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The essential guide to visiting Dublin

Here’s what you need to know about Ireland’s capital—when to go, what to do, and how to get around.

Trinity College campus buildings in city center with tourists.

Why you should visit Dublin

Nearly thousand-year-old Christ Church Cathedral . Trinity College Dublin’s Instagram-favorite Old Library , home to the Book of Kells. Bronze Age gold at the National Museum . Stories of emigration on the Jeanie Johnston ship. Snugs, pints of Guinness, and live music in old pubs .

The Long Room in the Old Library at Trinity College in Dublin.

Best time to visit Dublin

Spring:   Daffodils fill parks like St. Stephen’s Green and Merrion Square. The city comes alive for three days of celebrations during March’s St. Patrick’s Festival . The International Literature Festival Dublin takes place in May.

Summer: The Bloomsday Festival on June 16 sees readings around the city to celebrate James Joyce’s Ulysses. Outside the city, it’s a good time to explore the Dublin Coastal Trail —stroll beaches and piers or take a boat tour from Howth or Dun Laoghaire to see islands and wildlife.

Autumn:   Catch emerging performance art at September’s Dublin Fringe Festival , which precedes October’s Dublin Theatre Festival . The Bram Stoker Festival (the Dracula author was born in Dublin in 1847) has events like outdoor circus performances at night, choirs in dark libraries, and banquets in cathedral crypts.

Winter:   Grab a book from Hodges Figgis or Books Upstairs and sip a hot whiskey beside the fire in a historic pub like The Duke , or have a Guinness in Mulligan’s . See a candlelight musical performance at St Patrick’s Cathedral , which dates to 1200. The year ends with outdoor concerts and light shows at the Dublin New Year Festival .

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Lay of the land

The pedestrianized streets around Grafton Street are a hub for shopping and dining. Tuck into an Irish cheese toastie at Loose Canon wine bar on Drury Street, or watch the world go by from the outdoor seats at L’Gueleton before hitting George’s Street Arcade for everything from vintage to vinyl.

In the Georgian Quarter , stop for city stories at the Little Museum of Dublin before heading to MoLI , a museum of literature; the RHA for art; or the “dead zoo” at the Natural History museum (part of the National Museum of Ireland) for an 1850s zoological collection.

The Liberties is one of the city’s oldest neighborhoods, dating back to the 12th century. The Guinness Storehouse draws the crowds, but you can learn how Dublin was a powerhouse of world whiskey distilling on a tour of the Dublin Liberties Distillery . Drop in to Marsh’s Library , which first opened in 1707. “The Liberties is just 10 minutes from the center but it’s steeped in character and personality,” says Keelan Higgs, chef and owner of Michelin-starred Variety Jones .

The cobbled streets of Temple Bar are a nightlife hub for tourists. Visit by day to browse for retro finds at Dublin Vintage Factory or Lucy’s Lounge . Get a smoked salmon sandwich at Joy of Cha or coffee and flaky croissant at Il Valentino . Sign up for a tasting at the Whiskey Reserve and then see an arthouse film at the Irish Film Institute .

Getting around Dublin

By bus:   Dublin Bus operates most of Dublin’s routes with additional service by Go Ahead Ireland . Use the TFI Live app for journey planning. Pay with exact change or a pre-paid Leap Card on buses, Dart, and Luas (fares are €2 for any bus, Luas, or DART trip within 90 minutes).

By tram:   The Luas crosses the city—the Green Line runs north-south between Broombridge and Bride’s Glen, and the Red Line runs east-west from The Point to Tallaght and Saggart.

Cycling: There are some cycle lanes but traffic can be a challenge. Get a three-day pass for Dublin Bikes —the first 30 minutes of every journey is free.

By car:   Plan ahead to navigate the one-way system. There’s on-street parking (pay at a pay-and-display machine or via Parking Tag ) or find a car park with Parkopedia . Taxis are fully licensed (ride shares are not legal)—order via apps like FreeNow or Lynk .

By train:   The Dart light rail runs north-south between Howth and Malahide, via the city center, to Bray and Greystones in County Wicklow. Additional rail lines service western suburbs, and Irish Rail intercity trains connect Dublin to main Irish cities from Heuston, Pearse, and Connolly stations.

A stag stands in front of a herd of deer under a beautiful summer sunset in Phoenix Park, Dublin, Ireland, on a grassy plain with clumps of trees in the distance

Know before you go

Languages:   English and Irish are the official languages, however English is the dominant language in Dublin.

Wildlife awareness:   Don’t feed the deer in the Phoenix Park—it can cause disease and lead to competition and injury within the herd. The same goes for gulls—human food is bad for them.

LGBTQ+:   Dublin has a lively LGBTQ+ scene and same-sex marriage has been legal since 2015. The Dublin Pride festival is every June and there is an International Dublin Gay Theatre Festival in May and Gaze LGBTQIA Film Festival in July/August. For nightlife, try Pantibar on 7-8 Capel Street and The George on 89 South Great George’s Street.

How to visit Dublin sustainably

The best way to get around the city is to walk. Join a walking tour to get your bearings. Take a picnic and rent a bike for the day in the Phoenix Park or stroll beaches outside the city like Portmarnock or Skerries .

Buy Irish-made gifts like ceramics, knits, art, and jewelry from shops like the Irish Design Shop or Kilkenny . St. Anne’s Park Market in Clontarf on Saturdays and Dún Laoghaire Market on Sundays sell organic produce. The city’s many vegetarian and vegan restaurants include Flipburger and Glas .

Waste is separated into recyclable material (clean paper, cardboard, plastic, glass bottles and jars, and aluminum cans), and there is a refundable deposit for plastic bottles and drinks cans.

What to read and watch

Prophet Song , by Paul Lynch, is a dark fictional tale about Dublin’s descent into dystopia that won the Booker Prize in 2023.

The Bee Sting , by Paul Murray, is partly and significantly set at Trinity College, as it weaves the hilarious and heartbreaking stories of various members of the fictional Barnes family.

A blend of comedy and thriller, Apple TV+ series Bad Sisters shows off Dublin’s coast and swimming spots. Some of Normal People , streaming on Hulu, was filmed at Trinity College.

Sing Street is a coming-of-age film about a Dublin boy and a band. Once , from the same director, John Carney, tells the story of a Dublin busker and an immigrant.

( For more tips on what to do in Dublin, see our Explorer’s Guide .)

Related Topics

  • CITY GUIDES
  • ANCIENT HISTORY

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Well Worth The Climb

One thing is for certain, you’ll receive a warm welcome in every village and on every trail and leave with great memories that last a lifetime. It all starts just 30 minutes from Dublin City Centre. So go on, get outdoor in the Dublin Mountains. It’s Well Worth The Climb. Visit the uplands of our county and let this Google Map help you make the most of your visit! ‍

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Tourist Information Kiosk

To make the most of your holiday in Dublin, make sure your first stop is a visit to our official tourist information kiosk where you will receive free and independent advice, information, maps and literature to enhance your holiday experience. The official tourist offices are located at: Dun Laoghaire – Rathdown Tourist Information Kiosk The Metals, Marine Road, Dun Laoghaire (outside Meadows & Byrne) ‍ Winter Opening Hours (October to March) Monday & Tuesday – 11 am to 4 pm Wednesday to Sunday – 10 am to 5 pm Summer Opening Hours (April to September) Monday to Sunday – 10 am to 5 pm

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Guía turística de Dublin

Are you planning on visiting Dublin? If so, we’re here to help you. Throughout this guide, you'll find up-to-date information on the city’s top attractions , where you should stay , the best places to eat , and a lot of other interesting and helpful tips.

Dublin Travel Guide

  • General Information
  • Top Attractions
  • Getting to Dublin
  • Public transport in Dublin
  • Money-Saving tips
  • Where to Eat
  • Where to Stay
  • 2-day itinerary

Why visit Dublin?

Founded as a small settlement by the Vikings at the beginning of the 9th century, the capital of Ireland was witnessed centuries of conflict until it defined its own identity during the 20th century. Today, Dublin is a modern and culturally rich city that captivates its visitors with its unique blend of Gaelic traditions in its modern society. 

Dublin’s busy city centre and lush green surroundings make it an ideal destination for all types of travellers; those who prefer nature and those who love a good city break.

Dublin is also famous for its many writers such as James Joyce, Oscar Wilde, Samuel Beckett or Bram Stoker, all of whom reflect their unique vision of the city in their work.

Although the city does not stand out for its grandiose monuments or renowned museums , Dublin offers beautiful plush gardens, parks , picturesque neighbourhoods, and great traditional and lively pubs where you can enjoy a  pint of Guinness .

Looking for accommodation?

If you still haven't booked your accommodation, we recommend you visit our search engine, where you’ll find all types of hotels, hostels, and apartments with the best rates guaranteed (with up to 75% discount). Besides, in most cases, you'll only have to pay once you get to your destination, and you can cancel the booking just one day in advance.

  • Hotels in Dublin – Find the best deals online.

top activities

Cliffs of Moher, Doolin, Burren, & Galway Day Trip Venture to the wild and breathtaking Cliffs of Moher , the rugged Burren , and the charming Galway City on this day trip from Dublin!

Free Walking Tour of Dublin Our Dublin tour is the best way to discover the capital, taking in the main monuments, neighbourhoods, and stories which make up the city.

Glendalough, Wicklow & Kilkenny Day Trip Explore Ireland's luscious green landscapes on this tour of the Glendalough valley, Wicklow & Kilkenny . An unmissable day trip!

Boat Trip around Howth and Ireland's Eye Embark on a boat journey to Howth and the island known as  Ireland's Eye  - enjoy the spectacular Irish coastline and see  puffins , seals, and more!

Dublin Temple Bar Pub Crawl Discover the best pubs in Dublin on our Temple Bar Pub Crawl . You'll have an unforgettable night out on the town in the capital of Ireland.

Go City: Dublin All-Inclusive Pass The Go City: Dublin All-Inclusive Pass offers free entrance to over 30 attractions , including the Guinness Storehouse, Christ Church Cathedral, and more.

Giant’s Causeway, Dunluce Castle & Belfast Tour On this Giant’s Causeway, Dunluce Castle & Belfast Tour , you'll see one of Ireland's iconic symbols, a medieval castle, and Northern Ireland's capital.

Get a true taste of Ireland, at the  Jameson Whiskey Distillery and the world-famous Guinness Storehouse  in Dublin, on this tour with skip-the-line admission!

Book of Kells & Dublin Castle Tour Discover Dublin's rich history and culture with a guided tour of the Book of Kells , Trinity College's Old Library , Dublin Castle , and more!

Giant's Causeway, Titanic Experience & Belfast Tour Discover the secrets of the  Titanic , see the iconic  Giant's Causeway  and explore vibrant  Belfast  on this unmissable full-day trip from Dublin!

Dublin Folk Show and Dinner Enjoy a totally different night in Dublin at a Irish music folk show with dinner where you'll get the chance to taste the typical gastronomy!

Big Bus Hop-on Hop-Off Tour Dublin The Dublin tourist busses have two routes with multiple stops where you can get on and off as many times as you like . Enjoy two days of exploring Dublin!

Entrance to the Museum of Literature Ireland With your ticket to the Museum of Literature Ireland (MoLI) , you'll get to explore multimedia exhibitions and learn about the country's literary heritage!

Tour to Game of Thrones Studio Visit the Game of Thrones studio on this tour from Dublin . You'll learn all sorts of behind-the-scenes secrets and see iconic costumes and props!

Windmill Lane Recording Studios Tour Take a look behind the scenes of your favourite albums on this Windmill Lane Recording Studios tour . See where artists like U2 and The Rolling Stones recorded!

Celtic Boyne Valley & Ancient Sites Tour Explore Ireland's rich history on this day trip from Dublin. We’ll visit the Hill of Tara , Trim Castle , Loughcrew's Cairns , and Fore Abbey .

Dublin Boat Trip Discover the sights of Dublin on this sightseeing cruise on the River Liffey. Learn all about the city's history as you see its most iconic monuments.

Dublin Private Tour Explore the sights around the Irish capital with this Dublin Private Tour. You'll have an exclusive guide at your disposal to discover the city with your group.

Irish Whiskey Museum Ticket Visit the Irish Whiskey Museum and discover the history of one of the Emerald Isle's traditional beverages: enjoying tastings of the famous golden nectar!

Dublin North Side Walking Tour Discover the historic North Side of Dublin , exploring these streets filled with reland's history and visiting the area's most fascinating attractions.

Want to explore the Irish capital  in a unique way? Join this tour and discover Dublin while you sip on some afternoon tea onboard a vintage bus .

Ghost Bus Tour Dublin Climb aboard Dublin's creepiest bus and immerse yourself in the macabre history of the haunted Irish capital on a guided ghost tour... if you dare !

Cliffs of Moher & Boat Trip Discover the rugged beauty of western Ireland on this day trip to the Cliffs of Moher from Dublin and enjoy a boat trip along the wild Atlantic coast.

Blarney Castle, Rock of Cashel & Cahir Castle Day Trip Explore historic castles, kiss the Blarney Stone and see one of the Seven Wonders of Ireland on our Blarney Castle & Rock of Cashel Day Trip from Dublin.

Dublin City Sightseeing Bus Tour On this  City Sightseeing Bus tour of Dublin , you'll see the Irish capital's  most iconic points of interest . Don't miss out!

Dublin Food Tour Eat and drink your way through Dublin ! On this guided food tour, you'll visit local pubs and restaurants and taste classic Irish dishes and drinks .

Howth Peninsula Hiking Tour High cliffs, a prehistoric monument and a medieval castle will guide our steps on this hiking route through the Howth Peninsula. You'll fall in love with it!

Dublin Music Tour History and songs star in this music tour of Dublin , where we'll listen to live tunes as we delve into the past of Ireland's capital and its folklore!

Bull Island Tour Did you know that Dublin is home to a Biosphere Reserve? On this tour of Bull Island , we'll discover the landscapes of this natural area protected by UNESCO!

Tour of Dublin's Bridges On this tour of the bridges of Dublin , we'll follow the course of the River Liffey to discover the stories behind its bridges – a unique route!

If you're in  Dublin , this Irish Coffee Masterclass is a must! We'll learn about the invention of this delicious drink as we learn how to make it ourselves.

Guinness Storehouse + Dublin Sightseeing Bus Visit the world-famous Guinness Storehouse and enjoy a route through Dublin's top attractions on board Dublin's sightseeing bus . Get to know the Irish capital!

Old Town Dublin: Famous Pubs Quest The history of the Irish capital is vast. Learn all about it with this adventure quest of   Dublin's famous pubs , which is done through an app. You'll love it!

Bike Tour of Dublin Tour Dublin's historic city center  by pedaling along its cobbled streets on this fun bike tour . You'll discover the Irish capital in an eco-friendly way!

Dublin: The National Wax Museum Ticket Explore Dublin's National Wax Museum Plus , featuring wax figures, interactive exhibits, and immersive experiences. Delve into Irish history, culture and more!

EPIC, The Irish Emigration Museum Ticket Discover one of the most important parts of the history of Ireland at EPIC, The Irish Emigration Museum ; a must-see to understand this country's past.

Dublin Guided Tour + Castle Ticket If you want to explore Dublin , this tour is perfect for you. We'll walk past the city's most iconic sights and you can even  visit Dublin Castle !

Dublin Secret Societies Tour Discover the untold history of hidden power dynamics and underground orders on our Dublin Secret Societies Tour . Explore their influence and practices!

Grand Canal Cruise & Dinner Sit back and relax as you sail along the Grand Canal in Dublin  and enjoy a delicious dinner on this two-hour-long cruise.

The most complete guide of Dublin

This guide has been written after exploring Dublin thoroughly, taking photos of the city’s most charming streets and landmarks, and paying attention to every detail that may be useful for any traveller that wishes to discover this memorable capital.

The information provided in this guide is up to date as of January 2023. If you find a mistake or would like to make a suggestion, please do not hesitate to contact us .

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Is Dublin Worth Visiting? A Local’s 17 Pros (+ 5 Cons)

  • Isabelle Hoyne
  • February 15, 2024

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Is Dublin worth visiting? Uncover the truth with insider insights from a Dublin local. This blog post delves into the city’s best experiences, challenges, and essential tips, offering a complete and personal guide to Dublin.

As an Irish person who’s lived in Dublin for 15 years (almost my entire adult life), I’ve experienced firsthand the city’s captivating blend of history, culture, and vibrant modernity.

Dublin is a city that’s very close to my heart. Every street tells a story, and every corner reveals a facet of its character. This blog post is crafted from my personal experiences and insights, offering a unique perspective on why Dublin is worth visiting .

Here, I delve into the myriad reasons that make Dublin a must-visit destination, while also navigating its challenges. From its fascinating history and stunning Georgian architecture to its dynamic food scene and welcoming atmosphere, I’ll guide you through the many layers of this incredible city.

But it’s not just the highlights ; I’ll also address the practical aspects, like cost considerations and how to avoid tourist traps, ensuring you get the most authentic experience possible.

This post is more than just a guide; it’s a journey through the heart of Dublin from someone who knows it intimately. Whether you’re planning a trip or simply curious, I’m here to show you why Dublin, with all its complexities and charms, is a city like no other .

Essential resources for planning your Dublin trip

Top tours & experiences: ☆ Cliffs of Moher Tour Including Wild Atlantic Way and Galway City ☆ Irish Whiskey Museum Experience Ticket ☆ Jameson Distillery Guided Experience with Whiskey Tasting in Dublin ☆ Irish Rock ‘N’ Roll Museum Experience Dublin ☆ Fast-track Book of Kells Tour with Dublin Castle ☆ Dark Dublin Guided Walking Tour ☆ Dublin Literary Pub Crawl Cultured Voyages top places to stay in Dublin: Pembroke Townhouse – superb Georgian guesthouse // Zanzibar Locke – central & slick aparthotel // Iveagh Garden Hotel – sustainable & central // The Fitzwilliam Hotel  – 5* in unbeatable location

17 great reasons why Dublin is worth visiting

1. dublin boats a deep history.

A city steeped in history, Dublin is the capital city of Ireland and is renowned for its lively atmosphere, iconic pubs, and as the birthplace of Guinness.

Its appeal lies not just in these cultural staples but also in a past that is as fascinating as it is complex. For anyone intrigued by social and political history, Dublin offers a narrative rich in struggle and triumph.

Dublin’s history stretches back over a millennium, incorporating a spectrum of various settlers and transformations.

The city’s earliest known settlement, dating back to the fourth century, was established in the Cornmarket area and was known as Áth Cliath in the Irish language, meaning ‘Hurdled Fort.’

This ancient name continues to inspire Dublin’s modern Irish translation. Today, Dublin’s full name in Irish is ‘ Baile Átha Cliath’, which quite simply means ‘Town of the Hurdled Fort’. 

A notable moment in Dublin’s timeline is the sixth century, marked by the founding of the monastery Duiblinn (or ‘blackpool’ in Irish – it’s this name where ‘Dublin’ in the English language comes from).

This was the precursor to the Viking arrival in 841 , a pivotal event that shaped much of the city’s early character. The Vikings’ influence is still perceptible today, especially along the River Liffey, where they first settled.

The city’s destiny took another turn following the Anglo-Norman invasion in 1170 . Dublin was declared the capital of the English Lordship of Ireland, leading to an influx of settlers from England and Wales. This period heralded significant changes, laying the foundations for the Dublin we know today.

Ireland’s tumultuous journey to independence from British rule is vividly captured in landmarks like the General Post Office (GPO) , the epicentre of the 1916 Easter Rising .

Kilmainham Gaol , with its dim, haunting corridors, stands as a testament to the resilience of those who fought for Irish freedom. These sites, along with immersive experiences like the Dublinia Viking Museum , bring history to life in a way that is both educational and deeply moving.

2. It’s a great start point for an Ireland itinerary

Dublin, as the starting point of any Ireland itinerary , offers a unique and comprehensive window into the nation’s history .

The city’s museums are like chapters in a grand narrative, each revealing a different facet of Ireland’s story. From prehistoric times and the Stone Age, through the era of Vikings, to the epoch of Saints and Scholars, Dublin’s exhibits paint a vivid picture of a land shaped by colonisation, famine, and revolution.

Walking through these museums, you can trace the arc of Ireland’s history up to its modern chapter – the tech boom, where Dublin stands proudly as the European headquarters for many of the world’s largest tech companies. It’s a hub for innovative startups, blending the old with the new.

I believe it’s essential to start your journey in Dublin to grasp Ireland’s multifaceted history . Here, you gain the background knowledge crucial to understanding the country’s soul. It’s a foundation that enriches every step you take in the Irish countryside, where history and modernity continue to intertwine.

It genuinely upsets me when I hear people suggest skipping Dublin.

To me, this notion reveals a lack of understanding of what the city, and indeed Ireland, is about.

Skipping Dublin means missing out on a key piece of Ireland’s puzzle . To fully ‘get’ Ireland, starting in Dublin is crucial – it’s not just a city, but the prologue to the nation’s compelling narrative that sets the stage for a deeper appreciation of the entire country.

If you’re tight on time, try at least to spend a day in the capital before hitting the countryside, unless cities, art and culture are really not your thing.

3. There’s a cultural and artistic richness

Dublin’s cultural scene is a vibrant blend of art and literature , easily accessible and deeply enriching. The city is dotted with galleries and museums, many of which are free to enter, offering a spontaneous journey into the world of art and literature.

The National Gallery , a personal favourite, is a serene escape just off the serene, elegant Merrion Square. I love popping in when I’m at a loose end to view various collections and the fact that it’s free means that you don’t feel guilty if it’s only for half an hour.

The Hugh Lane Gallery , with its modern and contemporary art, showcases another facet of Dublin’s artistic diversity and is a fantastic gem off the north side’s Parnell Square, another legacy of Georgian Dublin.

But art in Dublin isn’t confined to galleries alone.

Merrion Square’s weekend transformation into an open-air art exhibit is a testament to the city’s living, breathing artistic culture. Here, amidst the outdoor displays, Dublin’s creative pulse is palpable as local artists afix their works to the black railings that fringe the park. It’s a great opportunity to pick up some Irish art.

Dublin’s literary connections add another layer to its cultural fabric. Walking the city’s streets, you’re walking with giants like James Joyce, W.B. Yeats, Samuel Beckett and Oscar Wilde. Their legacy is vividly celebrated in places like the Museum of Literature Ireland (MoLI) , a recent addition that brings their stories and influence to life.

On top of that, Dublin is quite the musical city . Whether that be the buskers on Grafton Street (even U2’s Bono isn’t immune to making an appearance at Christmas), the trad music in cosy pubs or the up and coming bands performing in concert venues like Whelan’s on Wexford Street, there’s always some good music to be heard. 

Being immersed in this rich cultural milieu is what makes Dublin truly special.

4. It’s easy to walk around

Dublin’s charm is best experienced on foot . The city centre, spanning just a few kilometres, invites leisurely exploration. You can cover much of it with a comfortable walk, discovering its many facets at your own pace.

One of my favourite routes epitomises the joy of walking in Dublin.

Start along the leafy Grand Canal, and then take a path that leads you along Mount Street Upper, past the aptly named Pepper Cannister Church. A leisurely stroll around Merrion Square is a journey through art and architecture, leading to the lively back lanes of the Dáil and down Merrion Row, culminating at the verdant St. Stephen’s Green at the heart of Dublin 2.

An integral part of the walking experience in Dublin is crossing the iconic Ha’penny Bridge .

As you traverse the Liffey on this historic structure, the city’s rhythm shifts. You step into the bustling heart of Mary Street, where the vibrancy of Dublin’s shopping scene comes to life. A detour through Moore Street introduces you to the spirited stallholders, whose place amongst Dublin’s fabric go back for centuries. 

From the bustling streets to the tranquil parks, Dublin unfolds its charm in every stride. It’s a city that reveals itself not in the rush but in the stroll, where the true essence of Dublin comes alive in its streets, squares, and pathways – and the people that you see along the way. 

5. There’s a lot of green spaces

While celebrated for its urban charm, Dublin is equally blessed with an abundance of green spaces, offering serene escapes within the city’s lively confines – it’s one of the ‘greenest’ cities in Europe .

Phoenix Park is a massive expanse of greenery that is home to Ireland’s president (as well as Dublin Zoo), and is Dublin’s largest city park. It is a perfect destination on a sunny day. I always recommend grabbing a bike and leisurely cycling around, taking in the vast, open landscapes and looking out for the wild deer that dot the park. 

Merrion Square holds a special place in my heart. Having lived just behind it, I’ve spent countless sunny days there, lounging on a blanket with a good book. Its idyllic setting offers a picturesque retreat, a patch of calm amidst the city’s hustle. There’s also a great food market there every Thursday at lunchtime. 

Then there’s St. Stephen’s Green , right at the heart of Dublin. It’s a hub where city life and natural tranquility coexist, providing a welcome respite for those navigating the busy surrounding streets. Walk its perimeter, feed the ducks, or get lost on the paths that cross through it. 

A hidden gem amongst Dublin’s central parks is the Iveagh Gardens . Tucked away from the usual tourist trails, it’s a special sanctuary that many visitors overlook. With its cascading waterfalls and quiet alcoves, the Iveagh Gardens feel like a secret garden, offering a unique, peaceful experience in the heart of the city.

6. Dublin is home to sublime Georgian architecture

Dublin’s Georgian architecture is not just a feature of the city; to me, these heritage buildings are a talisman, embodying the elegance and complexity of its history.

Living right amongst these architectural marvels for a significant part of my time in Dublin, I’ve always been captivated by their beauty and the stories they hold. Walking through the streets lined with Georgian buildings, one can’t help but imagine the grandeur of Dublin in its heyday – at least for those fortunate enough to reside in these splendid houses at the time, that is.

These structures, with their distinctive doors and ornate ironwork, were once seen as symbols of colonial oppression, leading early Irish governments to consider bulldozing them.

It’s a relief that this didn’t happen. Instead, what we have today is some of the planet’s most exquisite Georgian architecture, as old wounds slowly heal and we move on from our colonial past. Peek inside, and you might find hidden treasures like glass-domed ceilings. 

I highly recommend a visit to 14 Henrietta Street. Their Georgian walking tour is an enlightening journey into these buildings’ origins as townhouses for the upper classes.

The house tour delves deeper, revealing their transformation into tenements for Dublin’s poorest after the Act of Union in 1800. It’s a powerful reminder of the city’s evolving social landscape, housed within walls that have witnessed centuries of change.

tourist office (visit dublin)

7. Foodies will love its diverse food scene

Dublin’s culinary landscape is a treasure trove of flavours, reflecting the city’s diverse cultural influences and burgeoning food scene.

I’ve joyfully sunk a fortune into exploring Dublin’s restaurants , each offering a unique culinary adventure that mirrors the ever-diversifying population of the city. The diversity of Dublin’s restaurants, from Ethiopian to Brazilian to Korean, is a culinary mirror of its people.

Places like Mr. Fox serve up inventive dishes that delight the senses in the basement of an historic Georgian house, while Patrick Guilbaud’s , with its impeccable cuisine, offers a dining experience that’s nothing short of extraordinary (again, funnily enough, located in a former Georgian mansion that is now one of Dublin’s finest luxury hotels !).

If you’re looking for a cracking wine bar, check out Note . For those craving the vibrant flavours of Asia , Pickle’s Indian cuisine and Duck’s Chinese offerings never disappoint. And I can’t forget the succulent steaks at F.X. Buckley , a testament to Ireland’s rich produce.

Dublin’s dining scene isn’t just about high-end eateries.

The city is dotted with casual spots serving up mouth-watering delights. Take Leo Burdock’s , for instance, where the fish and chips are a Dublin staple. You’ll also find exceptional seafood and modern Irish cuisine that defies the stereotype of being bland.

Irish cuisine today is anything but boring.  With fabulous local ingredients and a focus on provenance , Dublin’s chefs are crafting dishes that are both innovative and deeply rooted in Irish culinary traditions.

8. Dublin is incredibly fun, with a vibrant nightlife

Dublin’s nightlife is an exhilarating blend of energy, fun, and authentic Irish spirit, something I’ve had the pleasure of immersing myself in during my college years, twenties and beyond. The city comes alive, whether it’s basking in the sun on a weekend day, buzzing during a big match, or just enjoying a regular night out.

South William, George’s, and Drury Street  are vibrant hubs of activity where the night’s pulse can truly be felt. Camden Street and Dawson Street also offer an array of lively spots to spend the evening. These areas are amongst those where Dublin’s heart beats loudest at night, filled with laughter, music, and the clinking of glasses.

For a taste of real Irish pubs, I always recommend skipping the tourist-packed Temple Bar and heading to Merrion Row and Baggot Street .

Here, places like O’Donoghue’s , famous for its traditional music, Toners , and Doheny & Nesbitts , are not just pubs; they’re institutions, echoing with stories and songs of Dublin. The Cobblestone pub in Smithfield is another gem, especially for those seeking authentic traditional Irish music.

Kehoe’s , just off Grafton Street, is an absolute favourite of mine. It’s a place where the after-work crowd gathers for good craic and a great pint. In any of these spots, you’ll find the real Dublin, a city that knows how to enjoy itself!

9. Dublin is the home of Guinness

Dublin and Guinness share an inextricable bond, one that has shaped not just a city but also Ireland’s identity on the global stage.

The Guinness brewery, a landmark in its own right, has been more than just a production site; it’s been a cornerstone of Dublin’s growth, particularly in the area around it. This part of the city, pulsing with the brewery’s lifeblood, has evolved alongside Guinness, mirroring its rise and enduring legacy.

The impact of Guinness on Dublin is profound. It’s a legacy of industry, culture, and community that has left an indelible mark on the city’s character. Guinness is not just a drink; it’s a symbol of Dublin’s spirit and resilience, and is a beacon of Irish cultural heritage that resonates worldwide.

Despite being a well-trodden tourist path, a visit to the Guinness Storehouse feels almost compulsory, especially for first-timers in Dublin.

It’s an immersive experience that goes beyond exploring a beloved stout; it’s a journey through a story that’s integral to understanding Dublin and Ireland. The Storehouse is a window into how a local brewery metamorphosed into a global icon, influencing perceptions of Ireland around the world.

Visiting the Storehouse, you’re not just learning about a beer; you’re absorbing a piece of Dublin, of Ireland. It’s a cultural pilgrimage, a rite of passage that connects you to the heart of the city and the essence of its most famous export.

Resources for visiting the Guinness Storehouse

  • Buy skip the line Guinness Storehouse tickets here
  • Guinness Storehouse & Jameson Tour – learn more here

10. There’s top class whiskey to be had too

Dublin’s whiskey scene is as rich and nuanced as its famous stout, offering a splendid alternative or an additional layer to the city’s renowned drinking culture. The rise of whiskey distilleries in Dublin has added another dimension to its already vibrant character.

Jameson , perhaps the most famous Irish whiskey, has a stronghold in the city with its renowned distillery. It’s more than just a place for whiskey production; it’s a cultural experience, a journey into the heart of Irish whiskey-making.

But Jameson isn’t the only name in town. Distilleries like Teeling , Pearse Lyons , and Roe & Co. have also carved out significant niches, each bringing their unique take on this beloved spirit.

Whiskey tasting has become a popular activity in Dublin, with enthusiasts and newcomers alike delving into the world of smooth, rich flavours. Experiencing whiskey in Dublin is to understand a crucial part of Irish heritage.

It’s a sensory exploration that ties you to centuries of tradition and innovation. Whether you’re a seasoned whiskey aficionado or a curious traveller, Dublin’s distilleries provide an immersive experience into a beverage that has long been intertwined with Ireland’s social and cultural fabric.

Top whiskey experiences & tours in Dublin

  • Irish Whiskey Museum Experience Ticket
  • Jameson Distillery Guided Experience with Whiskey Tasting in Dublin
  • Teeling Whiskey Distillery Tour and Tasting in Dublin Ticket 

11. There’s a thriving specialty coffee culture in Dublin

Dublin’s specialty coffee culture is a vibrant and rather established scene , reflecting the city’s modern, progressive spirit. The trend of specialty coffee has not only transformed Dublin’s café landscape but also my own coffee preferences over the years, as I’ve been well and truly spoilt! 

It was in Dublin that I truly fell in love with third wave coffee, learning to appreciate the nuances and complexities of a well-crafted brew. Now, exploring local coffee culture has become a way for me to engage with the contemporary vibe of any new place I visit.

My go-to spots for a coffee fix in Dublin are Cloud Picker and 3fe , whose beans I even order to my home in Kilkenny. These establishments are institutions that have set the bar high for quality and innovation in Dublin’s coffee scene. You’ll find many, many more outside of this however.

Dublin’s specialty coffee scene is undeniably cool, and a testament to the city’s evolving and dynamic character (if that’s why you like to visit a place). It’s not just about serving good coffee; it’s about creating spaces where modern Dubliners and visitors alike can savour, socialise, and soak in the city’s current pulse.

This thriving coffee culture is yet another reason why Dublin is a must-visit destination, offering a window into its lively, progressive soul.

12. You can see a lot of Dublin in a few days

When it comes to exploring Dublin, the question of whether two or three days are enough is a valid one. While it’s unrealistic to claim that one can see everything a city offers in just a few days, Dublin is a delightful exception in certain ways .

In two days, you can certainly get a substantial feel of Dublin.

The city, with its compact size and abundance of sights, lends itself to a condensed yet fulfilling experience. If you have a penchant for history, art, and culture, not to mention a love for great coffee, bars, and restaurants, Dublin won’t disappoint you even in a short span.

Three days in the city would allow you to delve a bit deeper, giving you the opportunity to explore museums, galleries, and various eateries without feeling rushed.

Even if you’re pressed for time, a single day in Dublin can be quite rewarding. My advice would be to select one or two main attractions, intersperse them with visits to a coffee shop and pub or two, and then cap off your day at one of Dublin’s excellent restaurants. 

So, whether it’s a quick visit or a leisurely three-day exploration, Dublin is a city that adapts to your schedule , and cam always deliver on providing you with a rich and memorable experience.

13. It’s a great base for day trips

Dublin is not only a captivating destination in itself but also an ideal launchpad for exploring the many wonders that Ireland has to offer. The city is perfectly positioned as a base for a variety of day trips, each leading to unique experiences and breathtaking sights.

You’ll find an array of guided tours starting from Dublin, catering to all kinds of interests. Popular destinations include the awe-inspiring Cliffs of Moher , the serene beauty of Glendalough and Powerscourt House & Gardens , and the rich history of Belfast and the Giant’s Causeway . These tours offer convenient and insightful ways to experience Ireland’s natural and historical landmarks.

For a taste of Dublin’s coastal charm, the nearby villages of Howth and Dun Laoghaire are perfect choices. Although they’re technically part of Dublin, they exude a distinct village feel, offering picturesque harbours, fresh seafood, and scenic walks – ideal for a leisurely day out.

For those who prefer to venture a bit further, the train network provides easy access to other notable Irish cities. My hometown of Kilkenny , with its medieval roots, and Waterford , another city steeped in Viking history, are both within reach for a fulfilling day trip. It is worth visiting Kilkenny for its rich cultural heritage and historic allure, making it a perfect addition to your travel itinerary.

Dublin’s strategic location thus makes it not just a destination, but a gateway to the broader Irish experience, connecting you effortlessly to the diverse beauty and heritage of Ireland.

Popular day trips from Dublin 

  • Cliffs of Moher Tour Including Wild Atlantic Way and Galway City
  • Northern Ireland Highlights Day Trip Including Giant’s Causeway
  • Kilkenny, Wicklow Mountains, Glendalough, Sheep Dog Trials, Day Trip

tourist office (visit dublin)

 14. Dublin is an incredibly friendly and welcoming city

Dublin’s reputation for friendliness isn’t just a pleasant cliché ; as an Irish person who’s lived it daily, I can attest to the genuine warmth that permeates this city. 

Upon spending any length of time in Ireland, you quickly learn that we’re a nation of talkers, always ready for a chat or a bit of banter. In Dublin, this characteristic shines brightly. Here, striking up a conversation with a stranger can often be the highlight of your day. Dubliners are extremely quick-witted, perceptive and (generally!) funny. 

As an Irish person, I’ve always found that our ability to connect and to really engage with people, is what sets us apart. We’re not just friendly; we’re genuinely interested in making a connection, sharing a laugh, and ensuring that you feel part of our community, even if just for a while.

Make an effort with people in Dublin and they will likely make an effort back – it all adds to the city’s charms.

15. There is no bad time to visit Dublin

I firmly believe that Dublin is a city for all seasons, offering unique charms throughout the year. While it can be said that no one visits Ireland solely for the weather, the city’s seasonal diversity is part of its allure. Rain or shine, Dublin radiates a special kind of beauty, making it an ideal year-round travel destination .

Spring in Dublin is a time I particularly adore. The city awakens from its winter slumber, days grow longer, and the vibrant greenery starts to flourish. There’s a sense of rejuvenation in the air, and seeing people gradually filling the streets and parks again always brings a smile to my face.

Summers here are an absolute blast. Dublin comes alive with the slightest glimpse of sunshine. I love how the city’s social life moves outdoors; beer gardens and parks become hubs of activity. Long, bright evenings are perfect for strolling along the coast or exploring the city’s many attractions. It’s during this season that Dublin’s social spirit truly shines.

The shoulder season of Autumn, meanwhile, has its own charm. The city transforms into a canvas of gold and red, less crowded, more serene. I find this time of year ideal for visiting, offering beautiful days amidst the changing leaves. With fewer tourists around, it’s an excellent time to visit and enjoy Dublin’s beauty at a more relaxed pace .

Winter in Dublin, especially during the festive season, is truly special. December is magical, with twinkling Christmas lights and bustling streets. The festive atmosphere is infectious, making it a joyous time to experience the city’s merry side.

Each season in Dublin offers a different experience, ensuring that whenever you visit, you’ll find a city that’s vibrant, welcoming, and brimming with life.

16. Dublin has a cool, modern edge

While Dublin is a city steeped in history, it also boasts a cool, modern edge that’s become increasingly pronounced in recent years.

The transformation, largely influenced by periods like the Celtic Tiger and the Celtic Phoenix , has catapulted Dublin onto the global stage, especially in areas like Grand Canal Dock. Here, sleek architecture and bustling tech hubs stand as symbols of the city’s economic and cultural resurgence.

This modernity is further accentuated by Dublin’s growing diversity . The influx of tech companies has not only brought economic growth but also a melting pot of cultures, enriching the city’s fabric with global influences. Walking through Dublin now, you encounter a vibrant mix of ideas, cuisines, and lifestyles, a testament to its evolution into a cosmopolitan hub .

What I particularly love about this new Dublin is how it harmonises with the Irish knack for creativity. This blend of global and local, of the traditional and the modern, is seen in the emergence of new businesses, both big and small. From innovative tech startups to quirky independent shops, Dublin pulsates with creative energy .

This modern edge, combined with the city’s inherent charm and creativity, makes Dublin not just a destination to explore but an experience to savour. It’s a city that’s been able to continually reinvent itself, always offering something new and exciting to discover.

17. It’s close to both the mountains and the sea

Dublin’s proximity to both the sea and the mountains give it a distinct edge; offering a variety of natural experiences just a stone’s throw from the city centre. As someone who cherishes the outdoors, I find this aspect of Dublin particularly enchanting.

Set along the coast, Dublin provides easy access to some stunning seaside locations. On sunny days, one of my favourite activities is the Howth Cliff Walk . Despite its popularity, the panoramic views it offers are absolutely worth it.

Another appreciated pastime on hot days is swimming at the public baths on Bull Island or strolling along Dun Laoghaire pier with an ice cream in hand. For a more adventurous day out, taking the train down to Bray and walking to Greystones offers a delightful coastal experience, showcasing the beauty of Dublin’s seaside setting.

The Dublin Mountains are another gem, easily accessible, especially by car. They offer a quick escape to nature, where tranquillity and scenic beauty reign. A favourite Sunday activity of mine is exploring these mountains, hiking with friends.

Not far from Dublin too is Glendalough , one of Ireland’s most breathtaking spots. Its trails and vistas provide the perfect backdrop for a rejuvenating hike, making it a must-visit for anyone exploring Dublin’s natural surroundings.

5 challenges when visiting Dublin

1. dublin is very expensive.

Dublin’s reputation as one of Europe’s most expensive cities is well-earned.

From accommodation to dining, the cost can be a surprise to many visitors. However, there are ways to mitigate this.

I always suggest exploring the wealth of free attractions Dublin offers, such as the Archaeological Museum, the Chester Beatty Library, the National Gallery, and the Hugh Lane Gallery. These cultural gems provide rich experiences without the hefty price tag.

For dining on a budget, you can always choose to embrace Dublin’s natural beauty. Grabbing a picnic and heading to one of the city’s many parks is both cost-effective and delightful. Phoenix Park or St. Stephen’s Green on a sunny day offer perfect settings for an affordable, yet charming Dublin experience. 

2. It’s easy to be drawn into tourist traps like Temple Bar

While Temple Bar might seem like a quintessential Dublin experience, it’s pretty much a tourist trap. The area, with its picturesque pubs and lively music, is designed to attract tourists seeking a stereotypical Irish experience – often at a premium cost. It’s the epitome of the ‘ plastic paddy ‘ experience, with overpriced pints and a crowd that rarely includes locals.

As an Irish person with a keen interest in cultural understanding, I beseech you to seek out more authentic experiences. There are plenty of traditional pubs and venues across the city where you can enjoy genuine Irish music and a warm atmosphere without the inflated prices.

Exploring outside of Temple Bar allows for a more authentic and often more enjoyable Dublin experience , spent amongst Irish people and not just other tourists who don’t know any better (because you now do!).

3. Certain things must be planned in advance

Spontaneity in Dublin, especially when it comes to dining, can sometimes lead to disappointment.

Many of Dublin’s popular restaurants require advance bookings , and deciding on a whim usually isn’t an option. This is especially true in December, when securing a table in city centre hotspots can feel like a competitive sport.

Planning ahead is key.

Reserving tables at restaurants and booking tickets for popular attractions well in advance can save a lot of stress. It ensures that you get to experience the best of Dublin’s culinary and cultural offerings without the last-minute scramble.

4. Accommodation can be a challenge

Finding suitable accommodation in Dublin can be a significant challenge, primarily due to its notorious expense.

The high costs can be attributed to a complex mix of factors, notably supply and demand issues, alleged price gouging by hotels , and the utilisation of hotels and guesthouses as temporary solutions for the homeless crisis, as well as for housing refugees. These factors have noticeably reduced the number of rooms available for tourists, further driving up prices.

I understand the frustration this can cause for visitors.

To tackle this, it’s crucial to book well in advance. Exploring areas just outside the city centre or considering alternative lodging options like guesthouses can offer more budget-friendly choices. Being aware of these challenges and planning accordingly can significantly ease the process of finding a place to stay in Dublin.

5. The weather could very well let you down

Dublin’s weather is famously unpredictable and often inclement. The city can be particularly windy, rendering umbrellas almost useless on rainy days. It’s a place where you might experience all four seasons in one day.

Having a flexible itinerary is crucial when visiting Dublin. Always have a backup plan, especially if your activities are outdoors. Indoor alternatives like museums, galleries, or cosy pubs can save the day when the weather turns.

And, if you do manage to visit Dublin without weather disruptions, consider it a stroke of Irish luck!

Additional insights for visiting Dublin: FAQs

Is dublin an expensive city to visit.

Yes, Dublin is considered one of the most expensive cities in Europe . While the city offers a wealth of experiences, the cost of accommodation, dining, and some tourist attractions can be high. However, there are ways to manage these costs, such as exploring free cultural spots like the National Gallery and enjoying nature in Dublin’s parks.

What is the #1 attraction in Dublin, Ireland?

The #1 attraction in Dublin varies depending on interests, but many would argue it’s the Guinness Storehouse, given its cultural significance and popularity. Additionally, Dublin’s vibrant food scene and nightlife, featuring spots like South William Street and traditional pubs off Temple Bar, are major draws. The Book of Kells and the Long Room at Trinity Library are also incredibly popular attractions. 

What month is best to visit Dublin?

Dublin is a year-round destination, but many find the spring and summer months (April to August) ideal for their longer days and milder weather. However, visiting in autumn or winter offers its own charm, especially with the festive atmosphere in December. Autumn and the run up to Christmas rank amongst my own favourite times of year in Dublin. 

Is Dublin good for tourists?

Absolutely, Dublin is known for its friendliness and welcoming atmosphere and is a great city to visit as a tourist. As a tourist, you’ll find the city easy to navigate, rich in culture and history, and filled with engaging activities and sights, as well as places to eat.

What’s Dublin famous for?

Dublin is famous for its rich history, evident in its Georgian architecture, historic landmarks like Trinity College and the General Post Office, and its cultural contributions, particularly in literature and music. The city is also renowned for being the home of Guinness.

What should I not miss in Dublin?

In Dublin, don’t miss the cultural and historical landmarks like the Book of Kells at Trinity College, Kilmainham Gaol, and Dublin Castle. Additionally, exploring the city’s vibrant art galleries, museums, and enjoying the lively pub culture are must-do activities. If you’re interested in people and social history, I’d highly recommend 14 Henrietta Street, as well as EPIC, The Irish Emigration Museum.

How many days in Dublin is enough?

Two to three days in Dublin are generally enough to see the main historical sights and get a feel for the city. However, if you’re interested in a deeper exploration, especially of Dublin’s museums and galleries, extending your stay to three days would be ideal.

Why is Dublin popular with tourists?

Dublin is popular with tourists for its rich blend of historical and modern attractions, vibrant cultural scene, friendly locals, and its status as a gateway to the natural beauty of Ireland. The city offers a diverse experience, from historic walks to lively nightlife, appealing to a wide range of interests.

Is Dublin worth visiting: my conclusion

Dublin’s unique blend of historical richness, cultural vibrancy, and modern dynamism makes it a city well worth visiting. From the stately Georgian architecture and profound literary history to the energetic streets and modern areas like Grand Canal Dock, the city offers a diverse range of experiences. The warmth of Dublin’s people adds to its charm, making every visitor feel welcomed.

Personally, Dublin has a special place in my heart, and you’ll find that each visit will uncover new layers and leave lasting impressions. Whether you’re in Dublin for a brief visit or an extended stay, the city promises enriching and unforgettable experiences, encapsulating the essence of Ireland in its lively streets and serene coastal landscapes.

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Hi there! I'm Isabelle, aficionado of immersive travel experiences and unique, luxurious hotels. You'll most likely find me camera in hand, or nerding out on research in advance of my next trip. A major foodie, history and scenery lover, nothing makes me happier than soaking in the atmosphere and culture of the destination I'm visiting.

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Dublin   Travel Guide

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22 Best Things to Do in Dublin, Ireland

Locals might say Dublin is full of "craic" (good times), with a healthy mixture of history and little debauchery that can be found on nearly every street corner. Start in the north at Phoenix Park and head south to the River Liffey, cross the famous

  • All Things To Do

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Trinity College and The Book of Kells Trinity College and The Book of Kells

Note: The Old Library is undergoing a massive restoration and conservation effort. While the Old Library will remain open for visits until construction begins in 2025, all books have been removed from the shelves. The Book of Kells is still on display and there will be a new exhibit about this important manuscript.

U.S. News Insider Tip: This must-see attraction is worth the (typically) long wait. The gift shop is a particularly good spot to pick up inspiring gifts and souvenirs to commemorate your trip. – Rachael Hood

tourist office (visit dublin)

St. Patrick's Cathedral St. Patrick's Cathedral

U.S. News Insider Tip: After seeing the sights, take a short walk to the cozy Brazen Head pub, said to be the oldest pub in Dublin. Come for the fish and chips but stay for the live music. – Elizabeth Von Tersch

St. Patrick's Cathedral is the largest cathedral in Dublin and the national cathedral of the Church of Ireland. Built on the site where St. Patrick is said to have baptized converts some 600 years earlier, this massive cathedral was erected between 1220 and 1259 with major restorations beginning in the 1860s. It remains one of the few buildings still standing from medieval Dublin.

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Chester Beatty Library Chester Beatty Library free

Widely known as one of the mote notable museums in Europe, the Chester Beatty Library is often overlooked by tourists. The library is home to an extensive collection of rare books, manuscripts and drawings dating back to 2700 B.C. The museum includes religious and artistic collections from across Asia, the Middle East, North Africa and Europe.

The library's namesake comes from the American mining millionaire and collector, Sir Alfred Chester Beatty, who donated his immense collection to Ireland when he passed in 1968. Works include Babylonian clay tablets, the Biblical Papyri and more than 250 different manuscripts of the Quran.

tourist office (visit dublin)

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tourist office (visit dublin)

St. Stephen's Green St. Stephen's Green free

This beautiful park (known for remaining green throughout the year) is a great place to spend a day outside without leaving central Dublin. It's been enjoyed by locals and visitors since 1880 when Arthur Edward Guinness re-opened it as a public park after it served as a private community for the wealthier residents of Dublin for more than century.

These days, the park is maintained by the Office of Public Works and includes a playground and garden for people with blindness or low vision. The green space is also home to several monuments dedicated to some of Ireland's most important figures, including James Joyce and Arthur Edward Guinness. Past visitors appreciated the peaceful grounds and described it as a great place to relax in the middle of the city. Reviewers also praised the park's cleanliness and recommended future visitors pack a picnic to enjoy the tranquil atmosphere.

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EPIC The Irish Emigration Museum EPIC The Irish Emigration Museum

This interactive museum details 1,500 years of Irish history, with stories of the 100 million people who left Ireland, how and where they lived, and their impact on the rest of the world. State-of-the-art interactive exhibits feature touch screens, quizzes and audio and video recordings, which bring Irish history to life. Everything from Irish music and dance to Irish literature to touching letters home, reveal the Irish emigrant experience from multiple points of view.

Recent visitors called the museum highly educational and informative and said it's a must-see for anyone of Irish descent.

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Phoenix Park Phoenix Park free

When the hustle and bustle of the city gets to be too much, seek refuge in Phoenix Park, one of the largest enclosed parks in a European capital. Encompassing more than 1,700 acres, Phoenix Park features plenty of lush green lawns, shady wooded areas and cool, clean lakes. Once upon a time, it was the royal hunting park (in the 1600s) and opened to the public in 1747. To this day, visitors can encounter fallow deer.

Travelers can start out at the park's Visitor Centre & Ashtown Castle to learn about the history of the park and tour the medieval tower that dates back to the 17th century. The park is also home the 78-acre Edwardian estate, the Farmleigh House , which still acts as a working farm as well as a Victorian walled kitchen garden. Recent visitors called the park beautiful, clean and peaceful.

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Kilmainham Gaol Kilmainham Gaol

U.S. News Insider Tip: While a prison may not be the most uplifting place to visit, a tour here really provides insight into the lives of the Irish people and the hardships they endured. – Rachael Hood

According to many, this gaol , or jail, gives its visitors one of the most unique looks into the darker side of Irish history. Occupied from 1796 to the 1920s, the prison housed many famous figures in the fight for Irish independence, including Thomas Francis Meagher and James Connolly, and was also the site for more sinister executions and hangings. Additionally, the prison acted as a transportation point for approximately 4,000 prisoners to Australia – then a penal colony – in the early 19th century. The gaol was known for the harsh treatment of its inhabitants, with no segregation by gender until 1861 when men were transferred to the newly built East Wing. It was later abandoned in 1924 and reopened as a museum in 1966 (though remodeling and updates have taken place since).

tourist office (visit dublin)

National Gallery of Ireland National Gallery of Ireland free

If you're an art lover, make sure to save some time for this extensive (and free!) museum, which has housed Ireland's national art collection since 1854. Here you'll find numerous works by such renowned artists as Caravaggio, Vincent van Gogh and the French impressionists. But the main attractions are works from some of Ireland's masters, with an impressive collection of works by notable residents such as Jack B. Yeats and Helen Mabel Trevor. The National Gallery also hosts notable traveling exhibitions as well as concerts and lectures.

Recent visitors called the museum outstanding and well worth a visit. If you're a fan of the arts, previous travelers recommended you set aside several hours to tour the museum. You'll also want to grab a map at the entrance as its collections are spread out.

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Dublin Book of Kells, Castle and Molly Malone Statue Guided Tour

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Blarney Castle Day Tour from Dublin Including Rock of Cashel & Cork City

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from $ 87.19

Dublin tour to Giant's Causeway Belfast Black Taxi Dunluce Castle

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from $ 97.13

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Dublin Castle Dublin Castle

Right in the heart of the city, the site of the Dublin Castle has played a part in Ireland's history since the land was used by Vikings to build a fortress in the 900s. Parts of the castle were built and torn down through the ages, but the oldest remaining structure, the Record Tower, dates back to the 13th century.

In addition to having been a stronghold against foreign attacks on the city, the castle and its grounds have also been home to a prison, an office of record, a water station, a seat of parliament, a royal court for entertainment and a military residence – all before 1850. The castle grounds were also the site where the Easter Rebellion of 1916 began, and after five years of fighting, where the treaty that granted Irish independence was signed. Many previous visitors recommended taking the guided tour, which they say is more extensive and informative that the self-guided tour.

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Christ Church Cathedral Christ Church Cathedral

Formally known as the Cathedral of the Holy Trinity, the Christ Church Cathedral has been visited for almost 1,000 years. Originally a Viking church founded in 1030, Archbishop Laurence O'Toole (the future patron saint of Dublin) merged it with the Irish Church in 1152. The Romanesque gothic church is known for its magnificent architecture and its famous bells (one of which is from 1738). This church also holds the largest and oldest crypt in Ireland and is full of historical objects of worship. Among the items stored in this church is a royal plate given by King William III, a rare 14th-century copy of the Magna Carta Hiberniae, and the heart of St. Laurence O'Toole. There's even a morbid oddity of a mummified cat and rat, better known as Tom and Jerry, frozen in eternal pursuit on display for all to gawk at.

Past visitors declare that it's a must-see attraction when visiting Dublin and it's quite affordable as well. Self-guided audio tours – included in your ticket fee – are available and recommended to get an experience filled with hidden facts and stories. Others say it's still a great place to wander about without the audio.

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Jameson Distillery Bow St. Jameson Distillery Bow St.

Did you know that in Irish, whiskey is called  uisce beatha  and literally translates to "the water of life"? Chronicling the history of the Jameson family and the "water" they're known for, the Jameson Distillery no longer makes the hard stuff (that's done elsewhere) though it does offer tours that provide insight on just how to do it. Whiskey drinkers hail the 45-minute guided tour (and the included tastings) as informative and fun, with energetic guides and a beautiful refurbished facility.

Whether you're a fan of whiskey or not, learning about the history is sure to entertain anyone. Even non-drinkers say they enjoyed the informative tour. Learning that the founder of the most famous Irish whiskey, John Jameson, was actually a Scotsman is a favorite tidbit. Or that the Latin on the bottle's label,  Sine Metu , means "without fear."

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Guinness Storehouse Guinness Storehouse

Like the Jameson Distillery , the Guinness Storehouse is no longer a functioning brewery, but it will give you an insider's view into the history and process behind the storied stout. Take the self-guided tour through the former brewery's seven floors to learn about the history of the one-of-a-kind beer, from the ingredients used in the brewing process to the iconic advertisements seen around the world. At the top, you'll be treated to a complimentary pint and city views from its rooftop Gravity Bar.

The best part of the tour for some visitors? The complimentary pint at the end along with the rooftop views. Even non-beer drinkers enjoyed the storehouse for its interactive and multimedia exhibits, but noted that during peak times they can be crowded. Other comment that tickets are a bit pricey. To make sure you get in at your preferred time, book your tickets online in advance. If you sign up for one of the best Dublin tours , you'll likely also visit the storehouse.

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The Little Museum of Dublin The Little Museum of Dublin

To discover Dublin, head on over to The Little Museum of Dublin to learn about the city's illustrious history in approximately 30 minutes. Located in a quaint 18th-century Georgian townhouse near St. Stephen's Green , this charming museum was founded in 2011, with more than 5,000 artifacts donated by Dubliners. You'll find items from Queen Victoria's visit, a copy of James Joyce's "Ulysses" and tokens from the Abbey Theatre's long history. There's even an exhibit on the top floor dedicated to the rise of U2 featuring signed albums, photographs, and gig tickets.

Being that the museum is so small, it's best to book a tour in advance as tickets sell out quickly. You can walk around on your own, but a guided tour is highly recommended and should not be missed, according to travelers. Museumgoers routinely praise the lively guides who left everyone – even small children – mesmerized.

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Dublin: Giants Causeway, Dunluce Castle, Dark Hedges and Belfast

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Cliffs of Moher, Doolin, Burren & Galway Day Tour From Dublin

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Grafton Street Grafton Street free

U.S. News Insider Tip: If you're looking for something special to bring home from your trip, head to Weir & Sons for fine Irish jewelry, Brown Thomas is a lovely department store to peruse and Avoca on nearby Suffolk Street has Irish-made Avoca Mill Handweavers wool goods. For a treat, tuck into Bewley's Cafe for coffee or tea and a scone. – Rachael Hood

When you need a break from all the museums and historical sites, head to Grafton Street. This pedestrian street – which runs from  Trinity College to  St. Stephen's Green  – is Dublin's premier shopping district. Here, you'll find everything from familiar brands to more unique items like quirky shoes and used books. There are also two shopping centers in the area, the Stephen's Green Shopping Centre and the upscale Powerscourt Centre. So, if you're looking for a place to exercise your credit card, this would be it.

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Temple Bar Temple Bar free

Often compared to Bourbon Street in New Orleans , this neighborhood is Dublin's famous party hub. During the day, this district thrives on artistic vision, featuring numerous independent galleries and performance art venues. At night, dozens of pubs (including one with the same name as the district) open their doors to those looking to share a pint of Guinness and click their heels to spirited Irish music.

Many visitors say the district has become more of a tourist trap than an authentic representation of Dublin's pub culture, but while in Dublin it is a sight one must see. Pull up a chair, order a (likely overpriced) pint and enjoy the music. For help navigating the crowds, sign up for one of the best Dublin tours , many of which stop in the area.

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Abbey Theatre Abbey Theatre

U.S. News Insider Tip: Be sure to check out the nearby National Leprechaun Museum . It may sound a little cheesy, but this museum is dedicated to preserving Irish folklore and myths about the fair folks plus other Irish heritage tales through the art of oral storytelling. – Yolanda Evans

Although the Abbey Theatre looks quite contemporary, even swanky with its glass front and the theater name bathed in blue light, the performance venue has turn-of-the-century origins. Famed poet, W.B. Yeats, along with another Irish writer, Lady Augusta Gregory, opened the national theater in 1904. It's since been rebuilt and now features 620 seats between  the Abbey and Peacock auditoriums and a continuous playbill of Ireland's most promising playwrights.

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Wicklow Mountains National Park Wicklow Mountains National Park free

U.S. News Insider Tip: Spend time in Glendalough  exploring the ancient ruins of the Christian settlement nestled in between two beautiful lakes. Then pick up a bottle of Glendalough whiskey or gin with the image of Saint Kevin plastered on the bottle to remind you of your visit. – Yolanda Evans

Just south of Dublin, Wicklow National Park is one of Ireland's largest parks consisting of more than 20,000 hectares (more than 50,000 acres) of winding mountain paths, bogs, lakes and breathtaking views for all that venture to the park. There are plenty of hiking trails – like the Wicklow Way – for outdoorsy travelers who want to spend more time in nature. For less adventurous visitors, you can seek out historical sites such as the old mine ruins or take a drive around the Great Military Road for a stunning view of the mountains. Also, be sure to check out Glenmacnass waterfall for photo for your Instagram!

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Dublin Zoo Dublin Zoo

The biggest attraction within Phoenix Park is the Dublin Zoo. Opened by the Zoological Society of Ireland in 1831 with just four acres, this zoo is one of the oldest of its kind in Europe. The zoo's first collection included monkeys, lions, bears and parrots; an elephant and rhinoceros later joined the collection as rentals (though London gifted the zoo an elephant in 1835). Today, Dubin Zoo spans nearly 70 acres and is home to more than 400 animals in a variety of large habitats. Popular exhibits include the Humboldt penguins and western lowland gorillas. Recent visitors praised the zoo for its size, cleanliness and obvious commitment to the care of its animals. Others note that the zoo can get extremely busy, especially in the peak summer season. After you leave, you can keep a keen eye on the animals via webcam.

The zoo is open every day starting at 9:30 a.m. and closing at 6 p.m. Admission costs 22.50 euros (about $24) for adults and 17 euros (about $18) for children ages 3 to 15. Family tickets and tickets or visitors who need additional assistance are also available. If you book online, you'll save a few euros. Learn more on its website .

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Dublin Highlights and Hidden Gems Guided Walking Tour

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Dublin Hop-On Hop-Off Bus Tour with Guide and Little Museum Entry

Dublin Hop-On Hop-Off Bus Tour with Guide and Little Museum Entry

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Big Bus Dublin Hop on Hop off Sightseeing Tour with Live Guide

Big Bus Dublin Hop on Hop off Sightseeing Tour with Live Guide

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Farmleigh House & Estate Farmleigh House & Estate

U.S. News Insider Tip: After wandering the estate grounds soaking up the history, treat yourself to a little snack and drink at the on-site restaurant, The Boathouse, for Italian and Irish cuisine. Located along the beautiful lake, it's the ideal setting for rest and relaxation. – Yolanda Evans

Once the home of the famous Guinness family, Farmleigh was purchased in 1999 by the government to house visiting dignitaries. This lavish Edwardian estate is nestled on 78 acres that includes the main house, a walled and sunken garden, a beautiful lake and the famous clock tower. Then there's the large collection of art as well as a rare collection of rare books and manuscripts in the library that remained in the house to be on display for visitors. Also on-site is the charming Cowshed theater where artists and performers can showcase their craft. As a bonus, there's a food and craft market behind the Gallery on the first Sunday of the month from Easter Sunday to December.

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Glasnevin Cemetery Glasnevin Cemetery free

U.S. News Insider Tip:  After visiting the cemetery, stop by  John Kavanagh – better known as "The Gravediggers" – for a pint. This bar's nickname was coined because gravediggers used to visit this pub after completing their shift. – Yolanda Evans

Opened in 1832, Glasnevin Cemetery was once one of the few places where Irish Catholics could be buried. It was founded by Daniel O'Connell, who largely helped remove restrictions on Irish Catholics in the early 1800s. Not only is Glasnevin the final resting place for O'Connell, but it's also the burial location for other famous Irish icons like politician Charles Stewart Parnell; the co-founder of the Irish Republican Army Michael Collins; and politician and first female cabinet minister in Ireland, Countess Markievicz. In fact, more than 1.5 million souls are buried in this cemetery. The tombs are also a great work of art, as many are adorned with Irish symbols such as the harp and clovers. There are also indoor exhibits exploring the cemetery's history and burial practices from around the world. With so much to offer, it's little wonder that Glasnevin is Ireland's national cemetery.

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St. Michan's Church St. Michan's Church

Located about a block from the Old Jameson Distillery , St. Michan's Church was founded in 1095 and is the oldest church on the north side of the River Liffey in Dublin. Rebuilt in 1686 by William Robinson, this church has a stunning vaulted ceiling and a large pipe organ. In fact, the organ is rumoured to be the one that George Friedrich Handel played when performing "Messiah" for the first time. Besides the history and architecture, the main draw to this church is its famous, yet eerie, crypts that contain the mummified remains of Dublin's most notorious residents dating back to the 17th century. Among the dead in the vaults are Irish rebels John and Henry Sheares, Earls of Leitrim, and Wolfe Tone. There are also four mummified corpses on display without lids, famously called the Unknown, the Thief, the Nun and the Crusader.

Travelers say visits to St. Michan's Church were still interesting due to their engaging tour guide who entertained them with the historical facts and spooky tales. 

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National Museum of Ireland – Natural History National Museum of Ireland – Natural History free

Note: The National Museum of Ireland – Natural History is undergoing extensive renovation. At this time, only the ground floor is open to visitors.

Nicknamed the "Dead Zoo" due to it being a zoological museum, the National Museum of Ireland on Merrion Street was opened in 1867. It features exhibits of animals native to Ireland like badgers, golden eagles, mussels, trout and insects (Ireland is home to some 12,000 of them!). Also available is the Wonder Cabinet, a take on the Victorian curiosity cabinets that showcases about two million scientific specimens of mammals, birds, and insects. This unique space also doubles as a filming location – it was featured in an episode of "Ripper Street" and "Penny Dreadful" – due to its charming architecture.

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23 Top-Rated Tourist Attractions in Dublin

Written by Andrew Birbeck and Meagan Drillinger Updated Dec 27, 2023 We may earn a commission from affiliate links ( )

Famous for its cultural attractions and charming hospitality, Dublin has always been one of the most popular cities in Europe to visit. But nowadays, in addition to its centuries-old traditions and historic roots, Dublin has grown into its own as one of the top cosmopolitan cities of Europe.

The ancient capital of the Emerald Isle, Dublin has been written about for centuries. The River Liffey, which flows into the harbor, has been vital to life and civilization here from the beginning. Today it's one of the city's focal points, slicing Dublin in two and creating one of the busiest commercial hubs in the country.

Dublin's history goes way back. Pre-independence from Britain, Dublin was once the second city of the British Empire. You can find evidence of English influence all over the city, from the Georgian architecture to picturesque parks. You'll also find the relics of the country's violent struggles for independence, and monuments that serve as reminders of how hard the Irish fought for freedom over hundreds of years.

A cultural capital, Dublin has given the world renowned literary figures such as Beckett, Joyce, Shaw, and Wilde. It was dubbed a UNESCO City of Literature in 2010, but Dublin's written traditions stretch back to as early as 800 CE with The Book of Kells, now on permanent exhibition at Trinity College.

Dublin sprawls rather than soars, but the historic city center is very easy to explore on foot Still, a light rail system, buses, and ample taxis allow travelers to get wherever they want to go.

Find the best places to visit with our list of the top attractions and things to do in Dublin, Ireland.

1. Trinity College and College Green

2. shop on grafton street, 3. take a stroll around st. stephens green, 4. the little museum of dublin, 5. explore kildare street museums and houses of parliament, 6. national museum of ireland: archaeology, 7. explore irish art at the national gallery of ireland, 8. visit merrion square, 9. epic the irish emigration museum, 10. gpo witness history museum, 11. learn about ireland's greatest writer at the james joyce centre, 12. national museum of ireland - decorative arts and history (collins barracks), 13. take the kids to phoenix park and dublin zoo, 14. go to jail: kilmainham gaol, 15. christ church cathedral, 16. st. patrick's cathedral, 17. dublin castle and the chester beatty library, 18. visit the irish museum of modern art, 19. the irish rock 'n' roll museum experience, 20. take a side trip to dalkey/killiney, 21. take a day trip to the cliffs of moher, 22. stroll o'connell street, 23. catch a match at croke park, where to stay in dublin for sightseeing, dublin, ireland - climate chart, tips and tours: how to make the most of your visit to dublin, editor's tips, map of attractions & things to do in dublin.

Trinity College

Trinity College is probably the best spot to kick off your Dublin tour. It's located in the heart of the capital, packed full of incredible history, and it's the oldest university in Ireland having been founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth I.

Occupying an enviable 40-acre site, Trinity retains some of its ancient seclusion of cobbled squares, gardens, and parks and is famed throughout the world for its collection of great treasures. These include, on permanent exhibition, the 9th-century illuminated manuscript, the Book of Kells , the Books of Durrow and Armagh, and an ancient Irish harp.

The priceless artifacts are displayed in the Treasury and the awe-inspiring 18th-century Long Room, which houses more than 200,000 of Trinity's oldest books and hosts regular literary exhibitions. Book the Early Access Book of Kells Tour to avoid the long lines. It also includes a trip to the exterior of Dublin Castle.

Trinity College and College Green

Trinity is a haven in an otherwise bustling area. Alumni over the centuries include such figures as Jonathan Swift (most famously known as the author of Gulliver's Travels ), Oscar Wilde, Bram Stoker (author of Dracula), and playwright Samuel Beckett. Entering through a timber-tiled archway, you are instantly brought back in time. The immaculate green lawns, 18th- and 19th-century buildings, and cobbled pathway are reminiscent of a more gentile age and ooze a sense of hushed academia.

It's best to time your visit strategically, as buildings open to the public can become crowded during peak season. As well as taking in the must-see sights, do make time to relax and simply enjoy the atmosphere. Opposite the college on College Green is the old Irish Parliament building now a branch of the Bank of Ireland.

Address: Trinity College, College Green, Dublin 2

Official site: www.tcd.ie/visitors/

Trinity College of Dublin - Floor plan map

A short southerly stroll from Trinity College takes you down towards Dublin's premier shopping location, Grafton Street. A statue of Molly Malone sits at the bottom of the street, so it's impossible to miss.

This eclectic stretch buzzes morning, noon, and night and is a magnet for buskers, from classical quartets to traditional fiddle players and singer-songwriters. Many famed bands and musicians have given impromptu performances here, including Bono of U2.

Flowers for sale on Grafton Street

Aside from buskers, you will find a broad range of boutiques, jewelers, and department stores, including upmarket Brown Thomas . Many would say that the jewel in the crown is Bewley's Oriental Café , a Dublin institution at this location since 1927.

If you're on a shopping spree, it's well worth taking a slight diversion to the arty Powerscourt Townhouse Centre, with its designer shops and trendy places to eat.

Official site: http://graftonstreet.ie/

St. Stephens Green

After eating your fill at Bewley's Oriental Café, an easy stroll to the top of Grafton Street brings you to Fusilier's Arch , the main entrance to St. Stephen's Green (Faiche Stiabhna). Georgian buildings surround "the Green" (as it's known locally), although some sadly fell by the wayside during redevelopment, mainly in the 1960s, 70s, and 80s.

The 22-acre park is a Dublin treasure and an oasis of calm away from the hustle and bustle of downtown city life. When weather permits, you should do as the locals do and stretch out on the grass for some rest and relaxation, or grab a picnic lunch. Immaculate flowerbeds fringe the lawns.

Also in the park is an ornate fountain at its center, a bridge over a duck pond, and a children's playground. Incidentally, the park was the scene of bitter combat during the 1916 Uprising, however it was agreed by both sides that hostilities should cease while the park-keeper fed the ducks.

The Little Museum of Dublin

The Little Museum of Dublin is a hidden gem tucked in a charming space amid all the city's historical sights. A couple of minutes' stroll from Fusilier's Arch, at the top of Dawson Street, it is a must-see for those interested in how Dublin and its people lived their lives and evolved over the past century.

James Joyce once famously said, "in the particular is contained the universal," which neatly sums up the ethos of this treasure trove. In the minutiae of people's belongings, history is indeed writ large.

Opened in 2011 following an appeal for mementos and artifacts, the museum has gone from strength to strength and now hosts an array of temporary exhibitions and events, as well as permanent installations, including a U2 retrospective with exhibits donated by band members. Other treats include the lectern used by John F. Kennedy when he addressed both houses of the Irish Parliament (Oireachtas) in June 1963.

Address: 15 St. Stephen's Green, Dublin 2

Official site: www.littlemuseum.ie

The Dail Government Building

From the Little Museum of Dublin, a saunter past the legendary hotel The Shelbourne Dublin will take you to the top of Kildare Street, home to the Irish Parliament (Dáil Éireann) on the left hand side.

The parliament building was once known as Kildare House after James Fitzgerald, the Earl of Kildare, who commissioned its construction in 1745 and set out to create a grand Georgian mansion to reflect his lofty social status. When he became Duke of Leinster in 1766, the house was renamed Leinster House .

Houses of Parliament in Dublin

If you're interested in literature, you should visit the National Library close by, which has a permanent W.B. Yeats exhibition.

Address: Kildare Street, Dublin 2

Sign at the Museum of Irelands: Archaeology

Located on Kildare Street near the National Library, the National Museum of Ireland: Archaeology is certainly worth spending time exploring. The museum features outstanding permanent exhibitions. Highlights include Ireland's Gold, Prehistoric Ireland, and the impressive Viking Collection.

It's also worth visiting for the Treasury collection, which includes the magnificent Ardagh Chalice . Widely regarded as one of the top things to do in Dublin for free , this world-class museum also offers tours and a rich program of workshops and educational events.

Address: Kildare St, Dublin 2

Official site: www.museum.ie/en-IE/Museums/Archaeology

The National Gallery of Ireland

A right turn at the end of Kildare Street will bring you to the National Gallery of Ireland, with entrances on Clare Street and Merrion Square West. Housing the finest collection of Irish art in the world alongside an outstanding collection of European art from the Middle Ages to the present day, this is a must-see while in the capital.

The gallery opened in 1864 with wings being added in 1903, 1968, and most recently, 2002. Collections include the Yeats Museum, seven rooms devoted to Irish art, Italian Painters, the Shaw Room, and Baroque Room.

The gallery, which is spread over four levels, regularly hosts impressive temporary exhibitions, and there's an excellent café popular with locals and visitors alike.

Address: Clare Street & Merrion Square, Dublin 2

Official site: www.nationalgallery.ie

Aerial view of Merrion Square

Exit the National Gallery's main portal, and you're on Merrion Square. Made up of stately private houses and offices, this is arguably Dublin's grandest Georgian square and stars in countless images and postcards of the city. At its center is a pretty park with a vibrant statue of that most colorful writer and renowned Dublin wit, Oscar Wilde .

An amiable stroll around the square is a journey back in time to the Georgian era. You may notice that the top windows in many buildings are smaller than those lower down. This was done in order to create an optical illusion of the houses being taller than they really are. At weekends, local artists line the perimeter of the park and display their paintings on the railings.

EPIC The Irish Emigration Museum

Ireland has long been an exporter of people. Scratch the surface of America's East Coast, and you'll find the influence of the Irish everywhere. Dublin's superb EPIC The Irish Emigration Museum is aptly situated in the city's docklands area, the scene of many a sad farewell.

Established in 2016, this fascinating museum offers an in-depth – and often moving – account of Irish emigration over the centuries. All told there are more than 20 separate themed galleries to explore, dealing not just with the history of Irish migration, but also the influence this dynamic people have had in the places they settled.

If you've got the time, be sure to visit the Irish Family History Centre for tips and advice – along with resources – to track your family history.

A nearby related attraction is the Jeanie Johnston: An Irish Famine Story . The centerpiece of this excellent museum is an accurate replica of the fabled Jeanie Johnston , a sailing vessel from Canada that was built in 1847 and which transported untold numbers of Irish across the Atlantic.

Address: The Chq Building, Custom House Quay, North Dock, Dublin 1

Official site: https://epicchq.com/

GPO Witness History Museum

O'Connell Street, Dublin's main thoroughfare, is home to the iconic GPO (General Post Office) built in 1814. The failed 1916 Uprising began here, and bullet holes still dot the Neoclassical portico. Inside, the city's newest attraction, the GPO Witness History Museum, is a must-visit for those wanting to gain a better understanding of this pivotal event in Irish history.

GPO Witness History Museum

While focusing predominantly on the period leading up to the uprising and the uprising itself, there's plenty of information on hand via interactive displays about other key events, including the Irish War of Independence right up to the Northern Ireland peace process. Guided tours are available, and come highly recommended.

Address: O'Connell Street Lower, North City, Dublin 1

Official site: www.gpowitnesshistory.ie

The James Joyce Centre

Around an eight-minute walk from the GPO, in a beautiful Georgian house, is the James Joyce Centre founded by Irish Senator, one-time Presidential Candidate, and renowned Joycean scholar, David Norris.

The museum is dedicated to all things Joycean, and although the writer never lived in the property, he had a connection to it through a real-life character featured in Ulysses , Prof. Denis J. Maginni, who ran a dance academy here. The building was condemned in the 1980s, but was ultimately saved and restored through a campaign spearheaded by David Norris.

If you're in the mood to learn more about Dublin's literary heritage, be sure to pay a visit to the Dublin Writers Museum . Located in an attractive 1700s home in Parnell Square, this interesting museum offers a fascinating glimpse into the lives of a number of great Irish authors, and their most important works. In addition to numerous artifacts and memorabilia, the museum houses a collection of paintings and portraits.

Address: 35 North Great George's Street, Dublin 1

Official site: http://jamesjoyce.ie/

National Museum of Ireland - Decorative Arts and History (Collins Barracks)

Originally an army barracks, the National Museum of Ireland - Decorative Arts and History opened in 1997. The collections include silver, ceramics, jewelry, furniture, Irish haute couture fashion, and exhibitions exploring Irish military history.

There are several other permanent exhibitions, including a retrospective of modernist designer Eileen Gray; Irish Silver dating from the 17th to 20th centuries; Asian Art; Irish Country Furniture; and Soldiers and Chiefs, which displays historic military artifacts and uniforms.

Another branch of the National Museum of Ireland worth exploring, the Natural History Museum was established in 1856 and remains little changed since, a fact that has led to its being known as a "museum of a museum" (or, less flatteringly, the "Dead Zoo"). Highlights include exploring the museum's large collections of specimens from countless species, fossils, and dioramas – all for free.

Address: Collins Barracks, Benburb Street, Dublin 7

Official site: www.museum.ie/en-IE/Museums/Decorative-Arts-History

Phoenix Park and Dublin Zoo

An 18-minute walk from Collins Barracks is Dublin Zoo in Phoenix Park. This is the largest enclosed urban park in Europe, some 1,750 acres, which is surprising given that Dublin is a relatively small capital city. Hundreds of deer roam the parkland, and the President of Ireland's official residence (Áras an Uachtaráin) is here along with Deerfield, a beautiful 18th-century property home to the American Ambassador to Ireland.

There's a visitor center located close to a 17th-century tower house, Ashtown Castle, for those wishing to find out more about the park and its environs. At the far Castleknock Gate end and on some 78 acres stands stately Farmleigh House , dating from the 1800s and purchased by the Irish state from the Guinness family in 1999.

For generations of Dubliners and those coming from abroad, the main draw is Dublin Zoo, which attracts more than one million visitors annually, dates back to 1830, and is the second oldest zoo in Europe. A trip to the zoo is a day out in itself.

Among other rare and exotic animals, there are Asian lions, Asian elephants, a Reptile House, an orangutan enclosure, sea lions, tigers, hippos, bats, and penguins. Facilities include restaurants, kids' play areas, and a family farm.

Official site: www.dublinzoo.ie

Kilmainham Gaol

The forbidding Kilmainham Gaol (jail), dating from 1789, truly is a notorious site in the history of Irish nationalism. It was here that the leaders of the 1916 rebels were first incarcerated and then executed for what was seen as an act of high treason.

The exhibition in a modern hall gives a taste of what conditions were like and outlines the struggle for Irish independence. There are excellent guided tours throughout the rest of the jail, which cover Irish history from 1796-1924. The Stonebreaker's Yard is sure to send shivers up the spine, as this is the spot where the leaders of the uprising met their grisly fate.

Address: Inchicore Road, Dublin 8

Official site: https://kilmainhamgaolmuseum.ie

Christ Church Cathedral

Restored in the 19th century and dominating the surrounding area, Christ Church Cathedral is built on the site of Dublin's first church, which was founded in 1028 and made of timber.

The Great Nave has magnificent early Gothic arches, and here you can see the 14th-century replica of the tomb of legendary Norman conqueror Strongbow, who is buried elsewhere in the cathedral. The fragment that lies alongside is said to be part of the original tomb and has the nickname, "Strongbow's son." Parts of the vast crypt, which runs the length of the building, date from the 13th century.

Also worth a visit is Dublinia , a first-rate historical recreation of life and scenes from the time of the Vikings to the medieval period that's located in the cathedral's Synod Hall. Highlights include costumed characters demonstrating period traditions and activities, various buildings, and authentic street scenes.

Address: Christchurch Place, Dublin 8

Official site: https://christchurchcathedral.ie

Christ Church Cathedral - Floor plan map

An easy seven-minute walk from Christ Church Cathedral, St. Patrick's Cathedral is the national cathedral of the Church of Ireland. Tradition has it that here, St. Patrick baptized converts to Christianity in AD 450.

Like Christchurch, the original edifice was timber. In 1192, another church was founded and constructed of stone. Just over a century later, another reconstruction took place and its status was raised to that of cathedral.

Over the centuries, much embellishment has occurred, chiefly in the mid 1700s, when the steeple was built, and during the late 1800s, when there were substantial renovations. Gulliver's Travels author and satirist Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), who was Dean of St. Patrick's for 35 years, is interred in a tomb to the right of the entrance beside his long time love "Stella" (Hester Johnson 1681-1728).

Address: St. Patrick's Close, Dublin 8

Official site: www.stpatrickscathedral.ie

Dublin - St Patrick's Cathedral - Floor plan map

Dublin Castle was the site of central administration during 700 years of British rule until 1922. The castle has seen many guises: medieval fortress, vice-regal court, and function of government. In 1534, Irish rebel Silken Thomas (so named for his fine clothes) launched an attack and besieged the castle.

Currently, the castle is mainly used for ceremonial occasions, exhibitions, and even concerts. The ornate state apartments are open to visitors, and there are a number of museums to explore including the Chester Beatty Library and Gallery.

The museum, founded in 1953 by an American living in Dublin, Chester Beatty, features a fine collection of oriental art and several collections of manuscripts, books, and ancient texts. Among the treasures are French Books of Hours of the 14th and 15th century and a prayer book that belonged to Philip II of Spain, works of Far Eastern art, Islamic prints, Sanskrit manuscripts (12th to 13th century), Indian miniatures, and Babylonian clay tablets (2,500 to 2,300 BC).

There are also European medieval and Renaissance manuscripts, Egyptian papyrus texts, and copies of the Qur'an, and the Bible. Buddhist paintings and Turkish and Persian miniatures are also on display, as are woodblock prints from Japan and Chinese dragon robes.

Address: Dame Street, Dublin 2

Official site: www.dublincastle.ie

Dublin Castle - Floor plan map

Since it opened in 1991, the Irish Museum of Modern Art (IMMA) has built a reputation as one of the country's top galleries. With a focus on modern and contemporary art, the museum offers frequently changing exhibits and displays of works from its own collections, as well as from across Ireland and the globe.

The building itself is beautiful. Erected in the late 1600s as a hospital, it serves as the perfect backdrop to the modern art that adorns its walls, as well as for the artists' studios located here. Highlights of the museum's permanent collections include some 3,500 works (some Irish, some by overseas artists) from the post-war period. Guided tours are offered, along with fun programs for the kids (there's also a café).

Address: Royal Hospital Kilmainham, Military Rd, Kilmainham, Dublin 8

Official site: https://imma.ie

The Irish Rock 'n' Roll Museum Experience

Music fans won't want to miss the opportunity to visit the Irish Rock 'n' Roll Museum Experience , which focuses on the top musical acts to have come out of Ireland. Highlights of this immersive, one-hour tour experience include the chance to "catch" acts like U2 and Thin Lizzy in various stages of their careers, either in the studio or performing on stage.

Along the way, you'll see a wide variety of artifacts and memorabilia from these and other leading Irish acts, and be exposed to their music and anecdotes about the music-writing and touring process.

Another quirky sightseeing opportunity can be enjoyed at the National Leprechaun Museum (honest!). Opened in 2010 in its location on Jervis Street, this fun museum features fascinating exhibits and displays relating to these mythical beings, Along the way, your tour guide will explain the importance of this folklore in Irish culture, as well as its impact on everything from Disney to Hollywood.

Address: Curved Street, Temple Bar, Dublin, D02

Official site: https://irishrocknrollmuseum.com

View from Killiney Hill

A must-see and, surprisingly, just a 25-minute southbound trip on a DART (Dublin's light rail network) from the city center is Dalkey, and one stop farther along, Killiney, although both areas can easily be explored from Dalkey town.

It's recommended to disembark at the earlier stop, as there's an excellent visitor center at Dalkey Castle, which includes information about the area, historic and cultural exhibitions, and best of all, live theater performances as part of a fun guided tour that scales the heights of the castle ramparts.

Dalkey was once the main trading post on Dublin's east coast, and the harbor at Coliemore Road was the place where medieval cargo ships could off-load their wares. Opposite the harbor is breathtaking Dalkey island, and an uphill stroll of around 15 minutes brings you to Vico Road with stunning views out over Killiney Bay.

For more panoramic vistas, continue up to the top of Killiney Hill, a public park that is home to many species of wildlife and birds.

Address: Castle Street, Dalkey, Co. Dublin

Official site: www.dalkeycastle.com

Cliffs of Moher

Relax in a luxury coach and see one of Ireland's most breathtaking natural attractions on a guided full-day Cliffs of Moher Day Trip . This excellent value excursion takes you through the stunning countryside of County Clare and also includes an opportunity to explore the charming town of Doolin, with its great traditional music and country inns. It also includes entrance to the Cliffs of Moher and Burren National Park.

In addition to the services of a professional tour guide to share details of the region's unique geology, you'll have ample opportunity to enjoy a leisurely stroll to take some great snapshots of some of the best views in Ireland. A stop at the city of Galway is also included.

Spire of Dublin on O'Connell Street

One of the most famous bridges in Dublin is the O'Connell Bridge that leads directly onto the broad, beautiful O'Connell Street. Here is where you'll find historic sites like the General Post Office, and more modern monuments like the Spire of Dublin. It's one of the most popular and well-trafficked streets in the city.

The original name of O'Connell Street was Drogheda Street, later renamed Sackville Street. In 1924, it was renamed O'Connell Street for Daniel O'Connell, who was one of the primary nationalist leaders in Ireland in the struggle to gain independence from England.

Croke Park

North of the city center is the largest sports venue in Ireland – Croke Park. Croke Park is the home of Ireland's Gaelic Athletic Association and has capacity for 82,300 spectators. Here is where you'll find everything from rugby and soccer to American football, Gaelic football, and hurling.

In addition to sports, Croke Park is one of the largest venues for music performances and has hosted some of the biggest names in entertainment, from U2 to Billy Joel, Elton John, Ed Sheeran, and many others.

Address: Jones' Rd, Drumcondra, Dublin 3, Ireland

If you're visiting Dublin for the first time, the best area to stay is in the city center. Most of the top tourist attractions lie within a short stroll of each other in this compact and easily walkable area, including Trinity College, St. Stephen's Green, and Grafton Street. Here are some highly rated hotels in this convenient and central location:

Luxury Hotels:

  • A short stroll from Grafton Street, The Merrion Hotel , with a day spa, swimming pool, and two-star Michelin restaurant, resides in four lovingly-restored Georgian townhouses.
  • The Radisson Blu Royal Hotel , just meters from St. Patrick's Cathedral and Dublin Castle, strikes a modern note with its sleek interior design and spacious guest rooms.
  • In the heart of the city and across the street from St. Stephens Park is the Fitzwilliam Hotel Dublin . Irish hospitality comes alive with the wonderful staff. Understated luxury is found everywhere in the property's decor.

Mid-Range Hotels:

  • In Dublin's heart, within walking distance of all the major tourist attractions, The Morrison, a DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel overlooks the River Liffey and has a bright, contemporary interior.
  • Across the river, in a trendy location near Grafton Street, the boutique Drury Court Hotel offers cozy rooms, and the apartments in an adjacent building are great for families.
  • Sleekly furnished and streaming with light, The Gibson Hotel is a little farther out from the city center, but public transport is nearby, and it's a great choice if you're planning to catch a concert at the adjacent 3Arena.

Budget Hotels:

  • A short stroll from Grafton Street and St. Stephen's Green, Dublin Citi Hotel offers great-value rooms with comfortable beds near a cluster of lively entertainment venues.
  • About a 15-minute walk to the city center, the family-run Dergvale Hotel has small but sparkling clean rooms, and the Celtic Lodge Guesthouse offers compact, clean rooms a short hop from all the city sights.
  • Bus Tour: One option is the one- or two-day Dublin: Hop-On-Hop-Off Tour , which gives independent travelers more freedom in their selections.
  • Amphibious Tour: Kids of all ages will love the 75-minute Dublin Viking Duck Tour. Travel the city on both land and water in a remodeled amphibious World War II vehicle.
  • Blarney Castle and Cork Day Trip : You can visit some of Ireland's other top attractions on the Blarney Castle and Cork Day Trip , which takes you in a luxury coach through the lush countryside and includes an experienced driver and guide, as well as entrance to the Blarney Stone and Rock of Cashel.
  • Northern Island Day Trip: On the Northern Ireland Day Trip from Dublin: Belfast Black Taxi Tour and Giant's Causeway , you can learn all about Belfast's tumultuous history and see a World Heritage-listed geological wonder. Professional guides, pickup and drop off from your hotel, and entrance fees to the key attractions are all included.
  • Three-Day Tour: For a more in-depth tour of Dublin's surrounding attractions consider the 3-Day Cork, Blarney Castle, Ring of Kerry, and Cliffs of Moher Rail Trip . This great-value package includes a host, entrance fees to the attractions, coach and rail travel with reserved seats, and two nights accommodation with a full Irish breakfast.

Malahide Castle

Of course there's plenty more to see and things to do in and around Dublin. The Discover Ireland Centre on Suffolk Street (just off Grafton Street) dispenses handy information on the city's tourist attractions. Although it may sound like a cliché, Ireland's capital really is its people. Unexpected conversations and snippets of Irish "banter" are most likely some of the strongest memories you will take away with you.

Dubliners are a sociable, knowledgeable, and, quite often, an opinionated bunch, so don't be afraid to have a chat and ask their advice about where to go and what to see. In particular, taxi drivers love to talk and will often regale anybody who'll listen with views on everything from politics to history and current affairs.

If staying in the capital for a few days, the DART (Dublin's light rail network) is a leisurely way to explore the coastline. The village of Howth, at the far extremity of Dublin's north side is well worth a visit. Here, visitors will find a range of restaurants, many serving fresh seafood, as Howth remains a fishing village, albeit an upmarket one these days. The views from Howth Head are spectacular.

Also on the north side, and on the DART line is Malahide , a quaint village with a beautiful castle open to the public. Day trips from the city should include magical Glendalough , home to a ruined medieval monastery, breathtaking lakes, and forest walks. Spectacular Powerscourt House and gardens , adjacent to the pretty village of Enniskerry is a must-see for those with a little extra time on their hands. There's a terrific restaurant, craft shops, and superb grounds to explore at your leisure.

More Related Articles on PlanetWare.com

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More of Ireland: Visitors will find Ireland is a wonderful country for road trips. After exploring Dublin, visit Waterford, roughly halfway between the capital and Cork . Explore the sights surrounding the city with our article on the top day trips from Dublin , including the magnificent Cliffs of Moher, and if you want to cast a fishing line, check out our list of the best fishing destinations in Ireland .

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13 useful things to know before you visit Dublin

Apr 15, 2024 • 10 min read

tourist office (visit dublin)

These local tips on packing, transport and etiquette can help you plan the perfect visit to Dublin © maydays / Getty Images

As a born and bred Dubliner, I’ve spent most of my life trying to make sense of my hometown.

In one way it’s a cinch to figure out: you’ll get your bearings pretty quickly and realize that you can explore most of it on foot. But it’s not just its size that makes it such a great walking city. It’s the nature of life here that makes it the ideal flaneur destination, where you amble and devote yourself to the art of observing life around you.

Spend a few days in Dublin and you’ll soon appreciate that there is much going on in this busy little town, and that to really understand the place you’ll have to move here and spend the rest of your days figuring out its wonderful idiosyncrasies and multilayered sense of humour.

In the meantime, though, here are a few local tips that will smooth your introduction to a city that has the power to grab your imagination and not let it go.

1. Plan on having at least three days in Dublin

Dublin might be a small capital city, but it’ll demand as much time from you as you’re willing to give. You’ll need at least three days to even make a dent in the place: one day to explore even just a couple of the main sights, such as  Trinity College and the  Guinness Storehouse . You’ll need another day to visit some of the city’s other brilliant attractions, like the  Little Museum of Dublin , the  Chester Beatty and just one branch of the  National Museum of Ireland . And a third day to sample some  whiskey and visit either of the city’s iconic  cathedrals .

A couple of days more will give you a chance to stretch your legs and explore more of the city – such as the historic  General Post Office and  14 Henrietta St on the northside. But you’ll have to build in some leisure time – after all there are 800 pubs in the city , a fine selection of music venues and a handful of great theatres. And what about going further afield, on a day trip to  Howth , for instance, or beyond?

Planning on some beers while you're in Dublin? Here's our guide to the locals' favorite traditional pubs  

A group of tourists on a guided tour of a Victorian prison building

2. Dublin is a casual kind of place so pack accordingly

You can wear pretty much whatever you want in Dublin, and smart casual is the most you’ll need for fancy dinners, the theater or the concert hall. Even most work places like to keep it casual as there’s a general perception in the city that dressing up is only for that special occasion, which work rarely is.

Irish summers are warm but rarely hot, so you'll want an extra layer for when the temperatures cool, especially in the evening when the disappearing sun can make that day’s warmth feel like a distant memory.

Ultimately, the ever-changeable weather will determine your outfits, but a light waterproof jacket (preferably with a hood, unless you’re carrying an umbrella) and waterproof shoes should never be beyond reach, for the almost inevitable rain.

Plan your packing with our seasonal guide to Dublin through the year

3. Take advantage of discount cards

There is a range of discount cards that will save you money on attractions and transport. The  GoCity All-Inclusive Pass (1–5 days, €79–164) gives you free entry to a bunch of top attractions, including the Guinness Storehouse, EPIC The Heritage Museum, the Jameson Distillery Bow Street, and the Big Bus Hop On, Hop Off tour. For 25% off six of those attractions, there’s the  DoDublin Days Out Card (€55).

As well as the Leap Card (see below), there are good discounts to be had with the  DoDublin Freedom Ticket (€48), a 72-hour travel pass that covers all public transport as well as a hop on, hop off tour.

4. Get a Leap card for use on public transport

If you’re planning on using public transport in Dublin, be sure to get a  Leap Card first, as it’s cheaper and more convenient than paying for fares directly. This green plastic card is available from most newsagents and can be used on all forms of transport in the city, including buses, DART, the Luas light rail system and commuter trains throughout the county. The Leap Visitor Card (1/3/7 days, €8/€16/€32) provides unlimited travel on public transport. It can be purchased in the city and at Dublin Airport, or ordered online and delivered to your home in advance of your trip.

To use the card, just tap your card on the machine as you get on: for Luas, rail and DART services you will also need to tap off when you get off (but not for buses).

You top up the card with any amount you want (there’s a minimum of €5) at newsagents, any Luas, DART and commuter rail machines, or by downloading the  Leap Top-Up App onto any NFC-enabled iPhone or Android phone: hold the card to the back of the phone and you can top up, collect pre-paid tickets and check your balance.  

If you’re using a regular Leap card, rather than the Visitor Card, the TFI 90 Minute Fare applies to journeys made by Dublin Bus, Luas and most Dart trains. Any journey less than 90 minutes (including transfer times) costs €2.

Here's more useful transportation information for Dublin

5. Uber is not the best taxi option in Dublin

There are plenty of taxis in Dublin, but they can be tough to find late at night, especially at weekends when thousands of Dubliners are looking to head home to the suburbs after a night out in the city. Uber does exist in Dublin, but it’s oddly expensive; by far the most popular taxi hailing app is Freenow , which most of the city’s taxis are connected to. There are taxi ranks in the city center, but hailing them through the app is the preferred (and most convenient) option for most.

Diners eat at tables outside a restaurant as a member of waiting staff walks by them smiling

6. Get to grips with Dublin’s dining habits

Dubliners rarely eat breakfast out, so you might struggle to find a decent spot for breakfast that opens before 9am or 9:30am. The good news is that a decent cup of coffee is a non-negotiable, so there are plenty of places open by 8am to cater for caffeinated employees.

Discounted lunch specials are common, especially in the busy city center. Book tables at popular restaurants at least a few days in advance if you want to avoid disappointment or dodge the 5:30pm seating nobody else wants. For the really fancy spots including those with Michelin stars, you’ll have to plan well in advance. Some (like  Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud ) will accommodate reservations no more than a month in advance, but a place like  Chapter One opens its reservations list three months in advance, and then only for blocks of two months. Most tables are nabbed up pretty quickly, but if you miss out you can join the online waitlist.

7. Many of the city’s museums are free to visit

Most of the city’s larger cultural institutions are free to visit, including the three  branches of the National Museum of Ireland, the  National Gallery , the Chester Beatty and the  Dublin City Gallery-the Hugh Lane – although there is a charge for some of the exhibitions. There are free tickets for the tours of  Áras an Uachtharáin , the official residence of the Irish president in Phoenix Park and there is no charge to visit the  Irish Museum of Modern Art in Kilmainham.

Smaller, privately owned museums charge a fee, but it’s rarely more than €10, and you won’t need to book your ticket in advance.

Traveling to Dublin on a budget? Here are some other free experiences to consider  

8. Bottled water is a needless extravagance

In most restaurants in Dublin you’ll be offered the choice of water – still or sparkling. Unless you have a particular fondness for a specific brand of bottled water, you should always opt for tap as the city’s supply is perfectly safe, free and generally excellent. Some restaurants operate their own in-house filtration system, so for a minimal cost (usually €1–2) you have your choice of still or sparkling tap water. Same goes for filling your water bottle: tap water is fine and you don’t need to buy pricey and environmentally unfriendly plastic bottles to replenish your supply.

9. In the pub, it’s all about the rounds system

Dubliners, like the rest of the Irish, put great store in conviviality and a generous spirit. And both of these qualities are embodied in the rounds system, whereby if someone buys you a drink, you are obliged to buy them one in return. Getting sucked into the rounds system is a great way of getting to know Dubliners: strike up a conversation and, at the appropriate moment (ie when they’re just about to finish their drink), ask what they’re "having" – and before you know it you’re multiple drinks and conversations deep into a blossoming friendship.

Needless to say, you don’t have to take part in buying rounds, but if you want to understand the social glue that binds people together in Dublin, there aren't many better ways than having a few drinks with them.

People enjoying nightlife on a cobbled street outside some pubs in a city

10. Dublin's nightlife is expensive

Dubliners love a good night out, but the city is a pretty expensive place to party in. The capital is notorious for the price of the pint of beer, which is higher than anywhere else in Ireland. As a result, many Dubliners will do pre-drinks at home before heading out, usually between 9 and 10pm.

Happy hour promotions are illegal in Ireland; expect to pay anything from €7–10 for a pint in the city center, but keep an eye out on pubs that sneakily raise the price of a pint later in the night, presumably when punters are too drunk to notice. It’s illegal to charge a price other than what is indicated; if it happens, your best reaction is to complain and leave.

Licensing laws are stricter in Dublin than almost any other European capital. Pubs can serve alcohol until 11:30pm Monday to Thursday, to 12:30am Friday and Saturday, and to 11pm on Sunday. Many premises apply for special exemption orders, which allows them to serve until 2:30am – usually from Thursday to Saturday nights. Nightclubs usually go until 3am, but in a lot of venues there’s barely a distinction between a huge pub that turns up the music really loudly and a dedicated club for dancing.

11. Learn to take a "slagging" among friends

Dubliners are, for the most part, an informal and easy-going lot who don't stand on excessive ceremony and generally prefer not to make too much fuss. That doesn't mean that they don't abide by certain rules, or that there isn't a preferred way of doing things in the city, though. But the transgressions of the unknowing are both forgiven and often enjoyed – the accidental faux pas is a great source of entertainment in a city that has made "slagging", or teasing, a veritable art form.

Indeed, slagging is a far more reliable indicator of the strength of friendship than virtually any kind of compliment: a fast, self-deprecating wit and an ability to take a joke in good spirits will win you plenty of friends. Mind you, even slagging has its hidden codes, and is only acceptable among friends: it wouldn't do at all to follow an introduction to someone by making fun of them!

12. LGBTIQ+ travelers are welcome in Dublin

Dublin has a pretty vibrant LGBTIQ+ scene, with some well-established bars and club nights as well as activities including hiking and sea swimming. The best-known gay bar in town is  the George on South Great George’s St, followed by  Pantibar , which is owned by renowned activist and drag queen Rory O’Neill, aka Panti Bliss. June’s  Pride Festival is the second-biggest celebration in the city after St Patrick’s Day, a raucous festival of color and fun that runs over five days. August sees  GAZE International LGBTQIA Film Festival , Ireland’s only dedicated film festival, while the  International Gay Theatre Festival usually takes place in May.

13. Dublin is generally a safe city with good health care

Health and safety should not be an issue during a visit to Dublin. Pharmacies selling basic medication are easy to come by, and crime is not a major concern. Taking normal precautions (eg keeping an eye on belongings in crowds) should be sufficient. O'Connell St and the streets immediately around it can get a little shady after dark, so keep your wits about you.

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20 Best Things to Do in Dublin

tourist office (visit dublin)

  David Soanes Photography

The Irish capital city may be small but it has plenty of sights, experiences, and activities to suit any taste and work with any budget. How much you can see and do often comes down to how much time you have to spend exploring. Luckily, many of Dublin’s must-see attractions are within easy reach of the city center—and even within walking distance—which leaves plenty of extra time for other essential Dublin activities including stops for pints and tea.

From castles to live music sessions, quirky museums , and iconic streets, here are the best things to do in Dublin.

Walk the Halls of Dublin Castle

TripSavvy / Jamie Ditaranto

It might not live up to your fairytale expectations, but how many cities have their very own castle?  Dublin Castle  dates all the way back to Viking times, though that old fortress has since been expanded, renovated, torn down and rebuilt over the centuries. Most of the fortifications have disappeared and the castle is now mainly used for government offices. The main tower and the Royal Chapel still have a medieval look about them while all administrative buildings done up in more modern styles—adding to the mix of architectural influences which makes this one of the best castles in Ireland . Though many of the offices are closed to visitors, the beautiful gardens and impressive state rooms are a must-see on any visit to Dublin.

Visit the Guinness Storehouse for a Pint From the Source

Guinness goes with Dublin like milk and cookies. The famous Irish beer was born in the city and nowhere is the stout more the center of attention than at the Guinness Storehouse . Based at historic St James's Gate, the now touristy (but fun) Guinness factory is housed in part of the original brewery. A tour of the old storehouse will lead you through the history of the drink, how the beer is brewed and even teach you how to pour the perfect pint. However, the real highlight of the tour is the free pint in the stunning Gravity Bar, which offers some of the best views of the city.

Admire the Book of Kells

Dublin, and Trinity College, in particular, is home to one of the most important illuminated manuscripts in the world. Every page of the Book of Kells feels like a work of art—with its scrolled Latin script that records the Gospels and its elaborate decoration. The book dates back to 384 A.D. and was probably created by three different artists and four different scribes, all working together on a religious-themed masterpiece. No trip to the Irish capital is really complete without a pilgrimage to see the book, which is split into four volumes and housed in the university’s library. Because the 1,600-year-old pages are so delicate, there are usually only two volumes on display at any given time: one open to a page which shows the beautiful illustrations, and another open to demonstrate the way the script was written. 

Stroll Down O'Connell Street and See the GPO

O'Connell Street is Dublin's main traffic artery with a central pedestrian area that is dominated by statues and monuments like the famous Spire. The largest and most impressive of the buildings which line the Dublin street is the General Post Office (GPO) , scene of the 1916 rebellion. The GPO was faithfully rebuilt after being shelled by artillery and, in addition to being the head office for Ireland's postal service, now offers an entire museum dedicated to the 1916 Rising: the "GPO Witness History" in the basement. 

Pay Homage to Saint Patrick's Cathedral

No visit to Dublin is complete without a stop in Ireland's largest church  (and the National Cathedral). St. Patrick’s Cathedral was officially founded in 1191 by Archbishop Comyn, but most of the architecture that is visible today is a result of a huge renovation funded by a member of the Guinness family (yes, that Guinness) between 1844 and 1869. The result is an impressive neo-Gothic cathedral with some older details hidden away. Here you will also see the graves of Jonathan Swift (who wrote "Gulliver's Travels") and his beloved Stella.

Have a Night Out in Temple Bar

Over the years, Temple Bar has been an abandoned marshland, a well-to-do neighborhood, a scrubby artistic enclave, and finally Dublin’s premier nightlife destination. During the day, you may find street artists peddling homemade wares or typical Irish souvenirs in the small shops which line Dame Street and the surrounding lanes. However, the Temple Bar district is really known for its lively bar scene. The area is full of pubs, many of which have live music every day of the week. Temple Bar has rightly been accused of being a bit touristy and expensive but it is a fun spot for a few pints. Enjoy the jolly mood and leave before 10 p.m., when things have a tendency to go from cheerful to rowdy.

Get an Education at Trinity College

Founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth I, Trinity College is still an unmissable part of the Dublin landscape well over 400 years later. The campus feels quiet and studious and the sounds of the and bustling city seem to disappear as soon as you walk through the gates onto College Green. Take a tour to really understand the history of the buildings and to learn more about everything that has been accomplished on the grounds. Then, peek inside Trinity College Library, which is home to more than a million books and some priceless manuscripts—including the  "Book of Kells,"  which is a Dublin attraction in its own right. 

Marvel at Christ Church

Christ Church Cathedral was built in 1030 and, with nearly 1,000 years of history, is the oldest building in Dublin. It is one of the best examples of medieval Dublin architecture and is the final resting place of Strongbow. The Cathedral became a part of the Church of Ireland in 1153 and is still the seat of the Church’s archbishop of Dublin. After admiring the 12th-century crypt, be sure to stick around to hear some of the cathedral’s 19 church bells ring away. 

Pop Into a Pub for Live Music and a Pint

Bernd Biege

Is there anything more Irish than listening to a live session while sipping on a pint? Dublin is brimming with great pubs to suit any taste, and all stand at the ready to pull that pint of Guinness. Stop into O’Donoghue’s for vegetable soup with a side of live music, or make your way out to The Cobblestone , which describes itself as a “drinking pub with a music problem” and hosts traditional Trad sessions every night of the week.  

Catch Your Breath in Phoenix Park

Located on the edge of the city,  Phoenix Park  is the world's largest enclosed municipal park with enough to keep the average visitor busy for days. Naturally, there are paths for strolling along the green hills, or working in a vacation run, but you will also find the magnificent residences of both the Irish President and the United States Ambassador to Ireland. After peeking through the imposing iron gates, keep exploring to find quaint cricket and polo fields, Ashtown Castle and even herds of deer roaming free. Phoenix Park is also home to Dublin Zoo, as well as numerous monuments and memorials. 

Walk Across the Ha'Penny Bridge

Dublin is a city built along the Liffey and the river is a defining part of the Irish capital. Take in the scenery by waltzing across the iconic Ha’Penny Bridge . The cast-iron bridge is fully pedestrianized and can be found near the Temple Bar area. It takes its name for the halfpenny toll that used to be charged to walk across its planks and pretty scrolled railings. These days it is completely free and you may even find entertainment in the form of live musicians playing an Irish tune along the walkway. (And keep in mind that locals pronounce it as “hey-penny.”)

Shop on Grafton Street

Stockbyte / Getty Images 

Running between Stephen’s Green and the entrance to Trinity College, Grafton Street might be considered the true heart of Dublin. It is also rumored to be the only street in the city without a pub. Fear not—there are plenty of cozy pints to be had nearby, but Grafton Street is where to come to see lively street performers and buskers (musicians who play for tips), as well as to do a bit of shopping and take in the cheery atmosphere. 

Get a Taste for History at the National Museum of Ireland

The city of Dublin has some of the best museums in Ireland, but one truly notable stop has to be the  National Museum of Archaeology and History on Kildare Street (Dublin 2) . The museum specializes in prehistoric and medieval Ireland (with some Egyptian artifacts thrown in for good measure). This is the best place to build an understanding of long-ago Irish history, catch a glimpse of bog bodies, as well as explore the entire wing dedicated to the Viking Age in Dublin, where models show what daily life would have been like. If you have more time, keep the exhibits coming with a trip to the National Museum dedicated to decorative arts and more recent history.

Eat Fish and Chips

Tracey Kusiewicz/ Getty Images

For a truly greasy and totally satisfying meal, nothing can beat a trip to the “chipper” for fish and chips. Every local has their favorite spot for this iconic Irish supper, so arguing about the best fish and chips in Dublin is almost pointless. Decide for yourself by trying different versions from the likes of Beshoff Bros , Leo Burdock (who started frying fish way back in 1913), or The Lido (135a Pearse Street), which is popular with students thanks to its location a short walk from Trinity College. There is something universally appealing about fish and chips, but the mushy peas are optional. 

Picnic in St. Stephen's Green

With the LUAS zipping along the tracks, double-decker buses whizzing by, and even a few horse-drawn carriages thrown in for good measure, there is a certain buzz about Dublin. This is especially true right off of Grafton Street, one of the main shopping areas in the city. Luckily, there is a green escape a few minutes inside ​ St. Stephen’s Green . The small park is a tiny oasis in the center of the city, complete with swans and a duck pond. On mild days, take a sandwich with you for a picnic – but don’t be afraid to visit in rainy weather either. Regardless of the time of year, you can always walk through to see the famous statues and memorials to figures from Irish history.

Get an Art Fix at the Hugh Lane Gallery

Hugh Lane Gallery 

Dublin has several world-class museums and quirky little exhibits, but one of the loveliest little museums to see is Dublin City’s own gallery, named the Hugh Lane Gallery.  The free gallery is a quick walk from O’Connell street and even though it is central, it is almost always quiet. That means you will be able to admire works by Degas, Manet, and Renoir, without the hustle and bustle of the city crowds outside the door. The true highlight of the little museum, however, is the art studio of Irish painter Francis Bacon, which has been completely reconstructed inside the museum. 

Go Georgian at Merrion Square

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Now known for its government offices, Merrion Square is one of Dublin’s Merrion Square is also one of the best places to see Georgian architecture in Dublin. The brick townhomes that ring the square were built in the 1760s and have a classic style about them which hints at their aristocratic history. Oscar Wilde was born at No. 1 Merrion Square, and the poet W.B. Yeats lived at No. 82. Their houses aren’t open for visits, but any visitor can still walk by and take a photo of the famous doors. The colored entryways are so closely associated with the city that their images make for a perfect Dublin souvenir . 

Get Spooked By the Mummies at St. Michan's

 Jennifer Boyle/ Flickr ( CC BY 2.0)

Dublin’s two main cathedrals (St. Patrick’s and Christ Church) are unmissable religious landmarks, but one of the more unique churches in Dublin is tiny, simple St. Michan’s on Halston Street on the north side of the city. The wood-lined chapel has a few interesting artifacts but most people admittedly visit for the mummies. A small, short tour will lead you under the church where the mummified 17th remains of influential Dubliner’s can be seen in five small burial vaults, along with the desk mask of famed rebel leader Wolfe Tone.

Stop for Tea

The Shelbourne Hotel 

Some people say that you haven’t seen Dublin until you have had tea at The Shelbourne . The capital’s most famous hotel puts on a lovely afternoon service complete with dainty cakes and is simply the place to see whos-who of the city. For an artistic touch, walk a few blocks further to The Merrion , where you will find tea cakes inspired by the hotel’s extensive collection of paintings. Of course, you can always find a humbler “cuppa” to warm up at most of the city’s cozy pubs and cafés. 

Raise a Glass at the Old Jameson Distillery

Dublin is probably most famous for being the home of Guinness, but Jameson Whiskey was also born in the city—right on Bow Street. Production has now moved out to the countryside, but it is still possible to visit the old distillery to learn more about the history of the beloved Irish spirit. Naturally, a tour includes a comparison tasting of whiskey, bourbon, and scotch, as well as a whiskey-based cocktail to really unwind at JJ’s Bar.

Catch an Irish Game at Croke Park

Ireland's native sports are not well known outside of the country but local fans go crazy for GAA. There is no better way to learn about the fast-paced sports of hurling and Gaelic football than by attending a game in person. The atmosphere at Dublin's Croke Park is electric when the teams (representing their home counties) take to the pitch. Even if the schedules don't line up, you can still visit the famous stadium and take a tour, with a stop at the GAA Museum . 

Dublin Guide: Planning Your Trip

15 Best Pubs in Dublin

Dublin: A Walking Tour of the Main Sights

Dublin in 1 Day Itinerary

The 10 Best Museums to Visit in Dublin

Dublin's Temple Bar District

Trinity College in Dublin: The Complete Guide

St. Patrick's Cathedral

St. Stephen's Green, Dublin: The Complete Guide

Romantic Dublin, Ireland's Sights and Attractions

How to Spend 5 Days in Ireland

The 10 Neighborhoods You Need to Know in Dublin

How to Visit Dublin on a Budget

Dublin's Best Lookouts

The National Library of Ireland: The Complete Guide

20 Best Things to Do for Free in Dublin, Ireland

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3 Days in Dublin Ireland: The Perfect Dublin Itinerary

Last updated: December 18, 2023 - Written by Jessica Norah 39 Comments

Dublin is Ireland’s capital and largest city, offering an endless number of museums, attractions, and entertainment options. We’ve put together a recommended Dublin itinerary to help you get the most out of your 3 days in Dublin. It includes all the main highlights of the city such as Trinity College, the Guinness Storehouse, the Temple Bar neighborhood, and Christ Church Cathedral as well as a few lesser known sites.

We suggest using this Dublin itinerary as a starting point for planning your 3 days in Dublin, and you can edit it to create your own personalized itinerary that reflects your own needs and interests. In addition to the 3 day itinerary, we also provide tips on how to get around Dublin, a map of each day’s suggested attractions, tips on where to stay in Dublin, and how to save money during your 3 days in Dublin.

3 days in Dublin itinerary Ireland

Table of Contents:

Planning for 3 Days in Dublin

Before we share our suggested day-to-day itinerary, here is some essential planning information on getting to Dublin, getting around Dublin, tips for saving money, how to find accommodation, and further resources for planning and making the most of your 3 days in Dublin.

Getting to Dublin

Dublin is easy to reach by plane and can also be reached via a combination of ferry, train, bus, or car. Dublin has one major airport, Dublin Airport with flights coming in and out from around the world.

From the airport, you can get into the city via taxi, Uber, bus, Dublin Express shuttle transfer , rental car, or by booking a private transfer .

Given that Ireland is an island with no bridge or tunnel connections, you can’t obviously reach Dublin directly by train or car if you are starting your trip outside of Ireland or Northern Ireland. If you are arriving from the UK or continental Europe, you can drive or take a bus or train to a ferry port in the UK or France, and then take a ferry to reach Ireland.

Dublin Port is the most convenient port for those wishing to visit Dublin. Stena Line and Irish Ferries both have a number of ferry routes to Dublin. The ferries take both foot passengers and cars. You can also check out the rail and sail options if your trip to Dublin will involve both train and ferry crossings.

If you traveling by train or coach to Dublin, you can check rates for tickets and schedules for both buses and trains on sites like thetrainline .

NOTE . If you plan to rent a car, please check your rental agreement as bringing a car to or from Ireland may be against your car’s rental terms (particularly if you want to take it on any ferry crossings). For instance, even cars rented in Ireland or Northern Ireland can sometimes not be brought by ferry over to Scotland or England and vice versa.

How to Get Around Dublin

Central Dublin is fairly compact and is best explored by a combination of walking and public transportation. Cabs, Uber, and bike hires are also options.

We would not recommend driving in Dublin unless you are planning to stay on the outskirts of the city or visit places outside the city as driving and finding parking in central busy locations can be difficult and parking can be expensive. If you are driving to Dublin, we’d recommend parking your car when you arrive in the city and then use public transport until you leave the city center.

Dublin has a good public transportation network which includes public buses , trams , and rail services  (for going outside the city center or outside the city). We used the bus several times on our most recent trip and found it easy to use.

There are also a few hop-on hop-off (HOHO) buses in Dublin, such as the City Sightseeing Bus and the Big Bus Open-Top Tours . If you have a Dublin Pass , you’ll get a free one day sightseeing bus ticket .

If you plan to use these buses, we recommend doing this when you first arrive in Dublin to get a good overview of the city before you start exploring. We find these tours are great ways to get a good introduction to a new city although not as practical if you are trying to get from one place to another quickly.

Dublin city sightseeing bus 3 days in Dublin itinerary Ireland

Best Time to Visit Dublin?

We love visiting Dublin at any time of year, and it really depends on your preferences. Dublin is a great year-round destination as most attractions are open year round in the city.

But we’d say spring, summer, or early autumn would be our recommended times of the year for a first time visit. Although winter is a great time to visit as well as it is less busy and you can enjoy the holidays, but it will also be darker and colder at that time of year. Halloween in October (believed to have originated in Ireland), Christmas in December, and St. Patrick’s Day in March are all accompanied by big celebrations and festivities in the city.

In terms of weather, you’ll have warmer days and more hours of sunlight in the summer. It may also rain less. However, whenever you visit, you will want to be prepared for rain so be sure to pack a rain jacket and/or umbrella. Ireland is known as the Emerald Isle, and all that greenery takes plenty of watering, so rain is a possibility at any time of year!

Where to Stay in Dublin for 3 Days

There are a range of lodging options in Dublin to suit all budgets and travel styles, from hostels to apartments to B&B’s to luxury hotels . If you are looking for a comfortable good-value hotel, we’ve stayed at a number of mid-range hotels in the city like the Ireland-based  Maldron hotels . We would recommend booking lodging in or near the city center to make the most of your time in Dublin.

Our current favorite way to find the best price on hotels when traveling in the UK is Booking.com. We find they tend to have the widest choice of listings, good discounts if you use them regularly, and an excellent selection of properties from hotels to apartments. See their Dublin city center listings here  to get started.

If you’d prefer an apartment or room, then you might also want to check out Plum Guide . They usually have some lovely properties available. Another option is Vrbo , who have many listings in Dublin.

If you are not finding what you want on those sites, check out our guide to the best AirBnB alternatives for lots of other accommodation booking options for your trip.

How to Save Money in Dublin

As a capital city in Europe, Dublin is not a budget destination but it is also not the most expensive city either. Generally, you’ll find that the main costs are going to be food, entertainment, accommodation, and sightseeing.

There are loads of ways to save money. Budget accommodation include hostels, budget motels, and rooms in private homes. You can save money on food by cooking for yourself or getting take away. There are also lots of free or inexpensive things you can do from admiring the city’s architecture and city parks to having a pint in a pub to enjoying a free city concert.

There are a number of great free museums in Dublin which include the National Museum of Ireland, National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin City Hall, and the Irish Museum of Modern Art. Also keep an eye out for discount cards, coupons, and special deals to save money on tickets, tours, and meals.

Our favorite way to save money on sight-seeing in Dublin is to invest in a Dublin Pass which allows for free entry into over 35 of Dublin’s popular attractions (see full attraction list ). It also comes with a free hop-on, hop-off bus ticket and additional discounts on food, shopping, and tours. It also includes fast track entry to many of the included attractions.

We’ve used the Dublin Pass twice when visiting the city, and for a three day visit, the savings can really add up. You can read our review of the Dublin Pass to figure out if it is worth investing in for your trip and more about our experiences using it.

St. Patrick's Cathedral 3 days in Dublin itinerary Ireland

Other Practicalities for Traveling to Dublin

Power:  Electricity in Dublin is of the 220v standard, and power outlets use the same three pin plug that you’ll find throughout the UK and British Isles. Travelers from most countries, including continental Europe and North America will need a travel plug adapter  like these or a universal adapter like this . Be sure to leave electronics that don’t support 220v at home or you’ll need to purchase a voltage converter .

Currency: Ireland (the Republic of Ireland) is in the Eurozone, so the currency is the Euro. You can get Euros from ATM’s, banks, and currency exchanges, although credit cards are of course widely accepted throughout the country. Note that if you plan to visit Northern Ireland, you’ll need to switch to GBP as the currency in the UK is pound sterling.

Internet:  Internet access is easy to find in the form of WiFi all around the city, as well as in the majority of hotels and coffee shops, so you shouldn’t have any trouble getting online. You can also pick up local SIM cards if you have an unlocked phone. For more options on getting online when travelling, check out our  guide to getting online when travelling  to help you figure out the best options.

Water:  The water in Dublin (and Ireland) is perfectly safe to drink unless otherwise posted. If you don’t like the taste, bottled water is widely available.

Safety:  We’ve never had any problems with safety when visiting Dublin, just take basic precautions with your valuables and personal safety, and you should be fine.

Further Resources for Planning your Dublin Trip

For information on events, happenings, and more ideas for what to do in Dublin, take a look at the official Visit Dublin website . If your travels are taking you elsewhere in Ireland, check out the official Ireland tourism website and our recommended two week itinerary for the UK and Ireland which includes Dublin.

There are several great day trips you can take from Dublin. For instance we’ve done a day trip to the Cliffs of Moher . Day tours also visit Belfast and the Northern Ireland Coast which has fantastic attractions like the Giant’s Causeway, Titanic Museum, and the Dark Hedges .

If you are looking for a guidebook, you might want to get a copy of the Rick Steves’  Dublin Snapshot Guide  or latest Ireland guidebook . For a good street map to help you navigate Dublin’s city center, we personally love the laminated Streetwise maps by Michelin.

Jeanie Johnston tallship 3 days in Dublin itinerary Ireland

3 Day Dublin Itinerary: How to Spend 3 Days in Dublin

Dublin has a large number of attractions, museums, shows, and potential things to do. This can be overwhelming for first time visitors so we’ve put together our suggested 3 day itinerary that takes in Dublin’s most popular attractions, museums, and neighborhoods. We’ve also tried to arrange them in a logical order so you spend less time traveling around the city and more time sightseeing.

Use this as a guide and starting point for planning your 3 days in Dublin, not as a definitive itinerary. This itinerary is pretty jam-packed and may be too packed for someone who wants to explore the city at a more leisurely pace. It also reflects some of the most popular highlights, but you’ll want to add or substitute places that reflect your own special interests. For example, it doesn’t include attractions like the Dublin Zoo, Avia Stadium, the botanical gardens, the wax museum, or trips out to Dalkey or Malahide Castle.

Be sure to check on admission days and hours for any must-see attractions before you set out as some attractions close for one day per week, or may be closed due to a special event or renovation. Many attractions have reduced winter hours and longer summer hours.

For all attractions with an admission fee, we’ve noted there is an entry fee by writing “(fee)” next to them. Note that since many people use the  Dublin Pass , the attractions that are included on the Dublin Pass (at the time of this writing) are starred (*) denoting that passholders receive free entry so they have “(fee*)” next to them. We do our best to provide the most updated information, but things change so you may want to double-check fees and check the latest list of attractions included by the Dublin Pass before your trip.

3 Days in Dublin itinerary Ireland

Dublin Itinerary Day 1

For the first day of our suggested 3 day Dublin itinerary, we have you exploring the area south of the River Liffey in the western part of central Dublin. Today you’ll learn about Dublin’s medieval and Viking past, have a chance to visit the city’s two famous cathedrals, pay a visit to one of Ireland’s most famous prisons, and end your day of sightseeing with a pint of Ireland’s most famous brew!

Dublin Castle

We’re going to start with a visit to Dublin Castle (fee*). There has been a castle on this site since 1166, although most of the current complex dates from the 18th and 19th century and doesn’t look too much like a medieval castle anymore. However parts of the medieval castle still exist and the State Rooms of the castle are still used for official state engagements. Many famous figures have visited the castle including Queen Victoria and Queen Elizabeth II, and Dublin-born author Bram Stoker worked as a civil servant at the castle for several years before moving to London.

Visitors to Dublin Castle can see the excavation site of the Viking and medieval parts of the castle, the Gothic Chapel Royal, and the State Apartments. You can purchase a ticket for either a self-guided visit of the castle or guided tour. Dublin Pass holders can take a self-guided tour for free or upgrade to a guided tour for just £3 extra. Do bear in mind that access to Dublin Castle may be restricted due to government events or activities, so check the official website before your visit to avoid disappointment.

Within the Dublin Castle complex are also the Garda Museum (Irish Police museum) and the Chester Beatty Library museum. Both of these are free and worth visiting, especially the library museum, if you have time.

Dublin Castle 3 days in Dublin itinerary Ireland

Christ Church Cathedral

Dating back to 1028, Christ Church Cathedral (fee*) is Dublin’s oldest medieval cathedral and is found in the heart of what was once medieval Dublin. Although it dates back to medieval times, the Christ Church cathedral that exists today is a mix mainly of Gothic, Romanesque, and Victorian elements. It serves as the seat of the Church of Ireland (Anglican church) in Dublin. Fans of the Showtime TV show The Tudors  will likely find it recognizable as many of the cathedral scenes from the show were filmed on site here.

There is a lot to see at Christ Church cathedral. First there is the beautiful nave and main building, which contains the organ, the Musician’s Corner, and some tombs including the disputed tomb of Strongbow , a medieval Norman-Welsh earl and warlord. There’s also the crypt which is the largest cathedral crypt in the British Isles. The crypt contains a number of items of interest, including monuments, a mummified cat and rat that were found stuck in the organ pipe, and an extensive silver collection.

The cathedral’s choir is very well known throughout Ireland and those who enjoy choir music may want to make time to listen to the choir for evensong which is normally performed several evenings a week in the cathedral.

You can visit the cathedral as part of a self-guided tour, or join a guided tour (additional fee) that are offered on most days at set times (check website for times). You can purchase tickets in advance here .

Christ Church Cathedral 3 days in Dublin itinerary Ireland

Next door to Christ Church Cathedral is Dublinia  (fee*), a fun family-friendly museum which tells the story of medieval and Viking Dublin. Along with the cathedral, this part of the city was at the center of medieval Dublin, although construction and city changes mean that not much else has survived from that time period.

At Dublinia, visitors can learn all about life in medieval Dublin on a self-guided visit, told through various mediums, which includes interactive exhibits. This being medieval times, there is naturally a large section dedicated to the Plague, or Black Death, which was responsible for the deaths of thousands of Dubliners. A part of the museum also covers how archaeologists have unearthed artifacts to help understand and bring the past to life. At the end of the visit, there is also the chance to climb the steps of the medieval St Michael’s Tower.

Most tours are self-guided; however, once per day, they do a guided tour in English of one of the sections of the museum with a costumed actor guide. These interactive tours are well worth taking, especially if you have children, and help bring a bit more life into the information. Check times before visiting if interested in the tour.

Dublinia and Christ Church Cathedral are next door and connected by the Synod hall and bridge. Both attractions are included for free with the Dublin Pass, but if you are not planning to buy a Dublin Pass but still want to visit both attractions, you can purchase a discounted combined ticket for both at the Dublina’s welcome desk.

Dublinia 3 days in Dublin itinerary Ireland

St. Patrick’s Cathedral

If you are interested in visiting another cathedral, you can also visit the nearby  St. Patrick’s Cathedral  (fee*). Dublin is unique for having not one, but two cathedrals and both date back to the medieval period. It is believed that St. Patrick’s Cathedral (fee*), founded in 1191, was initially intended to replace Christ Church but for whatever reason this did not happen and the two cathedrals have had to learn to co-exist together. Like Christ Church, it is part of the Anglican Church of Ireland.

St. Patrick’s Cathedral is the National Cathedral of the  Church of Ireland and its spire makes it the tallest church (but not cathedral) in Ireland and the largest. It is said that Saint Patrick used a well on this site to baptize people in Dublin approximately 1,500 years ago. The author of Gulliver’s Travels, Jonathan Swift , once served as dean of St. Patrick’s and is buried within the cathedral. It is an impressive cathedral and the church can be visited on a self-guided visit. An audio guide is available for an additional fee.

You can buy tickets for St. Patrick’s Cathedral here .

Interested in seeing more of Dublin’s Churches?  There are loads of churches you can visit in Dublin. If you are surprised like we were that both of the cathedrals in Dublin are part of the minority Christian faith of Ireland (Anglican), this is because both cathedrals changed from Roman Catholic to the Anglican Church of Ireland following the Protestant Reformation. If you are looking for the main Roman Catholic church in Dublin, you might want to visit St. Mary’s Church which is the episcopal seat of the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Dublin. Also if you enjoy church crypts, you might to visit St. Michan’s parish church , an Anglican church with an interesting crypt that is open on most days for public tours.

St. Patrick's Cathedral 3 days in Dublin itinerary Ireland

Kilmainham Gaol

We’re coming towards the end of the first day of our three day Dublin itinerary. Our next attraction is a little further out of the city, but worth the trek if you have the time.  Kilmainham Gaol  (fee) is a former 18th century prison which is today run as a museum by Ireland’s Office of Public Works.

Kilmainham Gaol opened  in 1796 and closed in 1924. During this period it housed convicts convicted of crimes ranging from stealing food to murder. In the early 19th century, about 4,000 prisoners were transported to Australia. In the early 20th century, it was mainly used to house rebels and military prisoners, and the leaders of the 1916 rebellion were notably held here and executed. Film fans may recognize this as the filming location for the prison that Michael Caine is held in the original Italian Job movie .

Kilmainham Gaol can only be toured as part of a guided visit, with tickets sold for specific times of the day. Tickets are usually available for walk-ins, however this is a very popular attraction and we recommend buying your ticket in advance online to avoid disappointment.

Kilmainham Gaol 3 days in Dublin itinerary Ireland

Guinness Storehouse

Our final stop on the first day of our three days in Dublin is Dublin’s most popular visitor attraction—the Guinness Storehouse  (fee*). We think this is an absolute must for most people when visiting Dublin! It is interesting even if you are not a big fan of Guinness or even beer.

The Guinness Storehouse is on the site of St James’s Gate Brewery. This is where Ireland’s legendary drink, Guinness, has been brewed since 1759. It’s quite the success story, with over 50 million barrels of Guinness being produced annually at St. James Gate brewery. The Guinness Storehouse itself is a huge seven storey visitor attraction arranged around a central atrium. The Storehouse was built in 1904 and used for fermentation until 1988, but is no longer part of the active brewery.

The tour, which is self-guided, goes across all seven floors, and you’ll learn a bit of everything including the  founder Albert Guinness’ story,  how Guinness is made, and how the brand’s iconic advertising has changed from the 18th century to now. Once you’ve learnt everything you can about Guinness, the tour culminates at the Gravity Bar on the seventh floor. Here you’ll get to sample a pint of the good stuff (included with your ticket), and admire a spectacular view of the city. Not a bad way to end your first day in Dublin, we think you’ll agree.

This is one of the most popular attractions in Dublin so we recommend that you  buy your tickets online , which will save you money compared to buying them on-site and you also have access to the fast track queue. You also get free entry and access to the fast track queue with the Dublin Pass.

Want more Guinness? After the Guinness Storehouse closes, you might want to make your way to the Open Gate Brewery  at St. James Gate to try some of the latest Guinness beers as well as experimental batches. It is a bar which is located within the Guinness active experimental brewery facility and is currently only open to the public on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday evenings. To visit, you must reserve a spot in advance online and you must be 18 years or older to enter.

Guinness Storehouse 3 days in Dublin itinerary Ireland

Dublin Itinerary Day 2

On the second day of your 3 days in Dublin, we suggest visiting more of Dublin’s classic sites,  seeing one of Ireland’s top cultural treasures, taking a break in the city’s most popular green space, visiting one or more of its free museums, and watching sunset over the River Liffey. Then after dinner, we recommend heading out to experience some of Dublin’s nightlife in the famous Temple Bar neighborhood. Today’s itinerary has you exploring the eastern area of central Dublin south of the River Liffey.

Trinity College and the Long Room

Trinity College  Dublin, officially the College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity of Queen Elizabeth near Dublin, is the only college of the University of Dublin. It was founded by Queen Elizabeth I in 1592 and is widely regarded as the finest university in the country. The college has a rich history and is an impressive place to wander around and visit.

One of the most popular attractions in Trinity College is the Old Library (fee), also known as the Long Room. This dates from the 18th century, and houses over 200,000 books which are kept across two  floors. The library is over 200 ft long, and is a sight you have to see when you visit Dublin! When you visit Trinity Library, you can also see a section of the Book of Kells . This 9th century decorated copy of the four gospels is the world’s most famous medieval manuscript and is regarded as Ireland’s greatest cultural treasure.

Entry to both the Book of Kells and the Long Room are included in the same ticket, which you can buy directly from the Trinity College Dublin website , or in person when you arrive. You can also take a walking tour which includes the Book of Kells as well as Dublin Castle.

Long Room 3 days in Dublin itinerary Ireland

Molly Malone Statue

No visit to Dublin would be complete without a visit to one of the city’s most famous inhabitants —Molly Malone. Or at least, her statue. Molly Malone, as you are likely aware, is a fictional character who features in one of Ireland’s most well-known songs , which tells the story of a fishmonger plying her wares in Dublin. As you can probably tell from the photo below, many tourists like to touch her statue, particularly her breasts, and unfortunately this has caused some of the bronze to be worn off.

The statue of Molly Malone was historically located on Grafton Street, but due to construction work on Grafton Street at the time of writing, she can currently be found just outside the Irish tourist information office on Suffolk Street.

Molly Malone statue 3 days in Dublin itinerary Ireland

Grafton Street

On your walk from the Molly Malone statue to the next site, the Little Museum of Dublin, we recommend walking along Grafton Street. This is one of the best known streets in Dublin and one of the city’s main shopping streets. It’s a lively place with lots of stores, restaurants, cafés, and street buskers (street performers). The majority of the street is pedestrian-only making it a friendly place for walkers and tourists.

Little Museum of Dublin

If you are interested in life in Dublin through the 20th century and up to the present day, then you should consider a visit to the Little Museum of Dublin (fee*). This museum of the people will take you on a journey through life in 20th century Dublin. It has over 5,000 artifacts on display across three floors, including a room devoted to Ireland’s most famous musical exports: the rock band U2.

It’s worth noting that the Little Museum of Dublin, as the name suggests, is a relatively small museum. As a result, visitor numbers are carefully managed, and the main exhibition has to be seen as part of a guided tour which lasts about an hour and begins at the top of every hour. Slots on these tours can fill up quickly at busier times of year, so to avoid disappointment we would recommend booking in advance, which you can do here . If you don’t want to do the tour, the temporary exhibitions can be seen on a self-guided visit.

3 days in Dublin itinerary Ireland

St. Stephen’s Green

Once a marshy common grazing area, St. Stephen’s Green is one of the Dublin’s most popular green spaces and a nice place to take a short break from sightseeing. It includes trees, a lake, a playground, a number of labeled plants (including some in Braille), fountains, statues, and memorials. This city center park is located just across from the Little Dublin Museum.

Those who enjoy gardens and green spaces might want to also visit the nearby Iveagh Gardens , a Victorian era garden featuring a rose garden, cascades, and yew maze. The garden is free to visit.

St. Stephen's Green 3 days in Dublin itinerary Ireland

Dublin’s Free Art Museums & History Museums

We recommend using the afternoon for time to visit a museum or two. Dublin offers a number of free museums which include three locations of the National Museum of Ireland, the National Gallery of Ireland, and the Irish Museum of Modern Art. You can’t visit all of these museums so I’d based your choice on your interests, time, and location.

In terms of today’s itinerary the nearest museums to St. Stephen’s Green (10 to 20 minute walk) are the National Gallery of Ireland, National Museum of Ireland – Archaeology, National Museum of Ireland – Natural History, and Dublin City Hall. But you can adjust the itinerary to fit as needed.

All the museums mentioned offer free general entry at the time of writing. Temporary and special exhibitions usually require a ticket and fee, and these are normally free for those with Dublin Passes.

History & Science Lovers:

  • National Museum of Ireland – Archaeology – This museum tells the history of Ireland through archaeology, presenting a wide range of objects from metalwork to weapons to religious objects to  preserved Iron Age “bog bodies”. Includes objects from Ireland as well as those found in other parts of the world.
  • National Museum of Ireland – Natural History – This museum houses a large collection (around 2 million specimens) of zoological and geological artifacts and exhibits collected from around the world.
  • National Museum of Decorative Arts & History – A museum that will appeal to both art and history lovers. It is filled with decorative arts, jewelry, furniture, costumes, weapons, Asian art, & history exhibits.
  • Dublin City Hall  exhibition – An interesting exhibit that tells the story of the city of Dublin from the first Viking invasion to the fights for Irish independence to modern Dublin. Notable artifacts on display during our visit included the Seal of Dublin City, the Great Mace of Dublin, The Sword of the City, and one of the original Proclamations from the 1916 Easter Rising. Note the City Hall suspended its entry fee in 2016 and was still free when we visited last in 2017 but the entry fee may be reinstated in the future (free for Dublin Pass holders).

wax seal 3 days in Dublin itinerary Ireland

Art Lovers:

  • National Gallery of Ireland  – This is Ireland’s national collection of Irish & European art, including works by Burton, Turner, Monet, and Caravaggio. This would be my choice if I was only going to visit one art museum in Dublin (although modern art lovers would probably prefer one of the other museums).
  • Irish Museum of Modern Art – Ireland’s largest collection of modern and contemporary art by both Irish and international artists located in a 17th century hospital building arranged around a large central courtyard. A good bet for modern art lovers.
  • Hugh Lane Art Gallery – A contemporary and modern art museum housed in a 18th century former home that includes the Francis Bacon studio. Founded in 1908, it is believed to be the first public gallery of modern art in the world.

National Gallery of Ireland 3 days in Dublin itinerary Ireland

Sunset over the River Liffey & Ha’Penny Bridge

We’re coming to the end of the second day of our three day Dublin itinerary, and what better way to finish off than by watching the sun set over the River Liffey, which runs right through the center of the city. If the weather is good, we can highly recommend taking a moment to enjoy the sunset view of Dublin. Most of the city center bridges along the River Liffey will offer you a good view. The most famous bridge is the Ha’Penny Bridge , a cast iron pedestrian bridge built in 1816.

You might also want to take a boat tour of the river during your trip to Dublin. If you are interested in taking a boat tour of the River Liffey or exploring the beautiful Dublin Bay (a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve), there are a number of boat tour options in Dublin, including dinner cruises. Just be sure to book in advance.

River Liffey sunset 3 days in Dublin itinerary Ireland

Temple Bar District

If you are not too tired and want to experience some of the Dublin nightlife, we recommend exploring the popular Temple Bar District. It is a good place discover the “craic”, the all-encompassing Irish word for having a good time. This is the party capital of Dublin, and if you’re seeking out pints of Guinness, live music, and lots of the aforementioned “craic”, this is definitely the place to come.

Yes, the prices are higher than everywhere else in town, and it’s also going to be full of tourists. But there are plenty of locals out here too, and you’re pretty much guaranteed a good time.

The most visited bar is The Temple Bar , but there are loads of bars in this area to grab a pint and many also offer food. A few others to consider are The Palace Bar , a traditional Victorian-era pub, The Brazen Head which is believed to be Ireland’s oldest pub dating back to 1198, and Buskers which offers a more contemporary bar atmosphere with modern cocktails.

If you prefer, you can also take an evening pub crawl tour with a guide, like this one . This can be a fun way to experience some new venues and meet different people from around the world.

Temple bar 3 days in Dublin itinerary Ireland

Dublin Itinerary Day 3

On the final day of our Dublin itinerary, we recommend crossing the river to explore the area of central Dublin north of the River Liffey. In the morning, we recommend learning a bit more about Dublin’s history by visiting a few of the recommend museums to learn about Ireland’s emigration history, the 1916 Easter Uprising, and Dublin’s rich literary history. It is a busy morning/afternoon if you want to visit them all so if you want a more relaxed day, I’d choose the attractions that are of most interest rather than trying to visit them all. Then later in the afternoon we recommend sampling some Irish whiskey and then going out for a night of traditional Irish food, drink, and entertainment. 

Jeanie Johnston Tallship & Famine Experience

The Jeanie Johnston tallship (fee*) is a remake of the original Jeanie Johnston, a three-masted sailing ship that was originally built in Quebec, Canada, in 1847. It was one of the so-called “famine ships”, which was used to transport emigrants between Ireland and North America. During the Great Famine in Ireland from 1845 to 1849, about one million people died in the country and a million more people left Ireland to seek a new life, primarily to the United States, the UK, Canada, and Australia. Liverpool was a particularly popular city for emigrants and it is estimated that today about three-quarters of the population has Irish roots.

Today you can take a guided tour of this replica ship built in the 1980’s, and learn about life on board for both the emigrants and crew. The Jeanie Johnston made 16 voyages carrying emigrants across the Atlantic to North America, and she was particularly noteworthy as she didn’t lose a single passenger or crew member on any of her voyages. It can be quite a moving experience, particularly if you had family who would have undertaken a similar voyage. On our tour, one of our fellow tour participants became quite emotional when he revealed that his ancestors had actually sailed on one of the original famine ships from Ireland.

Visits are given as part of a guided tour which lasts about 50 minutes. Be sure to check on tour times before you visit.

Jeanie Johnston Tallship 3 days in Dublin itinerary Ireland

EPIC The Irish Emigration Museum

Ireland has experienced a number of periods of mass emigration, not just during the Great Famine, and many Irish people continue to emigrate. If you want to learn more about the Irish emigration experience, EPIC The Irish Emigration Museum  (fee*) is a museum that tells the story of Irish emigration around the world. I reland is a country that has had its fair share of troubled times and this has led to an estimated 9 to 10 million people having emigrated since 1700! 

Through a self-guided interactive experience, the museum guides you through the personal stories of many people who have emigrated and their journeys. You’ll learn what caused them to emigrate, what that process was like, and what their new lives were like in their new home country. If you’ve ever visited Ellis Island in New York and learnt about immigration into the USA, this is a great counterpart to that experience. We both enjoyed the museum, and learned a great deal.

The museum is located in the CHQ building which is also home to several restaurants and cafes if you are looking for a convenient coffee, meal, or snack after your visit.

You can buy your entry ticket in advance online here .

Trying to find out more about your own Irish heritage? If you are specifically trying to find out more about your own Irish heritage, you might want to stop in at the Irish Family History Centre afterwards (located near the EPIC gift shop) to look up genealogy information. You can also book a private consultation with a on-site genealogist for more assistance.

EPIC Irish Emigration Museum 3 days in Dublin itinerary Ireland

GPO Witness History Exhibition

If you’re interested in learning a little bit more about 20th century history in Ireland, particularly the 1916 Easter Rising , a visit to the GPO Witness History Museum  (fee*) should be high on your list. This is found in Dublin’s General Post Office (GPO) on O’Connell Street, a beautiful Georgian building built in 1814 and one of Ireland’s most famous buildings.

In the self-guided exhibition you’ll learn all about the events of the 1916 Easter Rising as well as the events leading up to the uprising and the subsequent effects. On Easter Monday 1916, a group of Irish republican rebels who wanted Irish independence from Great Britain stormed the GPO and seized control of the building. This forced occupation lead to a bloody 6 day affair, which lead to the death of over 450 people which included civilians, British military officers, police, and rebels. The exhibition uses direct witness accounts, documents, and interactive exhibits to tell the story. There’s also a memorial to those who were killed in the rebellion, including an outdoor sculpture for the children killed.

It’s an informative and interesting experience, and definitely worth a visit for those interested in this period of Irish history. There is also a cafe on the ground floor, and we enjoyed coffee and pastries here after our visit.

GPO 3 days in Dublin itinerary Ireland

Dublin Writers Museum

Time for some literary themed attractions. Ireland is famous as being a nation of storytellers and Dublin is a UNESCO designated City of Literature. One of the best places to learn about the literary heritage of Dublin is at the Dublin Writers Museum (fee).

This museum has displays dedicated to some of the most notable writers in Irish history, including James Joyce, Jonathan Swift, George Bernard Shaw, Oscar Wilde, and William Yeats to name but a few. It is housed in a beautiful 18th century mansion on Parnell Square, and is next door to the present-day Irish Writers Union.

For anyone with an interest in writing and Ireland’s literary heritage, this is definitely a museum not to be missed. Visits are self-guided and tickets can be purchased on-site.

Dublin Writers Museum 3 days in Dublin itinerary Ireland

James Joyce Centre

If you want to learn more about Irish writers, you might want to seek out information on specific writers. One of the most famous Dublin born writers is James Joyce who wrote the 20th century classic Ulysses ( free on Kindle ), and the James Joyce Centre (fee) is dedicated to the author and his writings.

Here you can learn all about both the life of James Joyce, as well as his famous novel, told via film and exhibits. The museum also has the front door from No. 7 Eccles Street on display, which readers of Ulysses will know as being the home of protagonist Leopold Bloom.

Other Dublin Literary Spots? If you are looking for more literary spots consider visiting the  National Print Museum , doing a  Dublin Literary Pub Crawl , seeing some of Dublin’s beautiful libraries (Trinity’s Long Room, Marsh’s Library, Chester Beatty Library), or browsing for books at some of Dublin’s many popular book shops. The birthplace museum of George Bernard Shaw (33 Synge Street) was closed several years ago but there are hopes that it will re-open. But even if closed, you can see the plaque outside as well as many others literature related plaques in Dublin such as the one on Bram Stoker’s birthplace at 15 Marino Crescent (private home) and the plaque at Oscar Wilde’s childhood home at Number 1 Merrion Square (owned by the American College Dublin).

James Joyce Centre 3 days in Dublin itinerary Ireland

Jameson Distillery

Time to learn about (and drink!) another famous Irish beverage: whiskey! One of the most well-known Irish whiskeys is Jameson’s Whiskey, which you can learn about and sample at the Jameson Distillery on Bow St.

This is a fully guided tour through the former Jameson Distillery at which you’re going to learn all about the history of Ireland’s most famous whiskey, which was distilled at this site from 1780 until 1971. The tour is a lot of fun, and you get to try Jameson’s whiskey, as well as compare its flavor to other leading whiskeys to see if you can tell the difference. At the end of the tour you also get a whiskey to enjoy at the bar at your leisure.

Tours can be booked online , which is the best option to avoid disappointment as this is a popular attraction. Although you can also buy tickets and book a tour on arrival. Holders of the Dublin Pass have a free tour included .

Want more Irish Whiskey? If you are interested in Irish whiskey, there are several other whiskey experiences and tours you can take in Dublin in addition or as an alternative to the Jameson Distillery tour. If you are interested in visiting an active whiskey distillery, you might try the distillery tour and tasting at the Teeling Whiskey Distillery  (fee*) which opened in 2015 and is the first new distillery in Dublin in 125 years. A free Teeling distillery tour and tasting is available for Dublin Pass holders. Other Irish whiskey experience options include the Irish Whiskey Museum Experience  (fee) and taking a whiskey tasting tour  (fee) with a local around Dublin’s pubs. Book any of the whiskey experiences or tours in advance if you can as they are all popular.

Not interested in Whiskey? If whiskey is not of interest, I’d skip this visit. You can spend more time at the prior attractions or alternatively consider sitting down to relax for an afternoon tea or a coffee nearby, visiting Dublin Zoo  (fee*) within Phoenix Park, visiting the National Botanic Gardens of Ireland (fee*), or exploring one of the city’s many free museums (see Day 2 list).

Jameson Distillery 3 days in Dublin itinerary Ireland

Traditional Irish Night Out

Ok, we’re coming to the end of our three days in Dublin! How about going out with a bang, and celebrating all that is fun in Dublin, with a night of Irish food, drink, and some traditional Irish entertainment?

There are a number of locations offering various types of traditional Irish evening entertainment whether you just want to find a pub with some live music or you want to go to an entertainment show. We’ve attended the  Traditional Irish Night show at Dublin’s Belvedere Hotel and you can read about our experience . We also heard good things about Taylor’s Irish Night , although this is located a little south of the city center. Other options include the Irish House Party  dinner and show, a dinner cruise on a canal barge , or an evening pub crawl with traditional Irish music.

Irish Night 3 days in Dublin itinerary Ireland

Save Money in Dublin with the Dublin Pass

We think a great way to save money is on sightseeing with discount passes and cards. Our recommended way to save money on sight-seeing in Dublin is to invest in a Dublin Pass .

We’ve used these on a couple of occasions when visiting the city, and for a 3 day trip that includes visiting a number of attractions, the savings can really add up. You can read our Dublin Pass review for more information.

As noted before, the Dublin Pass is popular among travelers to Dublin and one we recommend for active sightseers to the city. We wanted to give you an example of the cost savings over 3 days in Dublin if you have a Dublin Pass.

The following is based on the above itinerary for 2 adults:

if you used the sightseeing bus and visited all of the main attractions listed on the suggested 3 day Dublin itinerary included in the Dublin Pass, it would cost you €198.5 at normal adult admission prices (April 2023 prices). A 3-day Dublin pass currently costs €109. This means you would save €89.5 per person or €179.00 for 2 adults!

Obviously you might not want to visit all the sites listed, but you can see from the above that even if you visited fewer sites, you would still save money with the pass if you plan to visit a number of attractions in Dublin.

The pass can also save you time by allowing you to skip the ticket lines and join fast-track lanes at many sites. Definitely a discount pass worth checking out before your trip to Dublin.

Dublin pass 3 days in Dublin itinerary Ireland

Walking Tours of Dublin

If you’d like to take a guided walking tour of Dublin, which can be a great way to learn about the city from an expert guide, then there are a few options to choose from. Different walking tours focus on different subjects, with some being more broad, whilst others might narrow down on a specific subject. Here are a few to give you some ideas of what is available.

  • This full day tour of Dublin with one of our favourite walking tour companies, Take Walks, includes Trinity College, the Book of Kells, the Guinness Brewery, Dublin Castle, and a whisky distillery.
  • This personalizable private walking tour with a local can be adjusted to meet your interests and availability
  • This 2.5 hour guided bike tour lets you cover many of the highlights of the city
  • This 1.5 hour guided walking tour focuses on the spooky history of Dublin, from ghosts to cults!
  • This 2-3 hour walking tour covers the main highlights of the city as well as a few hidden gems. A good general introduction to the city.
  • This 3.5 hour food tour will have you sampling many of the city’s famous dishes and drinks
  • This 3 hour food tour with Devour Tours (we love their food tours!) has you sampling some of the best of the Dublin food scene

As you can see, there are plenty of tour options to choose from!

And that’s the end of our 3 day Dublin itinerary! Hopefully this Dublin guide and itinerary has given you a good idea for what you can do with 72 hours in Dublin.

Our Dublin itinerary gives you day-by-day suggestions on how to spend 3 days in Dublin Ireland. Our Dublin itinerary includes all the main highlights of the city such as Trinity College and the Guinness Storehouse as well as a few lesser known sites. We also provide tips on how to get around Dublin, a map of each day’s suggested attractions, tips on where to stay in Dublin, and how to save money during your 3 days in Dublin. #Dublin #DublinItinerary #Ireland #travel

What would you do with 3 days in Dublin? Have you been do Dublin? If so, what were your favorite things to do? If you are planning a trip to Dublin, feel free to reach out with any questions as you plan your trip. Just type any comments or questions in the Comments section below and we’ll be happy to answer them.

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Alex Post author

October 2, 2023 at 10:16 am

I am currently planing on visiting Dublin for the first time and this is exactly what I needed! Great descriptions of the many places to visit and plenty of options. I will definitely use your Google Maps itinerary and adapt it to my personal preferences.

Thanks a lot!

Jessica & Laurence Norah Post author

October 2, 2023 at 6:24 pm

So glad you are finding our Dublin itinerary suggestions helpful in planning your upcoming trip. Yes, we try to give a lot of suggestions so people can tailor an itinerary to their own interests, budget, and speed. If you have any questions as you plan your trip to Dublin just shout!

Best, Jessica

Tony Post author

August 20, 2023 at 9:16 pm

G’day guys, from the land Aus,

Great Blog and really insightful information on Dublin.

We are in the early stages of planning an extensive trip Sep/Oct 2024, with intentions of touring Ireland/Scotland primarily, and then spending some in London.

We are looking at spending around 14 days touring each location(Ireland/Scotland), which seems to be the recommended duration. We have looked at Touring companies and they can become quite expensive. We are looking to self drive, organise our own accommodation etc. giving us flexibility in what we see and where we go.

Thus, do you have any suggested itineraries for both Ireland and Scotland. Any advice would be extremely helpful

We have read your Blog London Itinerary: 6 Days in London which will suit what we are looking for from London.

Many Thanks Tony

August 23, 2023 at 12:35 pm

Glad you enjoyed our blogs on Dublin and London, you should be able to put together your own personalized itinerary based on those posts. Also I would consider if the city passes would be worth it for your trip, if spending 6 days in London I would definitely recommend it there.

So if you were considering a touring company, I would recommend taking a look at Rabbie’s, they are an Edinburgh based company and lead tours all over the UK and Ireland. You can see their Ireland tours here and their Scotland tours here . They offer a big range of tour options, from short day trips to longer (10-14 day) trips.

What I might recommend if you like the idea of tours but also want some independence is to consider something like basing yourself in places and taking tours from there. You can easily independently tours places like Dublin, Belfast, Edinburgh, Glasgow, etc. and many places you can easily get to via train (or bus or ferry). Then for seeing more countryside, islands, and smaller places, most can be reached via tours (such as day tours or longer 2-5 night tours) from the larger cities. That would give you a nice mix of tours and independent travel without needing to worry about driving and there would be less to plan/book, and might be a happy medium between booking a tour and planning everything yourself.

Happy to help you plan an itinerary but would need to know an idea of the sort of places you definitely want to go, activities you like to do, budget, hobbies, general plan of travel (starting/ending point), etc. A couple who loves castles, museums, & shopping is going to want a very different itinerary who someone who is focused on golf, whisky distillery tours, birdwatching, and beaches.

You can see our Scotland content across our two blogs and here . We don’t have nearly as much Ireland content but you can see what we have here and here . We have guides on all the major cities in Scotland as well as Dublin and Belfast and day trip ideas for lots of places and that should give you a good idea of the kinds of places you are likely going to want to visit. But of course we have been to many places we haven’t written about, especially in Scotland, where we’ve traveled pretty extensively over the 5 years we lived there. The other thing that might help you have an idea of what kind of places you want to visit is the Rabbie’s tours (and other tours) as they often cover the highlights and things travelers are most interested in seeing.

Are you planning to fly between Ireland and Scotland, and then train from Edinburgh to London?

Anyway, hope that helps get you started, and happy to help with more questions and an itinerary as you get further into your planning!

Leonie Cornell Post author

October 17, 2021 at 7:35 am

Hi. I love your 3 day itinerary. We aim to be in Dublin for 4 nights and so 3 and a bit days. Love HOHO buses, and so will probably do the Dublin pass. We then have an 11 day tour booked ( or it will be once we organise.) This tour was meant to be in 2020, and so our dream is already 3 years old. We are in our late sixties, so a little reluctant to hurry around. But really interested in Guinness storehouse, the Gaol, EPIC and I might want to to see Trinity college again ( had a half day in Dublin in 2013 as part of a whistle stop tour of UK and Ireland) Your advice is timely and very recent so gives me a lot of hope. Do you know how early you need to book things like the Guinness storehouse? I am worried that using the pass we will only be able to book once we arrive and pick up the pass and may miss out.

October 17, 2021 at 2:06 pm

I am happy to hear that you are working on rebooking your trip to Ireland! And glad that you are enjoying our Dublin itinerary and yes, I think if you are planning 3-4 days in Dublin, you’ll probably save money with a Dublin Pass as long a you plan to visit several of the attractions which it is sounds like you plan to do.

Our itinerary is pretty busy, so I think since you want a more leisurely visit, I’d do less than what we suggest each day so you are not in a huge rush. It should help you choose the places and attractions that are of the most interest to you. You can also stretch out these attractions over an extra day or two as well if you do want to do/see a lot.

If you get the Dublin Pass, depending on the number of days you have in Dublin, I’d make sure you do all the things included on the Pass on consecutive days. So if you have 4 days total and a 3 day Pass, you might use the first day to sightsee and visit any places that are free or not included on the pass (e.g., the Gaol, Trinity College) and then do the rest on the other three days (HOHO bus, EPIC, Guinness Storehouse, museums, Saint Patrick’s, etc.) to make the most of your pass.

Now, the COVID-19 pandemic has changed things quite a bit in terms of the Dublin Pass. The Dublin Pass is now an online only product, so you can order it at home. As of 2021, there’s no longer a physical pass to pick up. Instead, the pass is a QR code that you can show on your smartphone, or you can print it out at home before you travel. We recommend having it both on your phone and to print the QR code as well as back-up (just in case there is an issue with your phone, such as it runs out of battery, etc.).

When you buy the pass, you will be sent the pass code (a number), your QR code, and instructions. You can then use this to book any attractions that require reservations, you’ll just need to put in your Dublin Pass details. There’s a list of those you can see here , along with instructions on how to book.

Most attractions did not require reservations before the pandemic, but a number of attractions to require reservations now so it is good to pre-book attractions at least a couple of days before you plan to visit. Some attractions also have more limited hours and opening times so I’d recommend checking on all the places you plan to visit to ensure they are open and to see if they require reservations. For the Guinness Storehouse, they recommend booking at least 24 hours in advance, but we’d suggest booking as soon as you have your pass and know your exact dates.

Using your pass number to book does not activate the pass. The pass only activates the first time an attraction scans the code. So you can start making reservations for attractions as you soon as you purchase your passes.

Hope that helps and just let us know if you have any further questions.

Wishing you a great trip to Dublin! Jessica

October 17, 2021 at 4:07 pm

thank you Jessica. That solves many of my questions. I have used a city pass before, so I should have realised the activation only happens at the first attraction. But I can book attractions ahead without paying upfront, so that is good. We hope to spend 3 weeks all up in Ireland and including Northern Ireland, so getting excited now. regards

October 19, 2021 at 5:41 am

Happy to help!

Yes, so you do have to purchase the Dublin Pass upfront to book attractions, of course, but you can do that before you leave for your trip (as soon as you make the purchase). But you don’t have to pay for the individual attractions that are included with the pass to make the bookings, you just need to give them your pass information to secure the bookings.

3 weeks is a great amount of time to spend in Ireland and Northern Ireland – so much to see and do and wishing you a wonderful trip!

Jenny Post author

July 26, 2020 at 3:11 pm

Hi! How much woul it take to travel to Dublin, Ireland?..I am from Phils. I am looking forward for an answer. Thanks?

July 27, 2020 at 10:48 am

It really depends on what you plan to do, where you plan to stay, and how long you plan to stay in Dublin. You can stay on a lower budget if you want to stay say in a hostel, eat at lower priced eateries or cook your own food, take public transit, and buy an attraction pass to save money on attraction fees.

I’d check out prices to get to Ireland, lodging you are interested in, and attractions you really want to visit to get an idea of how much your trip may cost. Once you are a bit further in your planning and know what you want to do and can tell me more about your budget, I would be happy to help you decide if your budget is reasonable or not for what you want to do.

Just note that now, as in most countries, there are travel restrictions for anyone traveling to Ireland from overseas. Travelers from most countries are currently are subject to a 14 day quarantine on arrival.

Janet Hindman Post author

November 2, 2019 at 7:44 am

This is very helpful. Some girlfriends and I are planning a trip to Ireland. We plan on staying in Dublin and doing a few day trips out but primarily just staying in the Dublin area. Thanks for sharing all this wonderful information.

November 2, 2019 at 8:08 am

Thanks so much for taking the time to comment and glad you found our information helpful!

Yes, there is plenty to do and if you have more than 3 days in Dublin there you can take your time and explore at a more leisurely pace. We give lots of suggestions in our itinerary and those suggestions can be spread out over several days. If you plan to visit several attractions (especially higher priced ones like Guinness Storehouse), you might want to consider the Dublin Pass to save money.

Also plenty of day trips you can take from Dublin to nearby places when you want a break from the city! Just let us know if you have any questions.

November 2, 2019 at 8:48 am

Thanks. Yes we are planning on about an 8-9 day stay

Borislava Apostolova Post author

April 26, 2019 at 6:45 am

Very helpfull and usefull!!!Thank you!

April 27, 2019 at 10:33 am

Glad you found our Dublin itinerary helpful! Best, Jessica

Patty O'Brien Post author

January 17, 2019 at 11:08 am

Your article is very helpful. I will be visiting in February for 6 1/2 days- along with my daughter and her friend (18 year old). I have printed out the map and 3 day itinerary. We are just doing one big day trip up to Belfast and Giant’s Causeway and I booked a day/time for the Goal. Other than that we are just going to wing it.

[in October 2017 I took the two of them to Ireland and we did the Southwest – Lahinch to Dingle to Kerry to Tipperary – back up to Ennis – and they loved it – driving was frightful for me – but fun. This time I want to relax and soak it all up. no driving!]

January 17, 2019 at 12:40 pm

Great, glad to hear that you are planning another trip to Ireland, sounds like you had such a great experience back in 2017. There is plenty to do and see in Dublin and surrounds without a car. Laurence also recently wrote a Dublin Pass review which may be useful in saving money since you will be in the city for several days.

We also have a post on things to do in Belfast and a guide to highlights of the Causeway Coastal Route that may be of interest for your day trip to Northern Ireland.

Have a wonderful trip! Jessica

Frances Scheele Post author

January 16, 2019 at 10:27 am

this information seems to fit the bill for me. I will be 80, still active, and do not want to play mountain goat and climb mountains or explore very large castles. I do use tours as they provide transportation for me. I would also like information on seeing Belfast and Waterford. these are the cities that interest me the most and I know I would be able to see. thanks for all that you can provide. Fran Scheele

January 16, 2019 at 11:52 am

Glad you are finding our Dublin itinerary helpful for planning your time in Dublin. You can reach both Belfast and Waterford easily by train from Dublin, or you can join a guided tour from Dublin.

We have a guide to the top things to do in Belfast as well as a suggested 2 day itinerary that you can check out.

If you’d like to do a day tour to Belfast or 2 day tour, we’d check out these options on GetyourGuide and Viator . Some also visit other destinations in Northern Ireland like the Giant’s Causeway, Castle Ward, and the St. Patricks Centre.

We don’t have any posts on Waterford Ireland although we did get some Waterford crystal when we were last in Ireland 😉 You can get to Waterford by train on your own or you can take a guided day tour from Dublin, such as this one (by train) or this one (by coach) .

Hope that helps, and let us know if you have further questions. Wishing you a wonderful trip to Ireland.

Bill Post author

January 7, 2019 at 5:17 pm

Thank you so much for this! It is so helpful in our planning! I can’t seem to find your write up for the day trip to the cliffs of Moher. I’d love to learn how you chose to do that.

January 7, 2019 at 5:44 pm

Hi Bill, Glad you are finding our Dublin itinerary helpful! Oh, yes, I mention a day trip to the Cliff of Moher but didn’t include the link as it is on our other travel blog (Finding the Universe) and you can read about the day trip here . I will also add it to the article. Just let us know if you have any other questions. Best, Jessica

sally sullivan Post author

July 21, 2018 at 10:19 am

Hello, We love visiting Dublin Ireland and this post lists some of our favourite places! We also made time to go on a wonderful pub tour in the wicklow mountains with Rural Pub Tours. Its a small group tour which enables you to see unique pubs that would otherwise be difficult to get to. Shane is the owner and driver and he is so much fun. If you decide to check it out, you won’t be sorry!

July 22, 2018 at 12:53 pm

Hi Sally, Glad you enjoyed our Dublin itinerary and thanks for the pub tour tip! Maybe we’ll check it out the next time we are in Dublin and want to do something outside the city. Best, Jessica

Rob+Ann Post author

May 4, 2018 at 11:02 am

This is an awesome itinerary! Although, we could be entirely happy just stumbling around Dublin for a few days. It’s such a great city, at once charming and exciting, historic and modern. What we didn’t do – but will next time – is invest in the Dublin Pass! Besides the savings, we find the passes often get us to go places we might otherwise pass by. Pinning this one for later – Thanks guys!

May 6, 2018 at 12:38 am

Hi Rob & Ann, Yes, we definitely agree about the passes. We find that city passes like the Dublin Pass often encourage us to stop by museums or attractions we probably would not have visited otherwise because of the entry fees. Hope you get back to Dublin soon! Best, Jessica

andrew Post author

May 2, 2018 at 1:07 am

Amazing, Dublin is a must visit the place, from the beautiful historical monuments to museums, picturesque landscapes to the trendy flea market. Visiting Dublin is a treasure, I have been there and fall in love with the astonishing city.

May 2, 2018 at 12:02 pm

Hi Andrew, Thanks for taking the time to comment – yes we love Dublin too 😉 We haven’t been to the flea market there, perhaps on our next trip if it is happening! Best, Jessica

Jessica Post author

May 1, 2018 at 6:38 am

What a treasure trove of incredible information! I visited Dublin a few years back, but would love to go again. I especially loved the experience at the Guinness Storehouse! I pinned this for my next trip there, thanks!

May 1, 2018 at 1:33 pm

Hi Jessica, Yes, the Guinness Storehouse is definitely a crowd pleaser and they seem to keep just adding new parts to it 😉 Glad you enjoyed our Dublin itinerary and hope you get a chance to return to Dublin to see more! Best, Jessica

Anna Post author

May 1, 2018 at 1:40 am

Hopefully, I´ll get a chance to visit Dublin any time soon. You’ve put together such a great itinerary! I love cities where you can walk a lot! The Old Library in the Trinity College has been on my travel bucket list for a while! I get super excited every time I see that many books

May 1, 2018 at 1:27 pm

Hi Anna, If you love books and literature, you’ll probably really love Dublin as it some great literary spots. If you like libraries, there is obviously the beautiful Trinity College Long Room but you would probably also like Marsh’s Library and Chester Beatty Library. There are also a few good literature related museums as well as some great book shops 😉 Hope you get a chance to visit Dublin soon! Jessica

Nath. Post author

April 30, 2018 at 7:09 am

Thanks for creating this great guide to Dublin Jessica and Laurence :).

I also recommend going to see a play (often with fantastic actors) at the Abbey Theatre or at the Gate Theatre. Temple bar can be fun but drinking there is expensive.

A couple of good pubs with live Irish music: O’Donoghues Bar or The Cobblestone. Two great traditional pubs: The Brazen Head or Mulligan’s.

My first impression on discovering Dublin: grey buildings, grey sea, grey sky. But don’t let that put you off, Dublin is an old city with a young population and lots on offer.

You’ll leave with a warm fuzzy feeling.

April 30, 2018 at 7:25 am

Hi Nath, Glad you enjoyed our Dublin itinerary and thanks so much for those great recommendations! We’ve been to The Brazen Head but not the other pubs you recommend, only so many pubs you can visit each time 😉 We’d love to see a play or other performance in Dublin at one of the theatres – and will try to do that on our next trip.

Oh, yes, the weather can have such a major factor in first impression when traveling. We had OK weather in Dublin on our last trip but I remember my very first visit to London (similar experiences in Edinburgh and Aberdeen) – it was cold, raining, hailing, and windy! Not a good first impression but seeing it in the sunlight the next day and exploring some of the attractions helped change that 😉

Anda Post author

April 29, 2018 at 2:09 pm

Great guide for visiting Dublin. A lot of useful information in it, like always. It’s good to know what the Dublin pass covers. I didn’t realize you would need to a voltage converter in Ireland.

April 30, 2018 at 2:45 am

Hi Anda, Yes, Dublin has a lot to offer and the Dublin Pass can be a good investment if you plan to visit a number of the covered attractions. We’ll probably use it again on our next trip to Dublin as there are still several sites we haven’t visited that are included on the Pass.

Yes, like all of Europe (and most of the world), Ireland uses 220v but some countries (particularly the USA) do not and the USA uses 110v. You don’t want to plug a 110v applicance into a 220v outlet or vice versa without a converter. You could damage the device and/or the electrical system (I’ve accidentally ruined a handheld water heater and flat iron this way over the years). Now the good news is that most newer electronics are dual voltage these days meaning that work with both 110v and 220v (e.g., laptops, tablets, phones) but most other things (e.g., curling irons, flat irons, hair dryers, DVD players, some phone chargers) are not. It should be labeled on the device or in the manufacturer’s book. We buy dual voltage appliances or have two of things (e.g., flat irons) for the things we travel with a lot.

Anisa Post author

April 29, 2018 at 12:41 pm

Wow such a comprehensive list of attractions in Dublin, one of my favorite cities. I have been a few times but did not know about some of the museums you mentioned. I will have to check them out on my next trip.

April 30, 2018 at 2:37 am

Hi Anisa, Glad you enjoyed our post, and glad we could mentioned a few additional places to visit on your next trip to Dublin! Best, Jessica

Lolo Post author

April 29, 2018 at 12:16 pm

I am a full on believer now of these city passes! They definitely save a lot of money, especially when transportation is included! I just said to my husband a few minutes ago, we should look into other city passes! I think this was a sign haha

Hi Lolo, Yes, we often use discount city or region passes, as they save us a lot of money since we go to so many places. Although you do have to watch out as some are not the best deals especially if you are not visiting a ton of attractions. But I’ve used them in the USA, Europe, Korea, etc. and have found them a really good way to save money without skipping places we want to visit. The Dublin Pass is one we’d definitely recommend as it is easy to save money if you plan to visit several more pricey attractions! Best, Jessica

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Celtic Wanderlust

Dublin City Guide: Your Insider’s Handbook to Exploring the Best of the Irish Capital

You are planning a city trip to Dublin, but you don’t know where to start? This Dublin city guide is here to help. I’ve been living in Dublin for more than a decade, and I’ve seen and visited pretty much everything in this historic city, from its biggest attractions to its hidden gems often ignored by mass tourism. I’ve poured everything I know into this Dublin city guide so that you can enjoy the best of the Irish capital.

Tips to help you prepare for your city trip to Dublin have also been included in this guide. Check out when it is best to travel to Dublin, where to book your hotel and how to get around the city. I also share with you my favourite (and reliable) booking and planning resources. Everything (or nearly everything) you need to know about Dublin is here.

Dublin City Guide: Your Insider's Handbook to Exploring the Best of the Irish Capital

Disclaimer This post may contain affiliate links. If you click on a link, I earn a little money at no extra cost to you.

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Let’s begin this Dublin city guide with your options for getting there from abroad.

With many airlines offering direct flights to Dublin International Airport from almost everywhere in Europe and beyond, it has never been easier to travel to Dublin. Low-cost Ryanair is, of course, the airline that comes to mind when planning a trip to Dublin. However, don’t disregard other companies offering very competitive prices, such as Aer Lingus or Air France/KLM .

From Asia, airlines like Emirates and Qatar Airways fly all the way to Dublin. It’s also very easy to travel from the United States with direct transatlantic flights offered by Aer Lingus or American Airlines .

From Belfast in Northern Ireland, you can easily reach Dublin by train in 2.5 hours. Currently, no security or identity checks are required to cross the border with the Republic of Ireland (at least for now).

If you’re looking for a more budget-friendly option, several bus companies, such as Aircoach and Dublin Express , regularly depart from Belfast city centre. Bus tickets are typically half the price of a train ticket, and the travel time is roughly similar.

Thought about travelling to Dublin by ferry? You can board a ferry from Holyhead in Wales to Dublin, with a sailing duration of just a few hours. Dublin is also connected by ferry to Cherbourg in France, but be prepared for an overnight journey at sea.

Fourt Courts, Dublin

Dublin city centre is fairly compact, and you won’t really need to rely on public transport. You’ll mainly be walking between the city’s main landmarks and museums, so make sure to pack comfy walking shoes.

Getting around Dublin by public transport is relatively simple. If you need to cover more distance, such as between the airport and the city centre, buses will be your main option. You can find all the information you need about Dublin Bus at their office on O’Connell Street or online. From the airport, you can take public double-decker buses or private coaches to reach the city centre. Taxis are also available outside the terminals.

Tram in Dublin, Ireland

Dublin has recently expanded its tram network called the Luas , with two lines now intersecting each other. The green line connects the north to the south of the city, while the red line goes east to west, connecting Dublin’s main train stations.

Unique to Dublin, the city has a railway system called the DART, which connects seaside towns nestled around Dublin Bay , such as picturesque Howth or posh Dun Laoghaire. It is a favourite means of transport for Dubliners to escape the city for the day, especially during the warmer months.

The Best Things to Do in Dublin

Let’s continue this Dublin city guide with a list of must-see attractions.

From the Viking invasions in early Medieval times to the 1916 Easter Rising , Dublin is a city steeped in History with beautiful landmarks waiting to tell you their very own stories. Among those not to be missed are:

  • Dublin Castle : with its lavish interiors, it is one of the best castles to visit in Dublin . A centre of power for centuries, Dublin Castle is an absolute must-see to understand Ireland’s past under British rule.
  • Trinity College’s Old Library : A jaw-dropping library, home to the world-famous Book of Kells and one of Ireland’s most cherished treasures.
  • Kilmainham Gaol : a former prison with high political significance (booking is advised) in Irish modern history.
  • St Patrick’s and Christ Church : the city’s two competing and historic cathedrals, built just 500 meters apart.

tourist office (visit dublin)

A great way to discover the city’s landmarks at your own pace is through a self-guided walking tour of Dublin , allowing you to explore up to 15 sites in a single day.

If you are worried about crowds and are not afraid to step away from the tourist trail, check out my favourite off-the-beaten-path things to do in Dublin for a more relaxed city trip.

All the major museums in Dublin are free of charge! Whether you are visiting Dublin on a budget or are a museum aficionado, here is your chance for an affordable cultural experience.

In this Dublin city guide, I recommend:

  • The Chester Beatty Library : the home of a world-renowned collection of richly decorated manuscripts, ranging from 12th-century Bibles to an 18th-century Turkish Quran and much more. It is the perfect museum for book lovers on a Dublin literary walking tour .
  • Glasnevin Cemetery Museum : an active cemetery, the largest in Dublin, it is also a museum. Glasnevin Cemetery is the resting place of numerous personalities who shaped Irish history. Access to the cemetery is free, although guided tours and access to the O’Connell Tower are not.
  • The National Museum of Ireland : the Museum has three distinct branches in Dublin: the Archaeology Museum, the Decorative Arts and History Museum and the Natural History Museum. Out of the three, my preference goes to the Archaeology Museum for its exhibits of Celtic metalwork!
  • As for the arts, you can access the permanent collection at the National Gallery of Ireland for free and admire paintings by well-known artists such as Monet, Picasso, and Vermeer, to name just a few. Along with the Hugh Lane , they are among the best art museums in Dublin .

National Gallery of Ireland, Best Art Museum in Dublin

Ireland is world-famous for its whiskey and beer, so a detour to a distillery or brewery should be on your bucket list.

The Guinness Storehouse is the one everybody thinks about when coming to Dublin. Possibly a tad overpriced, it is still a very interesting dive into the story of Guinness, a company intricately tied to the history of Dublin .

Copper Pot Stills, Roe & Coe Distillery, Dublin

When it comes to Irish whiskey, the Jameson Distillery comes to mind. However, please note that you won’t see the whiskey-making process in action, as no Jameson whiskey is produced in Dublin any more. My advice is to visit one of Dublin’s four working distilleries instead. At the Teeling Distillery , for instance, visitors can witness the operation of the huge copper pot stills. Just make sure to enjoy the tasting at the end of the tour on a full stomach, as it can have quite an effect!

For more whiskey tasting tours in Dublin, check-out the recommendations below:

Dublin’s nightlife reputation has travelled beyond the borders of the Irish Republic, and many choose Dublin to celebrate…anything! The Irish pub is a quintessential part of life in Dublin, and some will say you haven’t seen the city until you drink a pint in one of its pubs.

What is Dublin’s best pub then? That’s a question people could argue over for days. Everyone has a favourite depending on what they are looking for: the crowd or quiet socializing, modern or traditional (live!) music, Irish beers or foreign. 

Pub in Camden Street, Dublin

Although you can find a pub at almost every corner, let me suggest a few popular neighbourhoods to help you find your own favourite pub:

  • Temple Bar and its colourful establishments lining medieval looking cobbled streets lure crowds of tourists looking for an Irish pub with live Irish music. But it’s all a bit overpriced, and you’ll barely meet any Irish at the bar. Expand your search slightly beyond the cobbled streets for a more local crowd.
  • Definitely Dublin’s best entertainment district, Camden Street attracts a crowd ready to party until late into the night. Mismatched looking pubs quickly fill up with locals and expats eager to chill out after a long week at work. Pick one and move to the next until you find the right one for you!
  • The area roughly stretching from George’s Street to Dawson Street is a maze of streets filled with pubs, bars and clubs. Hotspots include George Street, Dame Lane, South William Street, Fade Street and Dawson Street.

You finally found a pub to your liking? Make sure to follow the Irish pub etiquette to blend in and have a great time in Dublin.

Hairy Lemon Pub in Dublin

Alternative Things to Do in Dublin

What else can you do in Dublin? Here come more recommendations.

Finding the city crowd too overwhelming? Why not venture outside Dublin to escape the city’s hustle and bustle for a short while? There are great places to visit around Dublin that are easily accessible by public transport.

For instance, head north to Malahide , a seaside town just 30 minutes on the DART, with a superb medieval castle and walled garden to explore. Alternatively, visit Howth , a quaint little harbour with one of the prettiest lighthouses in Dublin Bay and excellent seafood restaurants.

Malahide Castle, Co. Dublin

If you head south, you’ll find Bray , a sleepy seaside resort with a long stretch of pebble beach. From there, a scenic path along the cliffs will lead you to the village of Greystones in under two hours, offering breathtaking views along the way. It’s undeniably one of the best things to do on the East coast of Ireland .

Another option is to take a bus to Powerscourt Estate and discover its magnificent landscaped gardens. The 47 acres include romantic ornamental lakes, an exotic Japanese garden, dramatic terraces, and much more. Alongside the monastic settlement of Glendalough , they are considered one of the best places to visit in Wicklow , a breathtaking county just south of Dublin.

Powerscourt Japanese Garden, Wicklow

You can also take full advantage of Ireland’s public transport to discover another side of the country, with amazing day trips from Dublin by train . Explore historic cities like Waterford, Kilkenny, Galway, or even Belfast for a day out and about, thanks to frequent and affordable train services.

Looking to buy a new outfit or fill your suitcase with souvenirs and gifts? You’ll find all your favourite high street brands on Grafton Street , a posh pedestrian-only street on the Southside of Dublin. On the Northside, you can find two shopping centres and two department stores on Henry Street .

Shopping on Grafton Street, Dublin

Back on the Southside, the Creative Quarter is home to Irish design and some of the best craft shops in Dublin . At its heart, you’ll find the Powerscourt Centre, a beautiful 18th-century townhouse converted into an elegant shopping venue with fashion boutiques, jewellers, antiques, and art stores.

If vintage is your thing, Dublin is not short of vintage boutiques. Labelled as Europe’s oldest shopping centre, George’s Street Arcade is a colourful mix of quirky cafés, vintage, and second-hand shops. Temple Bar, Dublin’s cultural quarter , is another hotspot on the vintage scene. I enjoy browsing the many vintage boutiques found around its cobbled streets.

Bookshop in Dublin, Ireland

Like every capital, Dublin has its fair share of parks and manicured gardens that you can visit for free. Probably the most famous of them is Phoenix Park , the largest enclosed park in Europe. As you cycle around the 707 hectares, you may stumble upon a herd of 400 wild deer or decide to visit the elegant Farmleigh House , among other interesting things to do in Phoenix Park .

Garden, Farmleigh House, Dublin

My all-time favourite garden in Dublin is the National Botanic Gardens in Glasnevin, created in the late 18th century as the first botanical garden in Ireland. Its 19th-century glasshouse, made of curved iron and glass, houses a fantastic collection of tropical trees and cacti.

Dating back to the 18th century, manicured Georgian squares such as Merrion Square, St. Stephen’s Green, and Fitzwilliam Square are worth a visit. They are exceptionally popular during the summer months, when locals love to spend their lunch break on the grass and soak up as much sunlight as possible.

Dublin hosts festivals throughout the year, so if you happen to be in town during the St. Patrick’s Festival, music festivals, or arts festivals, why not join in!

In March, the week-long St. Patrick’s Festival culminates with the St. Patrick’s Day parade on March 17th. Many people travel to Dublin to celebrate the Irish national day in the Irish capital. Brace yourself for the crowds and join the green and orange tsunami!

One of the most established music festivals in Dublin is the Temple Bar TradFest , which takes place in January. Another major music event is the Forbidden Fruit Festival in June, conveniently organised on the grounds of the Irish Museum of Modern Art.

For film enthusiasts, the Dublin International Film Festival usually takes place around February or March, while the Dublin Tiger Fringe Festival in September brings an eclectic range of theatrical performances to the Dublin audience. Other arts festivals include the Dublin Dance Festival, Bram Stoker Festival, GAZE Festival, and more.

The Irish Film Institute in Temple Bar, Dublin

Genealogy is a hobby that is growing in popularity, and every year more people travel to Ireland in search of their Irish roots. In Dublin, two places should be on your radar to get the answers you need:

  • The National Library of Ireland : Visit the NLI’s free Genealogy Advisory Service located on Kildare Street. There, you’ll find experienced researchers ready to assist you.
  • Glasnevin Cemetery Museum : If you have ancestors buried in Glasnevin Cemetery, the Genealogy Research Centre at the Glasnevin Museum has a dedicated genealogist to help you find the answers you seek.

National Library of Ireland, Dublin

You want to stay as close as possible to Dublin city centre so that you don’t have to rely on public transport to get back to your hotel, especially at night when fewer buses run after 11:30 pm.

Merrion Square, Dublin, Ireland

Hotels on the south side of the Liffey are ideally located, but can be expensive. If you can afford it, by all means, stay at the luxurious Merrion Hotel (known to host celebrities!) or the iconic Shelbourne Hotel overlooking the leafy St. Stephen’s Green. You won’t find anything better than that in central Dublin.

If you’re on a budget and still want a room in a central location, you’ll find several reputable hostels in the city centre . However, be sure to book early as private rooms tend to get booked quickly. In terms of hotels, those located on Dublin’s Northside or a bit further out, such as in Smithfield, can save you a few bucks.

Smithfield, Dublin

If you’re hoping to enjoy a good night’s sleep, you’ll want to avoid hotels located in Temple Bar , or make sure to bring your earplugs.

To help you decide where to book your hotel, be sure to read my in-depth guide on the best neighbourhoods to stay in Dublin .

The unpredictable weather in Dublin makes it almost pointless to determine the best month to visit. Showers regularly give way to dry spells, and temperatures generally stay moderate throughout the year. It’s best to be prepared and bring a rain jacket regardless.

The tourist season usually kicks in with the St. Patrick’s Festival in March, followed by a slow build-up until August when Dublin becomes very busy, making it challenging to navigate the city centre.

My favourite months to visit Dublin are April/May and September . The crowds are manageable, and the sun makes regular appearances (no, I’m not kidding). You can enjoy longer days compared to winter, and hotels are usually more affordable during this time.

Dublin

These are my favourite websites for researching and planning a trip to Dublin. You’ll find a selection of international and trustworthy booking websites that every traveller should know about. I’ve also included some go-to local websites used on a daily basis by every Dubliner.

Heymondo – If you’re looking for travel insurance, Heymondo is offering a 5% discount to my readers! They also have a nifty app t help you get the assistance you need while on the go.

Skyscanner – Skyscanner is a great search engine for finding flight deals. It also provides a helpful tool for planning the best route to reach Dublin, especially when departing from an airport without direct flights to Ireland.

Irish Ferries and Stena Line – If you’re traveling from the UK or France, you can also reach Dublin by ferry. Check Irish Ferries or Stena Line for prices.

Booking.com – My go-to website when researching accommodation is Booking.com. The site offers a wider and more affordable selection of hotels and B&Bs that may not be found on other booking websites.

Hostelworld – If you’re on a budget, Hostelworld offers a good selection of hostels in Dublin with great city centre locations.

AirCoach and Dublin Express – These are my favourite bus companies for travelling from Dublin Airport to the city centre. Buy your ticket online and head straight to the bus!

Dublin Bus – The Dublin Bus website will help you navigate the city’s transportation network if you ever need to take a bus.

Irish Rail – Plan your day trips from Dublin with Irish Rail. Buying your ticket online and well in advance will guarantee you the best price.

Lonely Planet – Even after spending many years in Ireland, Lonely Planet remains one of my number one travel guides when planning a trip around this beautiful country. Buy a copy online and take it with you to Dublin; it always makes for a great travelling companion! Alternatively, read about all my favourite Ireland travel books .

Bookstore, Dublin

  • Dublin is a safe place to visit, but like any major European city, be aware of your surroundings. Some people will try to snatch your smartphone from your hands if you are too distracted.
  • You won’t be partying all night. Pubs serve alcohol until 11:30 pm (00:30 am on Friday & Saturday); some clubs can stay open till 2:30am.
  • Tipping is not compulsory in bars and restaurants (unless you’re part of a big party) but always appreciated (around 10%).
  • Travel prepared: pack a rain jacket as weather can change quickly.

Great South Wall, Dublin Bay

With a history dating back more than a thousand years, Dublin is one of the oldest cities in Europe. Its rich heritage can be seen everywhere as you walk along Dublin’s lively streets. From centuries-old cathedrals to Georgian townhouses, from traditional pubs to ancient libraries with links to French Huguenots fleeing religious persecution , Dublin oozes history. It is the ideal destination for a city trip, and I hope you will enjoy your stay!

Disclaimer: This post may contain affiliate links. If you click on a link, I earn a little money at no extra cost to you.

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11 amazing places to visit in Dublin

Ha'penny Bridge at night.

You may think you know Dublin, but how much of it have you really uncovered? It’s time to make the most of the unique blend of culture to be had in the capital. Walk in the footsteps of literary giants, visit secret rooftop gardens and experience the city in new ways.

Get out and explore, starting with these 11 amazing places to visit in Dublin.

  • 1 . Museum of Literature Ireland (MoLI)
  • 2 . Windmill Lane Recording Studios
  • 3 . Chester Beatty
  • 4 . Marsh’s Library
  • 5 . Jameson Distillery Bow Street
  • 6 . EPIC The Irish Emigration Museum
  • 7 . Croke Park Stadium Tour, Skyline Tour & GAA Museum
  • 8 . National Print Museum
  • 9 . Glasnevin Cemetery Museum & National Botanic Gardens
  • 10 . Hugh Lane Gallery
  • 11 . James Joyce Centre

Museum of Literature Ireland (MoLI)

Delve into Dublin's literary history and get better acquainted with giants like W.B. Yeats, James Joyce and Oscar Wilde. A trip to the Museum of Literature Ireland (MoLI) on St Stephen’s Green is a great way to learn the tales behind the writers and their work. Roam the interactive displays, download an audio guide to explore at your own pace, or book a 50 minute guided tour. 

The museum building was once University College Dublin’s Newman House where Joyce himself studied, and you can see the first copy of 'Ulysses' here. Get a feel for Joyce's student days as you stop at the Commons Café in the original dining halls, and pause with a cuppa as he would have.

tourist office (visit dublin)

Windmill Lane Recording Studios

Head to Windmill Lane Recording Studios in Ringsend for a slice of local musical history. A familiar name in the world of music, the Rolling Stones recorded 'Voodoo Lounge' here, Lady Gaga laid down tracks for 'Born This Way', and Kylie Minogue worked on 'Fever'.

Best of all, you can tour this space that’s been hosting musical greats since 1978. See how the magic happens, as you watch a recording session and hear stories of the studios' history. Round off the day nicely with a takeaway treat from 3FE Coffee nearby on Grand Canal Street. 

tourist office (visit dublin)

Chester Beatty

On the grounds of Dublin Castle , Chester Beatty is a museum and library that will take you on a global journey. You’ll see Asian paintings, North African costumes and Middle Eastern manuscripts as you hop across continents and centuries of cultural tradition. American mining engineer Sir Alfred Chester Beatty left this amazing collection to Ireland after his death in 1968.

Stop by the stunning rooftop garden to find a peaceful haven in the city centre, then head downstairs for Middle Eastern food from the Silk Road Café. After, take a walk through Dublin Castle’s courtyard and drop into an exhibition at the Coach House Gallery . 

tourist office (visit dublin)

Marsh’s Library

Lose yourself in Ireland’s oldest library, where regulars included famous writers like Bram Stoker and Jonathan Swift. As you gaze upon the 25,000 rare books at Marsh’s Library you can easily imagine days gone by, with many still in the spot where they were first placed in the 1700s. Come midnight, the ghost of Archbishop Narcissus Marsh is said to rummage through the bookcases.    Walk over to St Patrick’s Cathedral mere steps away to admire the spectacular architecture. If you time it right, you might catch one of the incredible choral performances that take place regularly. You can get a joint ticket to enjoy both of these neighbouring experiences.

tourist office (visit dublin)

Jameson Distillery Bow Street

Crowned the World’s Leading Distillery three years in a row, Jameson Distillery Bow Street has been a staple of Dublin culture since opening in 1780. Just off Smithfield Square, the operation covered five acres by 1886 and grew into a ‘city within a city’.    These days you can enjoy a tour of the historic building, learn how their world renowned whiskey is made and even blend some yourself at the Black Barrel Blending Class. After all that hard work, kick back with a cocktail in JJ’s Bar. This is great for groups, so get some friends together and plan to make an afternoon of it. 

tourist office (visit dublin)

EPIC The Irish Emigration Museum

Make your way to the striking CHQ Building overlooking the Liffey to immerse yourself in the experiences of Irish emigrants. At EPIC The Irish Emigration Museum , you'll discover the past as it’s brought to life through imaginative visual displays and interactive experiences. Explore Ireland’s struggle for independence, and witness the letters of thousands of Irish emigrants lost to the Great Famine. You can even trace your own ancestry at the museum’s Irish Family History Centre. 

A short walk around the neighbouring Dublin Docklands will reveal other iconic landmarks including The Jeanie Johnston Famine Ship , Custom House , Samuel Beckett Bridge and Convention Centre. 

tourist office (visit dublin)

Croke Park Stadium Tour, Skyline Tour & GAA Museum

Go behind the scenes at Croke Park , the home of Irish sport. On the Stadium Tour you'll venture pitchside, to Hill 16 for amazing views and beyond. Snap a selfie on the team bench and soak up the heritage of this iconic arena. You can take your visit to new heights with a Skyline Tour to see jaw dropping views as you move along a rooftop open air walkway. Experienced guides point out the Spire and Dublin Bay as you see the capital from a new perspective and look out over the field from the viewing platform.    Entry to the GAA Museum is included in both tours, and sporting fans can marvel at the 3000 year history of Gaelic games. Once you've checked out the exhibits and Hall of Fame, test your own hurling and football skills in the Interactive Game Zone.

tourist office (visit dublin)

National Print Museum

Discover Ireland’s only print museum and celebrate an art form that changed the world. At the National Print Museum , modern exhibits from names such as Annie Atkins and Damn Fine Print reveal the power of the printed message. Reaching into the past, the permanent collection includes an original 1916 Proclamation of the Republic (declaring Ireland's independence from the United Kingdom).

You can explore the layout of an old Dublin printshop, see classic machines at work from letterpress to Linotype, and browse original prints to take home. Pop into the bright PRESS café onsite for a Cloud Picker coffee and if you’re visiting at the weekend, try the delicious brunch menu. 

tourist office (visit dublin)

Glasnevin Cemetery Museum & National Botanic Gardens

Glasnevin Cemetery Museum is Ireland’s oldest cemetery. Some of Irish history’s most important figures are buried here including revolutionary leader Michael Collins and former Irish president Éamon de Valera. A choice of walking tours are on hand to guide you through its story stretching back nearly 200 years. But before you head inside the gates stop into John Kavanagh’s pub , more commonly known as The Gravediggers, for some refreshments. 

Through a shared wall, a linking gateway from the cemetery leads to the immaculate National Botanic Gardens . Stroll through the picturesque rose gardens, enjoy the tropical atmosphere of the Great Palm House and wander among the 15,000 plant species that inhabit the grounds.

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Hugh Lane Gallery

The Hugh Lane Gallery is a must for art lovers, with one of Ireland's most exciting collections of modern and contemporary work. Impressionist paintings by Monet and Pissarro keep company with the creative mess of Francis Bacon’s reconstructed studio, donated after the painter’s death and relocated from London. Even the dust was catalogued and carefully put in its proper place.

Make time to visit the Stained Glass Room to marvel at intricate work by Harry Clarke, and meet some famous Irish personalities face to face in portraits including W.B. Yeats. 

tourist office (visit dublin)

James Joyce Centre

Dedicated to the literary icon, the James Joyce Centre should be on the 'to do' list for any fan of the written word. Get involved with the interactive display of his most well known work 'Ulysses ' as it brings the novel to life. There’s lots of Joycean artefacts on show including the original door from No. 7 Eccles Street, the home address of 'Ulysses ' lead character Leopold Bloom.

Free audio tours are available, and walking tours take you outside to streets which provided the backdrop for so many of Joyce’s stories. Every year on June 16, the Centre also organises the Bloomsday Festival, a global celebration of 'Ulysses ' , its author and his place in world literature.   

tourist office (visit dublin)

Experience Dublin  

Dublin is jam packed with incredible things to see and do. Don't stop at this list, check out what’s on in Dublin and start planning your Dublin City break. 

tourist office (visit dublin)

Dublin

Visit Dublin

Here is the ideal guide for anybody considering a travel to Dublin ! Enthusiastic travelers should look into the must visit Dublin attractions as it offers a lot, from its energetic streets, fascinating history, to the active culture. Let’s discover the priceless Dublin tips so that your vacation is nothing short of spectacular. You’ll fall in love with Dublin’s architecture, savor delectable food, and find hidden jewels that will make your visit unforgettable as you stroll around the vibrant city. Prepare to be engrossed in Dublin’s ageless charm as we take you on an adventure full of wonder, beauty, and life-long memories. Together, let’s begin this Dublin travel guide to experience the city’s enchantment.

Best time to visit

Know the best times of the year to visit the city

Top things to do

Discover the best things to do in Dublin

Create your itinerary for your visit in jus a few minutes

Know before you go Dublin

Spoken language

Nearby airport

Dublin Airport

Top attractions in dublin, guinness storehouse.

Attraction Guinness Storehouse

Christ Church Cathedral

Attraction Christ Church Cathedral

EPIC The Irish Emigration Museum

Attraction EPIC The Irish Emigration Museum

Saint Patrick’s Cathedral Dublin

Attraction Saint Patrick’s Cathedral Dublin

Museum of Natural History In Dublin

Attraction Museum of Natural History In Dublin

Kilmainham Gaol

Attraction Kilmainham Gaol

National Art Gallery of Ireland 

Attraction National Art Gallery of Ireland 

National Wax Museum Plus

Attraction National Wax Museum Plus

Hop-on Hop-off Dublin 

Attraction Hop-on Hop-off Dublin 

Expert help to plan your trip to Dublin

A well-thought-out strategy is essential while preparing for a trip to Dublin to guarantee a positive experience. Consulting with knowledgeable consultants via a Dublin visitors guide might improve the journey by offering insightful advice and suggestions.

A Dublin visitors guide gives experienced and novice visitors the flexibility to find undiscovered treasures, favorite sights, and tranquil pursuits. Experienced travel advisors provide tailored suggestions based on personal tastes, adding their knowledge to the Dublin experience and creating the perfect Dublin weekend breaks for you.

Cities close to Dublin

Meet other cities near Dublin that are great tourist attractions

How to get around

We explain you which are the most common transportation methods and how to use them

Where to stay

Recommendations of the best hotels to stay in and for all budgets

Best neighborhoods

Discover the best neighborhoods in Dublin and what you can do in each of them

Enjoy Dublin

Explore Dublin’s city breaks , indulge in authentic Irish food in quaint pubs, and visit famous sites like Trinity College and Dublin Castle, famed for their rich architectural histories, to start an incredible journey into the city’s charm. With advice from well-known travel experts, you can uncover hidden treasures and local favorites and make the most of your Dublin holidays experience with insider knowledge and the most incredible deals.

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Revealed: Europe's Cheapest (And Most Expensive) Cities To Visit

Posted: July 9, 2024 | Last updated: July 9, 2024

<p>In 2024, savvy travelers are always on the lookout for budget-friendly destinations, and Europe is packed with fantastic options. But where to start? The Post Office Travel Money's annual City Costs Barometer report has revealed exactly where your euro will go further, with a list of the 10 cheapest European cities to visit this year. And if luxury is more your style (or you just want to know where to avoid), the most expensive holiday spots in Europe are included too. </p>  <p><strong>Read on to discover the best spots for your next European adventure that won't break the bank... </strong></p>

Spend or Splurge?

In 2024, savvy travelers are always on the lookout for budget-friendly destinations, and Europe is packed with fantastic options. But where to start? The Post Office Travel Money's annual City Costs Barometer report has revealed exactly where your euro will go further, with a list of the 10 cheapest European cities to visit this year. And if luxury is more your style (or you just want to know where to avoid), the most expensive holiday spots in Europe are included too. 

Read on to discover the best spots for your next European adventure that won't break the bank... 

<div class="flex-shrink-0 flex flex-col relative items-end"> <div class="pt-0.5 juice:pt-0"> <div class="gizmo-bot-avatar flex h-6 w-6 items-center justify-center overflow-hidden rounded-full juice:h-8 juice:w-8"> <div class="relative p-1 rounded-sm flex items-center justify-center bg-token-main-surface-primary text-token-text-primary h-8 w-8">Ranked as the 10th cheapest European city, Warsaw boasts a blend of diverse architecture, from meticulously reconstructed historic buildings to contemporary skyscrapers. Whether exploring on foot, taking a sightseeing bus tour ($34), or opting for a budget-friendly 48-hour travel card priced at just $4, there are ample ways to experience the city's charm affordably. After sightseeing, indulge in Warsaw's booming culinary scene. According to the Post Office report, a three-course meal for two with a bottle of house wine averages at $103, offering a taste of the city's rich flavors without straining your wallet.</div> </div> </div> </div>

10th Cheapest: Warsaw, Poland

<div class="flex-shrink-0 flex flex-col relative items-end"> <div class="pt-0.5 juice:pt-0"> <div class="gizmo-bot-avatar flex h-6 w-6 items-center justify-center overflow-hidden rounded-full juice:h-8 juice:w-8"> <div class="relative p-1 rounded-sm flex items-center justify-center bg-token-main-surface-primary text-token-text-primary h-8 w-8">Prague is a picturesque masterpiece at every turn with its abundance of Romanesque chapels, Baroque palaces, Gothic cathedrals, and Art Nouveau museums – but staying in this stunning city is possible even for those on a budget. Two nights in a 3-star hotel costs around $196, leaving you with cash to enjoy Prague's renowned Zly casy beer hall – the perfect spot for an evening out. Whether taking in the city's architectural marvels or enjoying its nightlife, Prague promises an unforgettable experience without the hefty price tag.</div> </div> </div> </div>

9th Cheapest: Prague, Czechia

<p>Slovakia's charming capital offers a peaceful weekend escape that transforms into a lively hub after dark. Its 18th-century, pedestrian-only Old Town is a gem by day, but come nightfall, the city’s famed clubbing scene springs to life. With beers as cheap as $4 per bottle and glasses of wine at just $5, you’re in for a memorable night out. The next morning, unwind with a leisurely stroll along the picturesque Danube River, soaking in the tranquil beauty of the surroundings. Whether you're exploring historic streets or dancing the night away, Bratislava promises a blend of relaxation and excitement.</p>

8th Cheapest: Bratislava, Slovakia

Slovakia's charming capital offers a peaceful weekend escape that transforms into a lively hub after dark. Its 18th-century, pedestrian-only Old Town is a gem by day, but come nightfall, the city’s famed clubbing scene springs to life. With beers as cheap as $4 per bottle and glasses of wine at just $5, you’re in for a memorable night out. The next morning, unwind with a leisurely stroll along the picturesque Danube River, soaking in the tranquil beauty of the surroundings. Whether you're exploring historic streets or dancing the night away, Bratislava promises a blend of relaxation and excitement.

<p>Budapest is a perennial favorite on holiday bucket lists, and rightfully so – its vibrant city center exudes an infectious energy. Whether you're captivated by its stunning architecture or exploring cultural treasures like the Hungarian National Gallery, where admission costs around $15, Budapest offers endless delights. Don't miss the opportunity to unwind in one of the city's numerous hot springs, a beloved tradition across Budapest, ensuring relaxation and rejuvenation during your stay.</p>

7th Cheapest: Budapest, Hungary

Budapest is a perennial favorite on holiday bucket lists, and rightfully so – its vibrant city center exudes an infectious energy. Whether you're captivated by its stunning architecture or exploring cultural treasures like the Hungarian National Gallery, where admission costs around $15, Budapest offers endless delights. Don't miss the opportunity to unwind in one of the city's numerous hot springs, a beloved tradition across Budapest, ensuring relaxation and rejuvenation during your stay.

<p>Situated between Estonia and Lithuania, Latvia serves as an ideal pitstop for exploring Eastern Europe, particularly its captivating capital, Riga. The city's distinctive 19th-century wooden architecture adds a unique charm to its landscape, while the Old Town transforms into a mesmerizing spectacle at night, bathed in warm beams of light. Riga offers affordable attractions, museums, and galleries, with tickets priced at under $10 each, making it a budget-friendly destination to immerse yourself in Baltic culture and history.</p>

6th Cheapest: Riga, Latvia

Situated between Estonia and Lithuania, Latvia serves as an ideal pitstop for exploring Eastern Europe, particularly its captivating capital, Riga. The city's distinctive 19th-century wooden architecture adds a unique charm to its landscape, while the Old Town transforms into a mesmerizing spectacle at night, bathed in warm beams of light. Riga offers affordable attractions, museums, and galleries, with tickets priced at under $10 each, making it a budget-friendly destination to immerse yourself in Baltic culture and history.

<div class="flex flex-grow flex-col max-w-full"> <div class="min-h-[20px] text-message flex flex-col items-start whitespace-pre-wrap break-words [.text-message+&]:mt-5 juice:w-full juice:items-end overflow-x-auto gap-2"> <div class="flex w-full flex-col gap-1 juice:empty:hidden juice:first:pt-[3px]"> <div class="markdown prose w-full break-words dark:prose-invert light"> <p>With a rich legacy dating back over three thousand years as the heart of Ancient Greece, Athens beckons travelers seeking to explore the well-preserved remnants of an old city through its iconic ruins. Adding to its allure, Athens ranks among the most affordable cities to visit in Europe. A sightseeing bus tour is a convenient way to take in must-see sites like the Acropolis and Parthenon – and with tickets under $25, it's a cheap way to get around too. </p> </div> </div> </div> </div>

5th Cheapest: Athens, Greece

With a rich legacy dating back over three thousand years as the heart of Ancient Greece, Athens beckons travelers seeking to explore the well-preserved remnants of an old city through its iconic ruins. Adding to its allure, Athens ranks among the most affordable cities to visit in Europe. A sightseeing bus tour is a convenient way to take in must-see sites like the Acropolis and Parthenon – and with tickets under $25, it's a cheap way to get around too. 

<p>Krakow, a city that feels straight out of a medieval fairy tale, is a hub of timeless charm and deep historical roots. Visitors can delve into Krakow's cultural scene without fear of overspending – according to the Post Office report, tickets to the city's top museum, art gallery, and heritage site, are all under $10. And don't miss exploring the UNESCO-listed Old Town, a remarkably preserved medieval center boasting Europe's largest market square, Rynek Glowny, lined with picturesque cafes and historic buildings.</p>

4th Cheapest: Krakow, Poland

Krakow, a city that feels straight out of a medieval fairy tale, is a hub of timeless charm and deep historical roots. Visitors can delve into Krakow's cultural scene without fear of overspending – according to the Post Office report, tickets to the city's top museum, art gallery, and heritage site, are all under $10. And don't miss exploring the UNESCO-listed Old Town, a remarkably preserved medieval center boasting Europe's largest market square, Rynek Glowny, lined with picturesque cafes and historic buildings.

<p>Near the border of Belgium, Lille blends French and Flemish influences seamlessly. Serving as an ideal gateway to northern France, Lille offers a taste of Franco-opulence without the hefty price tag, thanks to a 30% fall in accommodation prices since 2023. A 48-hour travel pass in Lille costs as little as $9.60, providing affordable access to the city's attractions. Many of its top tourist sites offer free admission, while renting a bike allows visitors to experience the cobbled medieval streets on wheels. </p>

3rd Cheapest: Lille, France

Near the border of Belgium, Lille blends French and Flemish influences seamlessly. Serving as an ideal gateway to northern France, Lille offers a taste of Franco-opulence without the hefty price tag, thanks to a 30% fall in accommodation prices since 2023. A 48-hour travel pass in Lille costs as little as $9.60, providing affordable access to the city's attractions. Many of its top tourist sites offer free admission, while renting a bike allows visitors to experience the cobbled medieval streets on wheels. 

<p>Despite its growing popularity fuelled by its vibrant atmosphere and lively nightlife, Lisbon remains affordable for visitors. Coffee-lovers can get their caffeine fix for just $1.20, while enjoying a glass of wine in the evening will set you back less than $2.60. For a quintessential Lisbon experience, set aside $4 to ride its iconic trams weaving through the city center. Don't miss the opportunity to visit the historic Sao Jorge Castle, offering panoramic views of the city and the Tagus River, providing a glimpse into Lisbon's rich history and stunning vistas. </p>  <p><span><strong>Liking this? Click on the Follow button above for more great stories from loveEXPLORING</strong></span></p>

2nd Cheapest: Lisbon, Portugal

Despite its growing popularity fuelled by its vibrant atmosphere and lively nightlife, Lisbon remains affordable for visitors. Coffee-lovers can get their caffeine fix for just $1.20, while enjoying a glass of wine in the evening will set you back less than $2.60. For a quintessential Lisbon experience, set aside $4 to ride its iconic trams weaving through the city center. Don't miss the opportunity to visit the historic Sao Jorge Castle, offering panoramic views of the city and the Tagus River, providing a glimpse into Lisbon's rich history and stunning vistas. 

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<p>Ranked as the cheapest European city to visit in 2024, Vilnius offers affordability and cultural richness. Explore its cobbled streets with a budget-friendly coffee in hand (from just $2.30) and immerse yourself in its medieval charm. Vilnius showcases stunning Baroque architecture, free-to-enter castles and cathedrals, and a UNESCO-listed historic center, but has a lot to offer beyond architecture too, with a thriving arts scene, diverse culinary offerings, and a lively cultural calendar. According to the Post Office report, a two-night stay for two people in 3-star accommodation costs just $167, making it an accessible destination for budget-conscious travelers.</p>

1st Cheapest: Vilnius, Lithuania

Ranked as the cheapest European city to visit in 2024, Vilnius offers affordability and cultural richness. Explore its cobbled streets with a budget-friendly coffee in hand (from just $2.30) and immerse yourself in its medieval charm. Vilnius showcases stunning Baroque architecture, free-to-enter castles and cathedrals, and a UNESCO-listed historic center, but has a lot to offer beyond architecture too, with a thriving arts scene, diverse culinary offerings, and a lively cultural calendar. According to the Post Office report, a two-night stay for two people in 3-star accommodation costs just $167, making it an accessible destination for budget-conscious travelers.

<p>Now onto the most expensive European cities to visit, and it's no surprise that Vienna – the opulent and romantic capital of Austria – makes the list. A weekend trip for two in the birthplace of Mozart and Beethoven will set you back $705, with a simple coffee costing around $6. However, Vienna's rich history, stunning architecture, and vibrant cultural scene make it a destination well worth visiting, despite the higher prices.</p>

10th Most Expensive: Vienna, Austria

Now onto the most expensive European cities to visit, and it's no surprise that Vienna – the opulent and romantic capital of Austria – makes the list. A weekend trip for two in the birthplace of Mozart and Beethoven will set you back $705, with a simple coffee costing around $6. However, Vienna's rich history, stunning architecture, and vibrant cultural scene make it a destination well worth visiting, despite the higher prices.

<div class="flex-shrink-0 flex flex-col relative items-end"> <div class="pt-0.5 juice:pt-0"> <div class="gizmo-bot-avatar flex h-6 w-6 items-center justify-center overflow-hidden rounded-full juice:h-8 juice:w-8"> <div class="relative p-1 rounded-sm flex items-center justify-center bg-token-main-surface-primary text-token-text-primary h-8 w-8">Geneva ranks ninth among the most expensive European cities, offering a blend of cosmopolitan buildings and stunning natural panoramas. While a glass of wine will set you back $8 and a bottle of Coca-Cola costs $6, there are still budget-friendly attractions. Lake Geneva, one of Europe's largest natural lakes, is free to visit and offers breathtaking views that are not to be missed.</div> </div> </div> </div>

9th Most Expensive: Geneva, Switzerland

<p>Surrounded by mountains and water, Oslo is a city of the future, boasting innovative architecture, efficient transport, and world-class museums. Oslo's museums are among the best globally, with highlights including the Norwegian Museum of Cultural History and the Holmenkollen Ski Museum, though tickets average around $19 each. After a day of exploring, be prepared to spend nearly $192 on a three-course meal for two. Despite the costs, Oslo's blend of natural beauty and modern sophistication makes it a popular tourist destination.</p>

8th Most Expensive: Oslo, Norway

Surrounded by mountains and water, Oslo is a city of the future, boasting innovative architecture, efficient transport, and world-class museums. Oslo's museums are among the best globally, with highlights including the Norwegian Museum of Cultural History and the Holmenkollen Ski Museum, though tickets average around $19 each. After a day of exploring, be prepared to spend nearly $192 on a three-course meal for two. Despite the costs, Oslo's blend of natural beauty and modern sophistication makes it a popular tourist destination.

<p>A two-night stay for two people in 3-star accommodation will set you back $407 in Copenhagen – a price many will argue is worth it for a chance to see the stunning canals and architecture. A glass of wine may cost over $11, but it is possible to save in other areas, namely by exploring the city's free attractions, such as the famous Little Mermaid statue, inspired by Hans Christian Andersen.</p>

7th Most Expensive: Copenhagen, Denmark

A two-night stay for two people in 3-star accommodation will set you back $407 in Copenhagen – a price many will argue is worth it for a chance to see the stunning canals and architecture. A glass of wine may cost over $11, but it is possible to save in other areas, namely by exploring the city's free attractions, such as the famous Little Mermaid statue, inspired by Hans Christian Andersen.

<p>A visit to one of Dublin's many ivy-covered pubs can come with a hefty price tag – a beer or a glass of wine will set you back around $8 apiece, while a three-course meal for two averages at $106. Then there's accommodation. According to the Post Office report, a two-night stay for two in a 3-star hotel will leave you around $540 poorer. Despite the costs, Dublin has much to offer, and the city's blend of historic charm and contemporary vibrancy ensures an unforgettable visit. Explore iconic sights like Trinity College and the Book of Kells, stroll through the picturesque St. Stephen's Green, and soak in the lively music scene in the Temple Bar district.</p>

6th Most Expensive: Dublin, Ireland

A visit to one of Dublin's many ivy-covered pubs can come with a hefty price tag – a beer or a glass of wine will set you back around $8 apiece, while a three-course meal for two averages at $106. Then there's accommodation. According to the Post Office report, a two-night stay for two in a 3-star hotel will leave you around $540 poorer. Despite the costs, Dublin has much to offer, and the city's blend of historic charm and contemporary vibrancy ensures an unforgettable visit. Explore iconic sights like Trinity College and the Book of Kells, stroll through the picturesque St. Stephen's Green, and soak in the lively music scene in the Temple Bar district.

<div class="flex-shrink-0 flex flex-col relative items-end"> <div class="pt-0.5 juice:pt-0"> <div class="gizmo-bot-avatar flex h-6 w-6 items-center justify-center overflow-hidden rounded-full juice:h-8 juice:w-8"> <div class="relative p-1 rounded-sm flex items-center justify-center bg-token-main-surface-primary text-token-text-primary h-8 w-8">A city of enchanting canals and otherworldly architecture, Venice stands as the Mediterranean epicenter for romantic (yet pricey) getaways. A 48-hour travel card alone will relieve your bank account of $40, while gondola rides start at around $119 depending on the time of day. However, Venice’s allure goes beyond its price tag. Wander through the iconic Piazza San Marco, marvel at the grandeur of St. Mark’s Basilica, and get lost in the maze of charming alleyways and hidden squares. The city’s rich history is evident in its stunning palaces and museums, and there is no experience quite like enjoying fresh seafood at a canal-side trattoria or sipping an Aperol Spritz while watching the sunset over the Grand Canal.</div> </div> </div> </div>

5th Most Expensive: Venice, Italy

<p>Known for its unique Art Nouveau architecture, Helsinki seamlessly blends historic charm with modern innovation and is a vibrant hub of culture and design, home to numerous museums, galleries, and theaters. A two-night break will set you back at least $753 but comes with the chance to visit the iconic Temppeliaukio Church, carved directly into solid rock, or the striking Helsinki Cathedral overlooking Senate Square. Warm up with a traditional Finnish sauna experience, an integral part of local culture, and indulge in hearty Finnish cuisine at cozy, candle-lit restaurants – if you have $150 for a three-course meal, that is.</p>

4th Most Expensive: Helsinki, Finland

Known for its unique Art Nouveau architecture, Helsinki seamlessly blends historic charm with modern innovation and is a vibrant hub of culture and design, home to numerous museums, galleries, and theaters. A two-night break will set you back at least $753 but comes with the chance to visit the iconic Temppeliaukio Church, carved directly into solid rock, or the striking Helsinki Cathedral overlooking Senate Square. Warm up with a traditional Finnish sauna experience, an integral part of local culture, and indulge in hearty Finnish cuisine at cozy, candle-lit restaurants – if you have $150 for a three-course meal, that is.

<p>Home to literary history, theatrical excellence, and atmospheric streets filled with the distant hum of bagpipes, Edinburgh is the third most expensive city on the Post Office City Costs Barometer list, and that's before prices skyrocket during the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. Dining out for a three-course meal for two can cost upwards of $125, while visiting heritage attractions like Edinburgh Castle often requires paying $25 or more to explore.</p>

3rd Most Expensive: Edinburgh, Scotland

Home to literary history, theatrical excellence, and atmospheric streets filled with the distant hum of bagpipes, Edinburgh is the third most expensive city on the Post Office City Costs Barometer list, and that's before prices skyrocket during the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. Dining out for a three-course meal for two can cost upwards of $125, while visiting heritage attractions like Edinburgh Castle often requires paying $25 or more to explore.

<p>Famously known as the birthplace of the RMS Titanic, Belfast is a popular tourist destination for exploring the secrets of the famous liner. This historical significance contributes to higher prices, with a weekend stay costing upwards of $560. Despite the expense, visitors can still enjoy the warm Northern Irish charm of the local community. Fortunately, prices for food and drink remain relatively low, allowing travelers to allocate more of their budget towards accommodation.</p>

2nd Most Expensive: Belfast, Northern Ireland

Famously known as the birthplace of the RMS Titanic, Belfast is a popular tourist destination for exploring the secrets of the famous liner. This historical significance contributes to higher prices, with a weekend stay costing upwards of $560. Despite the expense, visitors can still enjoy the warm Northern Irish charm of the local community. Fortunately, prices for food and drink remain relatively low, allowing travelers to allocate more of their budget towards accommodation.

<p>Amsterdam claims the title of the most expensive European city to visit in 2024, according to the Post Office report. The allure of Amsterdam's winding canals and iconic cityscape draws thousands of tourists daily. However, exploring this popular city comes with significant costs, including $25 for museum and gallery admissions, $31 for bus tours, and accommodation prices starting at $589 for a two-night stay for two. Despite the expenses, Amsterdam's unique charm, renowned museums, and the opportunity to enjoy traditional Dutch cuisine in cozy canal-side cafes, make it well worth a visit.</p>  <p><a href="https://www.loveexploring.com/galleries/80751/this-years-best-airlines-to-fly-with?page=1"><strong>Now discover this year's best airlines to fly with</strong></a></p>  <p><span><strong>Liked this? Click on the Follow button above for more great stories from loveEXPLORING</strong></span></p>

1st Most Expensive: Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Amsterdam claims the title of the most expensive European city to visit in 2024, according to the Post Office report. The allure of Amsterdam's winding canals and iconic cityscape draws thousands of tourists daily. However, exploring this popular city comes with significant costs, including $25 for museum and gallery admissions, $31 for bus tours, and accommodation prices starting at $589 for a two-night stay for two. Despite the expenses, Amsterdam's unique charm, renowned museums, and the opportunity to enjoy traditional Dutch cuisine in cozy canal-side cafes, make it well worth a visit.

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US Embassy in Dublin issues security alert for American travelers

tourist office (visit dublin)

The United States Embassy in Dublin issued a security alert for American travelers this week following an attack on a U.S. visitor.

“With a number of recent incidents reported in Irish media, the U.S. Embassy in Dublin reminds U.S. citizens to exercise good personal security practices while traveling,” the alert read. The embassy urged travelers to safeguard credit cards, passports and other valuables; avoid walking alone, particularly in the dark; and watch out for potential pickpocketing, mugging and other theft, among other safety measures.

The alert comes after a U.S. traveler was assaulted in the city on July 19. “The incident is believed to have occurred at around 10:40 p.m. when it’s reported a number of persons attacked a man,” the press office for the Garda, Ireland's police force, said in an emailed statement.

He was taken to a hospital and was in “serious but stable” condition following the incident, the statement said. Irish media reports identified the victim as 57-year-old Stephen Termini from Buffalo, New York. He was kicked and beaten, according to media outlet RTÉ .

Garda’s press office told USA TODAY it does not comment on victims or named individuals.

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Three minors have been arrested in connection with the incident, police said. The alleged attackers were 14, 15 and 16, according to the Irish Times .

A Ukrainian actor performing at a Dublin theater was also attacked by a group of people in June.

Nathan Diller is a consumer travel reporter for USA TODAY based in Nashville. You can reach him at [email protected].

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COMMENTS

  1. Visit Dublin

    Hidden gems. Uncover unique and exceptional experiences that are the lesser known attractions in Dublin. See all. Things to see & do Museums. The Little Museum of Dublin. Things to see & do Museums. National Print Museum. Things to see & do Museums. Windmill Lane Recording Studios.

  2. Dublin Tourist Information Centre, O'Connell Street

    Drop into the Tourist Information Centre on buzzing O'Connell Street where the friendly and expert Travel Advisors are ready to share their local knowledge so that you can enjoy the vibrant city and truly discover Dublin. The office is right in the heart of the city, a short stroll from historical buildings and top visitor attractions. Dublin ...

  3. Essential Dublin Tourist Information with Visit Dublin

    Tourist information centres. To make the most of your holiday in Ireland, be sure to visit one of Fáilte Ireland's tourist information centres for free and independent advice, maps and literature to enhance your holiday experience. 3 Palace Street, Barnardo Square, Dublin 2, D02 T277. 14 Upper O'Connell Street, Dublin 1.

  4. The essential guide to visiting Dublin

    Best time to visit Dublin Spring: Daffodils fill parks like St. Stephen's Green and Merrion Square. The city comes alive for three days of celebrations during March's St. Patrick's Festival .

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    The Dublin Visitor Centre is your one stop shop for everything Dublin. Their friendly multi-lingual staff are Dublin experts and can help you get the most out of our fair city. From Tours, Activities & Attractions to great restaurants, dinner shows and Victorian pubs the Dublin Visitor Centre is your go to Dublin guide. Stop by their Grafton ...

  6. Dublin

    The Hugh Lane Gallery, located on Parnell Square North, Dublin City, houses one of Ireland's most exciting collections of modern and contemporary Irish and international art. Established in 1908, Hugh Lane became the home of artist Francis Bacon's perfectly preserved studio in 1998. The gallery is free to visit.

  7. gov

    Visit Dublin aims to showcase the best of Ireland's capital city for tourists and visitors. By visiting the link below, you can: view maps of Dublin where you can pin the activities you'd like to do. view the latest information of what cultural and tourism events are on in Dublin. get insider tips of what to do during your stay in Dublin.

  8. Tourist Office

    Location. 14 O'Connell Street Upper, Dublin 1 , D01WP59 +353 1 800 230 330.

  9. DLR Tourism: What's On and Things to Do in Dublin

    Tourist Information Kiosk. To make the most of your holiday in Dublin, make sure your first stop is a visit to our official tourist information kiosk where you will receive free and independent advice, information, maps and literature to enhance your holiday experience. The official tourist offices are located at: Dun Laoghaire - Rathdown Tourist Information Kiosk The Metals, Marine Road ...

  10. 12 best things to do in Dublin

    9. Immerse yourself in culture at the National Museum of Ireland. Ireland's most important cultural institution is the National Museum of Ireland, which has four branches nationwide - three of which are in Dublin. The National Museum of Ireland - Archaeology on Kildare Street is the most significant, with an extraordinary collection of ...

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    Dublin's busy city centre and lush green surroundings make it an ideal destination for all types of travellers; those who prefer nature and those who love a good city break. Dublin is also famous for its many writers such as James Joyce, Oscar Wilde, Samuel Beckett or Bram Stoker, all of whom reflect their unique vision of the city in their work.

  12. Is Dublin Worth Visiting? A Local's 17 Pros (+ 5 Cons)

    17 great reasons why Dublin is worth visiting. 1. Dublin boats a deep history. A city steeped in history, Dublin is the capital city of Ireland and is renowned for its lively atmosphere, iconic pubs, and as the birthplace of Guinness.

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    Tourism information offices. Fáilte Ireland operates two Discover Ireland Tourist Offices in Dublin: Barnardo Square Tourist Information Centre, 3 Palace Street, Barnardo Square, Dublin 2, D02 T277 O'Connell Street 14 Upper O'Connell Street, Dublin 1, D01 WP59; For more information. Visit the Fáilte Ireland corporate website

  14. 22 Best Things to Do in Dublin, Ireland

    St. Patrick's Cathedral is the largest cathedral in Dublin and the national cathedral of the Church of Ireland. Built on the site where St. Patrick is said to have baptized converts some 600 years ...

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  16. 23 Top-Rated Tourist Attractions in Dublin

    Find the best places to visit with our list of the top attractions and things to do in Dublin, Ireland. On This Page: 1. Trinity College and College Green. 2. Shop on Grafton Street. 3. Take a Stroll around St. Stephens Green. 4.

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    6. Get to grips with Dublin's dining habits. Dubliners rarely eat breakfast out, so you might struggle to find a decent spot for breakfast that opens before 9am or 9:30am. The good news is that a decent cup of coffee is a non-negotiable, so there are plenty of places open by 8am to cater for caffeinated employees.

  18. Best Things to Do in Dublin

    Bernd is a travel writer from Germany who has lived in Ireland since the late 1990s and written several German-language tourism guides to the country. ... The largest and most impressive of the buildings which line the Dublin street is the General Post Office (GPO), scene of the 1916 rebellion. The GPO was faithfully rebuilt after being shelled ...

  19. Ireland's official holiday and travel guide

    With charming riverside towns and villages, majestic forests and sparkling waterways, Ireland's Hidden Heartlands is slow-travel perfection. Go with the flow. Amazing places to see. Don't miss these iconic sights and hidden gems around the island. Attraction. Cliffs of Moher. Clare. Destination. The Mourne Mountains.

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    Total Savings with Passes. €179. if you used the sightseeing bus and visited all of the main attractions listed on the suggested 3 day Dublin itinerary included in the Dublin Pass, it would cost you €198.5 at normal adult admission prices (April 2023 prices). A 3-day Dublin pass currently costs €109.

  21. Dublin City Guide: Your Insider's Handbook to Exploring the Best of the

    Visit the City's Famous Landmarks. From the Viking invasions in early Medieval times to the 1916 Easter Rising, Dublin is a city steeped in History with beautiful landmarks waiting to tell you their very own stories. Among those not to be missed are: Dublin Castle: with its lavish interiors, it is one of the best castles to visit in Dublin. A ...

  22. Top 11 Places to Visit in Dublin City

    Walk in the footsteps of literary giants, visit secret rooftop gardens and experience the city in new ways. Get out and explore, starting with these 11 amazing places to visit in Dublin. 1. Museum of Literature Ireland (MoLI) 2. Windmill Lane Recording Studios. 3. Chester Beatty. 4.

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  24. Revealed: Europe's Cheapest (And Most Expensive) Cities To Visit

    A visit to one of Dublin's many ivy-covered pubs can come with a hefty price tag - a beer or a glass of wine will set you back around $8 apiece, while a three-course meal for two averages at ...

  25. US Embassy in Dublin issues security alert for travelers

    The United States Embassy in Dublin issued a security alert for American travelers this week following an attack on a U.S. visitor. "With a number of recent incidents reported in Irish media ...