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who did the most tours in vietnam

Did Any Soldiers Serve Throughout the Vietnam War?

I’ve been reading the fictional series Vietnam: Ground Zero written by two Vietnam veterans under the pen name of Eric Helm.

I know in reality, some soldiers served as many as 3 tours in Vietnam. Did any serve the entire war?

Dear Arrow,

Apparently the longest-serving American in the Vietnam War was Robert Lewis Howard, who started his first tour in 1965 with the 101st Airborne Division, and went on to serve with the Special Forces and Military Assistance Command Vietnam/Studies and Observation Group (MACV/SOG), doing a record five tours of duty and becoming one of the most decorated American service men (including the Medal of Honor, after having been nominated for it three times).

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There is also a sizeable proportion of soldiers who served longer in Vietnam than Howard, however. Having nowhere else to go, and being lucky enough to survive more than a mere decade of (or more) of combat, these veterans had served in the Army of the Republic of Vietnam, the National Liberation Front and the People’s Army of Vietnam.

who did the most tours in vietnam

Jon Guttman Research Director World History www.historynet.com

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How Colin Powell’s Service in Vietnam Shaped His Leadership

By: Dave Roos

Updated: January 22, 2024 | Original: October 20, 2021

U.S. Chairman of the Joint chiefs of Staff General Colin Powell works February 1991 in Washington, D.C. Powell is overseeing military operations both stateside and in Operation Desert Storm during the war against Iraq that broke out in January 1991.

On November 16, 1968, Major Colin Luther Powell was serving his second tour of duty in Vietnam , this time as the assistant Chief of Staff to the commander of the U.S. Army’s 23rd Infantry Division (also called the Americal Division). It was mostly a desk job, but that day Powell was traveling by helicopter with his commanding officer, Major General Charles M. Gettys, to inspect a captured North Vietnamese camp when their chopper clipped a tree during landing and crashed.

Powell broke his ankle in the violent crash, but the injury didn’t prevent him from rushing back into the wreckage again and again to save the lives of Gettys, his chief of staff and one of the pilots. At one point, Powell tore away parts of the flaming wreckage with his bare hands to free a trapped comrade, knowing that the wrecked chopper could explode at any second.

Powell received the Soldier’s Medal for his bravery that day, which added to the Bronze Star and Purple Heart that he also earned during his two tours in Vietnam.

Decades later, Colin Powell would become America’s first Black national security advisor, the nation’s youngest chair of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the first Black Secretary of State. During the Persian Gulf War of 1991, Powell resolved not to repeat the costly mistakes of America’s failed war in Vietnam and executed an overwhelming show of force now known as the Powell Doctrine.

The qualities that later made Powell such an effective military advisor first “blossomed” during his Vietnam service, says Jeffrey J. Matthews, a professor of business and leadership at University of Puget Sound and author of the biography Colin Powell: Imperfect Patriot .

“Powell’s commanders commented consistently about his extreme dedication, his hard work, his commitment, and his competence as both an officer in the field and as a member of a staff,” says Matthews. “If you want to understand Powell’s ultimate prominence, it was because he used those qualities to become a great supporter, subordinate and advisor to very powerful military and civilian leaders.”

Powell's First Tour Advising South Vietnamese Generals

Powell arrived in Vietnam on Christmas Day 1962. It was the early days of U.S. military involvement in the ongoing conflict that pitted the communist North Vietnamese against the pro-Western government of the South.

In an effort to strengthen the South Vietnamese army’s response to the North’s guerilla attacks, President John F. Kennedy sent thousands of “military advisors” to Vietnam from 1961 to 1963. Powell, a 25-year-old Army captain, was among them.

During his year-long tour, Powell was a tactical advisor to three different South Vietnamese army commanders, and he adapted his supporting role to fit each man’s personality, writes Matthews. When the commander was effective, Powell stepped back into soldier mode, often personally leading dangerous counterinsurgency raids. But when one Vietnamese commander lacked rapport with his men, young Powell stepped in to win the confidence of his 400 troops.

“I was supposed to be an advisor, not the leader,” Powell wrote in his 1995 memoir My American Journey . “Nevertheless, the two of us were in quiet collusion. Leadership, like nature, abhors a vacuum. And I had been drawn in to fill the void.”

A loyal and unquestioning soldier, Powell didn’t hesitate to participate alongside the South Vietnamese when they torched enemy villages, killed livestock and burned fields, but he drew the line at corpse mutilation, writes Matthews, banning the practice of cutting off the enemy’s body parts as trophies.

Powell’s first tour was cut short when he stepped on a North Vietnamese booby trap called a punji spike. The sharpened stick was smeared with buffalo excrement to increase the odds of a deadly infection.

“The Special Forces medics cut my boot off, and they could see my foot was purple by then,” Powell later said in an interview. “The spike had gone all the way through, from the bottom to the top, and then come right back out, totally infecting the wound.”

Second Tour and the My Lai Massacre Cover-Up

In between Powell’s first and second tours in Vietnam, the career soldier enrolled in a series of prestigious officer training programs and repeatedly graduated at the top of his class. Powell redeployed to Vietnam in 1968 as a battalion staff officer with the Americal Division stationed in Duc Pho, a Viet Cong stronghold where American soldiers suffered heavy casualties.

Powell quickly impressed his superiors, including Maj. Gen. Gettys. After only three months on the job, Powell was promoted from mostly bureaucratic duties to become Gettys’ interim operations and planning officer, a job typically reserved for the most experienced officers.

“Overnight,” Powell wrote in his memoir, “I went from looking after eight hundred men to planning warfare for nearly eighteen thousand troops, artillery units, aviation battalions, and a fleet of 450 helicopters.”

Powell exhibited bravery and sense of duty during the helicopter rescue in November 1968, but he also showed some rare character flaws during his second tour in Vietnam, says Matthews.

Months before Powell was assigned to the Americal Division, members of the same infantry brigade perpetrated perhaps the most horrific crime against Vietnamese civilians during the entire war. What became known as the My Lai massacre  entailed the murder of more than 500 unarmed civilians—including women, children and infants—in the captured village of My Lai. When rumors began to spread of a possible atrocity committed by U.S. soldiers, the army called for an internal investigation and Powell was one of the officers tasked with looking into the charges.

“This was still early in the Army’s cover up of what happened, but Powell wrote a pretty simple, glossy overview saying that there was no evidence of any kind of massacre,” says Matthews. “He literally said that relations between the American forces and the South Vietnamese people were ‘excellent,’ which was hardly the truth.”

Matthews says that Powell later admitted that his career ambitions and a desire to preserve his reputation as a loyal officer likely influenced his thinking during the war, but he also blamed the atrocities committed by all sides to the awful realities of war.

From 'Vietnam Syndrome' to the Powell Doctrine

Gen. Colin Powell speaking in WH Rose Garden during Bush announcement of his re-appointment as chmn. of joint chiefs of staff. (Photo by Diana Walker/Getty Images)

More than 58,000 U.S. servicemen died during the decade-long war in Vietnam. Following the withdrawal of U.S. troops in 1973, U.S. military leadership was forced to reassess its decision to intervene in other countries’ civil wars. The consensus that emerged became known as “Vietnam Syndrome,” says Christopher O’Sullivan, a history professor at the University of San Francisco and author of Colin Powell: A Political Biography .

“After Vietnam, the fear was that every deployment would become another Vietnam,” says O’Sullivan. “This had a powerful influence on Caspar Weinberger, Reagan’s Secretary of Defense, who wanted to make the criteria for deploying troops much steeper.”

In a 1984 speech , Weinberger laid out what became known as the “Weinberger doctrine,” a six-part criteria for using military force to resolve an international conflict. Powell worked under Weinberger and the two had a “father-son relationship,” says Matthews. They came to share the same conviction about the use of military force as a last resort. But once military force was required, it should be overwhelming and decisive.

“We couldn’t fight another war like Vietnam that had unclear objectives,” says Matthews, “that didn’t have the full support of the American people, and that didn’t send a decisive overwhelming force when the war broke out.”

When Powell was chair of the Joint Chiefs of Staff under President George H.W. Bush , he polished Weinberger’s principles into the “Powell Doctrine” and deployed it with spectacular efficiency, first in toppling Manuel Noriega ’s regime in Panama in 1990 and then swiftly defeating Saddam Hussein’s forces in the first Persian Gulf War.

One of the most important lessons that Powell learned from Vietnam, says Matthews, was that senior military advisors needed to stand up and disagree with the president, “which the chair of the Joint Chiefs did not do during the Vietnam War.”

In the planning of the Persian Gulf War, President Bush and his Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney wanted to attack almost exclusively with air power, but Powell strongly disagreed.

“Powell said this would be another missed lesson from Vietnam,” says Matthews. “We need to go in with a decisive overwhelming force of ground troops, which they ultimately did. And after the Persian Gulf War, President Bush declared that the Vietnam Syndrome was over.”

who did the most tours in vietnam

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The Forgotten Soldier: The Story of Staff Sergeant Joe Ronnie Hooper

By Michael O’Donnell

It was philosopher and theologian Plato who once said, “A hero is born among a hundred, a wise man is found among a thousand, but an accomplished one might not be found even among a hundred thousand men.” We all know heroes of the past, Alvin York of World War I and Audie Murphy of World War II, but what about the heroes of Vietnam? Among the veterans of Vietnam, there are countless stories of valor, yet they have been largely ignored or forgotten over time. For the 543,400 Americans on the ground at the height of the Vietnam War, the 58,226 who were killed or missing in action, the 211,529 who were wounded, and the 4 million total who served in the Vietnam “theater,” there was one who stood out among all the rest. His name is Staff Sergeant Joe Ronnie Hooper, and not only was he a hero in the Vietnam War; he is also the most decorated soldier in American international combat, even eclipsing both York and Murphy.

Joe Ronnie Hooper was born on August 8th, 1938 in Piedmont, South Carolina. His family moved when he was a child to Moses Lake, Washington, where he attended high school. Hooper grew up a tough kid who knew how to scrap and take care of himself, and would even on some occasions go looking for a fight. This mentality would find itself of use when Hooper enlisted in the Navy at the age of 17 in the summer of 1955. There he served until 1961 when he left for the Army. Joe served multiple tours of duty in Vietnam, one from 1966-67 and another from 1967-68, with D company, 2nd Battalion, 501st Airborne Infantry, 101st Airborne Division. He would return to action in 1969 with special permission from the president. It was while serving in Vietnam that Hooper proved why he would later become the most decorated American soldier of all time.

One of the most noteworthy of all of Hooper’s battles took place on February 21st, 1968, in Hue, South Vietnam. For his actions on this day, Hooper would receive the military’s highest award for valor: the Medal of Honor.

It was dawn on the morning of the 21st. The sun rose over the fields of Hue and painted the sky red, an eerie sight during these bloody days of the Tet Offensive. D Company, 2/501st Infantry, 101st Airborne Division—the Delta Raiders—were assaulting a strong enemy position when they began to receive heavy fire from the Viet Cong. Rockets blazed through the jungle, and the sound of machine guns and other automatic weapons filled the air. Company D’s advance on the enemy was halted by their squad leader, then—Sgt. Hooper, in front of a stream approximately 20 feet-wide. Hooper gathered a few of his men and dashed across the stream, up into the face of the enemy fire. Although the enemy was firing from a protected bunker on the opposite side of the stream, it was quickly taken by Sgt. Hooper and the men that fearlessly followed him. Soon, the rest of Company D began to follow Sgt. Hooper’s example, taking the fight to the enemy. A couple of men were wounded, leaving them exposed to the wrath of enemy fire. Without a second thought, Sgt. Hooper braved the crossfire and went out after his wounded brothers. Hooper helped one man back to safety, then returned for the second man. He got to the wounded soldier, but in the process was wounded himself. Still, he brought the man to safety, saving him from certain death. Returning to the fight, Hooper found SSG Thomas pinned down by enemy fire. Trying to decipher where the shots were coming from, Hooper called through the rattle of gunfire and explosions to SP4 Mount, who was up ahead, to see if there was room to maneuver between two small houses in the direction of the fire.

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Who served the most tours of duty in Vietnam?

Table of Contents

  • 1 Who served the most tours of duty in Vietnam?
  • 2 Did soldiers do multiple tours in Vietnam?
  • 3 Did Colin Powell serve in the Vietnam War?
  • 4 Did Colin Powell see combat in Vietnam?
  • 5 How long was a tour of duty in Vietnam?
  • 6 What was the average lifespan of a soldier in Vietnam?
  • 7 What was the most decorated unit in the Vietnam War?
  • 8 Why did the Vietnam War have a time limit on tours?
  • 9 What was the average tour length of a soldier in Vietnam?
  • 10 How many tours can you serve in the US military?

He earned 38 military decorations during his career, and has been called the most decorated U.S. soldier of the Vietnam War….

Did soldiers do multiple tours in Vietnam?

‘ During the Vietnam War, the U.S. Army used a personnel rotation policy that at first blush defies military logic. The Army rotated soldiers through Vietnam on one-year tours. Officers also spent a year in country, but only six of those months were in a troop command.

Who has served the most tours in war?

Kristoffer Bryan Domeij (October 5, 1982 – October 22, 2011) was a United States Army soldier who is recognized as the U.S. soldier with the most deployments to be killed in action; before his death he had fourteen deployments over ten years.

Did Colin Powell serve in the Vietnam War?

Captain Powell served a tour in Vietnam as a South Vietnamese Army (ARVN) advisor from 1962 to 1963. While on patrol in a Viet Cong-held area, he was wounded by stepping on a punji stake. The large infection made it difficult for him to walk, and caused his foot to swell for a short time, shortening his first tour.

Did Colin Powell see combat in Vietnam?

Colin Powell served two combat tours in the Vietnam conflict and earned three medals for his service. Colin Powell served two combat tours in the Vietnam conflict and earned three medals for his service.

How long did the average soldier serve in Vietnam?

Fact: The average infantryman in the South Pacific during World War II saw about 40 days of combat in four years. The average infantryman in Vietnam saw about 240 days of combat in one year thanks to the mobility of the helicopter. One out of every 10 Americans who served in Vietnam was a casualty.

How long was a tour of duty in Vietnam?

All US military personnel serving in Vietnam during the Vietnam War were eligible for one R&R during their tour of duty (13 months for marines, 12 months for soldiers, sailors, airmen).

What was the average lifespan of a soldier in Vietnam?

During the Vietnam War, the odds were tremendously stacked against radio operations — and that 5-second life expectancy was, for some, a grim reality. To make matters worse, you can’t really control the volume on those radios since the dial was on the wearer’s back.

What was the longest tour of duty in Vietnam?

Apparently the longest-serving American in the Vietnam War was Robert Lewis Howard, who started his first tour in 1965 with the 101st Airborne Division, and went on to serve with the Special Forces and Military Assistance Command Vietnam/Studies and Observation Group (MACV/SOG), doing a record five tours of duty and …

What was the most decorated unit in the Vietnam War?

The men of Company D, 151st Infantry, exited the Vietnam War having been decorated 538 times, more than any other Army infantry company during any one-year period in Vietnam.

Why did the Vietnam War have a time limit on tours?

How long did US soldiers serve in Vietnam?

What was the average tour length of a soldier in Vietnam?

How many tours can you serve in the us military.

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Top Ten War Sites

Top ten historical vietnam war sites you can visit.

While we in the team that run this site have spent years discovering this beautiful country and countless of hours doing research on the war and those who fought it, we hope that we have created a top 10 list of Vietnam War Sites you can visit that will appeal not only to history buffs but travelers seeking to discover the country and its history.

Being passionate about history also means we want as many as possible to learn more about it and discover where and how the war was really fought.

who did the most tours in vietnam

Some say that the Vietnam War was not one war, but actually a thousand different wars fought in a thousand different places. Veterans’ stories will vary depending on where they were, which unit they were in and when they were there, so it’s hard to pick a definitive list of must-see sites.

For our list we have selected some of the most relevant places that we think represents a good variety of locations and periods in the war that will ultimately help the visitor understand how diverse and complex it was.

So in alphabetical order they are:

Ap Bac Battlefield

who did the most tours in vietnam

The battle at Ap Bac took place early in the conflict and was fought mainly between the Viet Cong and the Saigon Army (ARVN). More than anything, the battle can be described as the Viet Cong outsmarting the RVN forces and achieving a significant win.

Ashau Valley with Hamburger Hill

who did the most tours in vietnam

The Ashau Valley, stretching some 45 kilometers along the Laotian border west of Hue, is today well traveled by both tourists and locals. For the many people visiting Khe Sanh Combat Base along the DMZ tours, this is a small detour on the way back to Hue and a visit here will give a deeper understanding of how the war was fought.

More or less the whole valley was a battlefield at some point in time. It was a very important logistics lifeline for the North Vietnamese Army as they made their way towards the coastal lowlands including Hue and Da Nang.

Of course the battle of Hamburger Hill also took place here. If you want to visit, then take some time to read more on this website about some of the most significant places of interest to visit in the valley. Click here>>>

Ben Het Special Forces Camp

who did the most tours in vietnam

Located just off the main Ho Chi Minh Highway that stretches through the Central Highlands. Ben Het Special Forces Base makes a great visit for the traveler who wants to see the sites of some of the most intense battles fought during the war as well as getting the first hand understanding of how remote these bases were.

Take a walk down the old runway or hike up on the hills where the camp was located. Just make sure to stay on the trails to avoid any unexploded ordnance. Read more on Ben Het Special Forces Camp here>>>

Cu Chi Tunnels

who did the most tours in vietnam

Yes, we do recommend a visit to the Cu Chi Tunnels. Visiting the tunnels will give a first hand understanding of how the Viet Cong soldiers lived sometimes for months under ground. It’s not only the site itself, while going to and from the tunnels, make sure to look out the window of the car or bus you are traveling with. The landscape has changed over the years but the general flat terrain is the same giving you an idea of what the infantry soldiers faced. Driving to Cu Chi Tunnels you will also pass several large or medium former bases on the way, Cu Chi being the largest.

In between, and sometimes on, those bases, the war was fought intensely. Places like the Ho Bo Woods and the Iron Triangle are within kilometers. You will also come to realize how close this huge tunnel complex was to Saigon and how relatively easy V.C. infiltrators could enter the town itself. Read more on Cu Chi Tunnels here>>>

DMZ – Quang Tri province

who did the most tours in vietnam

The Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) was the area north and south of the 17th parallel which divided North and South Vietnam. The DMZ is today a very popular destination for all kinds of tourists coming to Vietnam — and for good reasons. During the war years some of the most intense fighting took place here. Along Route 9, the main road on the southern side of the DMZ there were several military bases, a few of them still offering the visitors an idea of what it was like then.

A tour here is probably the most popular activity together with the Cu Chi tunnels for tourists who wants to visit a war site. Read more about the DMZ  here>>>

Hue Citadel

who did the most tours in vietnam

Hue City has over the years become one of the most visited tourist sites in Vietnam, especially along the central coast. Some of the country’s most compelling and significant historical events has taken place here over the last few centuries and then during the war, this beautiful ancient city was the site of one of the fiercest battles of the war.

As the NVA and VC launched the 1968 Tet offensive, one of their main focuses was Hue as they sent thousands of their men to take over the city. It took weeks of door to door fighting by the U.S. Marines and ARVN forces to push them out.

Unfortunately most of the old citadel was destroyed during the battle but there is still much to see and discover in this historical town. Read more about Hue City and the Citadel here>>>

Khe Sanh Combat Base

who did the most tours in vietnam

Starting out as a small Special Forces Camp, Khe Sanh was later turned over to the U.S. Marines and became the scene of one of the most significant battles during the war as the North Vietnamese army laid siege to the camp during the 1968 Tet-offensive. The siege lasted 77 days and was reported in the news all over the world. It also served as one of the major launch points during the 1971 Lam Son 719 offensive in to Laos.

Apart from its historical significance, the base also has a very interesting museum on the site as well as several vehicles and aircraft on display. Read more about visiting the Khe Sanh Combat Base here>>>

Lai Khe Base Camp

who did the most tours in vietnam

Once known as Prey Nokor, then Saigon and now Ho Chi Minh City, the former capital of South Vietnam is a must for any tourist coming to Vietnam. In terms of historical war sites it will leave few disappointed.

Not only are there many places of historical interest but just walking around the old downtown areas can give visitors a chance to soak up the atmosphere and get an idea what this bustling metropolis was like 50 years ago.

We do recommend a visit to the War Remnants Museum and other sites that we mention in our Saigon article on this website, read more here>>>

Vinh Long Army Airfield

who did the most tours in vietnam

A major part of  the Vietnam War was the fighting in the Mekong Delta, both on the rivers and canals and the flat often swampy land. Vinh Long Army Airfield was one of the larger bases along the Mekong River, where thousands of troops were stationed. In the small town there was also a dock for the so-called Brown Water Navy

This is the best place to get an understanding of what the delta bases looked like. Although nothing is really left of the base, one can drive on the runway and the taxi ways as well as the old base area. Vinh Long Army Airfield was very typical for the American presence in the delta. Other bases were located in Soc Trang, Dong Tam and Can Tho.

We recommend a stay over in this often overlooked town. Combining an early morning boat tour on the Mekong with a visit to the old base makes for a very nice and interesting day. Read more about visiting Vinh Long Army Airfield here>>>

11 thoughts on “Top Ten War Sites”

MY BROTHERS NAME EDDIE WAYNE GRAHAM. HE DID COME HOME ALIVE. I WAS VERY YOUNG WHEN HE LEFT AND MY MOTHER REALLY DIDNT TALK ABOUT THE WAR BECAUSE IT UPSET HER SO MUCH THAT HE WAS THERE. I KNEW VERY LITTLE ABOUT IT. IT JUST WASNT TALKED ABOUT. I REMEMBER I WOULD JUST ASK MOM, IS ED OK? HAVE YOU HEARD ANYTHING? I WOULD JUST GET A LIMITED REPLY. MY FAMILY HAS NOW PASSED ON SO IM TRYING TO LEARN WHAT I CAN. THANK YOU. SINCERELY, BEVERLEEUSTICE@GMAIL,COM

I had served most of my tour at An Hoa as a Forward Observer with 2nd Bn., 5th Marines. In 1968 we moved our base of operations to Phu Bai on January 16th. I was short with only 34 days before I left for the World. On 31 January TET broke out and I ended up in Hue City with Hotel 2/5. I would leave Hue on 13 February after getting hit for my third time in Country. On 22 January I left DaNang for home.

I wish someone would visit sites like Dak To and LZ Hereford.

Hi. Thank you for your comment. We have an article on Dak To. Hereford is definitely on our list, but it might be a difficult location to reach.

I convoyed to Dong Tam several times in our near year based at Long Binh ’68-’69. Scary place. I wrote a book about the tour: “Vietnam Convoy Trucker.” Vets who served in Vietnam may find it interesting, 201 pages with 90 photos written by this enlisted truck driver. Contact me for more info. Thanks brothers.

God Bless you sir, thank you for your service and welcome home.

Bill, thank you for serving our country over there, and for coming home alive. I was drafted in ’65 but the refused me on medical grounds. Both my feet were operated on at 5 years old or I would have been there in ’65. Bless you. Lew Russo

I graduated high school in 63 and was on my way to USMC Boot Camp in San Diego then onto Vietnam. Sometimes I wonder what it’s like there now. But I don’t want to go and relive those memories. My time there was no vacation. Seeing the picture of that tunnel brings back horrible memories. But I’m glad the people there welcome Americans with open arms. But those history sites posted are nothing but horror sites.

God bless you sir, thank you for your service in Vietnam and welcome home.

I have a question? How do i get a message to a brother on the LaiKhe area. I found 7 members that may know a brother from times past in LaiKhe.

Hi Len. There are a number of Facebook groups where veterans are discussing the war. One is the Vietnam Veterans Photo Club with 80 000 members and then there is a Facebook group called Vietnam War Buddy Finder or something. Perhaps try there.

You can also write a comment on the Lai Khe page here on this website, perhaps one of the guys will see it.

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The 10 best places to visit in Vietnam in 2024

Joe Bindloss

Feb 24, 2024 • 8 min read

who did the most tours in vietnam

Experience the best of Vietnam with these top places to visit © hadynyah / Getty Images

With its rolling emerald landscapes, perfect beaches and energetic cities, Vietnam is unsurprisingly a magnet for visitors in search of an incredible travel experience.

This country is teeming with attractions, so it pays to plan your trip around the places you absolutely can't miss. Where you want to go will influence whether you fly into cultured Hanoi in the north or energetic Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC) in the south, or whether you bypass these two megacities for the laid-back beaches of tropical Phu Quoc.

Start your travel to-do list now with our ten favorite places to visit in Vietnam.

People splash around in the turquoise water of a beautiful island

1. Phu Quoc

Best for beach lovers

About as far south as you can get from Hanoi without splashing into the Gulf of Thailand, the island of Phu Quoc is where beach worshippers come to pray. Lapped by jewel-blue waters and edged by fine sandy beaches, this is a place to slip into low gear, reaching for a cocktail as the ember-colored sun dips into the bay.

But it's far from undiscovered – local tourists come in droves for theme park thrills at VinWonders and giddying views over the sea from the world's longest over-sea cable car. Phu Quoc is a popular stop for families, and if you fancy a change from the tourist scene, there are dense jungles to explore inland from the sand.

Planning tip: If you're bound for Phu Quoc, there's no need to go via Hanoi and HCMC; numerous Asian airlines offer flights from hubs such as Bangkok, Kuala Lumpur and Seoul, connecting with long-haul flights further afield.

Best for city slickers

Every trip has to start somewhere, and the ideal point of arrival for first-timers is Vietnam's historic capital. As well as easy infrastructure, inexpensive accommodation, world-class dining and more history than you'll ever have time to take in, Hanoi is the leaping-off point for the islands and outcrops around Halong Bay and the forest-draped trails of the mountainous northwest. Give yourself time to graze through Vietnam's catalog of street food treats  and pause to soak up the atmosphere in cozy cafes in the Old Quarter as well as rush around the sights.

Planning tip: To enjoy Hanoi nightlife on a budget, swing by the streetside bia hoi (draft beer) stalls at busy Bia Hoi Junction on the drinking strip of P Ta Hein.

A woman in a kayak holds her oar above her head as she floats along in a peaceful bay

3. Lan Ha Bay and Bai Tu Long Bay

Best for iconic photos

The crowds mob Halong Bay , but for our money, the shimmering bays to the north and south have a slight edge over Vietnam's most famous collection of outcrops and islands. While trips to Halong Bay are highly commercialized, with motorized luxury junks blowing diesel fumes around the eroded karst islands, Lan Ha Bay  and Bai Tu Long Bay  are a bit more laid-back, and you won't have quite so many cruise ships in your photos. Try kayaking between the outcrops, explore the tropical trails on Cat Ba Island – gateway to Lan Ha Bay – or kick back on the sand on Bai Tu Long's idyllic Co To Island.

Planning tip: If you visit Cat Ba Island, take time to explore the trails around Cat Ba National Park – if you trek with your own guide, it's easy to leave the crowds behind.

4. Ho Chi Minh City

Best for a sense of the past

Cosmopolitan Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC) is the southern counterweight to Hanoi in the north, taking its cultural cues from the Mekong Delta and neighboring Cambodia . It's fast-paced, frenetic and fun, particularly after dark, when the pavements transform into a mobile buffet of street food stalls and roadside bars.

A little of the frontier feel of the war years lives on in HCMC, and you can learn more about this violent period at sites such as the War Remnants Museum . The ghosts of French Indochina linger too – set aside some time to wander past the city's colonial-era landmarks, then settle into a coffee shop with a drip-brewed ca phi .

Planning tip: For a break from the city crush, swing out to nearby Tay Ninh, where the Cao Dai Holy See offers a fascinating introduction to the all-embracing Cao Dai religion.

A handful of yellow and red tents can be seen erected on a sand bar near the entrance to a cave

5. Phong Nha-Ke Bang National Park

Best for unique experiences

Vietnam's biggest natural attraction – literally – is Hang Son Doong Cave, the largest cavern in the world by volume and a true wonder. An entire New York City block could fit inside its vast main passage, but this monster cavern is only accessible on expensive guided treks.

The good news is that  Phong Nha-Ke Bang National Park  is pockmarked with caverns that you can clamber, crawl, boat or zipline through for a fraction of the cost. Trips to the Tu Lan, Phong Nha and Paradise caves are possible on a shoestring budget; more cash will buy access to Hang En, where trekkers set up tents on an underground beach, illuminated by shafts of natural light.

Best for history

A stay in harmonious Hoi An is a journey into Vietnam's lavish, layered past. This was once one of the most important ports in Asia, and traders from as far afield as Japan, Spain and North America filled the pockets of its merchants with gold. Locals used their money wisely, packing the Old Town with teetering shophouses, tea warehouses, fanciful covered bridges, elaborate Chinese guildhalls, and colorful Confucian and Buddhist pagodas. History is only the beginning – many travelers stay for days, learning to make white rose dumplings and summer rolls on chef-led cooking courses, and ordering made-to-measure suits and gowns from the city's modestly priced tailors' shops.

Planning tip: For a change of pace, head inland from Hoi An and spend a night in a friendly community homestay in the Co Tu minority village of Bho Hoong.

An aerial view of the beach of Nha Trang. The beach runs right alongside the city, with a number of skyscrapers and modern buildings visible just behind the golden sands.

7. The Central Beaches

Best for sun-seekers

Sandy bays stud Vietnam's central coastline, but the mood varies widely from beach to beach. Package tourists flock to high-rise Danang  and Nha Trang – famed as military R&R stops during the American War – but we rate the calmer beaches along the coast, where a little of Vietnam's old seaside charm still endures. To the south of Nha Trang, Mui Ne is a lively kitesurfing hub following a string of sandy coves, while Doc Let Beach to the north serves up 18km (11 miles) of sand, surf and seafood. For a quieter experience, hit the coast between Hue and Danang – Thuan An is the gateway to a string of serene and sandy beaches flanking a lagoon-backed barrier island.

Best for imperial history

The former capital of the Nguyen dynasty – which ruled over large parts of Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia in the 19th and 20th centuries – drips with imperial history, despite the ravages of US bombers during the American War. Much was lost in Hue , but the grandeur of dynastic Vietnam lives on in the Citadel and Imperial Enclosure , housing the emperor's residence, temples, palaces and court. At one time, entering without permission would bring instant death. Just outside town are the tombs of Vietnam's greatest emperors, resting serenely in green compounds beside the Perfume River. Another relic of royal rule is Hue's imperial cuisine – arguably the finest in the country – try a spicy bowl of bun bo Hue (vermicelli noodle soup) or a crispy banh khoai pancake, and you'll see what we mean.

Planning tip: To stay one step ahead of the crowds at Hue's imperial tombs and rent a motorcycle or scooter to explore; don't miss the Thien Mu Pagoda on your way out of the city.

An empty boat floats along in Ba Be National Park. Beyond the boat the shimmering still waters of the lake is visible, which is backed by numerous mountains, most of which are covered in forest.

9. Ba Be National Park

Best for lake and forest scenery

Vietnam has more than 30 national parks , taking in everything from coastal swamps to mountain jungles, but some are firmly on the tourist trail, and the crowds can be an impediment to spotting wildlife. That's less of a problem in lovely Ba Be National Park , where trails weave between the limestone peaks to Hmong, Tay and Dzao villages, and boat and kayak trips cross serene lakes hemmed in by forested ridges, creating scenes worthy of a medieval woodcut. The park is a haven for everything from macaques and langur monkeys to rare black bears, scaly pangolins and the spectacular crested serpent eagle.

Planning tip: Comfy accommodation in village homes completes the sense of stepping off the mainstream tourist circuit. For an intimate homestay experience, check out the family-run guesthouses in Pac Ngoi village, accessible by bus from Hanoi, via the village of Cho Don.

10. Ha Giang

Best for mountain views

Trekking to the minority villages in the hills around Sapa  is one of Vietnam's top draws, but the country's trekking capital feels rather commercialized these days. Hikers have to walk further every year to find the rural idyll that first drew people to the northwest.

For scenic countryside without the company, remote Ha Giang  province is Vietnam's new frontier. Staying in simple village homestays, you can hike out to minority villages and rice terraces tucked between the soaring limestone peaks, and motor (or pedal) over some of Vietnam's most spectacular passes. You'll want to take plenty of photos on the winding mountain road between Ha Giang town, Dong Van and Meo Vac.

Planning tip: If you're confident in the saddle, motorcycles can easily be rented in Ha Giang town – just ride slowly and be ready for rainy conditions!

This article was first published April 2021 and updated February 2024

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Vietnam has a complex history that shapes much of its modern life. We recommend visiting the cultural religious and historic sites of Ho Chi Minh City , including a tour of the Củ Chi tunnels leftover from the Vietnam War. Head North for a boat cruise on Ha Long Bay , or visit the capital city of Hanoi to discover its temples, museums and delicious street food.

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Vietnam - Tour Highlights and Travel Tips

Farmers grow rice during the monsoon season in Vietnam

Beautiful, serene, and enchanting is how every trip to Vietnam feels. Fly into Hanoi to start your Vietnam explorations in the north and adjust yourself to the local culture.  For something entirely unique, hire an open-sided river boat and drift along the Mekong River to enjoy some of the most spectacular views of the country that you’ll ever see. Holidaying in Vietnam is a constant bombardment on your senses. There are times when it feels downright ridiculous, but there are also times when it leaves you mesmerized.

Tour Highlights

  • Explore the Temple of Literature in Hanoi
  • Cruise down the Mekong Delta
  • Climb the Marble Mountains
  • Witness the art and architecture of Khai Dinh Tomb
  • Take a boat tour along the Ngo Dong River to Tam Coc
  • Visit the Thien Mu Pagoda
  • Visit the amazing rice terraces in Sapa

Travel Tips

  • Vietnam is a very safe country, but be wary of petty crime. Passerbys on motorbikes may try to steal your bags, and theft on sleeper buses is common. Do not carry valuable items and keep a secure hold of your cameras and cellphones.
  • Be sure to haggle whenever visiting markets or buying from street vendors. Try to figure out what the going rate really is, as vendors will always inflate their prices if they think they can get away with it. Pro tip: you’ll always get your lowest price as you walk away. 
  • The Vietnamese consider public displays of anger to be very embarrassing. Try not to raise your voice, cross your arms, or lose your temper.
  • Wi-Fi is very common in Vietnam, and is often free in hotels, hostels, cafes and restaurants.
  • The food you will eat in Vietnam will depend heavily on what area of the country you visit. Central Vietnam is full of spicy foods, while they love sugar in the South. Food in the North tends to be seasonal. Be sure to try Bún Chả and Pho (pronounced Fuh).

Vietnam has seasonal weather so please do check up on best time to visit Vietnam before planning your tour.

Tours in Vietnam - Questions and Answers

The best time to visit Vietnam is from December through March, since temperatures are not overbearing during this time of year, hovering between 20°C to 26°C, and the rainfall light. Vietnam’s weather during March and even early April allows for tours right across the country, although it can be a little colder in the north. Mid-April through June and September to November are considered low seasons because they see two periods of monsoon rain. Temperatures rise alongside humidity during these months, and you will need to be prepared for downpours, which can flood roads and cut off access to destinations. July and August are very hot, with nighttime temperatures hovering at around 26°C. You can find more information here .

Most travelers will find Vietnam an inexpensive country to visit. As our ultimate travel guide for Vietnam explains, both budget and luxury travelers are well catered for without having to break the bank. Good backpacker hostels will only set you back by around USD 10 per night. However, most consider staying in hotels during a Vietnam tour, since rooms in decent hotels even in big cities can cost as little as USD 40 per person, per night. Transportation is also a great value for money, and food is relatively cheap for the quality and quantity you will receive. Museum entry is usually around USD 2 per ticket.

Most nationals who wish to travel to the country require a visa, obtainable from your nearest Vietnamese embassy for USD 60 to USD 100 per person.

Knowing how long to spend in Vietnam is one of the tricks to having a great vacation. It is possible to cover the highlights of the country during a seven-day tour . However, for greater insight into its history and people along with a feel for what makes Vietnam so special, we advise opting for a ten-day trip instead. With this duration, you can experience everything from the floating markets of the Mekong Delta to the rush-hour traffic of Ho Chi Minh City! Spend two weeks in Vietnam and you can travel from the north of the country to its south (or vice versa) without constantly checking your watch. For more insights on your travel duration, read through our travel article here .

In Vietnam’s major tourist hubs, including the Ha Long Bay and Sa Pa, you will find plenty of people who speak English. Those working and operating hotels and tours will have decent English-language skills. English is primarily spoken by younger generations, with grandparents tending to speak French because of France’s colonial history in the country. In more far-flung destinations, such as the hill villages of the north, you may find locals speak nothing but Vietnamese, which is where a guide really comes in handy!

Visitors to Vietnam need to be careful with gestures and physical contact. For instance, Vietnamese women do not usually shake hands. Hugging should also be avoided, along with patting people on the back – a sign of disrespect in the country. Also avoid the temptation to ruffle the hair of kids, since the head is sacred to the Vietnamese. When it comes to gesturing, pointing at objects or people should not be done with the index finger – use your thumb or pinky instead.  Have your palm facing down when you are calling someone since an open, upward-facing palm is meant for dogs only. 

Generally speaking, Vietnam is a very safe destination for visitors. Muggings and street robberies are rare, but you should still use common sense and hide valuable items and large amounts of money. As you might expect, most taxi touts and fake tour guides hang around the big hotels in cities like Hanoi. Just ignore them. Road traffic accidents are probably one of the biggest risks you will face, so stay away from the temptation of riding on a motorbike. In less-visited areas, there is also the risk of unexploded ordinance from the Vietnam War. Only walk where you know it is safe to do so. Find more information here .

Most tours to Vietnam will start either from a tour of Hanoi in the north or a visit to Ho Chi Minh City in the south. Not only are they the locations of major international airports, but they also have a long list of attractions, from museums to Ho Chi Minh City’s war-era Chu Chi tunnels. Few visitors regret deciding to spend a couple of days drifting around the Ha Long Bay, while trekking expeditions in Sa Pa are gaining popularity with each passing day. You also will not want to miss spending a little time on the pristine beaches of Vietnam’s south, or touring the markets in the country – floating and otherwise. Read our article on the best places to visit in Vietnam .

Pho (noodle soup) is perhaps the meal that immediately comes to mind when thinking about Vietnamese food. The country’s cuisine is typified by fresh crunchy vegetables alongside seafood on the coast and chicken or pork away from it. Spring rolls are a common snack and are enjoyed best straight from the frier. Adopting the elements of French culture, baguettes stuffed with cooked meat, pâtés and vegetables are common lunch items in cities. A variety of prawn, pork, and beef dishes served with noodles or rice can be found throughout the day too.

Given the congestion in big cities, it is often easier to walk short distances. For longer journeys, take a taxi. The most efficient way of getting between destinations is by organizing private transport, followed by making use of the country’s expansive coach network. A trip by train is a must during your time in Vietnam but be warned that speed should not be the primary concern while traveling aboard these aging engines. Domestic flights between north and south are increasingly common despite growing concerns about the climate emergency.

To see all that Vietnam has to offer, a cross-country itinerary is definitely the way to go. Although there are plenty of things to do in Ho Chi Minh City , it would be a real shame to limit your scope to just this metropolitan area. That is unless you have a limited time. If you are using Vietnam as a stop-over destination and have just two to three days, staying in the capital or a city close to international airports is the right thing to do.

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How Long WAs a Tour Of Duty In Vietnam For Draftees Marines

How long must a conscripted soldier serve in vietnam.

Volunteers served lengthier tours than draftees; in the case of the Air Force, this was four years. Another option was to enlist in the National Guard or Reserve, do basic training, and then fulfill one’s military commitment via training weekends and brief active service deployments.

How long did a tour of service in Vietnam last?

During the Vietnam War, all United States military troops stationed in Vietnam were entitled for one R&R. (13 months for marines, 12 months for soldiers, sailors, airmen).

How long is a tour of duty?

Both conscientious objectors and conscripted personnel are compelled to complete a specific time of active duty, known as the tour of duty. The duration of a tour of duty during a national emergency would generally be two years, although the president and Congress might alter this if necessary.

How long is a Marine’s duty tour?

First-term Marines who are married or have dependents perform an unaccompanied 12-month deployment. In very rare instances, these Marines may be granted a 24-month accompanying deployment. All other Marines performed conventional tours of 36 months for accompanied service and 24 months for unaccompanied service.

How many tours of duty did you do in Vietnam?

During the Vietnam War, the United States played a prominent role. At first glance, the Army’s personnel rotation program violates military logic. The Army cycled troops on one-year rotations around Vietnam. Officers also spent one year in country, although only six months were spent under a troop command.

How long did conscripts have to serve?

The Draft and World War II This was the first draft in United States history during a period of peace. Those picked by the draft lottery were obligated to spend a minimum of one year in the military.

In Vietnam, which unit saw the most combat?

The all-volunteer MACV-SOG (most were “Green Berets” of the U.S. Army Special Forces) conducted some of the most hazardous and difficult special missions of the Vietnam War.

What was Vietnam’s most elite unit?

The People’s Army of Vietnam Special Forces Arms (Vietnamese: Bnh ch?ng??c c?ng) is the elite fighting branch of the People’s Army of Vietnam, commanded by the Vietnam People’s Army General Staff.

What ages were selected for the Vietnam War draft?

The Selective Duty System of the United States held two lotteries on 1 December 1969 to decide the sequence of call to military service in the Vietnam War in 1970 for males born between 1 January 1944 and 31 December 1950.

What was the Vietnam draft age?

Prior to the implementation of the lottery in the later stages of the Vietnam War, there was no mechanism in place to decide the sequence of call, other than the fact that males between the ages of 18 and 26 were susceptible to being drafted.

Did the Marines draft during Vietnam?

It has been a long and exceptionally expensive battle for Marines. About 450,000 Leathernecks, the most of whom were volunteers, served in Vietnam (42,600 were draftees). 13,000 were killed and 88,000 were injured (51,392 badly enough to be hospitalized).

What is a Marine Corps tour of duty?

A military tour of duty is the duration of time a soldier engages in battle in a dangerous area. A military tour of duty is a form of rotation that prevents the military from overextending its human resources while on active duty.

What is the length of a tour of duty?

Depending on the demands of the military and the field of duty, the average deployment length in 2018 is 6-9 or even 12 months. After six months of deployment, a soldier is entitled to two weeks of leave. Typically, tours of service in the United Kingdom last six months.

Who deploys first, the Army or Marines?

The Marines are often the first to arrive on the scene of a crisis, leading the charge. Additionally, they serve aboard Navy ships, secure Naval stations, and protect U.S. embassies.

How many draftees perished in Vietnam?

In Vietnam, draftees accounted for 30.4% (17,725) of combat fatalities. Reservists killed: 5,977 National Guard: 6,140 serviced: 101 fatalities Total conscripts from 1965 to 1973: 1,728,344.

Where did Vietnam veterans seek rest and relaxation?

There were two principal locations for R&R inside the country: Vung Tau beach, about 100 kilometers southeast of Saigon, and China Beach, approximately 12 kilometers north of Da Nang. These two locations, as well as a few more down the coast, offered enough sand, waves, and photo opportunities.

Why do Vietnam veterans not discuss the war?

Civilians dislike hearing about murder, and combat personnel do not like to discuss it. There is no euphemism or elegant way to discuss murdering, nor to describe a brutal death. Therefore, in order to cope, soldiers have created their own language to discuss these topics.

Who was excluded from serving in the Vietnam War?

1. Participate as a conscientious objector. Peace Churches that reject all forms of military duty include Jehovah’s Witnesses, Mennonites, Amish, and Friends. They were permitted to serve in other capacities, but as civilians.

Can you be drafted if you are a minor?

The “only son,” “last son to bear the family name,” and “last surviving son” are required to register with Selective Service. These sons are draftable. However, they may be eligible for a peacetime deferral if a member of their immediate family died while serving in the military. View further information on “Who Must Register.”

What was the Vietnam draft order?

On December 1, 1969, the United States conducted its first draft lottery, which assigned random numbers to young men based on their birthdays. Men with lower numbers were notified first to report to induction camps, where they may be ordered into active service and perhaps transported to the Vietnam War.

What was Vietnam’s deadliest battle?

The 1968 Battle of Khe Sanh was the longest, bloodiest, and most contentious engagement of the Vietnam War. North Vietnamese Army vs Marines and their allies.

Which unit was the greatest in Vietnam?

  • Eighth, the Eleventh Calvary Regiment
  • Seventh, the First Infantry Division
  • The 1st Brigade, 5th Infantry Division, ranks sixth.
  • The 173rd Airborne Brigade ranks fifth.
  • The 101st Airborne Division ranks fourth.
  • The 25th Infantry Division ranks third.
  • The 23rd Infantry Division ranks second.
  • Number one: First Cavalry Division (First Team)

How many troops died the first day they arrived in Vietnam?

On their first day in Vietnam, 997 troops perished. On their final day in Vietnam, 1,448 servicemen were murdered. There are 31 pairs of brothers on the Wall. Three score and eleven families lost two sons.

How many Marines were killed in Vietnam?

The Marine Corps lost 14,836 Marines, or 5% of its total strength. The number of deaths in the Navy was 2,556, or 2%. The Air Force lost 2,580 personnel, or 1%.

How long was each Vietnam tour?

For the majority of ground personnel, a tour of service in Vietnam lasted one year. Being “short” on a tour of service by having fewer than 100 days remaining was reason for joy. It also needed a countdown calendar on which each day was marked off until just “wake-up” remained, the last morning in Vietnam.

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How Long Was A Tour In Vietnam?

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one year. A tour of duty in Vietnam for most ground forces lasted one year . Becoming “short” by having less than 100 days left in a tour of duty was a cause for celebration. It also required a countdown calendar on which each day was crossed off until only the “wake-up” – the last morning in Vietnam – remained.

How long was 2 tours in Vietnam?

‘ During the Vietnam War, the U.S. Army used a personnel rotation policy that at first blush defies military logic. The Army rotated soldiers through Vietnam on one-year tours. Officers also spent a year in country, but only six of those months were in a troop command.

Who served the longest tour in Vietnam?

He earned 38 military decorations during his career, and has been called the most decorated U.S. soldier of the Vietnam War.

How long did drafted soldiers serve in Vietnam?

Draftees had a service obligation of two years , but volunteers served longer tours—four years in the case of the Air Force. Another alternative was to join the National Guard or the Reserve, go to basic training, and then serve out one’s military obligation on training weekends and short active duty tours.

How long was a conscripts tour of duty in Vietnam?

one year Nevertheless, as the tour of duty of each soldier during the Vietnam War was limited to one year (although some soldiers chose to sign up for a second or even a third tour of duty), the number of soldiers suffering from combat stress was probably more limited than it might otherwise have been.

Did any American soldiers stay in Vietnam after the war?

It’s estimated that tens of thousands of veterans have returned to Vietnam since the 1990s , mostly for short visits to the places where they once served. Decades after the fall of Saigon (now Ho Chi Minh City) many former soldiers still wonder why they were fighting.

How long is tour 4 duty?

In the Army, the tour of duty could last anywhere from six months to 12 months and up to 15 months . A soldier who has a family will experience a tour of duty that lasts 36 months, if accompanied by the family. If the soldier does not have a family, it will be for 12 months.

How were American soldiers tortured in Vietnam?

Although North Vietnam was a signatory of the Third Geneva Convention of 1949, which demanded “decent and humane treatment” of prisoners of war, severe torture methods were employed, such as waterboarding, strappado (known as “the ropes” to POWs), irons, beatings, and prolonged solitary confinement .

How many U.S. soldiers are still missing in Vietnam?

Current Status of Unaccounted-for Americans Lost in the Vietnam War

What was the life expectancy of a helicopter pilot in Vietnam?

“They were short of gunners on helicopters, because the life expectancy was somewhere between 13 and 30 days ,” he said. “I had no experience behind a . 60 caliber machine gun.”

How long was a deployment in Vietnam?

one-year There was a one-year deployment period for Vietnam, where soldiers served 365 days and returned home.

Can an only child be drafted?

No. the “only son”, “the last son to carry the family name,” and ” sole surviving son” must register with Selective Service.

How many draftees died in Vietnam?

WASHINGTON, Feb. 11—The war in Vietnam has claimed more than 12,000 deaths among draftees, most of them in the army, the Pentagon said today. This means that about one of every 104 draftees from June, 1965, the beginning of the Vietnam build‐up, to June, 1969, was killed in action.

How long were American soldiers required to serve in the Vietnam War?

The majority of service members deployed to South Vietnam were volunteers, even though hundreds of thousands of men opted to join the Army, Air Force, Navy, and Coast Guard (for three or four year terms of enlistment) before they could be drafted, serve for two years , and have no choice over their military occupational

What birthdays were picked for the Vietnam draft?

On December 1, 1969, the Selective Service System of the United States conducted two lotteries to determine the order of call to military service in the Vietnam War in the year 1970, for men born from January 1, 1944 to December 31, 1950 .

What was the draft age in Vietnam?

Lottery for Call of Order Before the lottery was implemented in the latter part of the Vietnam conflict, there was no system in place to determine order of call besides the fact that men between the ages of 18 and 26 were vulnerable to being drafted.

Are there still traps in Vietnam?

The Vietnamese did not put up well with the invasion, and did everything in their power to defend against the Americans. One strategy was booby traps, and there are still many tunnels and traps that have survived .

What did the Vietnamese call American soldiers?

The name comes from the shorthand of the Army of the Republic of Vietnam – ARVN. Number-One GI – A troop who spends a lot of money in Vietnam. Number-Ten GI – A troop who barely spends money in Vietnam. Ok Sahlem – Term American soldiers had for villagers’ children who would beg for menthol cigarettes.

What unit saw the most combat in Vietnam?

# 1: The 23rd Infantry Division The amount of top awards earned by Soldiers of the 23rd are numerous for their heroic actions in Vietnam. The Americal Division (23rd Infantry Division) was formed from elements of Task Force Oregon in Chu Lai, Southern First Corps, Republic of South Vietnam on 26 September 1967.

How long is 2 tours in the Army?

Tour Length Establishment. The standard tour length for a DoD Service member stationed OCONUS is 36 months in an accompanied tour and 24 months in an unaccompanied tour . Hawaii and Alaska are exceptions, with a tour length of 36 months for both accompanied and unaccompanied tours.

How long was a tour in Iraq?

They were increased up to 15 months for tours in Iraq and Afghanistan. As of 2018, typical tours are 6-9 or even 12 months’ deployment depending upon the needs of the military and branch of service. Soldiers are eligible for two weeks of leave after six months of deployment.

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COMMENTS

  1. Did Any Soldiers Serve Throughout the Vietnam War?

    Apparently the longest-serving American in the Vietnam War was Robert Lewis Howard, who started his first tour in 1965 with the 101st Airborne Division, and went on to serve with the Special Forces and Military Assistance Command Vietnam/Studies and Observation Group (MACV/SOG), doing a record five tours of duty and becoming one of the most ...

  2. Jorge Otero Barreto

    Otero Barreto has been called "the most decorated Puerto Rican veteran." Silver Stars. Otero Barreto earned both his Silver Stars in the first months of 1968 as a member of Company A, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 502nd Infantry Regiment. ... On 22 June 2012, Otero Barreto was the keynote speaker at a Vietnam Veterans Memorial Dinner in Lorain, Ohio.

  3. U.S. servicemen sent to Vietnam for second tours

    U.S. Defense Department officials announce that the Army and Marines will be sending about 24,000 men back to Vietnam for involuntary second tours because of the length of the war, high turnover ...

  4. How Colin Powell's Service in Vietnam Shaped His Leadership

    Getty Images. On November 16, 1968, Major Colin Luther Powell was serving his second tour of duty in Vietnam, this time as the assistant Chief of Staff to the commander of the U.S. Army's 23rd ...

  5. List of entertainers who performed for American troops in Vietnam

    Roy Acuff (1970) Anna Maria Alberghetti. Carroll Baker. Madeleine Hartog-Bel. Johnny Bench. Polly Bergen. Joey Bishop. Vida Blue. Jimmy Boyd.

  6. The Forgotten Soldier: The Story of Staff Sergeant Joe Ronnie Hooper

    Joe served multiple tours of duty in Vietnam, one from 1966-67 and another from 1967-68, with D company, 2nd Battalion, 501st Airborne Infantry, 101st Airborne Division. He would return to action in 1969 with special permission from the president. It was while serving in Vietnam that Hooper proved why he would later become the most decorated ...

  7. Carrier Deployments During the Vietnam Conflict

    THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES HOLD DECK LOGS FOR AIRCRAFT CARRIERS FOR THE VIETNAM CONFLICT. THE ADDRESS IS NATIONAL ARCHIVES, MODERN MILITARY RECORDS, 8601 ADELPHI ROAD, COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 20740-6001. USS AMERICA (CVA-66) Deployment Dates: 10 April 1968 - 16 Dec 1968. Source: Cruise Report for America covering above dates.

  8. Who served the most tours of duty in Vietnam?

    Apparently the longest-serving American in the Vietnam War was Robert Lewis Howard, who started his first tour in 1965 with the 101st Airborne Division, and went on to serve with the Special Forces and Military Assistance Command Vietnam/Studies and Observation Group (MACV/SOG), doing a record five tours of duty and ….

  9. This Is The Untold Story of a USO Icon's Vietnam War Experience

    A 1969 Delaware State News article reported that Krause's interviewees on the program included big names such as Charlton Heston, James Garner, Lana Turner, Nancy Sinatra and USO icon Bob Hope. A poignant part of the radio show was USO Mail Call. Veth's letter explained that Krause quickly realized upon arrival in Vietnam that many service ...

  10. Who Did The Most Combat Tours In Vietnam?

    He earned 38 military decorations during his career, and has been called the most decorated U.S. soldier of the Vietnam War. Jorge Otero Barreto Years of service 1959-1970 Rank Sergeant First Class Unit 101st Airborne 25th Infantry 82nd Airborne 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team What unit saw the most combat […]

  11. Top Ten War Sites

    The Rockpile in the DMZ. The Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) was the area north and south of the 17th parallel which divided North and South Vietnam. The DMZ is today a very popular destination for all kinds of tourists coming to Vietnam — and for good reasons. During the war years some of the most intense fighting took place here.

  12. What Unit Saw The Most Combat In Vietnam?

    What was the most decorated unit in Vietnam? 24. Project Delta, Detachment B-52, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), the most decorated single unit in the Vietnam War, had a memorial stone dedicated in their honor and placed in the Memorial Plaza at the USASOC headquarters. Lt. Who did the most combat tours in Vietnam?

  13. How Many Tours Did You Have To Serve In Vietnam?

    Apparently the longest-serving American in the Vietnam War was Robert Lewis Howard, who started his first tour in 1965 with the 101st Airborne Division, and went on to serve with the Special Forces and Military Assistance Command Vietnam/Studies and Observation Group (MACV/SOG), doing a record five tours of duty and.

  14. 10 of the best places to visit in Vietnam

    10. Ha Giang. Best for mountain views. Trekking to the minority villages in the hills around Sapa is one of Vietnam's top draws, but the country's trekking capital feels rather commercialized these days. Hikers have to walk further every year to find the rural idyll that first drew people to the northwest.

  15. What soldier did the most tours in Vietnam?

    According to the Pentagon's Defense Prisoner of War/Missing Personnel Office, there are currently 83,204 unaccounted for U.S. personnel, including 73,547 from World War II, 7,883 from the Korean War, 126 from the Cold War, 1,642 from the Vietnam War, and six from Iraq and other recent conflicts, including three Defense …

  16. Vietnam Tours and Trips 2024/2025

    13 days Vietnam Explorer. 5 - Excellent. Tim Paarmann. "Just completed the 13 days Vietnam Tour with our outstanding Guide Lucas. He was very passionate and knowledgeable about his Country, and tried to give us as many information about the history and current situation in Vietnam as possible.

  17. Quora

    We would like to show you a description here but the site won't allow us.

  18. How Long WAs a Tour Of Duty In Vietnam For Draftees Marines

    What is the length of a tour of duty? Depending on the demands of the military and the field of duty, the average deployment length in 2018 is 6-9 or even 12 months. After six months of deployment, a soldier is entitled to two weeks of leave. Typically, tours of service in the United Kingdom last six months.

  19. What Airborne Unit Jumped In Vietnam?

    Who did the most tours in Vietnam? He earned 38 military decorations during his career, and has been called the most decorated U.S. soldier of the Vietnam War. Jorge Otero Barreto; Years of service: 1959-1970: Rank: Sergeant First Class: Unit: 101st Airborne 25th Infantry 82nd Airborne 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team:

  20. How Long Was A Tour In Vietnam?

    one year. A tour of duty in Vietnam for most ground forces lasted one year. Becoming "short" by having less than 100 days left in a tour of duty was a cause for celebration. It also required a countdown calendar on which each day was crossed off until only the "wake-up" - the last morning in Vietnam - remained.