R. Tolkien add this portion to the novel?

While many have claimed that "The Scouring of the Shire" is a direct allegory for Great Britain in the aftermath of World War II, that wasn't quite the case. According to the author (who had previously served in the First World War), The Lord of the Rings "is neither allegorical nor topical." In fact, Tolkien detested allegory in most forms––much to his friend C.S. "Jack" Lewis ' dismay––and generally preferred "history, true or feigned, with its varied applicability to the thought and experience of readers" (per the Forward to the Second Edition of The Fellowship of the Ring ). Tolkien compared the hideousness of his youth in 1914 to the more contemporary age of 1939, noting that neither was necessarily worse than the other: it was all bad. Doubtless, this was part of his inspiration for "The Scouring of the Shire" in the first place, something he would later emphasize.

"It has been supposed by some that 'The Scouring of the Shire' reflects the situation in England at the time when I was finishing my tale. It does not," Tolkien penned. "It is an essential part of the plot, foreseen from the outset, though in the event modified by the character of Saruman as developed in the story without, need I say, any allegorical significance or contemporary political reference whatsoever." But, just because Tolkien held to his convictions concerning allegory didn't mean there wasn't any basis in his own experience. "It has indeed some basis in experience, though slender (for the economic situation was entirely different), and much further back. The country in which I lived in childhood was being shabbily destroyed before I was ten, in days when motor-cars were rare objects (I had never seen one) and men were still building suburban railways." This penultimate chapter of The Return of the King may not be an allegory, but Tolkien's personal experience with the devastation of war made a mark on him at an early age, one he'd revisit through Frodo's final adventure.

'The Lord of the Rings' Trilogy Referenced Tolkien's Original Ending but Didn't Commit to Adapting It

Christopher Lee in a deleted Saruman scene from The Return of the King - 2003

Although "The Scouring of the Shire" tragically doesn't occur in Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings films , the filmmaker echoed the original ending throughout the trilogy, particularly in his extended edition of The Return of the King . In the final confrontation between Saruman ( Christopher Lee ) and our heroes at the destruction of Isengard, the White Wizard is still killed brutally by Wormtongue ( Brad Dourif ). Just as Frodo attempts to reason with Saruman in the book, so does Gandalf Gandalf ( Ian McKellen ) here in the film, but it's too late. Additionally, Théoden ( Bernard Hill ) stands in Frodo's place when appealing to Wormtongue, hoping to remove him from the defeated Wizard's power. It doesn't work, and just like in the novel, Wormtongue is killed by an archer, though in this case by Legolas ( Orlando Bloom ) rather than a band of hobbits.

Additionally, in The Fellowship of the Ring , when Frodo ( Elijah Wood ) encounters Galadriel ( Cate Blanchet ), he looks into her mirror to see what could happen if Sauron's forces are not defeated. Looking into her mirror , he sees a future where the Shire is in flames, as orcs and other ruffians run wild and free, and hobbits are slaughtered . This is likely a reference to that infamous anticlimax at the end of J.R.R. Tolkien's novel and is by far the best look at the effects of the "scouring" that director Peter Jackson ever gave us. Of course, with Frodo's victory in destroying the One Ring and Middle-earth saved from the Dark Lord's evil reign, this event never occurred in this version of the story, and Saruman was killed long before he could make his way northward to the Shire. The end of The Return of the King retains some elements, such as Sam's ( Sean Astin ) interest in Rosie Cotton ( Sarah McLeod ), but otherwise falls short of adapting this part of the novel .

But while Jackson's trilogy failed to bring "The Scouring of the Shire" to life, there was another Lord of the Rings production that took an extra step to include this ending in their version. The Finnish miniseries Hobitit was an adaptation of Tolkien's three-part high fantasy epic (albeit on a significantly lower budget) that told the story in nine parts in 1993, a decade before Jackson's Return of the King hit theaters. Here, in the final episode, "Vapautus " (translated to "Liberation" in English), the four hobbits return to the Shire and are forced to fight for their freedom . It's sort of shoe-horned in at the end, with much of the episode focused on the conflict between Frodo and Gollum on Mount Doom, but it more-or-less attempts to capture the spirit of Tolkien's original ending.

'The Return of the King's Original Ending Is Important to the Hobbit's Journey in 'The Lord of the Rings'

Although J.R.R. Tolkien was clear that "The Scouring of the Shire" was "essential to the plot," Peter Jackson (and Rankin/Bass before him) opted to remove it from the final product. But is this warranted? Well, no, it isn't. In many ways, this final hurdle the four hobbits must go through is the culmination of everything they learned on their journey. For Merry and Pippin , the courage and skills they've developed are best put to use here, and Merry becomes a leader within his community. For Sam, he recognizes that he has waited too long to settle down and thus fights for his home and future. And for Frodo, well, Frodo's pacifism is a result of all the bloodshed he's seen along the way, often as a result of protecting him. Since he was given another chance after taking the Ring for himself, he offers the same to Saruman, who foolishly rejects it, resulting in his death.

These elements bring The Lord of the Rings full circle, and in many ways, "The Scouring of the Shire" mirrors the Fellowship's initial quest, just in reverse. Instead of leaving the Shire in their efforts to destroy the One Ring, they return to save and restore the Shire from the dark power that corrupted it . If so much of The Lord of the Rings was about destruction, the penultimate chapter represents the resurrection of what is true and good and beautiful. While Jackson's films are excellent without it , there's a reason Tolkien included this in the first place, and it deserves to be properly adapted in the future .

The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King is available for streaming on Max.

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lord of the rings frodo's journey

  • My Preferences
  • My Reading List
  • The Lord of the Rings

J.R.R. Tolkien

  • Literature Notes
  • Frodo Baggins
  • Book Summary
  • The Fellowship of the Ring
  • The Two Towers
  • The Return of the King
  • About The Lord of the Rings Trilogy
  • Character List
  • Summary and Analysis: The Fellowship of the Ring
  • Maps, Prologue, and Note on Shire Records
  • Book 1, Chapters 1–6
  • Book 1, Chapters 7–12
  • Book 2, Chapters 1–5
  • Book 2, Chapters 6–10
  • Summary and Analysis: The Two Towers
  • Book 3, Chapters 1–6
  • Book 3, Chapters 7–11
  • Book 4, Chapters 1–6
  • Book 4, Chapters 7–10
  • Summary and Analysis: The Return of the King
  • Book 5, Chapters 1–5
  • Book 5, Chapters 6–10
  • Book 6, Chapters 1–5
  • Book 6, Chapters 6–10
  • Character Analysis
  • Gandalf the Grey
  • Character Map
  • J.R.R. Tolkien Biography
  • Critical Essays
  • This Is Worse Than Mordor!": The Scouring of the Shire as Conclusion"
  • The Temptation of the Ring
  • Full Glossary for The Lord of the Rings
  • Essay Questions
  • Practice Projects
  • Cite this Literature Note

Character Analysis Frodo Baggins

When Frodo begins his journey, he does not consider himself particularly heroic, but the job must be done and he is the only person available. Many times along the way, especially before he and Sam separate from the rest of the Fellowship, either he or one of the powerful individuals he encounters comment on his obvious lack of qualifications. He is not wise like Elrond; he is not valiant like Aragorn; his not powerful like Gandalf. In fact, he lacks all the usual features of heroism. He is only a hobbit, gifted with such pedestrian virtues as common sense, a good heart, and the determination to do his best.

The first challenges to confront Frodo dramatize his inexperience. He is indecisive, delaying his departure from the Shire as long as possible even though he knows the task is urgent. He opts to risk the dangers of the Old Forest, nearly getting himself and his friends killed — twice. He behaves foolishly in Bree, drawing unnecessary attention to himself. And he gives in to the temptation to put on the Ring at Weathertop, making himself vulnerable to the Ringwraiths' attack.

Nevertheless, Frodo survives both the obvious dangers and his own mistakes. The novel attributes his success to two main factors. First, as Gandalf is fond of pointing out, hobbits are tougher than they look, and simple toughness — the ability to endure hardship and move past it — goes a long way in this struggle. Second, Frodo does not want and never sought the power of the Ring, meaning that he continues to resist its lure. Although he lapses momentarily at Weathertop, he reiterates his commitment to resist at the Ford of Bruinen. Heroism does not require perfection, only the aspiration to do good.

As the journey progresses, Frodo develops as a hero not by acquiring new wisdom, strength, or power, but by trusting his own virtues: the common sense, goodness, and determination that motivated him from the beginning. Spurred by Boromir's actions, Frodo realizes that the Ring will destroy everyone around him. His common sense tells him that he will have to rely on himself to complete the task, and his heart tells him not to endanger the others — physically or spiritually — by bringing them along. And as the exhausting journey continues, only his determination to see it through allows him to continue, struggling step by step along the difficult path.

Befriending Gollum is a crucial point in Frodo's personal journey as well as his physical one. When he first hears of Gollum, Frodo's initial reaction is one of disgust and anger. If only Bilbo had killed the creature, none of this terrible journey would be necessary; Sauron would not have learned of the Ring and Frodo could have remained safe in his hobbit-hole. He does not believe Gandalf when the wizard says that Gollum is pitiable, but he finds this to be the case when they at last meet. Gollum's service as a guide proves invaluable, even considering tricking them into Shelob's lair, but that is only one part of the service he does for Frodo. For the Ringbearer, Gollum serves as both an object-lesson (here is what the Ring will do to its bearer) and a glimmer of hope (if Gollum can be saved, perhaps Frodo himself will not be destroyed by the quest). Although Frodo does not see it, Gollum's moment of hesitation on the steps of Cirith Ungol shows that Frodo's hope has not been misplaced.

Frodo's quest succeeds through the fortunate intervention of Gollum and his life is saved by the eagles, but like many who leave to fight for their homes, Frodo suffers physical and spiritual wounds that cannot heal. While we would like to believe that heroes can come home, sometimes the struggle is too painful. Frodo's departure from Middle-earth acknowledges and rewards his sacrifice, freeing him from the pain of lingering in a world that he can no longer enjoy.

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Screen Rant

How long bilbo's journey takes in the hobbit (compared to frodo in lotr).

Bilbo Baggins and Frodo Baggins both underwent epic and lengthy journeys, but which of their adventures was longer there and back again?

Bilbo Baggins’ journey in The Hobbit is surprisingly longer than Frodo Baggins’ journey throughout the Lord of the Rings trilogy. The two hobbits are the main protagonist of their own respective stories within Middle-earth lore, and both went on excruciatingly long journeys to complete a dangerous quest. They each faced many obstacles along the way, with Frodo even following in Bilbo's footsteps at the beginning, encountering the same group of trolls (albeit they had been turned to stone via Bilbo and Gandalf decades earlier).

In Lord of the Rings , Frodo’s journey takes him from the Shire to Mount Doom to destroy the One Ring. On the other hand, Bilbo’s journey in The Hobbit is to join 14 dwarves, led by Thorin and Gandalf, to the Lonely Mountain to reclaim the land from the dragon Smaug. Both succeed in their quests, though neither without taking a permanent toll on themselves, which leads them both to depart for the Undying Lands at the end of Lord of the Rings .

Related: Where The Hobbit's Dwarves Are During Lord Of The Rings (Are Any Alive?)

How Long Bilbo's Journey Takes Compared To Frodo's

The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit Elijah Wood and Martin Freeman as Frodo Baggins and Bilbo Baggins

While the stories of Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit are both presented across movie trilogies of similar scale, the length of the two journeys differs, according to the Timeline of Middle-earth history . Bilbo joins Thorin’s company in The Hobbit to journey to the Lonely Mountain and leaves the Shire on April 27, 2941. The adventure to the Lonely Mountain and the return journey to the Shire takes Bilbo 421 days (almost 14 months) as he arrives home on June 22, 2942. This is confirmed in The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies when Bilbo returns home to find his belongings being auctioned off and is told he was declared dead after being missing for over 13 months.

In comparison, Frodo’s journey in Lord of the Rings is slightly shorter. Frodo leaves the Shire with Samwise Gamgee and the One Ring on September 23, 3018. Including detours, Frodo walks from the Shire to Mordor and Mount Doom and back in 404 days (just over 13 months) as he and the other Hobbits arrive back in Hobbiton on November 1, 3019. Most would assume that because Lord of the Rings is a bigger story and the original novels are much longer than the single book of The Hobbit, Frodo’s journey would be the longer one. However, considering both journeys encountered diversions and challenges, the two amount to a similar length.

How Much Time Passes Across The Hobbit & LOTR Trilogies

the hobbit bilbo baggins Aragorn lord of the rings

The Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings trilogies occur during the Third Age of Middle-earth and span over 80 years, six months, and 21 days. The Hobbit ’s story begins when Thorin Oakenshield meets with Gandalf for the first time, so they can quest to free the Lonely Mountain. This meeting happens on March 15, 2941. Lord of the Rings' timeline begins 60 years later with the celebration of Bilbo’s 111th birthday. At the end of the Lord of the Rings trilogy, Samwise returns home on October 6, 3021, after watching Frodo sail from the Grey Havens.

The world of Middle-earth is rich, and this is made clear by how many journeys can be explored in this world over 80 years. Lord of the Rings takes its time with its epic story and executes Frodo’s journey beautifully. The Hobbit , a much shorter book, expands on its arcs across its movie-trilogy timeframe, with plot lines beyond Bilbo's adventure. While this doesn't sit well with audiences, it’s surprising to discover Bilbo’s journey is longer. The Hobbit trilogy ultimately had the breathing room to show Bilbo’s journey there and back again.

More: Why Frodo Was Perfect To Destroy LOTR's One Ring

How Far Frodo and Sam Walked in The Lord of the Rings

Frodo and Samwise's journey to Mordor took around half a year to complete. But how many miles do they walk throughout The Lord of the Rings?

Frodo and Sam's journey across Middle-earth is a long and tiresome trek over some dangerous lands. And part of what makes their adventure so compelling is the simplicity of it, as their goal is to make it from one point to another before Sauron's power grows too strong, all while avoiding detection. This walk takes many grueling months for the two Hobbits to complete, and the total distance they walk throughout The Lord of the Rings is equally impressive.

Through craggy rocks, flat marshes, caves of giant spiders and the slopes of Mount Doom, Frodo and Sam walk along hundreds of miles. And this is all while they try to avoid armies of Orcs and Sauron's legions spreading across Middle-earth. Then, of course, there's the most difficult task of all -- carrying the One Ring . It may appear like a light trinket, but what it houses is a painful burden for even the strongest minds.

RELATED: How The Lord of the Rings' Middle-earth Was Created Through Music

How Many Miles Frodo and Sam Travel in The Lord of the Rings

frodo and sam

The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring notes that the distance between the western border of the Shire to Brandywine Bridge is 120 miles. With these two points marked on Middle-earth's map, it's possible to gauge the distance the Fellowship traveled throughout the trilogy. So, with their first destination being Rivendell, it's estimated that the Hobbits traveled 420 miles starting from the Shire.

Rivendell is where the Fellowship is formed, and the journey properly begins. And together, the group travels roughly 475 miles until Boromir dies, and they separate for good. During this time, they travel over mountains and through Dwarven ruins, but using boats after visiting Lady Galadriel helped with some of that. But from that point, Frodo and Sam walk 340 miles to Mount Doom, and the final total of their journey is estimated to be 1300 miles.

RELATED: Lord of the Rings' Least-Known Words That Really Matter

Frodo's Journey: Discovering the Hidden Meaning of The Lord of the Rings

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Frodo's Journey: Discovering the Hidden Meaning of The Lord of the Rings proposes a Christian foundation to J.R.R. Tolkien 's The Lord of the Rings , particularly Frodo Baggins ' part in the Quest of the Ring . It was written by Joseph Pearce and published by Saint Benedict Press in 2015, following Bilbo's Journey: Discovering the Hidden Meaning of The Hobbit (2012).

External links [ ]

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See also [ ]

  • Finding God in The Lord of the Rings
  • Walking with Frodo: A Devotional Journey through The Lord of the Rings
  • Bilbo's Birthday and Frodo's Adventure of Faith
  • The Philosophy of Tolkien
  • The Gospel According to Tolkien
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Lord Of The Rings: How Are Frodo, Pippin, And Merry Actually Related?

Merry, Frodo, and Pippin

Hobbit culture may be simple and rustic, but the Shire inhabitants are interested in more than food and pipeweed. In the opening pages of "The Fellowship of the Ring," Tolkien points out that Hobbits have a passion for family history, too. In "The Two Towers," Gandalf even warns Théoden against expressing casual interest in the subject, pointing out that Hobbits will happily discuss "the small doings of their fathers, grandfathers, and great-grandfathers, and remoter cousins to the ninth degree, if you encourage them with undue patience."

Some of these half-pint familial connections are easy to spot. For instance, most Middle-earth fans know that Frodo and Bilbo are related — although it often comes as a surprise to find that "Uncle Bilbo" is merely a nickname for the old Hobbit. (He's actually Frodo's first cousin once removed.) There's more family fun behind "The Lord of the Rings" Hobbitry-in-arms than just the Baggins connection, too.

Frodo is also related to Pippin and Merry . Savvy movie fans can easily recall the moment in "The Fellowship of the Ring" when Pippin (Billy Boyd) begins telling everyone about his connection to Frodo (Elijah Wood). The genealogical dialogue abruptly ends when Frodo slips, and the One Ring lands on his finger.

Pippin isn't referencing new information written for Peter Jackson's trilogy. The line is a callback to deep, complex, and incredibly convoluted genealogical data that Tolkien etched into his books of lore over half a century ago. The question is, with so many family connections in the Shire, how exactly are Frodo and Pippin — and Merry, for that matter — related? Short answer: They're cousins. But trust us, it's more complicated than that.

How is Frodo related to Merry?

Meriadoc Brandybuck (aka Merry) is referred to as Frodo's friend when he first shows up in J.R.R. Tolkien's writings. However, Frodo himself is more than half Brandybuck by blood, and both hail from the same larger family tree, making the two fellows close relatives. Most of Frodo's Brandybuck blood comes from his mother, Primula Brandybuck. Primula is the daughter of Old Master Gorbodoc, who functions as the de facto ruler of his family's geographic region of the Shire (called "Buckland").

The quickest and easiest way to trace the relationship between Frodo and Merry is via the appendices of "The Return of the King." In those hallowed extra materials, Tolkien provides visual family tree breakdowns for the Baggins, Brandybuck, Took, and Gamgee families. And we're not talking about a generation or two here. Each one stretches back generations, tracing hundreds of years of Hobbit history in the process.

Frodo shows up in three of the four genealogies, including the Brandybuck one, where he's listed on the opposite side of the tree from Merry. The principal connection between the two? Merry's grandfather, who goes by the splendiferous name of Rorimac "Goldfather," is the brother of Frodo's mom, Primula.

Thus, we can connect via the quagmire that is family ancestry categorizations that the closest family connection between Merry and Frodo is that they are first cousins once removed, Frodo on his mother's side and Merry on his father's side. As an added bonus, Merry is also related to Bilbo. Their closest connection is that the two are first cousins twice removed.

How is Frodo related to Pippin?

Now for the slightly more complicated connection between Frodo and his relative Peregrin Took (aka Pippin). Once again, Frodo's connection to Merry comes through his mother, Primula, via his grandmother, Mirabella Took. Mirabella has 11 siblings, one of whom is her brother Hildigrim. Hildigrim's great-grandson is Peregrin. So, tracing the two Hobbit heroes, this time across the Took family tree, we find that Frodo and Pippin are second cousins once removed, Frodo on his mother's side and Pippin on his father's side.

But wait. It gets better. The Took family tree is arguably the most famous Hobbit family clan of them all, and it has connections to Bilbo, Merry, and even Sam (who is generally left out of the larger family connection conversation). All three even show up on the arboreal Took family map.

Pippin is Bilbo's first cousin twice removed. He's also Merry's first cousin. And the connection to Master Samwise? The two Hobbits' children get married. That's right. After "The Lord of the Rings" ends, Sam 's daughter Goldilocks gets hitched to Pippin's son Faramir.

The best part about all of this is that these are just the primary ways that Frodo, Pippin, Merry, and Bilbo are related. There are other ways to trace their kinship across their frankly overwhelming family trees. Everywhere you look, Hobbits are crisscrossing their family ties. Fortunately, the marital connections are always multiple degrees of cousins apart, which keeps things above board. But that doesn't change the fact that it's one of the most chaotic and confusing concepts to grasp in all of Middle-earth. The fact that one man came up with all of it on his own is a feat on par with Frodo's quest.

10 Movies Like Lord of the Rings to Watch If You Love Fantasy

Lotr did it best, but others did it too..

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Easily in the top three of the best book-to-movie series ever, The Lord of the Rings retains a long-time fanbase that varies between casual viewers and all-out lore obsessors. While many existing fantasy epics held similar themes and canonical mythologies (elves, dwarves, wizards, goblins, dragons, etc.), none of them utilized the existing tools quite as well as Tolkien.

Director Peter Jackson has been hailed by fans and crew/cast members alike for having stayed true to the source material, save a few key character changes (Faramir and Arwen) and removed events (Tom Bombadil and the Scouring of the Shire). Though this may enrage some superfans of the LotR books , Jackson succeeded in his mission to make Lord of the Rings one of the most critically acclaimed fantasy trilogies of all time, picking up 17 Oscar wins.

Needless to say, finding films that are similar to The Lord of the Rings movies is quite difficult, though I’ve done my best to compile this list of 10 movies like LoTR below.

Are your excited for more Lord of the Rings movies and shows?

lord of the rings frodo's journey

The Hobbit Trilogy

A fairly obvious starting point on the list, The Hobbit Trilogy carries multiple similarities that will likely entertain most LOTR fans – save the sticklers. Based on the prequel novel that started it all, a young hobbit named Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman) is unexpectedly whisked away by a curious wizard and a gaggle of hardheaded Dwarves to embark on the adventure of a lifetime. Retaining a large amount of the same source material, this trilogy is more zany and drawn out than LOTR, in some good ways and some not.

Willow (1988)

A cult classic in the fantasy realm, Willow remains a go-to for fans of general fantasy lore. After he encounters an abandoned child on the shoreside of his humble community, a mild-mannered farmer named Willow (Warwick Davis) embarks on a quest that challenges everything he knows about his world. As with Lord of the Rings, there are stellar representations of similar characters highlighted by memorable performances from Davis and Val Kilmer, who carry familiar Frodo and Aragorn traits.

There was also Willow TV series that came out in 2022, but it has since been removed from Disney+ .

Tolkien (2019)

lord of the rings frodo's journey

Through love, friendship, and war, the story of Tolkien is developed as the author writes his masterpieces that will be admired through the ages. Nicholas Hoult plays Tolkien as a young adult building his legacy through turmoil. While the events of the film aren’t exactly synonymous with the events of the trilogy, Tolkien provides insight into the life and inspirations of the man behind the iconic Middle-earth stories.

Read our review of Tolkien .

Legend (1985)

lord of the rings frodo's journey

Containing more classical themes of good vs. evil and damsels in distress, Legend features impressive aesthetics and practical effects ahead of their time. Fighting to prevent the eternal night from covering the world in darkness, Jack (Tom Cruise) must rescue Princess Lilli (Mia Sara) before she, too, is consumed by evil. While not the most memorable or best of Ridley Scott’s films , the adventure and action portrayed are still a wonder to behold.

Beowulf (2007)

Based on the classic literary poem , Beowulf expands upon the myth with striking gusto. Plagued by his past decisions, Beowulf (Ray Winstone) pays for the glorious kingdom he built with the blood of his people. With stunning animation created from motion-capture technology, the actors are visually represented in the best way possible to create a breathtakingly gruesome tale.

Read our review of Beowulf .

The Princess Bride (1987)

A tonally different tale that focuses more on true love, The Princess Bride retains themes of heroism, fantasy, and adventure that fans of LOTR are looking for. Separated from his love after being captured by pirates, Westley (Cary Elwes) returns after years a new man bent on reuniting with his dear Princess Buttercup (Robin Wright). As it is much more of a fairytale than LOTR, the grittiness that trilogy fans love is not present, but the story is still endearing for those with a sense of adventure.

Warcraft (2016)

lord of the rings frodo's journey

Based on the popular video game series World of Warcraft , the Warcraft movie capitalizes on its fanbase by creating a derivative story that long-time gamers can enjoy. As Orcs start to move into the human land of Azeroth, unlikely and unwanted alliances are formed out of desperation for survival. The world-building and animation are its greatest appeal, and LOTR fans will enjoy the mystical creatures and the battles between them.

Read our review of Warcraft .

Solomon Kane (2009)

Solomon Kane could be considered a distant cousin to Aragorn as far as heroism and badassery are concerned. Bound to a life of violence and a sure sentence to hell, Solomon Kane (James Purefoy) is forced out of his vow of peace to rescue a woman from an evil sorcerer. With heightened violence and carnage, Kane resembles characters like Aragorn, John Wick, and Van Helsing in the best of ways.

Stardust (2007)

lord of the rings frodo's journey

Though magic and lore is not the main focus of this fun and charming movie, Stardust is riddled with great characters, imaginative tribulations, and endless adventure. Coming from a small village on the border of a magical land, Tristan Thorn (Charlie Cox) embarks on an adventure to retrieve a falling star for the woman he loves — but encounters much more than he bargained for. The endearing and diverse characters of this movie make it great, with the added bonus of an exciting story of romance and fantasy.

Read our review of Stardust .

Eragon (2006)

Based on the highly acclaimed children's book series The Inheritance Cycle, Eragon is a fantastical adventure about the wonder of dragons. A young farm boy stumbles upon a dragon egg in his homeland of Alagaesia, beginning a journey of good vs. evil as Eragon (Ed Speleers) defends his land with the help of his dragon friend, Saphira. While the movie features similar fantasy themes and deep lore, it is ultimately far from the book-to-movie success LOTR was. That being said, there is an Eragon TV series eventually arriving on Disney Plus that could be promising.

Read our review of Eragon .

Connor Sheppard is an Oregon-grown culture writer for IGN with previous work on The Manual. Intrigued from a young age by pop culture and movies, he has developed into an experienced critic and consumer of all things media. From his time earning a bachelor's degree in digital communications at Oregon State University, he found a love for writing and appreciating specific actors and directors in the many films he watches.

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Lord of the Rings: Worst Decision Made By Characters

I n The Lord of the Rings , a group of characters must overcome every obstacle to defeat the ultimate evil. The team consists of the three main inhabitants of Middle Earth as well as shorter and some more powerful friends working together to destroy the One Ring. But not every decision made during The Lord of the Rings was a good one.

The villains made blunders that ultimately led to their downfall. The heroes made blunders that made their journey to Mount Doom even more treacherous. Every step of the way, decisions both good and bad shaped the journey and helped bring one of the most epic stories to life.

RELATED: Lord Of The Rings: Best Samwise Gamgee Quotes

Merry: Cooked Bacon

In the grand scheme of decision in The Lord of the Rings , this may seem small and innocent, but Merry's decision to cook a meal for Sam and Pippin over a campfire causes far too much trouble. The light from the fire gives away their positions to the Nazgûl. Frodo ends up being stabbed with a poison blade in the attack.

This basic mistake is completely understandable. At this point in their lives and their journey, the Hobbits have never seen real peril. Still, this decision almost costs Frodo his life if not for the quick actions of Aragorn and Arwen.

Pippin: Touched An Arrow

While trying to make their way through Moria, the Fellowship is shocked to learn an unknown an enemy has killed all the dwarves. It's here where Pippin makes the mistake of touching an arrow sticking out of a corpse. The body falls loudly down a well alerting the orcs to their positions.

This leads to Frodo being stabbed for the second time on this journey, and he was only protected by wearing a coat mithril chain mail. While it was unlikely the Fellowship would never be detected, this decision ensured they would be in danger quicker than they should have been.

Saruman: Cutting Down Fanghorn Forest

Saruman is Sauron's greatest ally during The Lord of the Rings , but he makes a bad decision that ends his power. Perceived to be the greatest of the wizards, Saruman was wise and strategic , but he failed when he chopped down the trees around Isengard. The Ents saw the deforestation and joined the War on the side of Merry and Pippin.

RELATED: Lord Of The Rings: Best Frodo Baggins Quotes The Ents wouldn't have gotten involved if the trees were still there. Had he not cut down the forest, he wouldn't have had to worry about this new threat who neutralized him before the survivors of Helm's Deep approached Isengard.

Pippin: Looking At the Seeing Stone

This is one of the bad decisions that could've been a lot worse but actually helped the heroes. After the fall of Isengard, Gandalf, Merry and Pippin found the Palantir, but Pippin became too enamored with it and decided to sneak a peak. This put him in direct contact with Sauron who tortured the Hobbit for information, although Pippin stayed strong.

While it was certainly troublesome for everyone involved, Pippin did get a look into Sauron's plan. This allowed Gandalf and Pippin to ride to Gondor and warn them about the plan to attack Minas Tirith. Yes, the heroes were able to win because of this action, but if Pippin's will wasn't as strong as it was, it could've led to Sauron's ultimate victory.

Aragorn: Let Grima Live

Nobility is a wonderful trait, but it can come back to hurt during times of war. Grima Wormtongue had gained influence over King Théoden. Once Gandalf the White arrives with Aragorn, Gimli and Legolas, they are able to free Théoden from Grima's influence. However, when Théoden tries to execute Grima, Aragorn stops him.

This allows Grima to flee right to Saruman and provide vital information about Théoden's plans. Saruman knew about the weakness of Helm's Deep, costing people their lives and weakening the forces of good. It's a costly mistake by Aragorn .

Denethor: Tries To Burn Son Alive

While some parents may play favorites with their children, few have taken it to the level of Denethor. The Steward of Gondor adored Boromir while always looking down upon Faramir. After Boromir's death, Denethor devolves into madness and sends Faramir into a battle he can't win.

When Faramir returns nearly dead, Denethor decides to take his own life and burn with his dead son. Of course, Faramir was still alive and while Pippin and Gandalf was able to save the son, Denethor had already set himself on fire. He died by himself while his son lived on.

Frodo: Sending Sam Away

Sam has chosen to be by Frodo's side from the beginning of the journey. Frodo tried to keep Samwise Gamgee out of the fray, but his loyal gardener wouldn't leave his side. Sam was there every step of the way through the lands of men, elves and dwarves. By the time Frodo and Sam are climbing the Stairs of Cirith Ungol, Sam's loyalty should be unquestioned.

Still, Gollum has framed Sam for eating too much food on their journey. This sets up an argument between Sam and Gollum, but Frodo chooses to send Sam away. It's a poor decision on many fronts, but the most obvious is the person who has proven him the most deserves better treatment. Plus, it sets up Frodo's next bad decision.

Frodo: Trusting Gollum

While it makes sense that Frodo would need more than just Sam's help to get to Mount Doom, and Gollum played a pivotal part in the ring's destruction; trusting Gollum still came with dire consequences. The main issue is when Frodo follows Gollum into Shelob's lair almost derailing the entire mission.

RELATED: Lord Of The Rings: Strongest Weapons in Middle-earth

Frodo has believed Gollum to be redeemed, because the hobbit has been trying to build a relationship with Sméagol, however, it's a ploy for Gollum to steal back the ring. Frodo follows Gollum at the worst possible time, and he's lucky Sam proved to be the true hero of the series.

Boromir: Tried To Take Ring

Boromir never hid his desire to see the Ring delivered to Gondor. He wanted to harness the Ring's power, which was always a bad decision. Still, Boromir willingly joined the Fellowship on their mission to destroy the ring. In a moment of weakness, he tried to take the Ring which fractured the Fellowship sending them all in different directions.

Boromir would immediately try to undo the attempt, but he never could. He eventually gave his own life to ensure Frodo and Sam got away from orcs, but the Hobbits no longer had the Fellowship's protection. Merry and Pippin were taken away by orcs, and Aragorn, Legolas and Gimli were now hunters rather than protectors.

Frodo: Decided To Keep The Ring

Frodo's worst decisions come from the corruption brought by the Ring. Given his proximity to it, it's understandable that an object that powerful would start to influence his decisions. But Frodo ends up in the same place as Ilsildur when it comes to destroying the Ring.

Frodo allows the Ring to persuade him to not destroy it. It would've allowed Sauron to continue his rise to power and is the ultimate betrayal for their journey. Gollum's greed ends up being Frodo's salvation as the creature bites off Frodo's finger to get the ring but accidentally destroys it and himself.

MORE: Lord Of The Rings: Most Powerful Maiar, Ranked

Lord of the Rings: Worst Decision Made By Characters

COMMENTS

  1. How Long Was Frodo's Journey in 'The Lord of the Rings'?

    In total, Frodo's journey — from inheriting the ring to destroying it — takes right around 17 years. Things take quite a bit more time in Tolkien's original version, but we can see how ...

  2. Timeline of Frodo Baggins

    17 January: Frodo meets Galadriel. 14 February: Frodo looks into the Mirror of Galadriel. 16 February: Frodo and the Fellowship leave Lothlórien. 26 February: At Amon Hen, Boromir tries to take the Ring. Frodo decides to go to Mordor alone but is followed by Sam. 29 February: Frodo meets Gollum and spares his life.

  3. The Hero's Journey Breakdown: The Lord of the Rings

    Saruman has created an army of Uruk-hai to hunt down and kill the Fellowship. Meanwhile, the Fellowship has left Lothlórien by the river. Frodo wanders off on his own and is later confronted by Boromir. Boromir, seduced by the power of the Ring, tries to take it from Frodo. Frodo escapes.

  4. Is there a map of Frodo's journey during the Lord of the Rings?

    Journeys of Frodo by Barbara Strachey. I bought this book over 30 years ago when I was a young lad. It plots Frodo's journey day by day as well as the other members of the company of the ring. Lovely book for a Tolkien fan. Each map contains the campsites, eating places, and various other stops that Frodo used on his journey to Mordor.

  5. Frodo Character Analysis in The Lord of the Rings

    This resistance is Frodo's inner journey, in which his pure heart is constantly under assault by his darker yearnings for power. The ring tempts others in the fellowship, however good and pure they are. Gandalf, Aragorn, Sam, and Bilbo all have their eyes widen when the ring is before them, and their own weaknesses, despite their often ...

  6. 'The Return of the King' Ending Most Lord of the Rings ...

    Of course, this is a major part of the narrative and arguably even the most important trial and triumph of Frodo's journey. Yet, there's more to the story than just that. ... The Lord of the Rings ...

  7. Frodo Baggins

    Character Analysis Frodo Baggins. When Frodo begins his journey, he does not consider himself particularly heroic, but the job must be done and he is the only person available. Many times along the way, especially before he and Sam separate from the rest of the Fellowship, either he or one of the powerful individuals he encounters comment on ...

  8. Frodo's Journey: Discover The Hidden Meaning Of The Lord Of The Rings

    Here, Joseph Pearce, author of Bilbo's Journey uncovers the rich—and distinctly Christian—meaning just beneath the surface of The Lord of the Rings. Make the journey with Frodo as he makes his perilous trek from the Shire to Mordor, while Pearce expertly reveals the deeper, spiritual significance.

  9. Frodo Baggins

    In The Lord of the Rings Online, (2007), Frodo is first met in Rivendell, preparing for departure. Later, he is found on Cerin Amroth in Lothlórien, weary from the loss of Gandalf. From Amon Hen onwards, player experiences Frodo's journey in a series of Session Plays, alternatively playing as either Frodo, Sam or Gollum.

  10. Frodo's Journey: Discover the Hidden Meaning of The Lord of the Rings

    J. R. R. Tolkien's magnum opus, The Lord of the Rings has been beloved for generations, selling millions of copies and selling millions more tickets through its award-winning film adaptations. The immense cultural impact of this epic is undeniable, but the deeper meaning of the story often goes unnoticed.Here, Joseph Pearce, author of Bilbo's Journey uncovers the rich—and distinctly ...

  11. The Lord Of The Rings: How Long Did It Take For Frodo To ...

    However, in the source material, when Frodo first receives the Ring, it's on his 33rd birthday. It isn't until his 50th birthday, 17 years later, that he sets out on his quest. (Yes, J.R.R ...

  12. Journeys of Frodo

    An atlas of 51 maps charting the journey that Frodo and his companions undertake in J.R.R.Tolkien's epic work. Based on clear and detailed descriptions given in the text and on the original maps that appear in The Lord of the Rings, as well as Tolkien's own paintings and drawings of the landscape and features of Middle-earth, this book ...

  13. Lord of the Rings Proves Frodo's Hero's Journey Would Always Fail

    Frodo's personal hero's journey was always destined to fail because the Ring was a temptation itself. As Frodo came closer to Mount Doom, in an effort of self-preservation, the Ring worked to undermine his hero's journey. It didn't matter how virtuous or heroic Frodo had become over the course of his Lord of the Rings travels, in the end, he ...

  14. How Long Bilbo's Journey Takes In The Hobbit (Compared To Frodo In LOTR)

    The world of Middle-earth is rich, and this is made clear by how many journeys can be explored in this world over 80 years. Lord of the Rings takes its time with its epic story and executes Frodo's journey beautifully.The Hobbit, a much shorter book, expands on its arcs across its movie-trilogy timeframe, with plot lines beyond Bilbo's adventure.. While this doesn't sit well with audiences ...

  15. Quest of the Ring

    The Quest of the Ring was Frodo Baggins' quest to destroy the One Ring, which led him from his home in the Shire to Mount Doom in Mordor, as described in The Lord of the Rings. It began in September TA 3018 when Frodo set out for Rivendell, which he finally reached on October 20. From there it took five months until the One Ring and Sauron were finally destroyed on March 25 of TA 3019. In ...

  16. Quest of the Ring

    Though its necessity was obvious to many beforehand, the Quest was initiated during the Council of Elrond. Elrond appointed eight members to accompany the ring-bearer Frodo Baggins on his difficult journey: Gandalf, Aragorn, Legolas, Gimli, Boromir, Sam, Merry and Pippin. Merry and Pippin were not chosen, but went on their own consent. [1]

  17. Frodo's Journey: Discover the Hidden Meaning of the Lord of the Rings

    J. R. R. Tolkien's magnum opus, The Lord of the Rings has been beloved for generations, selling millions of copies and selling millions more tickets through its award-winning film adaptations. The immense cultural impact of this epic is undeniable, but the deeper meaning of the story often goes unnoticed. Here, Joseph Pearce, author of Bilbo's Journey uncovers the rich--and distinctly ...

  18. How Far Did Frodo & Sam Walk in The Lord of the Rings?

    During this time, they travel over mountains and through Dwarven ruins, but using boats after visiting Lady Galadriel helped with some of that. But from that point, Frodo and Sam walk 340 miles to Mount Doom, and the final total of their journey is estimated to be 1300 miles. RELATED: Lord of the Rings' Least-Known Words That Really Matter.

  19. Journeys of Frodo

    Publisher. George Allen & Unwin (UK) Publication date. 1981. ISBN. -04-912016-6. OCLC. 9160102. Journeys of Frodo: An Atlas of J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings by Barbara Strachey is an atlas based on the fictional realm of Middle-earth, which traces the journeys undertaken by the characters in Tolkien 's epic.

  20. Journeys of Frodo: An Atlas of J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings

    An atlas of 51 maps charting the journey that Frodo and his companions undertake in J.R.R.Tolkien's epic work. Based on clear and detailed descriptions given in the text and on the original maps that appear in The Lord of the Rings, as well as Tolkien's own paintings and drawings of the landscape and features of Middle-earth, this book clearly shows Frodo's route, together with the paths taken ...

  21. Frodo's Journey: Discovering the Hidden Meaning of The Lord of the Rings

    Frodo's Journey: Discovering the Hidden Meaning of The Lord of the Rings proposes a Christian foundation to J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings, particularly Frodo Baggins' part in the Quest of the Ring. It was written by Joseph Pearce and published by Saint Benedict Press in 2015, following Bilbo's Journey: Discovering the Hidden Meaning of The Hobbit (2012). Goodreads page Bookshop.org ...

  22. Frodo's Journey: Discover The Hidden Meaning Of The Lord Of The Rings

    The Lord of the Rings centers on the pilgrim's journey of faith. For as the believer takes up his cross and follows Christ, so Frodo takes the one ring to burn it in fire. Pearce beautifully illuminates such (and many more) theological truths expressed in Frodo's Journey. Every Lord of the Rings fan must read this fantastic work.

  23. Interactive Map of Middle-Earth

    This is a high resolution interactive map of J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle-earth. In the menu to the right you can show events, places and character movements. If you enjoy this site please consider a small donation and help keep it ad free. Hosting costs a lot of money and developing new projects takes hundreds of hours.

  24. Frodo's journey

    Frodo's journey. As part of our occasional 'Eye on fiction' series, Paula Jean Manners offers a Kleinian perspective on The Lord of the Rings in this 2006 piece. Psychoanalytic perspectives on the creative arts are not new; for example, Austrian psychotherapist Melanie Klein (1882-1960) offered a thematic analysis of the paintings by Ruth ...

  25. Lord Of The Rings: How Are Frodo, Pippin, And Merry Actually ...

    There's more family fun behind "The Lord of the Rings" Hobbitry-in-arms than just the Baggins connection, too. Frodo is also related to Pippin and Merry. Savvy movie fans can easily recall the ...

  26. 10 Movies Like Lord of the Rings to Watch If You Love Fantasy

    As with Lord of the Rings, there are stellar representations of similar characters highlighted by memorable performances from Davis and Val Kilmer, who carry familiar Frodo and Aragorn traits ...

  27. Lord of the Rings: Worst Decision Made By Characters

    Sam has chosen to be by Frodo's side from the beginning of the journey. Frodo tried to keep Samwise Gamgee out of the fray, but his loyal gardener wouldn't leave his side. Sam was there every step ...