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The Wandering Earth

Liu cixin , holger nahm  ( translator ).

45 pages, Kindle Edition

First published July 9, 2000

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The Wandering Earth

  • 4.5 • 40 Ratings

Publisher Description

From New York Times bestselling author Cixin Liu, The Wandering Earth is a science fiction short story collection featuring the title tale--the basis for the blockbuster international film, now streaming on Netflix. These ten stories, including five Chinese Galaxy Award-winners, are a blazingly original ode to planet Earth, its pasts, and its futures. Liu's fiction takes the reader to the edge of the universe and the end of time, to meet stranger fates than we could have ever imagined. With a melancholic and keen understanding of human nature, Liu's stories show humanity's attempts to reason, navigate, and above all, survive in a desolate cosmos. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

PUBLISHERS WEEKLY OCT 4, 2021

Climate change is the least worrying threat in this earth-shattering (literally) collection of 11 brilliant tales from Hugo Award winner Liu ( The Three-Body Problem ). In universes indifferent to humanity—filled with pragmatically minded, planet-stripping dinosaurs ("Devourer"), or where gods look to move back in with their offspring ("Taking Care of God")—survival depends on those people brave or noble enough to take the long view, even if it takes 2,500 years to reach a new solar system, as in the title story. Despite the hardships Liu throws at his characters, he cushions his rougher truths with a wry humor; the elder humans in "For the Benefit of Mankind" pilot spaceships that "looked like an intergalactic cold-relief capsules," and "Curse 5.0" pokes fun at Liu's own sci-fi ambitions. While built around a hard-science outlook that acknowledges the bleakness of humanity's chances, these stories also feature a lot of the heart and hopefulness that draw readers to science fiction in the first place. Liu conjures a sense of wonder while grounding his tales in well-wrought characters. This is a masterwork.

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So new, wish they were all full stories.

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wandering earth author

From New York Times bestselling author Cixin Liu, THE WANDERING EARTH is a science fiction short story collection featuring the title tale --- the basis for the blockbuster international film, now streaming on Netflix.

These 10 stories, including five Chinese Galaxy Award winners, are a blazingly original ode to planet Earth, its pasts and its futures. Cixin Liu's fiction takes the reader to the edge of the universe and the end of time, to meet stranger fates than we ever could have imagined.

With a melancholic and keen understanding of human nature, Liu's stories show humanity's attempts to reason, navigate and, above all, survive in a desolate cosmos.

wandering earth author

The Wandering Earth by Cixin Liu

  • Publication Date: August 30, 2022
  • Genres: Fiction , Science Fiction , Short Stories
  • Paperback: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books
  • ISBN-10: 1250796849
  • ISBN-13: 9781250796844

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The Wandering Earth II takes a sci-fi blockbuster in a stranger, darker direction

The prequel to one of China’s biggest-ever box-office hits is kinda just… 3 hours of suffering

A bleeding man in an astronaut suit tries to cover the head of a woman in a similar suit as a series of windows in a small mechanical space shatter, spraying them and a third man with fragments of broken glass, in an action scene from The Wandering Earth II

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To successfully imitate the kind of mega-budget worldwide blockbuster most closely associated with Hollywood productions, filmmaker Frant Gwo literally went global. 2019’s The Wandering Earth , a sci-fi disaster adventure that became one of China’s biggest-ever box-office hits, takes place in a future world where Earth has been implanted with thrust rockets and piloted out of orbit to avoid a solar disaster. Astronauts must steer the spaceship-planet to a new home, while the surface freezes and its diminished inhabitants huddle underground.

The film’s enormous scope helped the movie become a Chinese smash, though it fell short of a worldwide phenomenon. (In the U.S., it had a limited theatrical run, then premiered on Netflix a few months later.) Wandering Earth ’s extensive, sometimes convoluted world-building, drawn from a short story by The Three-Body Problem author Cixin Liu , left plenty of room for a follow-up. But Gwo must have grown attached to the less icy version of his home planet, because The Wandering Earth II , receiving a somewhat wider U.S. release alongside its Chinese debut, is something even less likely than a disaster-movie sequel: a disaster-movie prequel.

Set across multiple decades leading up to Earth’s launch out of orbit (enabled by thousands of fusion-powered engines around the globe), the prequel starts off with plenty of its predecessor’s grab-bag maximalism. There’s a seemingly mad scientist extolling the virtues of a “digital you that can live forever” — an AI-based plan pitched as an alternate way to survive the coming apocalypse. (It’s unclear, but it sounds like the idea was to upload everyone to a Matrix-esque digital world, and leave the actual one to fry.) Pro-digital terrorist groups attack a massive space elevator, explosions and low-gravity fisticuffs erupt, and we learn that 91% of Americans oppose moving Earth out of orbit because they don’t think a problem 100 years away is worth solving. (“The world isn’t on the side of the reality,” one official laments.)

A man stands in a dark, chilly-looking room in front of an immense blackboard covered with mathematical symbols and formulae, dimly lit by a single shaft of light, in The Wandering Earth II

The sprawling results initially feel like a mashup of Don’t Look Up and Independence Day: Resurgence , but as the film enters its second hour, then its third, it brings in even more familiar bits and pieces of other movies. (It runs 173 minutes, including credits and multiple postscripts.) There is so much movie in The Wandering Earth II , and so many disasters, countdowns, and chyrons to go around. The movie may set a record for the sheer number of subtitled locations, timelines, characters, and occasionally even hardware. The first movie’s astronaut, Liu Peiqiang (Wu Jing) gets a backstory. So does one of the computer systems. The writing team steals bits of Interstellar one moment, and engages in parallel thinking with Moonfall the next. (“The moon disintegrates in 179 hours.”)

But perhaps the goofiest thing about Wandering Earth II is how resolutely un-goofy much of it is. There are moments of absurdity, but the film is often surprisingly grim, in a way that feels admirably ambitious but questionably useful. Much of the movie has a downbeat moon-gray palette, even in scenes that don’t take place on the moon. The saddest storyline it weaves across the decades is about Tu Hengyu (Andy Lau), a scientist grieving the loss of his wife and daughter, convinced he can fine-tune the digital echo of his young child into a fuller AI consciousness. (Here, there are thematic parallels with Yeon Sang-ho’s JUNG_E , a fleeter and more manageable science fiction movie premiering on Netflix right as Wandering Earth II lumbers into theaters.)

The dead-family storyline isn’t the only obligatory pause for pathos, either. Another character must deal with his wife’s imminent death, since cancer cases have spiked during the rise of dangerous solar activity. At the same time, he’s trying to secure one of the limited tickets to an underground city.

A man bends over a table to look at something in a dark, futuristic-looking science lab in The Wandering Earth II

In many ways, Gwo carries this heaviness with more grace than the supposed masters of the modern form. Unlike Roland Emmerich (whose work the Wandering Earth series generally resembles) or Michael Bay (whose Armageddon feels like part of this movie’s DNA), Gwo isn’t afraid of quiet moments amid the bombast. He doesn’t nervously pack his movies with goony comic relief or shameless ploys for applause. Some of his imagery has an eerie, almost mournful beauty — even more so than the previous movie, which found some poetic imagery among the chintzier-looking special effects.

Yet none of this keeps exhaustion from setting in over the course of nearly three hours. Exactly how many countdowns to possible apocalypse can a movie bear, especially when the planet is demonstrably intact at the beginning of the next movie? The audience knows Earth survives, which turns Wandering Earth II into a torture device for its new characters: The planet will keep going, but these poor suckers can still get put through the wringer.

That obviously isn’t Gwo’s intention, and it is remarkable that his three-hour Wandering Earth prequel is simultaneously stranger and more emotionally grounded than the earlier film. Yet even at this length, even with eye-popping moments and believable characters, some crucial humanity feels missing. Classic disaster movies offer something similar to the feel of a horror movie: the terror of annihilation and the catharsis of survival, but spread over a larger canvas. Maybe that model just doesn’t work anymore. Skillfully made as it is, Wandering Earth II feels more like immersion therapy for the modern onslaught of apocalyptic news from around the world. Like franchises, global disasters no longer really end.

The Wandering Earth II opens in theaters on Sunday, Jan. 22, the first day of the lunar new year. Check the movie’s website for locations.

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Cixin Liu

The Wandering Earth: Classic Science Fiction Collection Paperback – 27 June 2013

  • Print length 484 pages
  • Language English
  • Publication date 27 June 2013
  • Dimensions 14.61 x 3.18 x 22.23 cm
  • ISBN-10 1489502858
  • ISBN-13 978-1489502858
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  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ Createspace Independent Publishing Platform (27 June 2013)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • Paperback ‏ : ‎ 484 pages
  • ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 1489502858
  • ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-1489502858
  • Dimensions ‏ : ‎ 14.61 x 3.18 x 22.23 cm

About the author

wandering earth author

Liu Cixin, born in June 1963, is a representative of the new generation of Chinese science fiction authors and recognized as a leading voice in Chinese science fiction. He was awarded the China Galaxy Science Fiction Award for eight consecutive years, from 1999 to 2006 and again in 2010. His representative work The Three-body Problem is the BEST STORY of 2015 Hugo Awards, the 3rd of 2015 Campbell Award finalists, and nominee of 2015 Nebulas Award.

His works have received wide acclaim on account of their powerful atmosphere and brilliant imagination. Liu Cixin's stories successfully combine the exceedingly ephemeral with hard reality, all the while focussing on revealing the essence and aesthetics of science. He has endeavoured to create a distinctly Chinese style of science fiction. Liu Cixin is a member of the China Writers' Association and the Shanxi Writers' Association.

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At Home in the World: Wandering Earth, Environmentalism, and Reimagined Homelands

Carlos Rojas is professor of Chinese Cultural Studies, Gender, Sexuality, & Feminist Studies, and the Cinematic Arts at Duke University. He is the author, editor, and translator of numerous books, including Homesickness: Culture, Contagion, and National Transformation in Modern China (Harvard University Press, 2015).

Based on a 2000 novella by Cixin Liu with the same title, Frant Gwo’s 2019 film Wandering Earth has been celebrated as China’s first big-budget science fiction film. As a Chinese film with a global theme that simultaneously targets both a domestic and an international audience, accordingly, the work invites a reflection on the relationship between the local and the global—on how we understand the concept of home, and what it might mean to be home in the world. This essay, accordingly, examines three intersecting ways in which Wandering Earth (both the film and the original novella) explores the relationship between home and the world, including the status of the Earth as an ecological system, the planet’s status as a lived environment, as well as a set of contemporary geopolitical discourses about China’s shifting position within the contemporary world order, and particularly its relationship to the Global South.

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Chen, Q. 2019. “What ‘The Wandering Earth’ Says about Chinese Sci-Fi.” M.Turner, trans. Sixth Ton. https://www.sixthtone.com/news/1003548/what-the-wandering-earth-says-about-chinese-sci-fi (Accessed April 29, 2021). Search in Google Scholar

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REVIEW | “The Wandering Earth”: Sampling Chinese Foreign Policy from Contemporary Pop Culture

by Vivienne Zhan g

As the rest of the world adjusts to the new normal of life in the time of COVID-19, this real-time global emergency reveals stark cultural, systematic, and stylistic differences between China’s crisis leadership and that of other countries. Our current situation might not be as dramatic as the Earth’s destruction, but China has theorised about that too on the big screen, and about what it would do to lead humanity to safety. 

In both fiction and reality, art plays a sometimes subtle, and at other times crude, role in promoting CCP ideology while diminishing those of other systems. More strikingly, the recent phenomenon of ‘main melody films’ in China provides a case study for how the Chinese government has adapted the messaging of its globalised agenda for international consumption. “The Wandering Earth” (2019) is a Chinese science fiction blockbuster released last February, timed to coincide with the busy Lunar New Year season and the historic touchdown of China’s Chang’e 4 probe on the dark side of the moon. The film, directed by Frant Gwo, is loosely based on the novella of the same name by award-winning sci-fi author Liu Cixin. It tells the story of a mission to save Earth from the parallel perspectives of cosmonaut Liu Peiqiang on the International Space Station, and his son, technician-in-training Liu Qi. 

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In their world, the Sun’s initial rapid expansion forced mankind to survive by living in underground cities and initiating “The Wandering Earth” Project, which sought to move planet Earth to another star system. The project is projected to build and activate 10,000 Earth Engines around the planet under the orders of the United Earth Government (UEG). These engines supposedly generate enough force to push Earth towards a new orbit over the course of 2,500 years. The project is hoped to bring everything ‘back to normal’ from crisis-mode, when some effects of disasters can be reversed and people can finally ‘go home’. Convinced by this plan, people on Earth are mobilised to maintain the Engines, while a group of cosmonauts on the ISS provide navigation and communication aids to them. But during Earth’s long voyage, the Liu family and their comrades face an existential threat, as Jupiter is on an unexpected collision course with Earth. Liu Qi’s motley crew of Chinese civilians and military personnel must team up with his estranged cosmonaut father via telecom to uncover a conspiracy within the UEG and prevent the Earth’s destruction as “The Wandering Earth” Project fails.  

The film received swarms of excellent reviews in China and stands as a modern sci-fi masterpiece. But this domestically-successful blockbuster deserves deeper analysis despite its relative international obscurity. According to Dr Katherine Bowers, Assistant Professor of Slavic Studies at the University of British Columbia, who has expertise in Soviet and Russian sci-fi, “Science fiction is almost always ideological because it enables you to imagine other systems of government. And as soon as you start to imagine these things, personal biases and belief systems come out.” 

Communist Cinema’s Commercial Makeover

The context of the film’s release plays a substantial role in its ideological message, so there is no better place to begin dissecting the beast. The film is not only the third highest-grossing Chinese movie of all time; popular opinion labelled it the centrepiece of a new wave of Chinese science fiction. The film won several prestigious Chinese awards and captured much attention within China, as well as a degree of recognition from foreign critics. For example, film critic Simon Abrams gave it a glowing review , ‘I can’t think of another recent computer-graphics-driven blockbuster that left me feeling this giddy because of its creators’ can-do spirit and consummate attention to detail. The future is here, and it is nerve-wracking, gorgeous, and Chinese’.

Like a number of China’s highest-grossing films, “The Wandering Earth” has been labelled a ‘main melody film’. This term refers to films reflecting official messages of the Chinese Communist Party. These films’ desired effect is to increase the understanding and social integration of the Chinese spirit of sacrifice, struggle, and patriotism . This genre of main melody art may involve obvious glorification of the military and law enforcement, the party and its leadership, as well as their revolutionary achievements, by way of reprogramming history. As a result of state censorship and propaganda, filmmakers may find themselves being conducted by the melody either willingly or involuntarily .  

Throughout Chinese cinematic history, main melody films were largely focused on revolutionary events or on the country’s development and maturation. They often centre around a classic socialist hero, frequently characterised as a strong, brave, macho leader, who commands respect in their community and has a perfect family with an obedient wife and child. In recent years, however, the new trend of main melody movies goes beyond the need to polish historical events and applaud perfect characters. Instead, they commercialise internationalism and adapt storytelling elements of their Hollywood competitors with resounding success. Evidence of such success is found in the growing trend of international casts, globally-produced set pieces showing off the blockbuster budget, and simple storylines with characters of universal appeal. Whilst black-and-white, ‘good versus evil’ plots are also part of Chinese cinema’s forte, the technical accomplishments of main melody films are quickly embraced by critical moviegoers and younger generations.   

Audiences long complained about the lack of technical quality in Chinese filmmaking. A major sore spot, for instance, is the CGI not being on par with international blockbusters. From this angle, “The Wandering Earth” outperformed, with beautiful effects and set designs, rad costumes, and a killer soundtrack (performed by the British Royal Philharmonic Orchestra). Importantly, its storyline created an image of China as an active leader and saviour, by incorporating known elements of nationalism with favourable perceptions of China on the global stage. 

Dimensions of a Hero

Diving into the wardrobe and symbolism of “The Wandering Earth”, although the significance of colour-coding is not overtly specified in the film, the segmentation of characters wearing black, white, and red clothing seem to indicate their degree of importance and their role in serving the socialist legacy. Those in black are mostly government and military officials. We see their sacrifices the most, as they internalise their duty as their identity and are most willing to risk their lives. Although we see flaws such as sternness and inflexibility, those in black in the end cultivate and mentor younger leaders in combating adversity.  

The white coats are mostly computer nerds who serve as comic relief. They are portrayed as risk-averse and wary of sacrifices, but when motivated enough by great leadership, they eventually become reliable team players, provide key problem-solving skills, and aid the final rescue effort. The half-Chinese, half-Australian character Tim best exemplifies this group. He is first introduced in a detention centre as a cowardly companion to Liu Qi, and an opportunist with a history of petty crime. The function of a mixed-race comic relief character is, on one hand, a refreshing indication of a progressive outlook on the traditionally homogenous Chinese citizenry. On the other hand, Tim’s thick Beijing accent, chosen Chinese companions, and allegiance to China paint the acceptable parameters of the Chinese identity. Ultimately, Tim learns from the heroes around him and puts his life on the line to save Liu Qi. This character’s growth shows that even unmotivated individuals and partially-Chinese folk can shine with inspiring comrades and leaders. 

Unsurprisingly, the three characters who wear red are the most interesting and unique. Here, red does not necessarily automatically equals COMMUNISM in a film from a communist country; rather, since the three wearing red are the youths and the elderly caught in the middle of this disaster, they represent the experience of common people. The melodramatic backstory of Liu Qi’s grandfather and Liu Peiqiang’s father paints him as a working-class saviour. In a flashback, the grandfather recollects a simpler time before the disaster, when he would come home to his now-dead wife and “enjoy” her terrible cooking, despite their financial hardship. We then see him heroically saving his adopted granddaughter from drowning. 

Like those wearing white, the “reds” experience sacrifice and pain before understanding their responsibility and finally accepting that apathy is useless. The youth in red surpass those wearing black, becoming inspirational changemakers. In times of desperation, their voices mobilise not only the Chinese people but the entire world. Without obvious socialist slogans, the glorification of youth, scientists, and the military against an international conspiracy in addition to extinction introduces a “communist lite” version of socialist realism. This resembles Hollywood plots like Independence Day (1996) , where the survival of the world is tied directly to the leadership of the United States. Here, China is taking the lead, and the international movement is called into action not by the head of state, but by the common people. 

In contrast to ‘my grandpa’s socialist hero’, the protagonist is no longer flawless in his blind obedience to the government. The deeper layer to the new ‘main melody protagonist’ is his disobedience of a conspiratory international government, embodied by western voices, amplifies his heroism. The most righteous hero in the film, Liu Peiqiang, does not play by the rules of the United Earth Government. UEG itself is a utopian international government (formerly known as the United Nations) with executive power over the entire planet. When faced with “The Wandering Earth” Project’s collapse and Earth’s annihilation, Liu Peiqiang and his Russian cosmonaut friend Marakov disobey the UEG and risk death to rescue civilization. Through multiple negotiations, pleas, and finally brute force, Liu Peiqiang bends the UEG to his sheer will and coerces the UEG to give him an endorsement. 

Liu’s revolt against UEG’s orders of abandoning Earth and his achievement in taking over executive control, endorsement of the rescue mission by the UEG, and fruitful coordination with those on Earth in the rescue mission give us a glimpse of how China idealises itself in the global order, as it justifies its desired role as a hegemonic power. On Earth, China’s soft power is exemplified by the global mobilization towards achieving the rescue plan after Liu’s team broadcasts an inspiring message to mankind. Under both kinds of hard and soft power, those who have given up on the failed Wandering Earth Project (including the Koreans and Canadians) turn back and join the Chinese in humanity’s last struggle in Sulawesi, Indonesia. Whether it is up in the ISS or on the ground, Chinese people inspire hope and bravery when the UEG fails. 

Zero-sum Fame

While touting “The Wandering Earth”’s success, a Sichuan Daily article praises the film’s blend of attractive effects, family and political drama, moral and ethical themes, with an intriguing sci-fi premise. It also commends the film’s natural integration of the Eastern culture of sticking to one’s land and traditions, with Chinese characteristics of strong determination and self-sacrifice. In the author’s view, this creates a uniquely Chinese style of sci-fi . 

The film took considerable liberties with its source, the novella of the same name by renowned Chinese sci-fi author Liu Cixin, altering the story’s setting and the relationship between characters. One of many focuses of the novella is its emphasis on the political unrest between two camps of people supporting and opposing the UEG and its Wandering Earth Project. Indeed, the adaptation tried to depict UEG’s betrayal of humanity in spite of it being the Earth’s absolute governing body. However, the film adaptation unsurprisingly removed the taboo content on the political divide and plays up elements of Chinese culture and tradition instead. This is demonstrated by a scene of a protest in the underground city of Beijing which only appeared onscreen for two seconds as a homage to the riots in the novella before it cut to scenes of chuan’rs and lion-dancing. These cultural traditions reflect China’s present as well as its future. Combined with the film’s heavy-handed theme of ‘homecoming’, this presents China’s existing system as a utopia that is to be preserved even in an emergency. 

The protagonist Liu Qi grows from an immature young adult and a spectator of disasters to a hot-headed but creative leader. One could interpret this as a metaphor for China’s shift in foreign policy: from a reactive actor to an active and assertive global leader, ready to “ always be a defender of international order ”. Character traits of both father and son offer insights into China’s new approach to diplomacy. The country strives to present itself as a leader who is ambitious, but nonetheless brave and innovative, forceful and persuasive, with the world’s best interests in mind. The excellence of Chinese leadership in this neo-idealist setting offers an exemplary illustration of Xi Jinping Thought, which is said to “connect the Chinese Dream with the World Dream” in dialectical unity .

As well as portraying outstanding Chinese leadership, the film diminishes the US’ role in international politics. The viewer hardly notices American elements except for the brief appearance of CNN and the American flag on “The Wandering Earth” Project’s UEG resolution (reflecting the United Nations Security Council’s P5 structure). On the other hand, audiences can easily sense France’s international presence, from French cosmonauts on the ISS to French news channels, and the faceless French-speaking UEG bureaucrat. 

The lack of American representation and the overrepresentation of other national stereotypes, contrasted with the glorification of Chinese culture, is a mirror image of any American blockbuster’s token diversity. Such characteristics of the film again showcase main melody films’ adaptability to Hollywood’s cinematic language. Regardless of the lack of widespread popularity the film garnered overseas, “The Wandering Earth” ’s marketability is strengthened by Netflix’s decision to distribute it outside of China . Netflix’s Asian market strategy of acquiring rights to Asian films for international release offers a route for main melody movies like “The Wandering Earth” to be seen outside of China, and enhance their ideological globalisation. 

Recently, the film’s message of China championing global crisis governance and leadership found a real-life parallel in aggressive media campaigns on Chinese medical aid to Italy and Serbia as COVID-19 ravages Europe. The political nature of emergency response should not be ignored; since in the imaginary and in reality, government messaging is constructed with ideological instruments and performed in the theatre of public opinion. In the case of China, its advocacy of nationalistic sentiments such as Chinese culture and tradition is combined with an outward-looking foreign policy direction and further supplemented by a celebration of its political system. For a spectator of pop culture and of international affairs, identifying these complex aims of communications and propaganda may be curiously thought-provoking. 

Hailing from Vancouver and Beijing, Vivienne Zhang is a Chinese-Canadian Master’s student in International Security at Sciences Po’s Paris School of International Affairs. She has worked at Canada’s diplomatic missions abroad in Thailand, Lao PDR, and Switzerland, and is a current member of the Global Shapers Community. 

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Gregg Borodaty

Software developer by day baker, writer, software developer by night.

wandering earth author

Book review: The Wandering Earth

Book cover for The Wandering Earth by Cixin Liu

Between the books on my usual reading list, I like to include short stories. I find it a good way to experience new authors to see if I may be interested in exploring their longer form works. Short stories can also be an interesting format. Writers have a limited amount of space to explore an idea, expand a plot, and develop characters. I like seeing how an author creatively utilizes the short story form.

For my latest short story reading, I choose The Wandering Earth . Rather than a single story, it is a collection ten short stories by science fiction author Cixin Liu .

The Wandering Earth was not the first time I’d read a book by Liu. A few years ago, I read The Three Body Problem , which was a very well written book with a very detailed and technical story line. It’s one of the things that drew me to his collection of short stories. The other strong draw is that he is a Chinese author. It is interesting to read science fiction from the point of view of an author who is not from America or a country dominated by western culture.

I’m not going to do a detailed review of all ten stories. The short summary is there were some I loved, some I liked, and some that were just OK. My favorites included the following:

  • The Wandering Earth – instead of sending people to another planetary system to save humanity, rockets are attached to earth to move the entire planet.
  • Sun of China – touching story about a boy who follows his dreams and takes risks to become one of the first explorers of deep space.
  • Micro-era – interesting story of a human who returns to earth from a deep space mission to learn that everything on the earth has been miniaturized; a classic short story that focuses on how the main character comes to grip with and accepts his discovery.
  • With Her Eyes – the shortest of the collection that contains a powerful message about appreciating what we have, enjoying every moment, and having empathy for others.
  • Cannonball – a story that is emblematic of Liu’s works exploring the trade-off between the benefits and consequences of technology.

Overall, The Wandering Earth is an interesting mix of stories. All of them contain a strong science fiction component, as you would expect. While some of the stories can get a little lengthy for the short story genre, it shouldn’t deter you from checking it out. It’s a solid collection that you can browse through at your leisure. Since none of the stories are connected, you can read them in any order, all at one time, or one or two at a time as I did. Bottom line, in my opinion, The Wandering Earth is worth checking out.

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  1. The Wandering Earth

    The Wandering Earth : : liúlàng dìqiú) is a 2019 Chinese science fiction film directed by Frant Gwo, loosely based on the 2000 short story of the same name Liu Cixin about taking the and pushing it somewhere else. The film stars Wu Jing Qu Chuxiao, Li Guangjie, Ng Man-tat Zhao Jinmai and Qu Jingjing.

  2. Liu Cixin

    Liu Cixin Liu Cixin ( Chinese: 刘慈欣, pronounced [ljǒʊ tsʰɨ̌ɕín]; born 23 June 1963) [1] is a Chinese computer engineer and science fiction writer. [2] He is a nine-time winner of China's Galaxy Award and has also received the 2015 Hugo Award for his novel The Three-Body Problem as well as the 2017 Locus Award for Death's End.

  3. The Wandering Earth (novella)

    The Wandering Earth is a science fiction novella by Chinese writer Cixin Liu. The novella focuses on humanity's efforts to move the Earth in order to avoid a supernova. It was first published in 2000 by Beijing Guomi and won the 2000 China Galaxy Science Fiction Award of the Year. [citation needed]

  4. The Wandering Earth

    From New York Times bestselling author Cixin Liu, The Wandering Earth is a science fiction short story collection featuring the title tale--the basis for the blockbuster international film, now streaming on Netflix.

  5. The Wandering Earth by Liu, Cixin

    From New York Times bestselling author Cixin Liu, The Wandering Earth is a science fiction short story collection featuring the title tale--the basis for the blockbuster international film, now streaming on Netflix.

  6. Amazon.com: The Wandering Earth eBook : Liu, Cixin: Kindle Store

    Cixin Liu Follow The Wandering Earth Kindle Edition by Cixin Liu (Author) Format: Kindle Edition 4.5 2,718 ratings Editors' pick Best Science Fiction & Fantasy See all formats and editions

  7. The Wandering Earth by Liu Cixin

    The Wandering Earth by Liu Cixin | Goodreads Jump to ratings and reviews Want to read Kindle $1.99 Rate this book The Wandering Earth Liu Cixin, Holger Nahm (Translator) 4.10 7,901 ratings746 reviews First published in Science Fiction World, July 2000. I've never seen the night, nor seen a star; I've seen neither spring, nor fall, nor winter.

  8. Wandering Earth: Liu, Cixin: 9781250796844: Amazon.com: Books

    From New York Times bestselling author Cixin Liu, The Wandering Earth is a science fiction short story collection featuring the title tale--the basis for the blockbuster international film, now streaming on Netflix. These ten stories, including five Chinese Galaxy Award-winners, are a blazingly original ode to planet Earth, its pasts, and its futures.

  9. The Wandering Earth

    From New York Times bestselling author Cixin Liu, The Wandering Earth is a science fiction short story collection featuring the title tale--the basis for the blockbuster international film, now streaming on Netflix.These ten stories, including five Chinese Galaxy Award-winners, are a blazingly original ode to planet Earth, its pasts, and its futures.

  10. The Wandering Earth

    Tor Publishing Group, Oct 26, 2021 - Fiction - 464 pages. From New York Times bestselling author Cixin Liu, The Wandering Earth is a science fiction short story collection featuring the title tale--the basis for the blockbuster international film, now streaming on Netflix. These ten stories, including five Chinese Galaxy Award-winners, are a ...

  11. The Wandering Earth by Cixin Liu, Paperback

    From New York Times bestselling author Cixin Liu, The Wandering Earth is a science fiction short story collection featuring the title tale—the basis for the blockbuster international film, now streaming on Netflix. These ten stories, including five Chinese Galaxy Award-winners, are a blazingly original ode to planet Earth, its pasts, and its futures.

  12. The wandering Earth : Liu, Cixin, author : Free Download, Borrow, and

    The wandering Earth. Cixin Liu is China's bestselling science fiction author and one of the most important voices in world SF. His novel, The Three-Body Problem, was the first translated work of SF ever to win the Hugo Award. Here is the first collection of his short fiction: eleven stories, including five Chinese Galaxy Award-winners, form a ...

  13. ‎The Wandering Earth on Apple Books

    From New York Times bestselling author Cixin Liu, The Wandering Earth is a science fiction short story collection featuring the title tale--the basis for the blockbuster international film, now streaming on Netflix. These ten stories, including five Chinese Galaxy Award-winners, are a blazingly original ode to planet Earth, its pasts, and its futures.

  14. The Wandering Earth

    From New York Times bestselling author Cixin Liu, THE WANDERING EARTH is a science fiction short story collection featuring the title tale --- the basis for the blockbuster international film, now streaming on Netflix.

  15. The Wandering Earth II takes a sci-fi blockbuster in a ...

    Wandering Earth 's extensive, sometimes convoluted world-building, drawn from a short story by The Three-Body Problem author Cixin Liu, left plenty of room for a follow-up.

  16. The Wandering Earth: Classic Science Fiction Collection

    4.5 2,709 ratings See all formats and editions "The Wandering Earth" is a collection of short stories by Cixin Liu, China's most acclaimed contemporary science-fiction author.

  17. The Wandering Earth: Liu Cixin: 9781784978518: Amazon.com: Books

    The Wandering Earth: Liu Cixin: 9781784978518: Amazon.com: Books Books › Literature & Fiction › Short Stories & Anthologies Enjoy fast, FREE delivery, exclusive deals and award-winning movies & TV shows with Prime Try Prime and start saving today with Fast, FREE Delivery Buy new: $12.11 List Price: $32.74 Details Save: $20.63 (63%)

  18. At Home in the World: Wandering Earth, Environmentalism, and Reimagined

    Carlos Rojas From the journal Journal of Chinese Film Studies https://doi.org/10.1515/jcfs-2021-0017 Abstract Based on a 2000 novella by Cixin Liu with the same title, Frant Gwo's 2019 film Wandering Earth has been celebrated as China's first big-budget science fiction film.

  19. The Wandering Earth II: A happy union between science and film

    Back in 2019, the film The Wandering Earth, which was adapted from a short story by author Cixin Liu, became a huge success at the Chinese box office.Four years later, director Frant Gwo and his team created a brand new, cohesive prequel to the original story that showcases the potential of science fiction to be both entertaining and educational.

  20. REVIEW

    The film, directed by Frant Gwo, is loosely based on the novella of the same name by award-winning sci-fi author Liu Cixin. It tells the story of a mission to save Earth from the parallel perspectives of cosmonaut Liu Peiqiang on the International Space Station, and his son, technician-in-training Liu Qi.

  21. The Three-Body Problem (novel)

    The Three-Body Problem (Chinese: 三体; lit. 'Three-Body') is a novel by Chinese science fiction author Liu Cixin, the first in the Remembrance of Earth's Past trilogy—though the series as a whole is often referred to as The Three-Body Problem, or simply as Three-Body. The series portrays a fictional past, present and future wherein Earth encounters an alien civilization from a nearby ...

  22. Book review: The Wandering Earth

    Rather than a single story, it is a collection ten short stories by science fiction author Cixin Liu. The Wandering Earth was not the first time I'd read a book by Liu. A few years ago, I read The Three Body Problem, which was a very well written book with a very detailed and technical story line. It's one of the things that drew me to his ...

  23. Wandering Earth: LIU, Cixin: 9781784978495: Amazon.com: Books

    Cixin Liu Follow Wandering Earth Hardcover - January 1, 2017 by Cixin LIU (Author) 4.5 2,673 ratings Editors' pick Best Science Fiction & Fantasy See all formats and editions Kindle $12.99 Read with our free app Audiobook $0.00 Free with your Audible trial Hardcover $32.38 10 Used from $22.02 2 Collectible from $249.95 Paperback