• The Association
  • Executive Committee
  • Events calendar
  • Latest news
  • HATAB picture gallery
  • The role of HATAB
  • HATAB Code of conduct
  • HATAB Constitution & Rules
  • Become a HATAB Member
  • Useful links
  • Visit Botswana
  • Brief information
  • This is Botswana guide
  • ------------------------
  • Architecture
  • Arts and dance
  • Botswana Pride

Botswana Tourism Organisation

  • Birdwatching
  • Exhibitions & Conferencing
  • Gaborone Dam
  • Mobile Safaris
  • National parks
  • Okavango Delta
  • Star Grading System
  • Camps & Lodges
  • Mobile Sector
  • Hotel Sector
  • Conservation & Wildlife
  • Tour Operators
  • Air Charter & Airlines
  • Mobile Operators
  • e-Reservations

Developing Botswana into a preferred tourism destination

 The Botswana Tourism Organisation was set up by the government to market tourist products and to grade and classify tourist accommoda- tion as well as to promote investment in the tourism sector. 

The organisation has successfully focused its efforts on achieving high standards and developing tourism strategies that exceed customer expectations as well as building customer confidence around the world. 

Its stated aim is to develop Botswana into a unique preferred tourism destination of choice, in order to increase the sector’s contribution to the economic growth of the nation. As part of its efforts to reach this goal, the organisation is constantly expanding and promoting the international image of Botswana. 

A good example is its website, which contains just about everything that potential visitors need to know. The website gives an insight into what’s on offer in Botswana as well as providing useful travel information and advice. It even suggests a list of books to read for visitors to Botswana. 

Dedicated to preserving the heritage and environment of Botswana, the organisation has laid down conservation policies and ecotourism strategies to ensure that tourism is sustainable for its inhabitants and future generations while still contributing meaningfully to the national economy. 

Although relatively new in its development, the Botswana Tourism Organisation has already shown itself to be a well run, fully functioning organisation – one that will continue to serve as a competitive front-runner in promoting Botswana as a destination of choice.

www.botswanatourism.co.bw

HATAB Head Office

Hospitality & Tourism Association of Botswana Tel: +267 395 7144 Fax: +267 390 3201 [email protected]

Maun Booking Office

Tribal Plot 529, Maun Mopane Road, French Connection Tel: +267 686 0143 Cell: +267 7135 0954 [email protected]

This-is-Botswana

Published and managed by: Land & Marine Publications Ltd. Tel: +44 (0)1206 752902 Email us www.landmarine.com

Select Language

facebook-icon

ADVERTISE  If you are interested in advertising on this website, please  Email us  or call: +44 (0)1206 752902

SiteLock

10 of the Best Places to Visit in Botswana

botswana tourism board

Botswana is a premier Southern African safari destination offering some of the best wildlife viewing on the planet, especially in and around the Chobe and Okavango Delta region. The Kalahari Desert with its San Bushman culture is another Botswanan highlight that deserves a place on your itinerary. Check out this list of top attractions for more ideas about what to see and where to go in Botswana.

Chobe National Park

TripSavvy / Christopher Larson

Chobe National Park lies in Botswana's Okavango Delta and covers four distinct eco-systems. The SavutiMarsh in particular offers some of the highest concentrations of wildlife in Africa year round. Chobe boasts around 120,000 elephants. The park's vast herds are best seen from the water on a sundown river cruise. The best time to visit Chobe is between May and September when the weather is drier and cooler. Herds of zebra, eland, buffalo, giraffe, and wildebeest congregate here at this time of year. Chobe is accessible by car which makes it a little less expensive than some of Botswana's other parks. There's a wide variety of accommodation available to suit all budgets. You can even rent a houseboat.

Okavango Delta

The Okavango River cuts through the center of the Kalahari Desert, creating a unique inland water system that gives life to a huge variety of birds and animals. The Okavango Delta is a unique safari destination because you can view much of its wildlife from a traditional canoe, or  mokoro . Every year the delta floods cover over 6,175 square miles/ 16,000 square kilometers. The best time to view wildlife is during peak flood season (which is ironically during the May-October dry season). Wildlife is more concentrated on the delta islands at this time, making it easier to spot. There are numerous lodges and luxury safari camps, many of which offer walking safaris and/ or island camping trips.

Tsodilo Hills

Tsodilo Hills is a spiritual outdoor art gallery, showcasing more than 4,000 ancient San Bushmen rock paintings. There are around 400 sites depicting hunting scenes, ritual dances and typical safari animals. Some rock art dates back more than 20,000 years and archaeologists have ascertained that people lived in this area as far back as 100,000 years ago. The San Bushmen believe this sacred area is the site of the first creation of man and a resting place for spirits of the dead. Not surprisingly, this is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Visitors can expect to hike the three main hills, with the assistance of local guides. There is a basic campsite and a small but informative museum on site.

Nxai Pan National Park

The Nxai Pan National Park is a spectacular destination for a safari. The scenery is the main draw here, with wonderful sand dunes, towering baobab trees, and of course the salt pans themselves. When flooded, the pans also offer tremendous birding and game-viewing opportunities. Short grasses replace the salt pans and attract vast herds of ungulates—including zebra and wildebeest. The best time to visit is from December to April. The location in northeastern Botswana makes it easy to combine your visit with a trip to Chobe and the Okavango Delta, which reaches into the park. Lodging here is only possible as part of a mobile camp, but nearby Makgadikgadi Pan camps are also an excellent option.

The Tuli Block is a wildlife rich area in eastern Botswana that borders South Africa and Zimbabwe at the confluence of the Limpopo and Shashe Rivers. It was once an area of private farms, but a few decades ago it made more economic sense to transform the land into a wildlife sanctuary. Now the Tuli Block encompasses several reserves, including Mashatu Game Reserve and Northern Tuli Game Reserve. It's a beautiful area with several rivers, riverine forests, savannah, and lots of massive baobab trees. Wildlife sightings are guaranteed year round. There are large herds of elephant, plenty of lion, leopard and even cheetah . Because it's private land, guided walking safaris and night drives can be enjoyed. There are fine lodges and camps to stay at.

Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park

TripSavvy / Jess Macdonald

Salt pans, Kalahari sand dunes, and plenty of wildlife during the rainy season makes this a wonderful park to visit during the summer months (January - April). But it's not easy to get to, especially from the Botswana side. You'll need a 4x4 and the ability to camp self-sufficiently. The Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park is huge, covering an area of 14,670 square miles/ 38,000 square kilometers. It encompasses two previously separate parks: the Kalahari Gemsbok National Park in South Africa and Gemsbok National Park in Botswana. You won't see all of the Big Five here, but migrating herds of wildebeest and other antelope attract large numbers of predators and raptors. Lodging is offered in camps on the South African side.

Mokolodi Game Reserve

Mokolodi is a short drive from Botswana's capital Gaborone and makes for a great day trip. Mokolodi is a private reserve dedicated to conservation education so when you visit, don't be surprised to see excited school children out on a field trip. Given that many Africans are denied access to game reserves because of prohibitive costs, Mokolodi is well worth patronizing so that it can continue its programs. Rhino tracking is a highlight at Mokolodi and it's one of the few places in Botswana where you can spot white rhinos. A successful breeding program has helped keep the white rhino from extinction in Botswana. Guided walks, game drives, and night drives are all possible at Mokolodi. Simple chalets and camping facilities are available if you want to overnight here.

Moremi Game Reserve

Moremi is a small reserve with a very high density and variety of wildlife. It lies in the eastern Okavango Delta and borders Chobe National Park. Its birdlife is unrivaled, with over 500 species to admire through your binoculars. July through October is the best time to visit, and 4x4 safaris combined with water-based mokoro trips offer the best way to see the abundant wildlife. Wild dogs are regularly spotted here, as well as the Big Five thanks to the recent re-introduction of both black and white rhino. There are a few camps within the park, some of which are exclusive to fly-in safaris. The others are very sought-after by those on a self-drive safari. Several ​lodges and camps just outside the reserve offer wildlife viewing in the park.​

The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency Tours

Alexander McCall-Smith's popular detective series, The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency , put Gaborone (Botswana's capital) on the map. Now you can take a tour and see protagonist Precious Ramotswe's hometown come to life. Tours also include film locations from the popular HBO series based on the books. Short tours last for half a day and are based mostly in and around Gaborone where you get to see Precious' home on Zebra Drive and her office opposite Speedy Motors. Two-day tours take you further afield to Mokolodi (see above) and ​Machudi, Precious' ancestral home. Bush tea will be served along the way.

Khama Rhino Sanctuary

The Khama Rhino Sanctuary was set up in 1992 to help save Botswana's endangered rhinos and to re-introduce wildlife to the area so that the local community could benefit from tourism. The rhino sanctuary also hosts school kids from neighboring communities and Botswana's second-largest city Francistown, thereby educating them about conservation. The sanctuary is centered around the Serwe Pan - a large grass-covered depression with several natural water holes in the Kalahari Desert. Basic campsites and chalets offer accommodation at the sanctuary. Activities include game drives and walks to view the many animals (besides rhino) that live in the area. This is an excellent option for a self-drive safari.

Article updated by  Jessica Macdonald .

Top 10 Unmissable African Safari Destinations

Botswana Travel Guide: Essential Facts and Information

Okavango Delta, Botswana: The Complete Guide

The Best Time to Go on Safari

15 Animals to See on an African Safari

Top 5 Self-Drive Safari Destinations in Southern Africa

The Top 5 Places to See Leopards in Africa

The Top 12 National Parks to Visit in Africa

The Ultimate Guide to Choosing the Right Safari for You

The Best Places to Go in Southern Africa

The Top 5 Places to See Elephants in Africa

Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park, South Africa: The Complete Guide

Chobe National Park: The Complete Guide

The Top 5 Places to See Lions in Africa

The Best Time to Visit Botswana

10 of the Best Private Game Reserves in South Africa

17 of the best things to do in Botswana

Melanie van Zyl

Oct 16, 2023 • 16 min read

Tourists watch African elephants swimming across the Chobe River, Botswana

Experience the best of Botswana with this guide to the top things to do © THP Creative / Shutterstock

Botswana is famous for its remarkable wilderness areas.

The Okavango Delta and Chobe National Park – along with some seriously fancy luxury lodges – make it one of the best destinations in Africa for wildlife lovers. The country is a unique playground for amateur anglers and birdwatching enthusiasts, too. It also offers fun experiences for culture-seekers and outdoorsy adventurers.

The stark Kalahari Desert covers much of Botswana, providing an unorthodox stage for an African safari. At first, the desert might seem lifeless and uninhabited, but the dry plains play host to unusual delights that make for a magical travel experience: endless salt pans, ephemeral lakes, islands of baobab trees, friendly meerkat colonies, Neolithic sites that speak to a fascinating past and an oasis of epic proportions in the form of the world's largest inland delta.

Despite being covered by large areas of desert, the miracle of water truly sets this country apart. Fed by rains from the mountainous watersheds of Angola , the life-fueling annual floods create exquisite river systems and replenish the Okavango Delta for the extraordinarily diverse wildlife.

Whether your tastes run to wildlife encounters or elemental desert scenery, plan your trip to include these unmissable experiences in Botswana.

A driver pauses to watch elephants crossing the road in a dusty national park

1. Book a classic Botswana safari

Botswana has perfected the art of the safari. Almost half of the country has been set aside for wilderness tourism, as  national parks , wildlife conservancies and game reserves account for more than 40% of Botswana's land allocation.

Chobe National Park is the most accessible wilderness, in part because it sits at the end of a tarmac highway within easy reach of  Kasane Chobe Airport . It also presents an effortlessly rewarding rendezvous with wildlife. This part of Botswana has the world's largest concentration of elephants (roughly 126,000), and the best way to see Africa's elephant capital is to board a boat and cruise the Chobe River's game-rich shores.

Nearby,  Moremi Game Reserve covers one-third of the  Okavango Delta . The Batawana people of Ngamiland created this reserve in 1963, making it one of the first reserves in Africa to be declared by local residents as opposed to colonial powers. Most luxury lodges and camps lie in concession areas rented out by the government to enforce a more responsible high-value, low-volume tourism strategy. The best reserves sit in the swamps of the Okavango Delta and visitors fly in on small bush planes from Maun .

The logistics of reaching these isolated locations inevitably hikes up the price of a game-viewing experience – stays cost a minimum of US$650 per person per night and can reach up to US$4,000 a night – but lower visitor numbers minimize adverse environmental effects on these pristine wildlife areas. It also means travelers are highly likely to have viewings of lions, painted wolves and other creatures all to themselves.

For an even more far-flung adventure, seek out the desert-adapted animals of the Kalahari, an enormous wildlife park that opened to the public in the late 1990s. Black-maned lions, stately oryx antelope and comical ground squirrels all roam the  Central Kalahari Game Reserve (CKGR), which covers a staggering five million hectares (12.4 million acres).

The CKGR is also the ancestral home of the San people. Often referred to in Botswana as bushmen, the San traditionally followed a nomadic lifestyle, hunting and gathering only what was needed from the desert, and you can still see glimpses of this life when visiting local communities.

Planning tip: Budget travelers should aim to visit during the green season . In Botswana's summer (November to March), prices can drop by 40%. This is also when most lodges waive the single supplement fee, making it an appealing time to visit for solo travelers. You can also save by driving to some luxury stays in the southeastern delta and Khwai areas, the CKGR and Nxai Pan, or ask about boating access between camps.

A campsite with a campfire under a starry sky

2. Feel your heart race on a wild camping trip

If you're intrepid but don't want to shell out for a luxury camp, you can rent a vehicle and drive to simple demarcated campsites throughout the country. You'll need a fully equipped 4WD camper, but these are easy to rent from companies in Botswana or South Africa (many flights to Botswana are routed via Johannesburg) and typically cost US$140 a day. These vehicles come with all-terrain tires, recovery gear and basic camping equipment, such as rooftop tents, chairs, cutlery, crockery and even battery-powered fridges.

Most of Botswana's wildlife parks and camps are not fenced in, and there's no better way to feel the rugged intensity of the wilderness than camping alongside the creatures of the Kalahari. You may well have to dodge spotted hyenas on the way to the bathroom (if there is a bathroom) or wait for hippos to scamper back into the river after a night grazing along the riverbanks. Many campsites in the CKGR require total self-sufficiency, but some in Savuti and Moremi Game Reserve have flushing toilets and hot showers.

The most popular self-drive camping route hits all of the country's iconic wildlife hotspots on one two-week circuit, connecting  Baines' Baobabs in  Nxai Pan National Park with  Third Bridge in Moremi Game Reserve before proceeding north to  Savuti and the Chobe River in the Chobe National Park.

3. Honor San culture with a nature walk

The San have called the Kalahari home for more than 50,000 years, and any trip to this desert area should factor in some time to appreciate their ancient wisdom. Tragically expelled from their ancestral land in the central Kalahari, the San have long been regarded as the original inhabitants of southern Africa, and nature walks with skilled trackers offer culturally sensitive insights into the traditional bushman's way of life.

Entering their world to learn about their traditions helps to guarantee the conservation of this fast-vanishing culture. You can find responsible tours arranged by lodges such as Tau Pan Camp, Nxai Pan Camp and Jack's Camp. Alternatively, visit  Grassland Safari Lodge , where you can also track rhino.

4. Detour to a contemporary San art gallery in D'kar

A bold community project in the village of D'kar near Ghanzi offers an alternative way of experiencing Botswana's oldest culture. Punchy prints and vivid paintings preserve accounts of the lives of the Naro San people at the  Kuru Art Project . Visitors can see backcountry art studios and find artworks that celebrate botany, wildlife and traditional beliefs. Don't miss  the little museum next door to the art project.

Visitors in mokoro canoes on are paddled along in a flooded grassland

5. Take a canoe across the Okavango Delta

In most parts of Africa, a safari takes place aboard a rattling 4WD vehicle, but Botswana's most iconic safari vehicle offers a more serene means of communing with nature. The Okavango Delta is Botswana's crown jewel, and the best way to explore this wondrous, watery Unesco World Heritage site is on board a traditional mokoro canoe.

The area's first human inhabitants traveled the wild waterways of the delta using these flat-bottomed boats, steered by standing at the back of the vessel and pushing forward with a long pole. Modern visitors do the same – certified professional polers follow paths cleared by herbivore hippos and hungry elephants.

Most luxury lodges in Okavango offer canoe experiences. You'll sit at water level, inches above the surface, and enjoy the river in silence, sharing the channels with gorgeous water lilies, cute Angolan painted reed frogs and aquatic lechwe antelopes. It's how the Okavango Delta has been savored for centuries. You can also do day trips or overnight camping adventures from the town of Maun with the  Okavango Kopano Mokoro Community Trust – a good option for travelers on a budget. Inquire directly at its office or make arrangements via a hostel, such as the  Old Bridge Backpackers or  Delta Rain .

Planning tip: Try to time your trip to catch the  Nkashi Classic , an annual time-trial mokoro race to find the fastest poler in the entire Okavango Delta. The Botswana Wild Bird Trust (a Public Benefit Organization) founded the first competition in Maun in 2018, and polers compete in four categories: female, male, veteran (age 55 and over, any gender) and doubles (two-polers).

6. Hop on a scenic flight to view the Delta from above

To fully appreciate the scale of the swollen swamps that make up the Okavango Delta, you must take to the sky. The serpentine channels reveal themselves in all their glory from inside a small Cessna plane or a helicopter with the doors removed. Lagoons decorate the delta in watercolor swatches of emerald, olive, pea, lime and every other imaginable hue of green, while elephants and buffalo herds pick their way across the landscape.

Okavango Delta Maun Airport is the hub for scenic flight operators, and you can book directly at the offices of companies such as  Mack Air and  Helicopter Horizons .

7. Don't miss a Maun walking (and tasting) tour

A turnstile to the safari world, Maun is the base town used by many travelers to explore the untamed northern regions of Botswana. Make time for an immersive guided walking tour to see the modern face of Maun with  Your Botswana Experience . Walks start with a trip to the town market, where household essentials such as cattle bells, water tap locks, palm-leaf baskets and fat cast-iron cooking pots are busily traded.

Guides will explain the traditional uses of everything in the market before you try your hand at basket-weaving – you'll soon understand why it can take two weeks to craft one of these intricate vessels. Afterward, you'll dig into regional delicacies such as tswi , a water lily stew made from potato-like roots harvested from Okavango waters, served with magwinya , a deep-fried donut-like bread roll.

Detour: Do a horseback tour of Maun. Shorter excursions remain within the confines of the reserve at  Thamo Telele (home to zebras, wildebeests, impalas and gemsbok and a resident herd of 20 sociable giraffes). Longer rides meander through traditional cattle posts before following the placid Thamalakane River further downstream to spy hippos and crocodiles before breaking for a picnic lunch.

Tourists explore Botswana's salt flats on quad bikes

8. Sleep on the salt pans after a quad biking adventure

A sprawling network of massive salt flats, the  Makgadikgadi Pans are so immense they can be seen from space. Quad biking across this incredible white landscape with a guide is the most exhilarating way to savor the scale of the landscape, as you drive for miles towards the horizon without ever reaching it. Many finish a trip by sleeping below the stars in the middle of nowhere – if you thought the Makgadikgadi was enormous by day, wait until the Milky Way unfolds in the dome above your pillow at night.

Planning tip: If you can't afford to visit the iconic Jack's Camp (the first lodge to be built in this rather unforgiving landscape) the charming village of Gweta is a good base for booking less expensive excursions with  Planet Baobab or  Gweta Lodge .

9. Catch an African tiger on a fishing trip

Okay, real tigers don't live in Africa, but a menacing toothy fish named after the big cat can be found in the upper reaches of the Okavango Delta. Reached by a short drive along a tarred but pothole-riddled road from Maun, this area is known as the "Panhandle" – the upper segment of the Okavango Delta where the main Okavango River glides south as a single channel before splintering off into separate streams creating the Delta proper. While this region is not as brimming with big game as the swampy floodplains of the lower Delta, it is no less beguiling.

Even amateurs will love fishing up here. When hooked, feisty tiger fish vault into the air with incredible acrobatics, after which they are safely released back into the water.

Planning tip: The "barbel run" is the best time for catching tiger fish; a feeding frenzy occurs when the water levels drop after the winter floods, flushing small baitfish from the papyrus beds where they've been safely feeding into the mouths of waiting barbels (catfish) and tiger fish. The timing varies depending on flood water levels, but the run typically occurs between September and October.

10. Explore sacred legends in the rock art of the Tsodilo Hills

Unesco-listed but off the beaten track, the  Tsodilo Hills protect more than 4,000 prehistoric rock paintings created by Botswana's first inhabitants, the San. Archaeological excavations and stone tools found here date the site back to 500 CE and the well-preserved paintings delicately depict ancient customs from a time when human and animal lives intertwined. You're only allowed to walk this sacred site with a trained guide, who will unlock the secrets of the stones.

Guides are available at the information center and don't need to be booked in advance; arrive and take your pick from the four walking trails. The shortest and most popular track is the Rhino Route, leading to exquisite rock art of rhinos,  penguins and whales . If you're up for a challenge, you can climb to the highest point in Botswana at 1,489m (4,885ft) via the Male Hill Route.

Visitors watch meerkats, stretchy rat-like creatures, standing on their back legs and looking around

11. Meet the Makgadikgadi meerkats

Colonies of meerkats that are well habituated to humans occupy the fringes of the Makgadikgadi Salt Pans, burrowing tunnels into the golden grasslands. These animals are wild but are very used to human presence, and each colony has a dedicated caretaker. Wake early and these curious critters might clamber up onto your head for a better lookout position, all the better to keep a beady eye out for predators! Trips to meet these cute little creatures can be arranged through Planet Baobab or Gweta Lodge, or the operators of San Camp, Jack's Camp or Camp Kalahari.

12. Take a 4WD trip to Kubu Island

Rising like the humps of kubu (hippos) wallowing in water,  Kubu Island is a fitting name for the mounds of rock that poke through the otherwise flat plain of the Makgadikgadi Salt Pans. Operated by the Gaing O Community Trust, a campsite set amidst the baobabs presents breathtaking views of the endless creamy white salt pan landscape.

The waters of the Okavango Delta once filled up this vast area, and attracted by the bounty of this water, humans periodically settled here. Scattered stone walls and pottery shards dating to 1200 CE are still visible dotted around the landscape.

You'll need to be self-sufficient on this adventure and pack everything you need, including water, firewood, fuel and toilet paper. The route is best approached via the village of Letlhakane, a route where there's less chance of getting stuck in the Makgadikgadi mud.

Detour: Get a permit from  Makumutu Safari Lodge and go to the Orapa Game Park to spot rhino and visit the Adrian Gale Diamond Museum. Anecdotes and artifacts chronicle the critical period of gem discovery in the nation's history, tracing the story of Botswana's diamonds, from deep in the earth to treasured heirlooms, through excellent exhibits across five halls.

13. Explore Gaborone with a local

At first glance, Botswana's capital city of  Gaborone doesn't seem to have much to divert attention, besides looking at a handful of statues or wandering through shopping malls, so it's not typically on the list for first-time visitors. However, an immersive tour with female-run  Happy Soul Adventures reveals the layered life lived by ordinary citizens.

Explore the surrounding sprawl of villages on a bicycle ride, following scenic dirt roads through a pastoral landscape, and engage with rural communities by crafting pottery, learning how to cook local dishes or singing karaoke in the bars of Gaborone.

Planning tip: Fans of Mma Ramotswe, the main detective in the The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency  series, can see Gaborone through a literary lens on the The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency Tour with Heritage Adventures Botswana. Stops include "Zebra Way" and the Anglican Church where Trevor Mwamba worked.

Black-and-white striped horse-like creatures gathered together in a group as they wade through water

14. Witness the extraordinary zebra migration at Nxai Pan

The national animal of Botswana is the zebra, and you can see them in the thousands after nourishing rains spill over  Nxai Pan National Park between December and March each year. These herds make an arduous journey from the Chobe region, searching for sweet grasses, and a safari to this less-visited park is a monochrome spectacle.

Detour: If you don't want to travel in the rainy season between January and March, the  Boteti River hosts massive numbers of zebra and wildebeest during the dry season.

15. Track rhinos on a walking safari

Rhino tracking is a memorable way to check off one of the top animals from the Big Five list. The government reintroduced 138 white rhinos into northern Botswana between 1967 and 1986, but an aerial count in the early 1990s found the population had declined by 80%, largely because of poaching. In response, the government moved the remaining rhinos to refuges where they could be closely monitored, including the  Khama Rhino Sanctuary in Serowe and  Mokolodi Game Reserve in Gaborone.

Walking safaris can be booked directly at Mokolodi or the Khama sanctuary, but set aside a full morning. It can take anywhere from 20 minutes to five hours to locate a rhino safely on foot, aided by two expertly trained field guides. These modestly-sized reserves are also home to giraffes, zebras, warthogs and kudus, so you'll see plenty besides endangered rhinos when setting out on a walking safari.

16. Float under the world's only quadripoint

There is only one place on the planet where the corners of four nations come together, but it's more a theoretical point on the map than a physical travel destination. The Kazungula Bridge, which opened in May 2021, connects Botswana with Zambia and Zimbabwe and overlooks Namibia. A trip here is the best way for geography nerds, architecture appreciators and travel nuts to tick off the quadripoint as visited.

Boat trips to the confluence of the Chobe River and Zambezi River can be booked from most riverfront accommodations, including  Chobe Safari Lodge . Bring binoculars to keep track of the lively kingfishers and colorful bee-eaters you'll spot on the way here.

17. Visit an elephant-friendly brewery

Designed and launched with human-wildlife co-existence in mind,  Okavango Craft Brewery produces unique, award-winning beers worth sipping. It's northern Botswana's first microbrewery and it operates in partnership with local NGO  Ecoexist , which works with farmers in the Okavango Panhandle.

Millet grain is described as a climate-smart crop that requires less rainfall and the brewery buys it at an above-market price to reward small-scale farmers. In return, farmers follow elephant-aware practices that Ecoexist champions. Examples include preventative crop-raiding methods such as using chili pepper smoke as a deterrent and planting away from elephant corridors.

The elephant-friendly millet is carefully malted and worked into every recipe at the Okavango Craft Brewery, from IPAs to draught-infused ice cream. To find your favorite, don't miss the mokoro (a tasting paddle of Irish-style stouts, pale ales and lagers). These beers are also available at some Maun cafes and luxury safari lodges. Check social media for upcoming events, such as live music and conservation talks.

Detour:  Elephant Havens is a one-hour drive north of Maun. Through habitat protection, community outreach, and the emergency rescue of baby elephants under dire stress, this orphanage provides refuge, daily care, and companionship for orphaned elephants until they can be reintroduced into the wild. Visiting hours are 9–10 a.m. and 4–5 p.m. seven days a week and timed with feedings.

This article was first published July 2022 and updated October 2023

Explore related stories

GettyImages-1176863014.jpg

Nov 12, 2019 • 1 min read

Royal fans can follow in the footsteps of Meghan Markle and Prince Harry with a new itinerary inspired by September's royal tour in South Africa and…

Features - GettyImages-184920482_medium_1

May 10, 2016 • 4 min read

Features - 160869730_20(1)

Jun 10, 2015 • 5 min read

Tourist watching an elephant crossing a river in the Chobe National Park in Botswana, Africa; Concept for travel safari and travel in Africa

Feb 20, 2024 • 17 min read

Deepa-in-Botswana.jpg

Jan 31, 2024 • 6 min read

Stills from The Reluctant Traveler with Eugene Levy

Dec 26, 2023 • 5 min read

botswana tourism board

Oct 29, 2023 • 12 min read

Oct 16, 2023 • 9 min read

Bisate- Credit Wilderness Safaris.jpeg

Jan 12, 2023 • 9 min read

Spencer Thrust, guitarist of the Death Metal band Overthrust from Botswana, performing at the Wacken Open Air in Wacken, Germany, 5 August 2016. 75,000 fans are attending what organisers say is the largest heavy metal festival in the world. PHOTO: AXEL HEIMKEN/dpa | usage worldwide   (Photo by Axel Heimken/picture alliance via Getty Images)

Oct 22, 2022 • 9 min read

botswana tourism board

CEO of Botswana Tourism Organization reveals plans to increase international arrivals in 2023

  • Story By: Kojo Bentum Williams

botswana tourism board

  • Published: 2:41 AM UTC, Thu December 8, 2022

On the back of a great year for Botswana’s tourism, the country is devising strategies and taking initiatives for more successes for the industry next year. The country has already set its sights on new international tourism markets and is hoping to build a more vibrant MICE sector.

The Southern African nation saw the return of its biggest tourism and travel event, the Botswana Travel and Tourism Expo (BTTE) in November this year. Earlier in October, the country hosted the 5th Africa Tourism Leadership Forum and Awards. Both events attracted hundreds of participants and boosted confidence in Botswana’s tourism industry while giving a strong indication that it is an emerging destination for the events and meetings sector.

In a conversation with VoyagesAfriq, the CEO of Botswana Tourism Organization, Ms. Tshoganetso Carl-Ponoesele posited, “2022 has been quite an eventful year for our tourism sector in Botswana, and I must say that what really came out strong was the events and the conferences. For the first time in Botswana, we managed to host with finance international events of a stature that has amazed our patrons and our counterparts regionally.”

botswana tourism board

According to her, the feat has propelled them to do more in the coming year.

“We walk into 2023 with new vigour and new energy. As we see already, the interest in the MICE sector has increased. We already see different interests in international organizations lobbying for Botswana to host these international events.”

With BTTE 2022 proving to be good in terms of the number of international buyers, Ms. Carl-Ponoesele is hopeful that the country would attract even more in the coming year.

“We received over 100 international buyers in BTTE 2022. So to us, this is a huge blessing and breakthrough because post-Covid one will not expect so much,” the CEO indicated.

As part of the approaches to achieve this, Ms. Carl-Ponoesele hinted that in addition to their traditional source markets, Botswana will turn attention to other international markets in their tourism marketing and promotion campaigns.

botswana tourism board

“We are not only going to lean ourselves towards the traditional source markets, we are also looking at the new tourist interest because we have the UAE market which is coming up, and by virtue of having the desert, we are looking forward to working with the UAE market. We are also looking at penetrating the Japanese and the Asia markets because they have also been quiet for some time” she stressed.

Ms. also disclosed that they are looking forward to a bigger and better BTTE in 2023. In light of this, they would ensure providing seamless travel for international agents and participants.

The CEO explained, “We are already lobbying for partnerships with other airlines. During the WTM London, we managed to engage with Ethiopian Airlines and lobbied for assistance with the transportation of our international agents for BTTE 2023 to reduce the travel time and the layover time during the transit.”

Related Posts

botswana tourism board

President Samia Suluhu appoints Ephraim Mafuru as Tanzania Tourist Board Director General

President Samia Suluhu Hassan has sacked chief executive officers of the Tanzania Tourist Board (TTB) and the Ngorongoro Conservation Area Authority (NCAA) respectively, the State House announced yesterday in a

botswana tourism board

“Safari 2 Go” A revolutionary approach to planning travel in Namibia

Gondwana Collections, a prominent name in Namibia’s tourism sector, has unveiled a groundbreaking product, “Safari 2 Go,” during the ITB Berlin event this year. In an exclusive interview with VoyagesAfriq,

botswana tourism board

Tourism Seychelles and National Airline Air Seychelles Ink Agreement to Boost Destination Marketing

Tourism Seychelles and the National Airline Air Seychelles have solidified their commitment to promoting Seychelles as a premier tourist destination through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed on Wednesday, March

botswana tourism board

VoyagesAfriq is Africa’s No 1 Travel & Tourism Media & News publication with specialist interests in presenting the continent's travel & tourism to a Global Audience. VA provides superior News content about Travel and Tourism in Africa & beyond. Our specialist team of writers and editors ensure the African travel story is told with a global perspective.

WhatsApp: +33744287093

Sign Up for our Newsletter

Outlook Travel Magazine

  • Testimonials
  • Meet the Team
  • Work With Us
  • Outlook Features
  • Sign Up Today
  • Travel Guides
  • Middle East

Botswana Travel Guide

Travel Team

With its standout safaris, luxury lodges and the cosmopolitan capital of Gabarone, Botswana has a lot to offer the discerning business traveller.

Botswana’s wild landscapes attract nature lovers from around the world. Visitors are captivated by its dramatic vistas, from the undulating dunes of the Kalahari Desert to the lush Okavango Delta. Clusters of ancient baobab trees and shimmering salt plains also draw in the crowds. A landlocked country slightly larger than France, Botswana shares borders with Namibia, South Africa and Zimbabwe. Over a third of its land is reserved for wildlife parks and game reserves. Botswana boasts an abundance of wildlife, including the black-maned lion and Cape buffalo. As a result, it’s one of Africa’s top safari destinations, renowned for its luxury tented camps and lodges.

While English is the official language, most Botswanans speak Setswana. Over 20 languages are in use, including Afrikaans, Kalanga and Kgalagadi – an indicator of the country’s ethnic diversity. Botswana is also a country steeped in traditional culture and folklore. The Maitisong Festival is a major cultural arts festival in Gabarone. But the country’s most legendary event is the Toyota Kalahari Botswana 1000 Desert Race – an adrenaline-fuelled car race spanning a thousand kilometres of the Kalahari Desert. With its warm climate, luxurious accommodation and breath-taking landscapes, Botswana is an inviting tourist destination.

THE BUSINESS END

In the 1960s, Botswana was a British protectorate known as Bechuanaland. It was one of the world’s poorest nations. But its independence in 1966 sparked the beginnings of rapid economic growth. In 1967, diamonds were discovered in the town of Orapa, which became the largest diamond-producing mine in the world. This allowed the government to invest heavily in primary and secondary infrastructure ­­– it also improved social services and education. Between the 1960s and 1990s, Botswana had the highest rate of economic growth in the world. The per capita GDP has increased almost elevenfold since independence. Botswana’s consumers now constitute a high net worth market.

Today, Botswana is Africa’s most long standing democracy. It is renowned for its lack of corruption, political stability and low crime rates. The economy continues to expand, with half of all government revenue coming from diamond exports. Tourism is also big business in Botswana. In 2018, the travel and tourism economy exceeded $2.5 billion, and the sector supports 84,000 jobs. Around 96 percent of tourists were travelling for leisure, with the remaining four percent visiting for business reasons. The government are keen to promote Botswana as a business destination. The capital, Gabarone, is an up-and-coming MICE hub with conference centres, upmarket hotels and restaurants. 

TOURISM INSIGHTS: BOTSWANA TOURISM ASSOCIATION

  Botswana Tourism Organisation was established in 2009. Its mission: to develop Botswana into a popular tourist destination, thereby increasing the sector’s contribution to the nation’s economic growth. The organisation is committed to sustainable tourism and collaborating with local and international communities. We spoke to the CEO, Myra Sekgororoane, about Botswana Tourism Organisation’s past development and future goals.

Q&A WITH MYRA SEKGOROROANE, CEO, BOTSWANA TOURISM ORGANISATION

Since inception, how has Botswana Tourism Organisation developed and progressed in terms of its key objectives and the messages it tries to get across?

Myra Sekgororoane (MS):  Botswana Tourism Organisation was set up by the government to market tourist products, grade tourist accommodation and promote investment in the tourism sector. The organisation has successfully managed to introduce high standards and develop tourism strategies that exceed customer expectations, while building customer confidence around the world. The organisation aims to increase the tourism sector’s contribution to Botswana’s economic growth. It does so by promoting Botswana as a destination of choice at both regional and international exhibitions, such as World Travel Market London. 

How would you say Botswana has developed in recent years as a business travel hub and what are the key reasons behind its growing appeal?

(MS): Botswana has experienced significant growth in the business travel sector. This is largely due to major developments in infrastructure, such as improved conference facilities, airports and roads. An increase in hosting major events is a second contributing factor.

Why, in your opinion, should someone visit Botswana?

(MS): Botswana is one of Africa’s top tourist destinations. This is thanks to its rich culture, stable democracy, biodiversity and varied landscapes. In Botswana you will find one of the world’s largest inland deltas, vast rivers, grassy plains, deserts and salt pans.

Are there any specific attractions, landmarks or places to eat and drink that you would recommend?

(MS): Botswana is renowned for having some of the best wilderness areas on the continent, such as the stunning Kalahari Desert and the lush Okavango Delta. Sites of historic interest include the Tsodilo Hills and Goo Moremi Gorge. In recent years, cities such as Gabarone have improved the quality of their services, offering high-end hotels, restaurants and bars.

What are the best ways of getting around the country?

(MS): There are various ways you can explore Botswana: by air, rail and road. Our national carrier is Air Botswana, which operates a scheduled network between Gaborone, Francistown, Maun and Kasane. You can also take small 6-12 seater planes to more remote camps in the Delta, Kalahari and Chobe regions. These are normally organised by private tour operators and depart from Maun and Kasane. We also have a growing rail network. Many tourists elect to drive in Botswana. The country has a good road network, especially in towns and between major cities.

What trends are transforming the tourism industry in Botswana at present? How are you responding to these trends?

(MS): China is the leading generator of outbound travel in both figures and expenditure, with many destinations vying for a portion of the market. Botswana is no exception to this emerging, lucrative trend. Plans are under way to intensify entry and penetration of the Chinese market. We have already participated at the International Travel Expo (ITE-Hong Kong) and are conducting market research into what Chinese consumers look for from a destination. We are also interested in attracting the millennial travel market. Since many millennials organise their travel online, developing web-based strategies to optimise the market is crucial. We are also committed to developing inclusive tourism so that people of all ages, abilities and sexual orientation will enjoy visiting Botswana. Finally, we are proponents of sustainable tourism, responding to demands from tourists themselves.

How do you see Botswana developing as a business travel hub over the next year to two years?

(MS): The events industry is a dynamic and fast-growing sector with obvious synergies with tourism. Events planning has over the years proved to have the potential to grow the tourism economy, provide media exposure, promote development, and stimulate infrastructure developments. The Botswana Tourism Organisation has therefore successfully hosted events to help grow the tourism industry, as part of a broader strategy.

Are there any plans or projects in the pipeline that you wish to highlight?

(MS): In a bid to diversify and expand the tourism industry, the Government of Botswana has established the Dams Initiative. The project will diversify Botswanan tourism and improve the economic livelihoods of local communities through the development of lodges, campsites and outdoor activities. The communities around these projects are expected to actively participate and directly benefit from the dam tourism initiative, which will be carried out in collaboration with other relevant stakeholders. 

Are you optimistic about the future of the tourism industry in Botswana?

(MS): The Government of Botswana is committed to growing the tourism industry as part of its economic diversification strategy. Tourism plays a significant role in the national economy, creates jobs and exhibits enormous potential for future growth. The future is positive for the industry in Botswana – we seek to expand tourism in the country by adding more products and increasing geographic spread.

GABORONE IN FOCUS

Botswana’s capital city, Gabarone, is a laidback metropolis with a population of 232,000. Construction began on the city in 1964, and was completed three years later. The country’s government buildings are all located here, alongside universities, shopping malls and upmarket hotels. Gabarone has a growing number of conference centres and business hotels, and good transport links to the rest of the country.

The city centre is characterised by Main Mall, a pedestrianised strip of shops, restaurants and other amenities. Many of Barone’s bars and restaurants are located in indoor malls dotted around the city. Business travellers will discover plenty to entertain them.

Despite its modern appearance, Gabarone is a great place to learn more about the country’s traditional culture. Botswanacraft is the country’s largest craft emporium, selling handicrafts made by Botswanan and African artisans. Gabarone’s most well-known landmark is The Three Digkosi Monument, bronze statues of the three chiefs who pleaded with Britain for independence. Gabarone is surrounded by nature reserves, including the Molokodi Game Reserve, and is home to animals such as giraffes, ostriches and wildebeest. It’s also an ideal jumping-off point to explore the vast Kalahari Desert. 

botswana tourism board

LANDMARK ATTRACTIONS

CHIEF’S ISLAND

“The combination of reed-fringed waters, grasslands and light woodlands makes for game viewing that can feel like a BBC wildlife documentary brought to life. Not surprisingly, the island is home to some of the most exclusive lodges and tented camps in Africa” –  Lonely Planet

MAKGADIKAGI NATIONAL PARK

“The shimmering salt pans of Makgadikgadi along with the Nxai Pans are believed to be the largest in the world. Most of the time they appear as glaring, white, endless plains. During the rainy season they are one of the most important wetland areas in Botswana – when they transform and come alive into stunning grass-plains” –  Siyabona Africa

BAINES’ BAOBABS 

“Located in the south of Nxai Pans National Park are the seven baobabs known as Baines’ Baobabs or the Sleeping sisters. This stunted cluster of Africa’s most iconic tree was immortalized by the paintings of Thomas Baines, a British landscape artist commissioned by the Royal Geographic Society” –  Discover Africa

GCWIHABA CAVES

“Certainly one of the wildest and most remote destinations in Botswana, Gcwihaba is a fascinating underground labyrinth of caverns and pits, linked passages, fantastical stalagmite and stalactite formations, and beautifully coloured flowstones that appear like waterfalls of rock” –  Botswana Tourism Board

OUTLOOK RECOMMENDS

Ranked fourth in the country,  Botswana International University of Science and Technology  (BIUST) specialises in engineering, science and technology. It occupies an ecologically diverse 2,500-hectare site near Palapye. It boasts well-equipped faculty buildings, modern halls of residence and sports facilities, including a football pitch and gymnasium. BUIST is driven by a mission to contribute to Botswana’s economic development by using education to facilitate a move towards a knowledge-based economy. It aims to conduct pioneering and innovative research, and hopes to attract more local and international researchers in the future.

University of Botswana

Imperial School of Business and Finance

New Era College

Ta Shebube   consists of two lodges located in the undiscovered Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park. Take a safari between the encampments, traversing vast savannahs and red-gold dunes. Look out for herds of oryx and wildebeest, as well as predators like the black maned lion. Spend your evenings in comfort, watching dramatic sunsets give way to starry skies. The Rooiputs camp consists of luxurious thatched chalets with ensuite bathrooms. There’s a spacious bar and dining area. Polentswa may look like a camp from a bygone era, but it has all the mod cons. Each private tent has an ensuite, a private veranda and an outdoor shower.

Deception Valley Lodge

Planet Baobab

Air Botswana

Blue Sky Airways

South African Airways

Air Namibia

EAT & DRINK :

The Courtyard Restaurant @ Botswanacraft

Caravela Restaurant

Bull & Bush Pub

Dusty Donkey Café

Machaba Safaris  has three safari camps located in Botswana. One of them, Machaba Camp, won the 2019 World Luxury Hotel Awards for the best luxury tented safari camp. With its lavish tented accommodation, private swimming pool and onsite spa therapist, it’s easy to see why. But these luxurious camps also offer a world-class safari experience. You’ll be taken on morning and afternoon game drives, nature walks and trips in dugout canoes. You can take a self-drive safari between the camps, while the Machaba Blue Safari couples a Botswanan safari with a seven-night trip to the Seychelles.

Kalahari Safari

Chobe Boat Cruises

Tawana Self Drive

GETTING THERE AND AROUND

There are few direct flights to Botswana outside South Africa. Most international visitors will have a stopover at Johannesburg Airport or Windhoek Airport in Namibia. Botswana’s main airport is Sir Seretse Khama International Airport, located 11 kilometres from the capital, Gabarone.  

Botswana has invested heavily in transport infrastructure, making it possible to explore the country using various modes of transport. The national air carrier, Air Botswana, flies between the four largest towns: Gabarone, Francistown, Maun and Kasana. Charter flights operate out of Maun and Kasane, taking passengers to safari lodges and camps located in the Kgalagadi Desert and the Chobe River. These are often organised by tour operators.

Tourists can also travel the country by rail or road. A railway runs from Lobatse to Francistown, passing through several towns including Gabarone. There is one service a day from each station, which departs in the evening and arrives the next morning.

A variety of buses connect Botswana’s main towns. They are an inexpensive way to travel, often used by locals. Taxis and minibuses are the best way to travel within towns and villages. Self-driving is also popular in Botswana. The roads are in relatively good condition, although you’ll want a 4×4 if you’re planning to visit more remote locations.

Read Issue 15 of Outlook Travel Magazine

Seychelles Travel Guide

botswana tourism board

Seychelles : Outlook Recommends

botswana tourism board

Seychelles : Tourism Insights

Kid feeding two aldabra giant tortoises

Seychelles National Botanical Gardens in Focus

botswana tourism board

Seychelles : Landmark Attractions

botswana tourism board

Getting To and Around Seychelles

botswana tourism board

Seychelles Travel Guide 2022

botswana tourism board

Mahé In Focus

botswana tourism board

Seychelles Travel Guide 2021

botswana tourism board

Seychelles Travel Guide 2019

More africa travel guides.

botswana tourism board

Kenya Travel Guide

botswana tourism board

Madagascar Travel Guide

botswana tourism board

Malawi Travel Guide

botswana tourism board

Mauritius Travel Guide

botswana tourism board

Malawi Travel Guide 2022

botswana tourism board

Zambia Travel Guide

botswana tourism board

South Africa’s Western Cape Travel Guide

botswana tourism board

Enrico Costantini : Behind the Lens

botswana tourism board

Lepogo Lodges : A Sustainable Safari Experience

botswana tourism board

Casa de Olivos : Sustainability Stories 

Train interior, dining car

Opulence on the Orient Express 

Weihnachtsmarkt in Köln am Dom

Europe’s Charming Christmas Markets

Scenic view of Raja Ampat

Batanta : The Last Stop

botswana tourism board

Greg Johnston : Behind the Lens

botswana tourism board

Victory Leisure Homes : Sustainability Stories

botswana tourism board

A Tiny House Resort : Travel Business

botswana tourism board

New South Wales : The Most Unmissable Sites

Sign in to your account

Username or Email Address

Remember Me

Explore the wonders of Botswana

Botswana tourism - a way of diversifying the economy.

Botswana's principal tourist attractions are its game reserves, with hunting and photographic safaris available. Other attractions include the Okavango Delta region, which during the rainy season is a maze of waterways, islands, and lakes. The tourism industry also helped to diversify Botswana's economy from traditional sources such as diamonds and beef and created around 23,000 jobs in 2005.

Botswana offers the traveller a choice of accommodation options from top class tourist hotels, luxury lodges and safari camps, to budget guesthouses and camping grounds. The major tourist areas have a choice of private lodges, safari camps, and public camping sites. [1]

...

Tourists Destinations

Tourism champions, botswana tourism organisation, bto.

bto

The mission of BTO is to develop and champion tourism, so as to build the sector into a key driver of economic growth. Botswana Tourism Organization (BTO) provides tourism information and promotion about our country's natural appeal; our stunning and seemingly endless wilderness, prolific wildlife, cultural diversity, and welcoming people. BTO also grades and classify tourist accommodations so that they are consistent with consumer expectations and industry ratings standards. Botswana Tourism is committed to responsible tourism. Therefore, the Botswana government’s conservation and wildlife management policies, along with the eco-tourism strategies work in concert to ensure that Botswana’s tourism is sustainable for it’s inhabitants and future generations of tourists, while contributing meaningfully to the national economy. [2]

Major Tourism Sectors

Game reserves and national parks.

Three national parks and seven game reserves that are wildlife shelters occupy 17% of the land area of Botswana. The three national parks are the Chobe National Park, the Nxai Pan and Makgadikgadi National Park and the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park. The seven game reserves are the Central Kalahari Game Reserve, Gaborone Game Reserve, Khutse Game Reserve, Mannyelanong Game Reserve, Maun Game Reserve and Moremi Game Reserve. In addition, a number of small privately owned reserves are maintained.

linyati

The Big Five – lion, leopard, elephant, black rhino and buffalo - along with a huge variety of other less famous but equally impressive animals – antelopes, giraffe, zebras, wildebeest, red lechwe, puku and hippo – can be seen in abundance in Botswana's two main parks, Chobe National Park and Moremi Game Reserve. [8]

linyati

Botswana is around 90% covered in savanna, varying from shrub savanna in the southwest in the dry areas to tree savanna consisting of trees and grass in the wetter areas. Even under the hot conditions of the Kalahari Desert, many different species survive; in fact the country has more than 2500 species of plants and 650 species of trees. Vegetation and its wild fruits are also extremely important to rural populations living in the desert and are the principal source of food, fuel and medicine for many inhabitants.

camping

The Okavango Delta

The Okavango Delta is a vast inland river delta in northern Botswana. It's known for its sprawling grassy plains, which flood seasonally, becoming a lush animal habitat. The Moremi Game Reserve occupies the east and central areas of the region. Here, dugout canoes are used to navigate past hippos, elephants and crocodiles. On dry land, wildlife includes lions, leopards, giraffes and rhinos.

mog

Rock Paintings

Tsodilo Hills, now a World Heritage rock art site where some 4,500 paintings have so far been recorded. Although some of the paintings were made by San/Bushmen most are believed to have been made by Khoi (Khoe) people and also by Bantu immigrants like the Hambakush who arrived there about 1,800 years ago. It is possible that most of this art was made during the last 2,000 years. In eastern Botswana a lot of the art is San art but there is also some Khoe art in the east. [7]

b13

Museum and art galleries

A multi-disciplinary institution that includes the National Art Gallery and Octagon Gallery, as well as—since November 2007—the National Botanical Garden. Displays traditional Botswana crafts and paintings and aims to celebrate the work of local artists. A list of some museum sites are; 1. Botswana National Museum 2. Kgosi Bathoen II (Segopotso) Museum 3. Kgosi Sechele I Museum 4. Khama III Memorial Museum 5. Nhabe Museum 6. Phuthadikobo Museum 7. Supa Ngwano Museum Centre

Urban Tourism

Intensive urban growth and proliferation of urban settlements are basic characteristicks of postcolonial development in Botswana. Immediately before gaining independence, only 4% of the population lived in urban settlements. According to the Government Central Statistick Office (CSO), 47.5% of population will live in cities, townships and urban villages by year 2001. [6]

bdc

Desert Race

Drawing thousands of motor sport fanatics from across the globe to the small town of Jwaneng in Botswana, the Toyota Kalahari Botswana 1000 Desert Race is upon us. A motor spot competition, the Toyota 1000 Desert Race takes place annually towards the end of June. 2018 will mark the 37th year that the competition has been held with each year proving that the race is gaining a bigger following as it continues to grow in popularity. The race draws over 120 000 spectators, making it the biggest off road race in Africa. Spectators come from neighbouring countries and abroad to enjoy the thrill of race cars zipping past at uncanny speeds. [5]

desert race

Premium Partners

botswana tourism board

botswana tourism board

No spam. We promise.

botswana tourism board

Botswana factsheet

Discover the total economic contribution that the Travel & Tourism (T&T) sector brings to this economy and the world in this data-rich, two-page factsheet.

Discover the total economic contribution that the Travel & Tourism sector (T&T) brings to this region and the world in this data-rich, two-page factsheet

Discover the direct economic contribution that the Travel & Tourism (T&T) sector brings to this city in this data-rich, two-page factsheet

Create an account for free or login to download

Factsheet details

This factsheet highlights the importance of T&T to this economy across many metrics, and features details such as:

  • Contribution of the sector to overall GDP and employment
  • Comparisons between 2019 and 2022
  • Forecasts for 2023 and 2033
  • International and domestic visitor spending
  • Proportion of leisure vs business spending
  • Top 5 inbound and outbound markets

This factsheet highlights the importance of T&T to this region across many metrics, and features details such as:

  • Contribution of the sector to overall GDP and employment in the region and globally

This factsheet highlights the importance of T&T to this city across many metrics, and features details such as:

  • Contribution of the sector to overall GDP and employment in the city
  • Comparisons between 2019, 2020 and 2021, plus 2022 forecast
  • Proportion of the T&T at city level towards overall T&T contribution at a country level
  • Top 5 inbound source markets

In collaboration

Supported by.

botswana tourism board

Home

  • Community Projects
  • Tourism Offices
  • Star Grading System
  • Eco - Tourism Certification Application Process
  • At A Glance
  • Arts and Crafts
  • Local Events
  • International Events
  • Publications

botswana tourism board

Send us any comments and suggestions you may have about this website as well as make any other enquiries about our products, destinations, activities and so on.

A qualified team of people will handle your request and will contact you shortly.

If you would like to visit or call:

Botswana Tourism Organisation Plot 50676, Fairgrounds Office Park Block B, Ground Floor Gaborone, Botswana Tel: +267 391 3111, Fax: +267 395 9220

Email: [email protected]

Our Partners

botswana tourism board

  • Travel Info
  • You are here:
  • Member homepage
  • Content library search

CEO of Botswana Tourism Organization reveals plans to increase international arrivals in 2023

On the back of a great year for Botswana’s tourism, the country is devising strategies and taking initiatives for more successes for the industry next year. The country has already set its sights on new international tourism markets and is hoping to build a more vibrant MICE sector.

The Southern African nation saw the return of its biggest tourism and travel event, the Botswana Travel and Tourism Expo (BTTE) in November this year. Earlier in October, the country hosted the 5th Africa Tourism Leadership Forum and Awards. Both events attracted hundreds of participants and boosted confidence in Botswana’s tourism industry while giving a strong indication that it is an emerging destination for the events and meetings sector.

In a conversation with VoyagesAfriq, the CEO of Botswana Tourism Organization, Ms. Tshoganetso Carl-Ponoesele posited, “2022 has been quite an eventful year for our tourism sector in Botswana, and I must say that what really came out strong was the events and the conferences. For the first time in Botswana, we managed to host with finance international events of a stature that has amazed our patrons and our counterparts regionally.”

Source: VoyagesAfriq

IMAGES

  1. Botswana Tourism Board Website (2006)

    botswana tourism board

  2. Botswana Tourism Board

    botswana tourism board

  3. Botswana Tourism Board Website (2010)

    botswana tourism board

  4. 10 of the Best Places to Visit in Botswana

    botswana tourism board

  5. Botswana Tourism Organization Partners with the GSTC on Sustainable

    botswana tourism board

  6. Botswana tourist map

    botswana tourism board

COMMENTS

  1. Home

    Botswana Tourism Organisation. Fairscape Precinct, Plot 70667. Fairgrounds Office Park. Building 1A & 1B, 2nd Floor (East Wing) Gaborone, Botswana. Tel: +267 391 3111 Fax: +267 395 6810 Email: [email protected]

  2. About BTO

    Botswana Tourism Organisation. Fairscape Precinct, Plot 70667. Fairgrounds Office Park. Building 1A & 1B, 2nd Floor (East Wing) Gaborone, Botswana. Tel: +267 391 3111 Fax: +267 395 6810 Email: [email protected]

  3. Welcome

    Botswana Tourism Organisation. Fairscape Precinct, Plot 70667. Fairgrounds Office Park. Building 1A & 1B, 2nd Floor (East Wing) Gaborone, Botswana. Tel: +267 391 3111 Fax: +267 395 6810 Email: [email protected]

  4. Botswana Tourism Organisation

    Botswana Tourism Organisation | 2,034 followers on LinkedIn. This board is a parastatal body set up through an Act of Parliament 2003, with Section 5 of the mandate to: Market the Botswana Tourist Product, Grade and Classify tourist accommodation facilities as well as to promote investment in the Tourism sector. The Botswana Government's decision to establish the Botswana Tourism Board as a ...

  5. Botswana Tourism Organisation

    Developing Botswana into a preferred tourism destination The Botswana Tourism Organisation was set up by the government to market tourist products and to grade and classify tourist accommoda- tion as well as to promote investment in the tourism sector. The organisation has successfully focused its efforts on achieving high standards and developing tourism strategies that exceed customer ...

  6. Tourism in Botswana

    Tourism in Botswana. Botswana 's principal tourist attractions are its game reserves, with hunting and photographic safaris available. Other attractions include the Okavango Delta [1] region, which during the rainy season is a maze of waterways, islands, and lakes. [2] The tourism industry also helped to diversify Botswana's economy from ...

  7. Botswana Tourism

    Botswana Tourism, Gaborone. 125,933 likes · 1,216 talking about this. Botswana is truly one of Africa's top tourism destinations,with wildlife,bird-life, and a strong commitment to wildlife...

  8. 10 of the Best Places to Visit in Botswana

    The Khama Rhino Sanctuary was set up in 1992 to help save Botswana's endangered rhinos and to re-introduce wildlife to the area so that the local community could benefit from tourism. The rhino sanctuary also hosts school kids from neighboring communities and Botswana's second-largest city Francistown, thereby educating them about conservation.

  9. 8 best places to visit in Botswana

    The serene Okavango Delta in Botswana ©2630ben/Getty Images 1. Okavango Delta. Best for luxurious wildlife watching . Dubbed the "Jewel of the Kalahari", the Okavango Delta is a highlight of any Africa trip. Heavy rains in the Angolan highlands swell the Okavango River, which spills across the desert, fanning out into a shimmering maze of channels, lagoons, and islands.

  10. 17 of the best things to do in Botswana

    It also presents an effortlessly rewarding rendezvous with wildlife. This part of Botswana has the world's largest concentration of elephants (roughly 126,000), and the best way to see Africa's elephant capital is to board a boat and cruise the Chobe River's game-rich shores. Nearby, Moremi Game Reserve covers one-third of the Okavango Delta ...

  11. CEO of Botswana Tourism Organization reveals plans to increase

    In a conversation with VoyagesAfriq, the CEO of Botswana Tourism Organization, Ms. Tshoganetso Carl-Ponoesele posited, "2022 has been quite an eventful year for our tourism sector in Botswana, and I must say that what really came out strong was the events and the conferences. ... The Namibia Tourism Board (NTB) is leading a comprehensive ...

  12. Botswana Tourism

    In 2018, the travel and tourism economy exceeded $2.5 billion, and the sector supports 84,000 jobs. Around 96 percent of tourists were travelling for leisure, with the remaining four percent visiting for business reasons. The government are keen to promote Botswana as a business destination. The capital, Gabarone, is an up-and-coming MICE hub ...

  13. Botswana Tourism

    The tourism industry also helped to diversify Botswana's economy from traditional sources such as diamonds and beef and created around 23,000 jobs in 2005. Botswana offers the traveller a choice of accommodation options from top class tourist hotels, luxury lodges and safari camps, to budget guesthouses and camping grounds.

  14. Botswana Tourism (@BotswanaTourism)

    The latest tweets from @botswanatourism

  15. Botswana's New Tourism Policy of 2021 and Mantras of Citizen

    Tourists traveling on boats in a lake. Summary Botswana's first tourism policy was published in 1990 as the first true attempt at formalizing tourism activities in the country. The policy advocated for a high-cost, low-volume (HC, LV) marketing approach for general tourism practice in Botswana. ...

  16. Tourism Statistics Annual Report 2020

    Trade Statistics December 2023: Total Imports in million Pula = 6,421.5 Total Exports in Million Pula=4,623.3 Trade Balance in Million Pula = (1,798.2) Index of Mining Production Q3 2023 = 98.3. Index of Electricity Generation Q3 2023 = 211.6. Tourism: Total Tourists 2020 = 358,225. Unemployment Rate (Quarterly Multi-Topic Survey Q3 2023) = 25.9%.

  17. PDF TOURISM STATISTICS

    TOURISM STATISTICS RORT 2020 1. Private Bag 0024 Gaborone Tel: 3671300 Fax: 3952201 Toll Free: 0800 600 200 Private Bag F193, City of Francistown Tel: 241 5848, ... Statistics Botswana outputs/publications are available on the website at www.statsbots.org.bw and at the

  18. Tourism Offices

    [email protected]. Fax Number +267 395-9220/310-5216. Physical Address. Plot 50676, Fairgrounds Office Park, Blocks B & D. Postal Address. Private Bag 00275. ... Botswana Tourism Organisation. Fairscape Precinct, Plot 70667. Fairgrounds Office Park. Building 1A & 1B, 2nd Floor (East Wing) Gaborone, Botswana ...

  19. Botswana

    Factsheet details. This factsheet highlights the importance of T&T to this economy across many metrics, and features details such as: Contribution of the sector to overall GDP and employment. Comparisons between 2019 and 2022. Forecasts for 2023 and 2033. International and domestic visitor spending. Proportion of leisure vs business spending.

  20. Contact Us

    A qualified team of people will handle your request and will contact you shortly. If you would like to visit or call: Botswana Tourism Organisation Plot 50676, Fairgrounds Office Park Block B, Ground Floor Gaborone, Botswana Tel: +267 391 3111, Fax: +267 395 9220 Email: [email protected].

  21. CEO of Botswana Tourism Organization reveals plans to increase

    In a conversation with VoyagesAfriq, the CEO of Botswana Tourism Organization, Ms. Tshoganetso Carl-Ponoesele posited, "2022 has been quite an eventful year for our tourism sector in Botswana, and I must say that what really came out strong was the events and the conferences. For the first time in Botswana, we managed to host with finance ...