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Sydney Modern Project - Art Gallery of NSW

Learn about the transformation of the Art Gallery of New South Wales into a two-building art museum that almost doubles the space for the display and enjoyment of art.

Large artistic flower sculpture beside modern glass framed building

Exterior view of the Art Gallery of New South Wales’ new building, featuring Yayoi Kusama Flowers that Bloom in the Cosmos 2022. Photo: copyright Iwan Baan

Part of a series of pages highlighting key recent major cultural infrastructure projects supported by Create NSW and other partners.

Project at a glance

The Sydney Modern Project was completed in 2022 and opened to the public on 3 December 2022.

The $344 million transformation and expansion of the Art Gallery of New South Wales created a new art museum experience across two buildings connected by a public art garden.

The new building has almost doubled exhibition space, delivering rich and diverse experiences for all visitors.

It's Australia’s first public art museum to be awarded the highest rating for sustainable design.

In 2023, the building won the prestigious Sulman Medal for public architecture awarded by the Australian Institute of Architects (NSW).

See Art Gallery of NSW website

Who is it for

Each year, over one million visitors enjoy the Art Gallery, and its collection, exhibitions and public programs of art. The new building is expected to double visitation.

The Sydney Modern Project is for everyone who loves art and for those who are curious. It's for artists, communities, students and teachers, art lovers and visitors.

The project has created an exceptional experience of art, architecture and landscape in one of the world’s most beautiful urban locations.

Who is involved

The Sydney Modern Project was delivered by Infrastructure NSW on behalf of the Art Gallery of NSW in collaboration with Create NSW . It was funded by the NSW Government and private donors.

The project was designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architects SANAA with Architectus as executive architect.  Richard Crookes Constructions  was the construction contractor for the new building.

Special features

The project involved construction of a new building (the North Building), revitalisation of the original building (the South Building), and significant landscape design.

The stunning new building features dynamic galleries, site-specific works by leading Australian and international artists, and extensive outdoor spaces for everyone to enjoy.

The expansion provides dedicated spaces and facilities for learning and participation to significantly increase student and teacher visits.

The project has also delivered enhanced digital capabilities to expand engagement with schools, communities, artists and visitors across the state including regional and rural areas.

The project has a 6-star Green Star design rating and features solar cells on the entrance pavilion roof. It's Australia’s first art museum to be awarded the highest rating for sustainable design.

The Sydney Modern Project opened to the public on 3 December 2022.

Construction on the new building commenced in November 2019.

See the key project milestones at  Art Gallery of NSW - About the project  page.

More information

  • Sydney Modern Project | Art Gallery of NSW
  • Sydney Modern Project architecture | Art Gallery of NSW
  • Infrastructure NSW : Sydney Modern

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Aerial view of the Art Gallery of New South Wales’ new SANAA - designed building,

The Art Gallery of NSW has opened the absolutely huge new Sydney Modern Project

Make sure to visit the new $344 million Sydney Modern Project at the Art Gallery of NSW. Check out this sneak peak

Alannah Le Cross

The most significant cultural development to be established in the Harbour City since the Sydney Opera House opened its doors to the public on Saturday, December 3. Sidled up next to the existing Art Gallery of New South Wales, the new standalone building is the centrepiece of the Sydney Modern expansion, and has been in the works for the past decade.

To celebrate the opening week, the gallery will be open late every night until Sunday, December 11, including a pop-up bar by  Mount Pleasant. The bar is open every night on the terrace outside the new restaurant, MOD Dining, with views of the harbour. The wines on offer pair beautifully with the mini lobster rolls and vegan dip and crudites on offer. The bar also  doubles as the best spot to watch the evening drone show designed  by  Kamilaroi artist Reko Rennie, which is now on at 8.30pm nightly until this Sunday (Dec 11). Find out more about the opening celebrations here .

You cannot fully comprehend the scale of this mammoth building – designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architects Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa of SANAA – until you descend down from the ground floor entrance, through the three limestone-clad art pavilions that gently step down towards the harbour, and wander out onto the more than 3,400 square metres of accessible roof ‘art terraces’ and courtyards. Around every corner, new spaces emerge, and reveal with them entirely new styles and arrangements of art. Keep heading down to the fourth level below ground to discover the Tank , an adaptive re-use of a 2,200-square-metre former Second World War fuel bunker.

Sydney Modern Project

Rather than obstructing the sweeping views of the city, the architecture embraces the scenery. Sheer glass-panelled walls, a Wonka-esque glass elevator and layers of escalators with glass railings all work to showcase the landscape as an artwork in its own right. Natural light plays a big role, and on a particularly sunny day the rays stream through those clear walls and the ripped cover to the entrance foyer to light up the indoor and outdoor artworks better than any specially rigged electric lights. 

“This gallery demonstrates how powerful art can be,” said critically acclaimed artist Tony Albert, member of the Art Gallery of NSW Trust, at the new gallery’s media launch. 

“Art has the ability to heal and to transcend culture, age and language to educate and to challenge. With the opening of Sydney Modern, this art museum has the opportunity to engage many more people than ever before. It broadens our outreach to a wider and more diverse audience. In a place like Sydney, Australia, why follow when we can lead? Let's not be a part of history, let's make history.”

Sydney Modern Project

Highlights to discover among this mind-bogglingly expansive temple to art include the first installation to inhabit the subterranean Tank gallery, ‘The End of Imagination’ by Argentinian artist Adrián Villar Rojas. Amid the darkness, roving lights reveal “time-travelling sculptural forms” (or “Terminator fossils”, according to the Time Out team). Side note: you wouldn’t want to lose a child down there.

Immerse yourself in the kaleidoscope-like optical illusion of American artist Samara Golden’s ‘Guts’ in the Dreamhome exhibition on Level 2. Among the permanent outdoor sculptures (which contribute to the largest commissioning program in the Art Gallery’s 151-year history), you’ll find a colourful contribution of towering florals by famously polka-dot-peddling Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama, ‘Flowers that Bloom in the Cosmos’ . 

AGNSW’s first-ever purpose-built gallery for time-based art is kicking things off with Outlaw , an exhibition inspired by the escapades of fugitive rebels (definitely worth settling in to watch Howie Tsui’s monumental and rather graphic animation of everyday life in an ungoverned realm). The Yiribana Gallery , elevated from the lowest level of the original building to a larger dedicated space on the ground level of the new building, also showcases an exciting collection of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art. 

Sydney Modern Project

From Saturday, a free opening program of exhibitions, collection displays and new commissions, featuring works by over 900 artists from around the world, will be open across the Art Gallery’s two buildings and outdoor spaces, to celebrate this historic moment.

Sydney Modern is genuinely a world-class new art institution, with a spacious design and impressive collection that could even rival the likes of the MoMA in New York. It should definitely be on your summer things-to-do list. 

Want more? Check out the best art exhibitions in Sydney this month .

  • Alannah Le Cross Arts and Culture Editor, Time Out Sydney

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Art Gallery of NSW Sydney Modern Project opens new gallery with underground Tank space and top-rating sustainable design

A large, multi-coloured and dotted sculpture of flowers, standing outside a building of panelled windows

It's been 10 years and $344 million dollars in the making, but on Saturday December 3, the Art Gallery of New South Wales (AGNSW) will finally open the doors of its highly anticipated new building.

Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architects Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa of Tokyo-based firm SANAA, the new building — the centrepiece of AGNSW's Sydney Modern Project — nearly doubles the gallery's architectural footprint and exhibition space.

Connected to the 19th-century neoclassical building by a Welcome Plaza and series of landscaped gardens, the new gallery consists of a series of sprawling, airy, glass-fronted and interlocking pavilions and stepped terraces that are embedded into the land bridge and existing infrastructure of The Domain parklands.

A building with many glass windows over three levels, painted white, is in the foreground, with the Sydney skyline behind

Inside, across four levels, there is a gallery showcasing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art; a new 1,300 square-metre gallery space for major exhibitions; a gallery for 'new media' (e.g. video, VR); dedicated learning and participation studios; and a staggering 2,200sqm subterranean gallery that was once a World War II naval oil tank.

The name of this new art palace? While it's being dubbed "Sydney Modern" by many, the new building doesn't have an official title yet.

"With the development of a 'campus', we've been looking towards having an Indigenous name for both the new building and the existing building," AGNSW director Michael Brand told ABC News.

"But to do that appropriately, we are in consultation with the community — and we're still moving forward with that consultation so we can find the right time to do it, the right way to do it, and the right names."

'Most significant build since the Opera House'

At the media preview on Tuesday, the NSW Premier Dominic Perottet and the Arts Minister Ben Franklin, and gallery director Michael Brand, all spoke of the financial and cultural significance of the investment in the Sydney Modern Project (for which the NSW Government contributed $244 million, with private donations covering the other $100 million) as well as the social, economic and creative benefits it will offer to the state and visitors and artists alike.

"Make no mistake, this is the most significant cultural build since the [Sydney] Opera House [in 1973]," said Perottet.

Franklin added: "Over the next 25 years it will inject a billion dollars into the state's economy."

A large, brightly coloured sculpture of flowers stands outside a building lined with large windows

There was talk of an "architectural renaissance" and comparisons drawn to Tate Modern's Turbine Hall and the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Guggenheim Museum in New York City.

Whether or not these comparisons bear out, from a sustainability perspective the achievements are notable: this is the first public art museum in Australia to achieve a 6-star Green Star design rating.

The new building, which operates on 100 per cent renewable energy, features solar panels, rainwater capture and harvesting capabilities, and more than 8,000sqm of landscaped areas and green roof that have been planted with Australian natives.

But what of the art?

A multiplicity of stories

When the doors open on Saturday, there will be work by more than 900 Australian and international artists on display across the two-building AGNSW campus.

Brand described the new building as a "21st-century art museum" where the voices of artists are central.

An older man with grey hair and glasses, wearing a suit, looks into the camera, one hand in his pocket

"There are stories told [here] in a multiplicity of voices from a multitude of places, but they're all told across Sydney," he said.

"Our chief artistic possibility as a 21st-century Australian art museum derives from the coexistence here in Sydney and Australia of multiple cultural traditions: from those of our Indigenous Australians, which can be traced back 65,000 years, to those of a long series of subsequent arrivals over the past 250 years."

And while the director concedes that the core and strength of the Art Gallery of NSW's collection "will always be what might be loosely termed 'Australian' art, we recognise that this term has become increasingly less useful in an ever-more fluid and easily connected world," he said.

A large rectangular artwork spans several metres of a gallery wall, featuring a nighttime scene in vivid pinks and purples.

"Australian artists have always mediated the flow of ideas and forms in both directions. And this is why we are redoubling our efforts to find points of commonality with the art and artists beyond our shores."

New art for a new building

As part of the Sydney Modern Project, the gallery has undertaken the largest commissioning program in its 151-year history.

Speaking at the press conference, deputy director and director of collections Maud Page described this commissioning process "as one that has given breadth and ambition to artists to work with us and to tell us what they think an art museum leading into 2023 needs to be".

The gallery has commissioned nine new, large, site-specific works: by Australian artists Karla Dickens, Simryn Gill, Lorraine Connelly-Northey and Jonathan Jones; New Zealanders Lisa Reihana, Francis Upritchard and Richard Lewer; and international artists Yayoi Kusuma and Lee Mingwei. All are on display except for Jones's work, bíal gwiyúŋo (the fire is not yet lighted), which will be completed in mid-2023 .

A panel made of metal depicting hooded figures, installed in above the entranceway to a classical-style building

Elsewhere in the building, recent acquisitions and commissions pepper an exhibition titled Making Worlds, which presents the work of a number of Australian and international artists from AGNSW's collection in compelling conversation with each other.

Korean artist Kimsooja's gently monumental participatory work Archive of Mind (2017) is a highlight here, with visitors invited to sit and mindfully mould a handful of clay that is added to the galaxy of hand-shaped spheres on the enormous table in front of them.

Another exhibition, titled Dreamhome: Stories of Art and Shelter, introduces Australian audiences to works by acclaimed international artists including Jeffrey Gibson, Simone Leigh and Samara Golden, alongside works by more familiar names including Tracey Moffatt and Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran.

A large white structure of columns with flat platforms featuring illuminated colourful artworks towers in a gallery space.

The underground Tank gallery

When construction began several years ago, the subterranean oil bunker that is now known as the Tank gallery could only be accessed through a manhole in the roof.

While remnants of the Tank's past industrial life still linger quite literally in the air (with the faint smell of oil), this cavernous, columned space will now hold the gallery's most ambitious work: a site-specific commission that will change every year.

For the opening, AGNSW commissioned a new work by Argentinian artist Adrián Villar Rojas, who has previously created works for the rooftop of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and for the 2015 Istanbul Biennial, at Büyükada Island.

A scukpture made of organic and inorganic materials including metal is placed in a darkened bunker-style space

Rojas's work for the Tank gallery, titled The End of Imagination, is composed of five suspended, monumental sculptural forms, which are animated by the shadows of sentient-seeming spotlights. The dark and atmospheric descent down a large spiral staircase into the Tank is a memorable first experience.

Elevating First Nations Art

A core part of the Sydney Modern Project has been the symbolic relocation of AGNSW's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander space, its Yiribana Gallery, from lower level 3 in the old building to a much larger space at the entrance of the new one.

Artist and Girramay and Kuku Yalanji man Tony Albert is one of the gallery's artist trustees, and he spoke powerfully at the media preview about the significance of the relocation, but also of the opportunity and responsibility to elevate and empower Indigenous knowledge as the gallery looks to the future:

"Art has the ability to heal and to transcend culture, age and language to educate and to challenge. With the opening of Sydney Modern this art museum has the opportunity to engage many more people than ever before. … Our colonial history is complex; it cannot be extinguished. But if we cannot learn from our mistakes we are doomed to make them again in the future. We do not need to encourage alternative viewpoints, but implement and value Indigenous people, perspectives and knowledges. We do not need to tell the story of Indigenous people. We need to empower and open the front door to let Indigenous people tell their stories their ways. … The relocation of the Yiribana gallery to the entrance of this new building along with major commissions by Indigenous artists Lorraine Connelly-Northey, Karla Dickens and Jonathan Jones makes a visit to the Art Gallery of New South Wales a flagship opportunity for this engagement."

Five Indigenous paintings hang on the walls of a gallery. Dozens of stalactite-like glass pendants hang from the ceiling.

Looking forward

Meriam Mer artist and designer Grace Lillian Lee is one of the artists whose work is on display in the new Yiribana Gallery. Her series of intricately woven, wearable sculptural forms, Belonging, was also commissioned by the gallery.

Lee is excited to have her art shown in this context: "It's really shifted my thinking about how I see my work, what I'm creating, and why I'm creating it for myself," she tells ABC Arts.

She is the founder of First Nations Fashion + Design (FNFD), a not-for-profit organisation dedicated to supporting and promoting Indigenous fashion through mentoring, skills development and curated fashion performances.

Her success as an artist and designer was key to establishing FNFD, and now, the opportunity to be shown in Yiribana has enabled Lee to focus on her independent practice.

A collection of woven body armour on display in an art gallery. On the walls behind it paintings can be seen.

She has also reflected on what her inclusion means for her mentor, artist Uncle Ken Thaiday, who taught her the weaving technique she employs across all of her work.

"He has been really supportive of my practice, and he's had an incredible career and wants to see that happen for me. So it's just been a really special opportunity to be part of the Yiribana space and to see it come to life," says Lee.

"For Yiribana to be here and for us to be here as a collective is quite powerful … I was really moved by Tony's speech because I do think [this moment] is an opportunity for [us as] artists. We do have an opportunity to hopefully shift where the future narrative and direction of our way of living could be.

"We have the oldest living and surviving culture in the world, but as a colonial country, we are so young. And so how are we going to evolve as artists? And what's going to be the shift in the narratives that are being spoken about and shared from our old knowledge into what the future looks like?"

They're questions to ask of everyone who visits the new gallery.

Art Gallery of New South Wales' new building opens on December 3.

From December 3-11 the gallery will host a special program of talks, performances and concerts to celebrate, and opening hours for the old and new buildings will be extended to 10pm each night during that period.

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Sydney Modern

An expansion of the Art Gallery of NSW.

On this page:

  • Public benefits
  • Sustainability

Infographics

The Art Gallery of NSW opened its new building to the public on 3 December 2022, an architectural and cultural landmark for everyone to enjoy. 

The completion of the Sydney Modern Project is a once-in-a-generation transformation of the state’s 151-year-old Art Gallery, creating an art museum campus comprising two buildings connected by an art garden on Gadigal Country overlooking Sydney Harbour. It is the most significant cultural development to open in Sydney in nearly half a century. 

The Art Gallery is the first public art museum to receive a 6-star Green Star design rating from Australia’s Green Building Council. The expansion meets the evolving expectations of audiences for a 21st century cultural institution. The design almost doubles exhibition space to attract more of the best national and international exhibitions to Sydney. It also creates a prominent new destination for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art. 

Infrastructure NSW delivered the project on behalf of the NSW Government and the Art Gallery. 

The new building was designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architects SANAA with Architectus as executive architect, and the contractor was Richard Crookes Constructions.

Artist's impression of Sydney Modern as viewed from Woolloomooloo

Public benefits  

  • Doubled exhibition space to showcase more of the State’s outstanding art collection and attract more major national and international exhibitions to Sydney. 
  • Dynamic new galleries to show different types of spaces for new forms of art. Prominent destination for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art and culture. 
  • Dedicated spaces and facilities for learning and participation, with innovative and interactive programs. 
  • Enhanced digital capabilities to expand engagement with schools, communities, artists, and visitors in the Gallery and remotely.  
  • Maximised open space across the site, integrating the building with the landscape, including more than 3,400sqm of accessible roof ‘art terraces’ and courtyards.  
  • Improved 24/7 public access across the site and to the wider eastern cultural precinct for all visitors and an improved universal pathway with 2 new lifts to better connect Woolloomooloo with the CBD. 
  • Wider economic benefit to the NSW economy of more than $1 billion over the next 25 years. 
  • Revitalised original building with restored architectural features, more space for art and an enhanced visitor experience. 
  • Expanded forecourt with two black granite reflecting pools, new landscaping, seating and shade to create an expanded civic area.  

Sustainability  

  • The Art Gallery is the first public art museum in Australia to achieve a 6-star Green Star design rating – the highest environmental standard for design. 
  • 100% of the new building’s energy is powered by renewable energy, with more than 10% generated by 735 solar panels covering nearly 1,500sqm of roof top space. 
  • Rainwater capture and harvesting for re-use in irrigation and cooling towers.  
  • Adaptive reuse of industrial infrastructure, transforming a former WWII oil tank into a spectacular art space. 
  • More than 8,000sqm of green roof and landscaped areas are planted with some 50,000 Australian native species.
  • Innovation also extended to the construction to deliver a more sustainable process across the project
  • 95% of construction and demolition waste was diverted to recycling 
  • 34% greener cement by reducing Portland cement in all concrete mixes.

Sustainability, workforce and materials fun facts infographic

Download the Sydney Modern fun facts infographic .

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Sydney Modern Museum / SANAA

Sydney Modern Museum / SANAA - Exterior Photography, Cityscape

  • Curated by Hana Abdel
  • Architects: SANAA
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  40000 m²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2022
  • Photographs Photographs: Iwan Baan , Jörg Baumann
  • Lead Architects: Kazuyo Sejima + Ryue Nishizawa / SANAA
  • Builder : Richard Crookes Constructions
  • Executive Architects:  Architectus
  • City:  Sydney
  • Country:  Australia

Sydney Modern Museum / SANAA - Exterior Photography, Cityscape

Text description provided by the architects. The Sydney Modern Project is a once-in-a-generation transformation of the 151-year-old Art Gallery of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, creating an art museum campus comprising two buildings connected by an Art Garden on Gadigal Country overlooking Sydney Harbour. The centerpiece of the Sydney Modern Project is a new building designed by Pritzker prize-winning architects Kazuyo Sejima + Ryue Nishizawa / SANAA.

Sydney Modern Museum / SANAA - Interior Photography, Kitchen, Windows

Designed as a complementary counterpart to the Art Gallery’s revitalized original building with its 19th-century neoclassical facade, SANAA ’s design for the new building responds to the unique project site with a series of interlocking pavilions that gently step down towards Sydney Harbour. The pavilions sit low and lightly on the site, following the natural topography of the land.

Sydney Modern Museum / SANAA - Exterior Photography, Windows, Facade

The design delivers much-needed exhibition space while respecting and enhancing public use of the surrounding landscape, retaining and celebrating significant trees, and improving access to Sydney ’s eastern cultural precinct. The new building also comprises art research and education spaces, multipurpose spaces, a gallery shop, food and beverage facilities, and visitor amenities.

Sydney Modern Museum / SANAA - Interior Photography

The new building has been designed to meet the evolving expectations of audiences for a 21st-century art museum with greater capacity to accommodate future Art Gallery visitors, particularly students, teachers, and artists. 

Sydney Modern Museum / SANAA - Image 34 of 39

The Art Gallery is the first public art museum in Australia to achieve the highest environmental standard for design. The Sydney Modern Project has been awarded a 6-star Green Star design rating by the Green Building Council of Australia. Classified as ‘world leadership’ in sustainability, the rating exceeds the Art Gallery’s original 5-star goal and sets a new standard for art museums globally.

Sydney Modern Museum / SANAA - Exterior Photography, Facade

Project gallery

Sydney Modern Museum / SANAA - Exterior Photography, Cityscape

Project location

Address: art gallery rd, sydney nsw 2000, australia.

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  • Sustainability

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Aerial view of the Art Gallery of New South Wales’ new SANAA-designed building, 2022. Image © Iwan Baan

悉尼现代艺术博物馆 / SANAA

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‘Like walking into a crystal’: our first preview of the Art Gallery of NSW’s new Sydney Modern

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Honorary (Senior Fellow) School of Culture and Communication University of Melbourne. Editor in Chief, Design and Art of Australia Online, The University of Melbourne

Disclosure statement

Joanna Mendelssohn began her professional career at the Art Gallery of NSW and has been a reader for some of its publications. She has in the past received funding from the Australian Research Council.

University of Melbourne provides funding as a founding partner of The Conversation AU.

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In 1972, when the Art Gallery of New South Wales opened its first modern building, it was rightly praised for its innovative design.

Architect Andrew Andersons incorporated the latest aspects of museum architecture. The egg crate ceilings were designed to reduce noise for people walking on its marble floors. There were moveable screens that looked like walls and adjustable light levels for fragile art.

But where the building faced Sydney Harbour, Andersons placed a giant window. The intrusion of reality into art connected visitors to the world outside.

It was revolutionary for the time, a marked contrast to the giant granite box of the National Gallery of Victoria , opening in 1968. The Melbourne building had followed the standard model of museum design of eliminating windows to maximise hanging space.

Just over 50 years later, the Sydney Modern expansion under architecture firm SANAA could be described as putting Andersons’ approach on steroids. It will open in December but in recent weeks small groups of visitors have been given preview tours, while installation crews make the finishing touches.

Read more: State Library Victoria proves libraries aren't just about books: they're about community

A gallery for Indigenous art

The relationship of Sydney Modern to the older building echoes Andersons’ uncompromising but sympathetic linking of his 1972 construction to the original Grand Courts designed by Walter Liberty Vernon.

The new link between the two buildings includes an installation honouring the history of Country by Wiradjuri and Kamilaroi artist Jonathan Jones.

This new building is very aware of its physical and spiritual location. It is dominated by the light from its soaring glass walls. The ground floor entrance feels like walking into a crystal.

In a nod to Andersons’ first glorious window, the Yiribana gallery of Indigenous art has a window facing the harbour so visitors can see where the Gadigal ancestors first witnessed the arrival of convicts in 1788.

The relocation of Yiribana from the basement of the older building is a physical manifestation of the significant shift in Australia’s understanding of its culture.

visit sydney modern

In 1958, the gallery’s deputy director Tony Tuckson facilitated collector and surgeon Stuart Scougall ’s gift of Tiwi Pukumani grave posts. For the first time Indigenous work was shown as art and not anthropological artefact.

In 1972 there was a temporary exhibit of Yirrkala bark paintings and figures, but this was soon replaced with another temporary exhibition.

In late 1973, funding from the arts programs associated with the opening of the Sydney Opera House enabled a permanent installation of Melanesian art, another gift from Scougall. It was accompanied by what the trustees thought would be a temporary exhibition of Aboriginal art.

Tuckson died while the exhibition was being installed and it remained on view, in a dark little space at the bottom of the gallery’s marble stairs, until about 1980.

In 1983, Djon Mundine curated a temporary exhibition of bark paintings and the following year was appointed as part-time curator, but there was little official interest in Aboriginal art by the gallery.

The big shift came in 1991 when Hetti Perkins curated another temporary exhibition, this time of previously little-known Aboriginal women artists.

Perkins’ achievement was especially appreciated by Mollie Gowing , one of the volunteer guides.

Starting in 1992, Gowing collaborated with Perkins to privately fund the gallery’s major collection of contemporary Indigenous art.

In 1994, on the initiative of then NSW Minister for the Arts Peter Collins, the gallery opened Yiribana, its first permanent dedicated exhibition space for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art.

This basement had previously been the offices and working area for the public programs department and was not an especially sympathetic space for art. It was well over a decade before Indigenous art began to be integrated into other exhibits of Australian art.

visit sydney modern

The relocation of Yiribana to Sydney Modern can be seen as the gallery’s affirmation of the importance of Indigenous cultures to any understanding of what Australia may be.

Cultural exchange

In 1972 when the newly opened gallery wanted to show its best art to the world, the main gallery was dominated by art from the United States. All eyes were drawn to Morris Louis’ Ayin .

That same space now has work by Sol LeWitt in visual conversation with Emily Kame Kngwarreye and Gloria Tamerre Petyarre .

visit sydney modern

The integration of Australian art with art from the rest of the world is a reflection of historic reality. Last century was a time of mass travel and cultural exchange, when many national barriers were breached, especially in the arts.

Sydney Modern, combined with the reconfiguring of the 20th century exhibits in the older building, is a quiet repudiation of that cultural cringe which persists in seeing Australian culture as some kind of backwater.

Although most of Sydney Modern is filled with light, its most surprising space is buried in dark.

During the second world war, when the navy fleet needed to refuel at Garden Island, the Australian government secretly built a giant underground fuel storage tank, its true depth hidden below the water line.

Now a spiral staircase leads the visitor to the Tank, a magical space of oil-stained columns and echoing sounds. Right now it is empty, but within weeks the Argentine-Peruvian artist, Adrián Villar Rojas will begin to create a new work, The End of Imagination.

visit sydney modern

There are two meanings to the title. One suggests imagination is now dead. However, by being placed at the core of such an inspirational space it seems Rojas may be suggesting a culmination of imagination, a questioning of what imagination may be in these days of the Anthropocene.

The work is not yet made. As with the rest of the art that will fill this magical space, we will have to wait and see.

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Sydney Modern Project: Inside The Art Gallery of NSW’s New $344 Million Museum

Sydney Modern Project: Inside The Art Gallery of NSW’s New $344 Million Museum

Chris Singh

As of this Saturday, Sydney now has a massive new $344 million museum, shooting off from the well-established Art Gallery of New South Wales as one of the most significant cultural developments to open in the city’s 234-year history. Already over 15,000 people have registered to be amongst the first at Sydney Modern Project on its opening day, Saturday, December 3, validating a decade’s worth of construction for the project, which includes 3,400 square metres of accessible rooftop art terraces and courtyards, as well a converted World War II fuel bunker that’s been transformed into a 2,220-square-metre art space with a seven-metre-high ceiling.

Numerous spaces make up this beastly project, which was designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architects Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizara of SANNA, fashioned as a series of descending spaces primarily features across three limestone art pavilions that jut out towards the harbour.

Water seems to be a pervasive theme for the new modern art museum, with a Welcome Plaza canopy made from 108 pieces of curved, form-cast glass designed with notable ripple patterns to reflect Sydney Harbour.

The aim to create “seamless connections between art, architecture and landscape,” as AGNSW director Michael Brand puts it, seem to be very much on the money here, presenting a significant cultural milestone for Sydney that should centre as one of the city’s biggest attractions moving forward.

Sydney Modern has been built around an original building which was designed by Walter Liberty Vernon in 1986, reimagined by Tonkin Zulaikha Greer as a very communal and educational space with a members’ lounge, the country’s first children’s art library, a Capon Research Library and a National Art Archive.

What’s On At Sydney Modern Project?

One of the major pieces at Sydney Modern

The team behind Sydney’s newest modern art museum seem to be tackling summer holidays with a more-is-more approach. From Saturday, December 3, Sydney Modern will offer a free opening program of exhibitions, collection displays and new commissions with works by over 900 artists from around the world.

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A reason to travel to Sydney in December: the new Sydney Modern gallery

Caoimhe Hanrahan-Lawrence

Nov 23, 2022 • 5 min read

Artist Adrián Villar Rojas during a visit to the Tank space in the new building at the Art Gallery of New South Wales

Artist Adrián Villar Rojas during a visit to the Tank space in the new building at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, photo © Art Gallery of New South Wales, Mim Stirling

Looking for a great reason to start planning your next adventure? In this series, we share the most compelling events, attractions and experiences that will have you booking a trip to the world's most exciting destinations.

Summer in Sydney immediately evokes images of vibrant sunshine, pristine beaches, and copious quantities of sunscreen. But this year, the advent of good weather also heralds the completion of an ambitious artistic and architectural project. The new Sydney Modern, an expansion of the Art Gallery of New South Wales , promises a world-class facility to showcase the best in contemporary art, opening on Friday, December 3rd.

Rising out of the oasis of the Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain precinct, the expansion nearly doubles the existing exhibition space of the art gallery. Acclaimed Japanese architectural firm SANAA designed the building, and, conscious of the abundant natural beauty surrounding the expansion, the glass-paneled exhibition spaces respond to the topography of the site. 

A dark underground bunker that has been transformed into an art space.

One unique aspect of the project is the repurposing of a decommissioned naval fuel bunker into The Tank, an underground exhibition space. There will also be a public art garden, accessible at all hours of the day. 

To celebrate the opening of Sydney Modern, nine artists have been commissioned to create works responding to the project and its surroundings. Wiradjuri artist Karla Dickens was recently depicted in the winning portrait for the 2022 Archibald Prize. Her work will tie the Sydney Modern expansion to the existing Vernon building, being installed into a niche of the original building’s sandstone façade. The installation work from Taiwanese–American artist Lee Mingwei interacts with the building’s physical structure, transforming the external wall into an intimate and introspective space.

A number of events have been planned to mark the new gallery’s opening week. Highlights include a series of talks with exhibiting artists, and a performance by Djinama Yilaga opening the new Yiribana gallery, which showcases Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art.

A woman stands holding a round black piece of art with writing on it.

Entry to the gallery is free to the public collections. If you are planning to visit the new building on the opening weekend, you will need to book a free timed and dated ticket.

24 free things to do in Sydney  

If you want to sample some food without leaving the premises, the Sydney Modern expansion will introduce new dining facilities. MOD Dining by Clayton Wells offers a modern sit-down dining experience, and the take-away kiosk focuses on native ingredients, with each menu item chosen by Gamileroi Elder Aunty Beryl Van-Oploo. The Art Gallery Restaurant, Crafted by Matt Moran and the Gallery Café are open in the pre-existing building. The multiple dining options will keep you fueled through a full day of art-viewing, but can get crowded around lunch time, and they close when the galleries do. 

Sydney's best neighborhoods to get a taste of the Harbour City

To reserve tables or treat yourself to a dinner out, you’ll have to cast your net a little wider than near the gallery. Luckily,  the adjoining suburbs of Chippendale and Glebe are favored haunts of Sydney creatives, and are only a short bus ride away from the Art Gallery of New South Wales and Sydney Modern. While you’re in the area, take the time to visit the White Rabbit Gallery , which houses a world-class collection of Chinese modern art.

The White Rabbit Contemporary Chinese art collection, One of the world's largest collections of contemporary Chinese art was founded by Kerr and Judith Neilson

Chippendale restaurant Automata ⁠— also from Clayton Wells of the gallery’s MOD Dining ⁠— provides a fine dining experience without a prohibitive price tag. Wells’s goal is to reveal the depth hidden within seemingly simple ingredients. The six- and eight-course tasting menus change regularly, so you can plan to visit Automata again.

Glebe is known for its café culture, especially the institution that is Sappho Books, Café & Bar . At the front you will find a charming and well-stocked second-hand bookstore, with several rare and out-of-print titles. Upstairs is Da Capo music, offering a wide selection of second-hand sheet music. Once you’ve selected your reading material, you can move out to the courtyard café. It offers a sizable vegan menu, great coffee, and regular poetry and live music events.

Just across the road is the Lillipad Café, which husband and wife duo Nyoka and Laszio Hrabinsky envision as a slice of Far North Queensland in inner city Sydney. The menu reflects Nyoka’s Yidinji culture, incorporating native ingredients and flavors into many of the dishes. A Wild Country platter and wattleseed coffee are the perfect precursor to a visit to the Sydney Modern’s Yiribana gallery.

The historic Rocks area of Sydney promises everything from bottomless Sunday brunches to opulent evening drinks, all only a short walk from Sydney's other major gallery, the Museum of Contemporary Art .

A dark wood interior of a rustic bar.

Co-owners Ciara Doran and Eoin Daniels head two of the most atmospheric bars in the Rocks, the Doss House and Frank Mac’s . Both bars have an intimate, old-world feel, perfectly suited to whispered conversations across the table. Once a boarding house and an opium den, the historic sandstone building of the Doss House is now home to over 150 varieties of whisky, including several rare varieties. Gin lovers should make their way up the road to Frank Mac’s, where you can try the wide selection of gins neat, with soda, or in one of their carefully curated cocktails.

If you want to take advantage of the summer sun, opt for the brighter Maybe Sammy . The bar’s retro design pays homage to the era of classic Hollywood, which continues in the names of their well-loved cocktails. The dramatic drinks range in price from their $13 minis (which drop to $7 at happy hour!) to a luxurious $330 concoction from the premium pour list.

For those of you just looking for a no-nonsense pub serving ordinary beer, the Lord Nelson Brewery Hotel has you covered. The Lord Nelson is Sydney’s oldest continually operating hotel, and they brew their award-winning beer on site.

The new Sydney Modern expansion is centrally located. Many international hotel chains are located in the CBD and Darling Harbour, both of which are well connected by public transport. Potts Point also offers luxury accommodation options and is closer to the Gallery but has fewer public transport options. If you want to stay among Sydney’s creative community, look for accommodation in Surrey Hills, Chippendale, Darlinghurst, and Paddington – the last two being close to Sydney’s major fine arts universities. 

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Aerial view of the Art Gallery of New South Wales’s new Sanaa-designed building with CBD and harbour bridge and opera house in the background

Sydney’s $344m gallery has been open for eight months – so why doesn’t it have a name?

Political intervention and conflicting advice over Indigenous language use are at the heart of the impasse over the addition to the Art Gallery of NSW

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E ight months after opening , New South Wales’s largest cultural construction investment since the Sydney Opera House remains nameless, with political intervention and conflicting advice over language behind the deadlock.

The $344m addition to the Art Gallery of NSW remains colloquially known as Sydney Modern, the name of the Sanaa-designed construction project which began in 2015.

But the impasse over an official name remains, after political intervention from the former NSW government and disquiet within the museum’s own staff and Indigenous advisory group, according to documents obtained through NSW’s Government Information Public Access (Gipa) Act.

Just six weeks out from the new building’s opening in December 2022, the AGNSW’s board of trustees – responsible for endorsing Indigenous names for the new Sydney Modern building and the 151-year-old sandstone landmark to its south – called time on the naming process. And it appears little progress has been made since.

On 11 October 2022 the museum sent a brief to Ben Franklin, the arts minister in the previous Coalition government, explaining why the building would be opened on 3 December without a name.

“It became apparent that there was increasing discomfort amongst art gallery Indigenous staff, the art gallery’s Indigenous advisory group and community leaders whom the art gallery has long, productive and established relationships,” the brief said.

Large flower sculpture sits on an outdoor deck in front of floor to ceiling glass windows

Eight days later the museum’s Indigenous advisory group met. The meeting’s minutes noted that plans to give the AGNSW’s two buildings – the old and the new – Indigenous names had been temporarily scuttled due to “broader external political factors”.

Negotiations then began over how politicians could deal with the unprecedented situation of cutting the ribbon on a $344m project without an official name.

Politics descends

In 2021 the museum convened a naming consultation group, including Prof Jakelin Troy, a Sydney Indigenous language academic; Stephen Gilchrist, a Yamatji lecturer in Indigenous art at the University of Sydney; Tony Albert, an award-winning Indigenous artist; and a number of Indigenous Sydney elders. First Nations museum staff and the Metropolitan Local Aboriginal Land Council were also invited to contribute.

In May 2022, the chair of the museum’s board of trustees, David Gonski, informed the arts minister that Naala Nura (seeing the land/country) was in the final stages of being approved by the board for the old building and Naala Badu (seeing the water/s) for the new. The names were sourced from the Dharug language.

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But the next month, the NSW government instructed the museum to broaden its consultation to include its own government agency, the Aboriginal Languages Trust.

Franklin told Guardian Australia he suggested the AGNSW include the trust “so as to ensure that any new name announced would be supported by the broader Aboriginal community”.

“The method, process and management of all consultation was conducted at the discretion of AGNSW,” Franklin said in the statement.

But the museum told Guardian Australia Franklin requested the Gujaga Foundation, which represents the La Perouse Indigenous community, be brought on board for consultation. The chair of that foundation, Raymond Ingrey, also sits on the board of the Aboriginal Languages Trust.

Meetings with members of the Gujaga Foundation took place in July and August 2022.

People walking through an art gallery

But the the chief executive of the Metropolitan Local Aboriginal Land Council, Nathan Moran, said he had not heard about Gujaga’s involvement in the naming project until Guardian Australia called him.

Moran said the government and the museum had taken a serious misstep in protocol.

“We are the legislated representative body to preserve and protect cultural heritage, we are the representative body of all Aboriginal people on the land where the art gallery is based and operates.

“They’ve invited someone else into our back yard. It’s just not on.”

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Under the Gujaga Foundation’s advice, names in the Dharawal language were put forward to the board of trustees.

The foundation told Guardian Australia its advice was sound because the Dharawal language was spoken by the clans, including the Gadigal clan, who continued to live in traditional camps around Sydney Harbour and Botany Bay, as well as in the Illawarra and Shoalhaven region, in the decades after colonisation.

In 1883 (11 years after the gallery was founded), government intervention caused the Aboriginal people living in the Sydney Harbour and Botany Bay camps to be moved to La Perouse to be “out of sight and out of mind” from the colony.

“As is the case with the vast majority of the La Perouse Aboriginal community, each member, director and employee of the Gujaga Foundation belongs to families with an ancient and unbroken connection to coastal Sydney … the land on which the Art Gallery of NSW is situated,” the foundation’s chair said in a statement.

The AGNSW told Guardian Australia the addition of alternative names in Dharawal “did not denote the art gallery’s disendorsement of that proposed by the naming consultation group, but rather the introduction of a further option”.

Nevertheless, in early September, Gonski wrote to the minister seeking approval of the board’s decision to go with the Dharawal words Nandhi Ngura (seeing country) and Nandhi Gadhu (seeing [salt] waters) as the Indigenous names for the old and new buildings respectively.

The next day the AGNSW’s director, Michael Brand, informed the museum’s Indigenous advisory group that the government had decided to postpone the announcement of the new names.

Language barriers

The decision to go with Dharawal names appears to contradict the widely held view of other sources, including the Australian Museum and the City of Sydney , which, in consultation with Troy and First Nations groups, accepts Gadigal and/or Dharug as the languages spoken on the land where the Sydney CBD now stands.

Art curator Hetti Perkins, the AGNSW’s former head of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art for 13 years, emailed Brand complaining that in the intellectual property agreement signed between the museum and Gujaga, acknowledgement of the new naming did not contain a single reference to the Gadigal clan.

Moran told Guardian Australia it showed “a total lack of cultural protocol [on the part of Gujaga], and a total disrespect of the local people and the local language by the museum”.

“To bring in languages from other areas is so profound, people are deeply offended quite frankly,” he said.

A spokesperson for the Gujaga Foundation, Ash Walker, said the confusion was understandable, “which is largely due to non-Indigenous people and Indigenous people traditionally from areas outside of coastal Sydney failing to understand our complex layers of identity”.

On 11 October , a brief was sent to the minister by Gonski withdrawing the Dharawal names, saying it was “no longer appropriate to proceed with the adoption of Sydney Aboriginal language names … at this time”.

Faced with the prospect of opening a much-publicised new building without a name, the minister’s office and the museum began negotiations on a prepared statement to explain the nameless mystery to the media and the public, the Gipa documents show.

On 3 December 2022, the project – the product of Australia’s largest ever government and philanthropic arts partnership – was opened as “the new art gallery building”.

It is still waiting for a name.

A museum statement sent to Guardian Australia said it “remains optimistic” that Indigenous names will be adopted for one or both of its buildings and consultations are continuing.

“The art gallery strongly believes that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have the right to self-determination in their cultural affairs and expression of cultural matters,” it said.

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Sydney Contemporary, Australasia’s premier art fair, returns from 5 – 8 September 2024 with the largest and most diverse gathering of contemporary art galleries in the region. Staged at Carriageworks, Australia’s striking multi- arts venue, the Fair welcomes over 90 galleries from Australia, New Zealand, Asia and around the world. Billed as one of the most celebrated events on Australia’s cultural calendar, Sydney Contemporary has established itself as a must-attend art event and the perfect place to discover and collect modern and contemporary art.

Wednesday 4 September Collector Preview 2pm-8pm (VIP Pass holders and Premium Multi-Day Pass holders only)

Thursday 5 September General Admission 11am – 5pm Art Night 5:30pm-9pm

Friday 6 September General Admission 11am – 4pm Friday After Work 4pm-8pm

Saturday 7 September General Admission 11am – 6pm

Sunday 8 September General Admission 11am – 5pm

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Sydney Contemporary takes place at Carriageworks, a leading contemporary multi-arts institution situated within the vibrant urban cultural precinct of the former Eveleigh Railway Workshops in Redfern, Sydney, Australia. Originally spanning 51 hectares (130 acres), the Eveleigh Rail Complex Yards were constructed between 1880 and 1889, featuring the historic Eveleigh Railway Workshops and the decommissioned Eveleigh Carriage Workshops site, now home to Carriageworks.

Carriageworks 245 Wilson Street Eveleigh, Sydney

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Getting There

Sydney Contemporary is held at  Carriageworks in Eveleigh. A short walk from nearby bus and train stations, and a 20-minute drive from Sydney Airport. 

Trains Redfern Station | 8 minute walk Macdonaldtown Station | 10 minute walk Newtown Station | 15 minute walk More info  transportnsw.info

Buses Nearest stop is at Codrington Street at City Road, approximately a 5 minute walk to Carriageworks. Buses: 422, 423, 426, 428, 370, 352 More info  transportnsw.info

Parking Valet parking will be available for visitors, guests and staff and can be booked through Gieves. Flat rate of $44.00 pre-booked (and pre-paid) per space per day or $55.00 pay-on-arrival. Call 1300 880 839 or email [email protected]

Accessibility

Carriageworks  is a full accessible venue, with a wheelchair ramp and level access at all entrances. There is level access and disabled seating available in venues. Toilets are fully accessible. Service animals are welcome throughout the precinct. Wheelchairs and motorised scooters are available for visitors. 

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7 national symphonies you must visit for a musical experience

  • By Mr. Digital Fingers
  • May 24, 2024

symphonies

Music has the power to transcend boundaries and touch the soul. For those seeking a truly immersive musical experience, visiting renowned symphonies worldwide is a must. These symphonies offer a feast for the ears and provide cultural insights and architectural grandeur that make the experience unforgettable. Here are seven national symphonies you must visit for a musical experience like no other.

1. Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Austria

The Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra is one of the world’s most prestigious and celebrated orchestras. Founded in 1842, this orchestra is renowned for its unique style and exceptional classical music performances. The orchestra’s home, the Musikverein, is an architectural marvel and, acoustically, one of the best concert halls globally.

The Magic of the Musikverein

The Musikverein’s Golden Hall is iconic, with its stunning interior and impeccable acoustics. Attending a concert here is not just about listening to music; it’s about experiencing history and tradition. The Vienna Philharmonic’s New Year’s Concert is a global event watched by millions and a bucket-list experience for many music lovers.

2. Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, Germany

The Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra is synonymous with musical excellence and innovation. Established in 1882, this orchestra has a rich history and has been led by some of the most influential conductors in the world, including Herbert von Karajan and Sir Simon Rattle.

A Modern Architectural Gem

The Philharmonie, the orchestra’s home since 1963, is a modernist architectural masterpiece. Its tent-like structure and unique seating arrangement, where the audience surrounds the stage, create an intimate and immersive listening experience. The Berlin Philharmonic’s Digital Concert Hall also allows music enthusiasts to enjoy their performances from anywhere in the world.

3. Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Netherlands

The Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, based in Amsterdam, is often hailed as one of the finest orchestras globally. Founded in 1888, it has a reputation for its rich and warm sound, usually attributed to the exceptional acoustics of its home, the Concertgebouw.

The Concertgebouw Experience

The Concertgebouw is renowned for its perfect acoustics, which makes attending a concert here a sublime experience. The orchestra’s repertoire ranges from classical masterpieces to contemporary works. The annual Concertgebouw Orchestra’s Mahler Festival is significant for classical music lovers.

4. London Symphony Orchestra, United Kingdom

The London Symphony Orchestra (LSO) is one of the world’s oldest and most respected orchestras. Since its founding in 1904, the LSO has been at the forefront of British music, known for its dynamic performances and innovative programming.

The Barbican Centre

The LSO’s home, the Barbican Centre, is a cultural hub in London. The venue is not just a concert hall but a center for the arts featuring theater, film, and visual arts. The LSO’s concerts at the Barbican are known for their energy and creativity, making it a must-visit for any music lover.

5. New York Philharmonic, United States

The New York Philharmonic is the oldest symphony orchestra in the United States, founded in 1842. This orchestra has a storied history and has played a vital role in American musical culture.

Lincoln Center’s David Geffen Hall

The orchestra’s home, David Geffen Hall at Lincoln Center, is in New York City’s heart. The venue offers an electric atmosphere, and the orchestra’s performances are characterized by their passion and precision. The New York Philharmonic’s free concerts in the parks during the summer are a beloved tradition, making classical music accessible to all.

6. Orchestre de Paris, France

The Orchestre de Paris is one of France’s leading orchestras, known for its elegance and refined sound. Founded in 1967, the orchestra quickly became a cornerstone of Parisian cultural life.

The Philharmonie de Paris

The Philharmonie de Paris, the orchestra’s home since 2015, is a striking contemporary building designed by architect Jean Nouvel. Its state-of-the-art acoustics and modern design provide a perfect setting for the orchestra’s performances. The Orchestre de Paris is also known for its educational initiatives, bringing classical music to new generations.

7. Sydney Symphony Orchestra, Australia

The Sydney Symphony Orchestra (SSO) is Australia’s premier orchestra, founded in 1932. Known for its versatility and excellence, the SSO has a strong presence in Australia and internationally.

The Iconic Sydney Opera House

The Sydney Opera House, one of the most recognizable buildings in the world, is the home of the Sydney Symphony Orchestra. Attending a concert here is a unique experience, combining world-class music with breathtaking views of Sydney Harbour. The orchestra’s performances, ranging from classical symphonies to contemporary compositions, are always a highlight of any visit to Sydney.

The Unforgettable Experience of Visiting National Symphonies

Visiting these seven national symphonies offers more than just a musical treat; it’s a journey through history, culture, and architectural beauty. Each orchestra brings its unique flavor and style, providing diverse experiences for any music enthusiast. Whether it’s Vienna’s traditional elegance or Sydney’s modern allure, these symphonies promise an unforgettable musical adventure.

Incorporating a visit to these prestigious orchestras into your travel plans can enhance your appreciation for classical music and provide a deeper understanding of the cultural contexts in which these masterpieces were created and performed. So, pack your bags, book your tickets, and get ready to be enchanted by the symphonic sounds of the world’s greatest orchestras .

This story was created using AI technology.

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  • Berlin Philharmonic , Classical music , London Symphony , music experience , New York Philharmonic , Orchestre de Paris , Royal Concertgebouw , Sydney Symphony , symphony orchestras , Vienna Philharmonic

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16 of the best hotels in Sydney

Sydney offers accommodation for all styles and budgets. from beachside bolt holes and boutique hotels to affordable family escapes, here are the best places to stay.

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Y ou’ll need a good base for the sights, culture and nightlife of Sydney, Australia ’s commercial capital — and the chance to explore the rest of New South Wales too. Accommodation in the city doesn’t disappoint, whether you’re looking for luxury overlooking Sydney Harbour Bridge and the Opera House, or quirky options such as a former 19th-century quarantine station. Here’s our choice of the best places to stay in Sydney .

Main photo: Park Hyatt Sydney

Pier One Sydney Harbour (Jarrad Seng)

1. Pier One Sydney Harbour, CBD

Best for a city centre location For the essential Sydney experience — encapsulated in a luxury hotel suite — Pier One has serious waterfront wow-factor. Expect glimpses of Sydney Opera House from your balcony, and close-up views of Sydney Harbour Bridge from your bath. This pad is on a pier in the heritage-listed Walsh Bay Wharves Precinct, which has been reimagined as an arts hub, and with Circular Quay and the trendy Rocks district a stone’s throw away, you’ll have everything you need on your doorstep.

Spa N Pool N Price ££

Park Hyatt Sydney

2. Park Hyatt Sydney, CBD

Best for views Location, location — oh my — what a location. Park Hyatt offers five-star luxury in what might be the most sought-after spot in Sydney, with its floor-to-ceiling windows providing jaw-dropping, direct views of the Opera House and Sydney Harbour.

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The property is just four floors high, and the year-round rooftop pool (it’s heated in winter) has the same striking views, with the span of the Sydney Harbour Bridge stretching so close overhead you’ll want to swap your front crawl for backstroke. With all mod cons, a sumptuous spa and a destination restaurant on site, the Park Hyatt represents the pinnacle of Sydney’s luxury hotels.

Spa Y Pool Y Price £££

3. Shangri-La Sydney, CBD

Best for luxury The Shangri-La’s high-end high-rise differentiates itself from its local competitors with bird’s-eye views over Sydney Harbour, the Opera House and the CBD (central business district). All 564 modern suites and rooms have harbour views, with window seats you can sink into to take it all in. Deluxe Opera House City View Rooms overlook Sydney’s main attraction, while Deluxe Darling Harbour Rooms don’t face the Opera House, but offer unparalleled sunsets.

Look forward to top-notch service and an outstanding spa, but most of all the restaurant and bar on level 36; this is what makes the Shangri-La. Altitude and the Blu Bar pair destination drinking and dining with the best views in Sydney.

Spa Y Pool Y Price ££

Paramount House Hotel

4. Paramount House Hotel, Surry Hills

Best for hipsters All polished cement, potted plants and exposed brick, Paramount House is a hip place to stay. Set in the former Paramount Picture Studios building, this evolving warehouse space also has the Coffee Project (where you can mingle with Sydney’s creatives), Golden Age Cinema (showing classics and cult hits), and the airy rooftop Paramount Recreation Club, where you can take a yoga class (or get breakfast and a spa treatment).

It’s slap-bang in the super-cool Surry Hills suburb — celebrated for its fine drinking and dining — and you’re still only 20 minutes’ walk from Sydney Harbour.

Spa Y Pool N Price ££

paramounthousehotel.com

Ovolo Woolloomooloo

5. Ovolo Woolloomooloo, Woolloomooloo

Best for fun Ovolo is arguably the most fun place in Sydney to bed down. Here, historical meets millennial, with funky spaces (think gumball machines, pool tables and 1980s-homage grid-tiled bathrooms) occupying the cavernous interior of the 100-year-old, heritage-listed Finger Wharf — reputedly the longest timber-piled wharf in the world.

The hotel’s restaurant, Alibi, offers plant-based dining and is a destination in its own right, with a vegan menu that omnivores will appreciate. That said, there are plenty of restaurants around the wharf and in Woolloomooloo — plus your minibar is complimentary and restocked every day.

Spa N Pool Y Price £££

The Old Clare

6. The Old Clare, Chippendale

Best for seeing Sydney like an insider Beloved by locals, The Old Clare has taken two buildings in the once gritty, inner-city Chippendale neighbourhood — a locals’ boozer and an old brewery — and tastefully renovated them into one property, linked by a glass atrium.

Achieving a mix of modern minimalism and original bare-brick industrial charm, the bar is still bustling every evening, as many of its facilities are open to the public, which gives the whole place a lively atmosphere and makes guests feel like one of the locals. The three destination restaurants on site, your luxurious room and the heated rooftop pool have quite the opposite effect, as you holiday like a high roller.

Spa N Pool Y Price ££

Watsons Bay Boutique Hotel

7. Watsons Bay Boutique Hotel, Watsons Bay

Best for seaside escapes Watsons Bay — 30 minutes by ferry from Circular Quay — has been a decadent day-trip destination for Sydneysiders for years, with incredible views of the distant cityscape from the South Head of Sydney Harbour, and one of the city’s favourite strips of sand, Camp Cove.

This seafront property’s Cape Cod interiors maintain the yachties’ getaway aesthetic — all linens and wood panelling across its 31 capacious rooms — and the nautical, blue-and-white striped parasols of the Beach Club below are a picture of mid-century Monte Carlo.

Adina Apartment Hotel Sydney Darling Harbour

8. Adina Apartment Hotel Sydney Darling Harbour, CBD

Best for families The perfect place for an affordable family escape, Adina eschews the overt opulence of the CBD’s luxury suites and instead presents a smart, chic home away from home. Each apartment has spacious lounges, with vast windows commanding views of downtown or — better still — Sydney’s newest tourist district, the glitzy Darling Harbour development.

Children are catered for with a complimentary kids’ pack and toy box and there’s a paid babysitting service. If dragging your little ones to a buffet breakfast each morning, or finding a restaurant after a long day of sightseeing doesn’t appeal, you can whip up a quick meal in your own fully equipped kitchen.

Spa N Pool Y Price £

QT Bondi

9. QT Bondi, Bondi Beach

Best for beaches Cobalt seas, white sand, banana smoothies, golden tans, lurid surfboards and psychedelic camper vans — QT knows the kitsch images that Bondi Beach brings to mind, and has plastered them all over the entrance lobby of its boutique Bondi branch. Interiors offer colour pops, pastel furnishings and bleached wooden floors aimed at the kind of guests sporting sandy soles and acai bowls. They’ll even organise surfing lessons for you.

There’s no private pool or restaurant, but room facilities include kitchenettes and washing machines, and there’s a supermarket just downstairs. Oddly, you can’t actually see the sea from any of the rooms, but Bondi Beach is right outside your front door.

Spa N Pool N Price £££

Spicers Potts Point

10. Spicers Potts Point, Potts Point

Best for a home away from home A row of three renovated Victorian terraces come together to form one 20-room boutique hotel in the celebrated dining and nightlife neighbourhood of Potts Point. Inside, the property is surprisingly sleek, light, bright and modern, although its three Victoria Terrace Suites feature period, marble fireplaces, hardwood floors and two sets of French doors that open on to your own balcony overlooking the leafy, inner-city-village street below.

It’s hard to believe you’re just around the corner from edgy Kings Cross and that Sydney Harbour is within easy walking distance — although, with marshmallow-soft doubles in every room, you still might not make it to either by midday.

11. Q Station, Manly

Best for Sydney beyond the city This is a quirky option. On the North Head peninsula of Sydney Harbour National Park, Q Station is based in the structures of a 19th-century quarantine station, which was operational until 1984.

These days the buildings have, thankfully, been transformed into accommodation more redolent of a boutique Butlin’s than a medical facility, but for those interested in its history there are tours plus informative boards dotted around the grounds. There’s a ghost walk too, but the site’s real draw is its natural surroundings, offering Sydney’s only private hotel beach, plus views of bucolic bushland and Sydney Harbour.

Spa N Pool N Price £

InterContinental Sydney Double Bay

12. InterContinental Sydney Double Bay, Double Bay

Best for a glamorous getaway As chic and refined as its upscale Eastern Suburbs location, the five-star InterContinental brushes against expensive restaurants and designer boutiques, with whitewashed, curved balconies and arched windows looking out on to Double Bay’s main shopping strip and the harbour’s inviting waters.

Expect plenty of opulence, with the lobby, bar and bathrooms decked in miles of marble. The property’s well-heeled guests come to be pampered, sip martinis in the cocktail bar — with its collection of 140 obscure and vintage gins — take high tea, and lounge beside the rooftop pool.

QT Sydney

13. QT Sydney, CBD

Best for design A lavish lesson in left-field luxury, and a design hotel truly worthy of the moniker, QT Sydney is based in the city’s main shopping district, housed within the former Gowings department store building and the historic State Theatre. Designers have reanimated and reimagined these spaces with a keen eye for blending the elegant with the absurd. All asymmetrical headboards and dogstooth floor tiles, plus QT’s signature silly minibar (think vintage games, a seduction kit and an emergency bow tie), it’s as if Coco Chanel had set up a hotel with Tim Burton.

14. Kimpton Margot Sydney, CBD

Best for architecture This 1930s art deco delight — amid the CBD’s department stores — was the headquarters of Sydney’s Sewerage and Drainage Board before it was transformed into the luxury 172-room hotel you see today. Rooms are contemporary and comfortable and the marble bathrooms are a picture of Jazz Age elegance, but it is the original features — from the magnificent curve of its terracotta-tiled façade to the 26ft, blood-red scagliola columns that overlook the lobby — that really make this property shine.

15. Ace Hotel Sydney, Surry Hills

Best for food Ace Hotel Sydney is the boutique hotel chain’s first property in the southern hemisphere, and is a hip, exposed-brick-meets-mid-century renovation of an industrial, historic building. Situated in sybaritic Surry Hills, a Sydney suburb known for its fine drinking and dining, Ace Hotel Sydney rightly focuses on its food and beverage options, slinging craft cocktails and small-batch wines and beers from the Lobby Bar; and laid-back, all-day Aussie favourites at downstairs restaurant, Loam. Eighteen floors up, chef of local renown, Mitch Orr — best known for his pasta — heads up the kitchen at the soon-to-open, glass-walled, rooftop restaurant, Kiln, using woodsmoke and umami flavours to produce a rich fusion of southeast Asian, Japanese and Italian cuisines.

Crown Sydney

16. Crown Sydney, Barangaroo

Best for high rollers Sydney’s first six-star hotel, Crown Sydney is housed in the city’s tallest, glitziest building, towering over waterfront dining and nightlife precinct Barangaroo. It has been mired in controversy since its launch in December 2020, when the hotel and casino chain was deemed unfit to hold a gambling licence, but the gaming rooms are now open to VIP members. That’s far from the only reason to stay, however, with its 349 luxurious rooms — all clean, contemporary lines, mirrors and marble — affording views across the city in every direction, including some overlooking Sydney Harbour Bridge. The property also offers 14 glamorous dining venues, including a Nobu; an opulent, expansive spa; a huge outdoor pool with harbour views; and even a tennis court.

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Sydney’s most stylish hotels to book for your next staycation or holiday

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Sydney is an unquestionably picturesque city, and one that is home to a plethora of equally beautiful hotels . Whether you’re in need of a staycation or you’re travelling interstate, Sydney is lucky to play host to a chic selection of design-led and iconic hotels that won’t only leave you feeling refreshed and recharged, but inspired.

From boutique hotels that feel like home to five-star hotels in the heart of Sydney’s bustling CBD, we have curated a selection of the most fabulous and stylish retreats where the only problem will be you not wanting to leave.

To help you make the most of your stay in Sydney, we’ve also included some helpful information on things to do, where to eat and how to get from A to B, navigating Sydney’s trains, buses and lightrail (or not).

Sydney’s best (and most stylish) hotels to book

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Ovolo Woolloomoloo

Best for: those who want a vibe

A former wool warehouse and terminal for large ships entering Sydney Harbour turned ultra-stylish boutique hotel, the Ovolo Woolloomoloo is a delightful haven situated on a historic wharf. The interior is playful with an industrial edge, housing spacious rooms and split-level lofts, many with water views, that feature vibrant pops of colour and modern art complemented by exposed metal beams.

The five-star boutique hotel offers pet-friendly rooms, a free mini bar, on-site dining, and an indoor pool and fitness centre. Plus, guests now have complementary access to a PEUGEOT 408 GT Fastback Plug-in Hybrid car if needed thanks to an exiciting new partnership between Ovolo and PEUGEOT.

Be sure to book a table at Alibi restaurant which serves up seriously impressive plant-based dishes and appetising aperitifs.

The details:

  • Spacious rooms with water views
  • Free mini bar
  • On-site restaurant and bar
  • Walking distance to Sydney CBD and Botanic Gardens
  • Complementary access to a PEUGEOT 408 GT Fastback Plug-in Hybrid car

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Kimpton Margot Sydney

Best for: luxury accommodation with a rooftop bar and pool

When it comes to boutique hotels across the globe, Kimpton is a name synonymous with style. With luxury properties in the likes of Barcelona, Tokyo, Tulum and London, Kimpton Margot opened in Sydney just a couple of years ago and, even more recently, has reopened a refreshed rooftop bar, restaurant and pool. Just moments away from the State Theatre and QVB, the five-star Kimpton Margot Sydney embraces heritage-listed Art Deco architecture with a modern Australian style.

Patrons are welcomed into an original Scagliola pillared lobby filled with bold patterns, plush furnishings and walls adorned with some 600 pieces of work from artists worldwide. The 172 deco-inspired rooms and suites embrace a worldy cosmopolitan aesthetic, and will leave you feeling anywhere but home.

  • 172 deco-inspired rooms
  • Rooftop pool, bar and dining
  • Pet-friendly
  • Prime location in Sydney’s CBD

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Paramount House Hotel

Best for: A staycation

Set within the former headquarters of Paramount Picture Studios and the adjoining film storage warehouse, Paramount House Hotel is an urban oasis in the heart of Surry Hills. The 29-room accommodation sees a deft mix of heritage and new design merge together to form an industrial yet chic space. Sitting atop the hotel, is a recreation club which includes an expansive fitness pavilion, treatment rooms and everyone’s favourite A.P Bakery, set amongst a rooftop garden.

Within the Paramount House precinct is Paramount Coffee Project which serves breakfast, lunch and expertly made coffee, and Poly wine bar, which offers a spectacular Japanese-style menu.

  • Architect-designed rooms all with unique features
  • French linen sheets and premium mini bar
  • Rooftop garden with fitness centre and A.P Bakery
  • Paramount Coffee Project downstairs

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Ace Hotel Sydney

Best for: those with an appreciation of architecture and modernist design

Opening in early 2022, Ace Hotel Sydney is located in the historic Tyne House brick factory – the site of one of Australia’s first ceramic kilns – and was designed in partnership with Ace Hotels and multi-disciplinary practice Flack Studio.

Since opening its doors, the Surry Hills hotel has become somewhat of an institution for locals and travellers alike, with people booking in just to experience the hotel and in-house restaurant, Kiln.

The 264 rooms vary in size but all feature a cohesive material and colour palette of eucalyptus and terracotta tiles, natural stained American oak, acoustic straw panelling on the walls, and custom joinery and storage that make for comfortable stay.

  • David Flack-designed rooms
  • Eco-friendly bath products
  • Tivoli radio, premium mini bar
  • Acoustic guaitar available in some rooms
  • On-site bar and restaurant

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Crystalbrook Albion

Best for: those who like hotels that feel like home

Little Albion is a favourite haunt for design lovers, and for good reason. Contemporary additions have been made to the former Surry Hills convent which offers a local guest-house experience reimagined for the modern luxury traveller. No two rooms are the same in this pet-friendly hotel which intimately houses 35 chic guestrooms each awash with bold patterns and vibrant colours. Bespoke furniture pieces paired with unique fixtures and finishes contribute to its luxe feel.

The verdant rooftop offers alfresco seating, an outdoor shower to cool off and views over the vibrant and creative suburb of Surry Hills and the city of Sydney – it’s the perfect spot to soak up the sun or to wind down over a chilled glass of wine.

  • Rooftop garden and bar
  • Bespoke, beautifully-furnished rooms
  • Private bathroom

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The Old Clare Hotel

Best for: those who love pub-style accommodation with a luxe twist

Old and new come together in this reimagined 69-room hotel that has been uniquely conceived within two iconic heritage buildings in Chippendale. The buildings’ salvaged features juxtapose elegantly with the sleek and understated interiors that have been peppered with modern furnishings. Head up to the rooftop for an an idealistic spot to take a dip and have a drink (or two) at the pool and bar. For the ultimate luxury experience, go on a culinary adventure at Longshore, a seafood-centric diner and wine bar, which is located on site.

  • Spacious, mocern and stylish rooms
  • Close to Central Station and The Capitol Theatre
  • Rooftop bar and pool
  • On-site restaurant

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Little National Sydney

Best for: Bougie on a budget

The Little National Hotel’s ethos centres on the idea of embracing luxury without being excessive. This chic accommodation offers a unique fusion of low-cost, yet high value, for those willing to forgo traditional hotel frills, while still catering to the design-savvy traveller.

The 230 well-appointed and well-considered guestrooms are cosy and sleek, boasting a decidedly Tokyo feel to them. Here, the designers have drawn light in through floor-to-ceiling feature windows which highlight the room’s pièce de résistance, a super king-sized bed. The spectacular indoor/outdoor area with double-height ceilings houses a library/work-space and an atmospheric lounge and beautifully landscaped rooftop bar area where guests can drink and socialise all while enjoying the city skyline.

  • Modern minimal rooms
  • Affordable rates
  • Rooftop terrace and bar
  • Great inner-city location

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Sofitel Sydney Darling Harbour

Best for: a celebration or romantic getaway

Those looking for a more traditional hotel stay shouldn’t look past the Sofitel’s Darling Harbour outpost. Renowned for their luxurious, resort-style accommodation, the Sofitel group have not disappointed with this retreat that overlooks the city skyline and harbour. The 590 guestroom hotel offers everything you’d expect from a five-star hotel, including French bathroom amenities, a stunning outdoor infinity pool, state-of-the-art gym and four delightful bars and restaurants.

  • Located on Darling Harbour
  • Infinity pool and rooftop bar
  • City and harbour views
  • Spa and wellness centre
  • In-house fine dining restaurant

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Best for: immersing yourself in Sydney’s nightlife

If you’re looking for something a little bit different, the QT Sydney is an eclectic hotel with glamorous design elements. Conveniently stationed in Sydney’s CBD and set in the site of the historic Gowings Department Store and Sydney State Theatre, this hotel combines an impressive mix of Gothic, Art Deco, and Italianate influenced architecture.

The Sydney flagship offers a personalised guest experience, unforgettable dining and a signature touch of quirk with a playful take on five-star luxury.

  • Acclaimed in-house spa, spaQ
  • Luxurious rooms with flair
  • Several in-house restaurants and bars
  • Close to restaurants, bars and Pitt St Mall
  • Conveniently located next to the Sydney State T

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Pier One Sydney Harbour, Autograph Collection

Best for: A relaxing weekend soaking up views of Sydney Harbour

Built on and over the water of Sydney’s iconic harbour and housed within a repurposed Heritage building, Pier One is undoubtedly one of the city’s most spectacular hotels. Natural light, contemporary art and Federation-style touches culminate to create welcoming and stylish accommodation against a spectacular backdrop of Walsh Bay and Sydney Harbour Bridge. Dog-friendly rooms are also available with direct pier access.

The hotel takes full advantage of its waterfront location which can also be enjoyed from the premium bar or The Gantry restaurant which serves up a delicious modern Australian fair.

  • Private pontoon and panoramic harbour views
  • Located in the heart of Sydney’s historic Rocks precinct
  • 20-minute walk to Sydney Opera House
  • In-house restaurant, The Gantry Restaurant & Bar
  • Spa and balcony rooms available

Things to do in Sydney

From gorgeous beaches and gardens to galleries, restaurants, bars, theatres and more, there’s no shortage of things to do in Sydney, it really depends on what you want to do, what’s on and what kind of budget you have. If you simply want to explore the city and see all the main attractions: the Harbour Bridge, the Sydney Opera House, the Royal Botanic Gardens and Hyde Park, then you can spend a day walking around the Harbour City, stopping for lunch or a picnic in the park along the way. If you’re looking to book an experience, the Sydney BridgeClimb is popular, or you could visit the Sydney Aquarium or get the ferry across to Taronga Zoo. Check out Sydney Tourism for more ideas, attractions and itineraries to suit. For dining recommendations, check out Gourmet Traveller’s guide to the best restaurants in Sydney .

Getting around Sydney

Train, bus, lightrail, ferry, or by foot, there’s plenty of ways to get around Sydney, the best mode of transport depends on where you’re staying and where you’re going. If you’re staying in the CBD and aren’t travelling far, walking is a fabulous way to see the city. You can jump on and off the lightrail if you get tired of walking. The City Circle train can take you around the city, from Central Station to Circular Quay and there are buses and trains that can take you to Bondi, the inner-west, North Sydney and beyond. Ubers and taxis are aplenty in the city and never hard to get. A ferry ride is a great way to see Sydney Harbour and there are ferries that can take you to the north, east or west.

You can always hire a car if you need, but be sure to check that you’re hotel offers parking. If you’re staying at Ovolo Woolloomoloo, you have complementary access to a PEUGEOT 408 GT Fastback Plug-in Hybrid car which is handy if you want the freedom to explore or get out of the city for lunch or a scenic drive.

See more Sydney accommodation options

Oxford House Paddington Sydney pool area

Sydney boutique hotels you’ll leave well-rested and ready to transform your own home

6 of the best and brightest hotel stays in Australia

6 of the best and brightest hotel stays in Australia

Inside the Ace Hotel Sydney: A new boutique destination designed by Flack Studio

Inside the Ace Hotel Sydney: A new boutique destination designed by Flack Studio

Olivia started her writing career at Home Beautiful magazine, moving on to become the Digital Managing Editor of Homes To Love and Home Beautiful. She lives and breathes homes and interiors and loves nothing more than dreaming up new design ideas (big and small) for her own home. Being married to a builder means there is always a project on the go and most weekends are spent with a paintbrush in hand or perusing Pinterest for inspiration.

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Plan ahead to make the most of Vivid Sydney’s lights, food, ideas and music

Vivid will bring millions of people into Sydney’s streets over the next 23 nights so make sure you plan your visit and book ahead to enjoy this spectacular winter event

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Sydney’s festival of light is back for another year and is bigger and brighter than ever.

The famous sails of the Opera House will again be lit up from Friday with original artwork from Archibald winning artist Julia Gutman.

The harbour’s iconic bridge and buildings will also be illuminated but with music, ideas and food featured on the program, there is plenty more than lights to see.

Last year 3.5 million visitors poured into the city and this year will likely be just as popular.

Sydney’s streets can get very busy over the 23 nights of Vivid but a bit of planning ahead will help make the most of it.

So here are some tips for how to tackle Vivid 2024.

Australian artist and 2023 Archibald Prize winner Julia Gutman’s animated patchwork will light up the Sydney Opera House’s sails during Vivid Sydney. Picture: Supplied

1. DITCH THE CAR

With thousands of Sydneysiders flocking into the city each night until June 15, catching public transport is the way to go and extra services have been added.

In addition to the crowds, there will be road closures and trackwork on some lines on weekends. There will also be long lines for ferries as spectators take to the water to check out the lights around the harbour.

Transport NSW is urging visitors to plan their journeys.

Lana Newton-Plater, 8, and brother Jackson Newton-Plater, 12, at the Vivid Ribbon Tunnel display at the Royal Botanic Garden Sydney. Picture: Jonathan Ng

2. VIVID WITH KIDS

Children love the spectacle of Vivid but battling crowds with toddlers or strollers can really take the fun out of it for parents.

Friday and Saturday nights will be the busiest so plan to take the littlies early to midweek. Sunset is around 5pm ensuring plenty of time for sparkling fun before tiredness sets in.

Darling Harbour is again the hub for kids with free, family entertainment in Tumbalong Park from 5pm each night. There will also be a range of interactive activities and cultural experiences to enjoy and plenty of kid friendly restaurants nearby.

Tekno Train by Paul Mac is new this year and offers an interactive light and musical ride on Sydney’s railways. Picture: Vivid Sydney

3. WHAT’S NEW

The new Paul Mac Techno Train experience is for music lovers and trainspotters alike.

This special rail service will run from Central three times every night and include an interactive music and light experience composed by US musician Paul Mac. There is a Scenic Route for an earlier (6.35pm) more serene ride across the Harbour Bridge to Lavender Bay. Or the fast-paced Tech Express which journeys underground and to Sydney’s south. Tickets start at $19 and are available here .

Shifting Perspectives is an all ages and abilities interactive light and performance. Dancers move through the audience and around 24 reflective plinths. The show was a hit when it toured in Adelaide and is now expected to shine in Sydney.

Star Matildas goalkeeper Mackenzie Arnold will feature in the Vivid Ideas program with coach Tony Gustavsson. Picture: Ronald Cortes, Getty Images.

The Ideas program will feature a huge range of options including an onstage chat with Matilda’s star Mackenzie Arnold and coach Tony Gustavsson at the Sydney Town Hall.

Another new performance could be confronting to those who are immersed in virtual social worlds. A Thousand Ways: An Encounter seats strangers opposite each other separated by a glass partition and given a set of instruction cards.

4. ON A BUDGET

As Vivid has expanded, so too have the range of events on offer. They cater to a range of tastes and budgets but there is still plenty to see for free.

The light walk starts at the Goods Line, next to Central Station in Ultimo and winds through to the Harbour. The trail includes dozens of installations and organisers recommend three visits to see everything properly. However you will need to buy tickets for Lightscape in the Royal Botanic Gardens.

The Goods Line will also feature the Vivid Fire Kitchen where an array of barbecue stalls from around the world will sell a range of delicious grilled foods. For desert, the Messina Milkbar will reimagine some old favourites into modern day treats including a warm Milo fudge Sundae.

The Vivid Fire Kitchen will delight the senses with barbecues from around the world. Picture: Jason Ierace.

Every night the Global Rainbow will beam rainbow lasers from the Sydney Eye across the city for up to 40km.

Another laser spectacular is Hika Rakuyu, an eight minute show beamed across Cockle Bay and featuring falling leaves and blooming Australian native flowers.

At Barrangaroo, Horizon is a trance like strobing light display from Spain which promises to challenge spatial perception and everyday reality.

The Love is in the Air drone show will run for three nights only, June 8,9 and 15. Some ferries won’t be able to run between 9pm and 9.30pm on these nights and Circular Quay and the city will be busy. But as the drones are visible from a wide area in the night sky there will be plenty of vantage points around the harbour to watch the spectacle.

The Global Rainbow will beam lasers from the Sydney Eye 40km across the city. Picture: Supplied.

5. BLOW THE BUDGET

Food was introduced to the Vivid program in 2023 and is back with a vengeance.

For the ultimate Vivid dining experience head to Luke’s Table high above the city in one of the Harbour Bridge pylons.

For $395 a head enjoy a lavish three-course meal from Sydney restaurateur extraordinaire Luke Mangan.

Climb the 200 steps to the lookout, enjoy a tour or the museum and then canapes and champagne before sitting down to dine at a communal table for 20.

This will surely have the best views of the lights across the harbour.

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Alternatively, Plates with purpose – A Taste of Ukraine starts at $160pp but this 10 course degustation menu by Kviv Social’s Borys Charnyk is all for a good cause. It will include authentic Ukranian dishes and some reimagined classics. Entertainment will be provided by an all-female Ukranian band.

Proceeds will provide 200 meals to Ukranians at home and in Sydney.

To book tickets and plan your Vivid visit vividsydney.com.

Originally published as Plan ahead to make the most of Vivid Sydney’s lights, food, ideas and music

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We acknowledge the Gadigal of the Eora Nation, the traditional custodians of the Country on which the Art Gallery of New South Wales stands.

Sydney Modern Project Update: July 2022

Your transformed art gallery opens 3 december 2022.

The Art Gallery of NSW looks forward to welcoming visitors to its transformed home for art when its new building officially opens to the public on Saturday, 3 December 2022.

As part of the Sydney Modern Project, the Art Gallery has commissioned nine major site-specific artworks by leading artists Lorraine Connelly-Northey (Australia), Karla Dickens (Australia), Simryn Gill (Australia/Malaysia), Jonathan Jones (Australia), Yayoi Kusama (Japan), Lee Mingwei (France/USA), Richard Lewer (Australia), Lisa Reihana (Aotearoa New Zealand), and Francis Upritchard (UK/Italy/Aotearoa New Zealand).

When the expanded Art Gallery opens, visitors will experience art right across the campus – indoor and outdoor – from the inaugural exhibitions in the new building to the completely re-installed galleries in the existing building.

The Art Gallery’s collection will be accentuated by bold and compelling new artworks that contribute to important global conversations of our time from our place here in the Asia Pacific.

Construction update

In recent months, the following works have taken place:

Completion of the building’s glazed and limestone facades

Installation of photovoltaic (solar) panels on the roof of the entrance pavilion providing the building with renewable energy

Installation of wall, floor and ceiling finishes, including internal lighting

Construction of art walls within the gallery spaces

Installation of internal and external glazed balustrades, and internal stainless-steel handrails and balustrades

Insulation and waterproofing to remaining roofs and commencement of green roof installation

Installation of joinery to back of house areas

Completion of the contoured rammed earth wall on Lower Level 1 and Lower Level 2, including the domed rammed earth wall to the circular gallery space

Lift car installation and escalator finishes

Pouring of external concrete topping slabs to the welcome plaza

Commencement of testing and commissioning of building services

In-ground services, pouring of base slabs, installation of paving, and commencement of planting within the landscape works zone at the front of the existing Art Gallery building.

Extended construction hours 

Extended construction hours for minor works have been approved to enable completion and commissioning of project elements impacted by the pandemic and inclement weather. Approval was granted under a modification to the State Significant Development by the Department of Planning and Environment on 1 June 2022.

This modification permits low impact internal and external works during the following extended hours (in addition to standard construction hours):

Monday-Friday: 6pm – 12am

Saturday: 3:30pm – 12am

Sunday: 7am – 12am

Public holidays: no construction work to be carried out.

Most work undertaken during extended hours will be inside the new building. The minor external works to take place during the extended construction hours will predominantly be focused on landscape works at the front of the existing Art Gallery building and along Art Gallery Road. Any noise generated by internal or external work undertaken during this period will be low level. In accordance with the modification, extended construction hours cease at the time of public opening of the new building on 3 December 2022.

Upcoming works

Construction over the next three months will focus on:

Installation of automated doors and internal blinds and curtains

Installation of the curved glass panels to the welcome plaza canopy

Installation of joinery, furniture, fixtures and equipment

Installation of external lighting, green roofs and landscaping

Continued testing and commissioning of building systems.

Deliveries via both Art Gallery Road and Lincoln Crescent site gates will continue to support the works underway on-site.

Pedestrian and vehicle access

Access around the Sydney Modern Project site continues in line with the wayfinding map shown.

Due to an increased volume of construction work, vehicles, and pedestrians in the area, we ask everyone to abide by all road rules in this shared zone, including directions from traffic controllers. Thank you to everyone for their cooperation, understanding, and patience as we create a new art museum experience for everyone to enjoy.

All parking bays in front of the existing Art Gallery building have been removed as part of the landscaping works taking place in this area.

The bus stop for Bus 441 is temporarily relocated to the south of the Art Gallery on Art Gallery Road. The Art Gallery Road footpath adjacent to the site is closed to pedestrians, however the Domain side footpath remains open. A temporary accessible pedestrian crossing is located south of the Art Gallery. An accessible ramp is located on the southern side of the Art Gallery.

Map showing alternative route to/from Woolloomooloo and accessible route to/from Woolloomooloo via lift (or stairs). The latter route includes a steep gradient. Pedestrian access routes may temporarily change with signposting to advise alternative routes.

Keeping you informed

We are committed to keeping the community informed as the project progresses.

For more information about the Art Gallery’s expansion and transformation, see the  Sydney Modern Project FAQs .

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us:

Tel 1800 717 705 [email protected]

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Australian Society of Miniature Art (NSW) National Awards Exhibition

Friday 12 July 2024 to Sunday 28 July 2024

With over 100 artworks on show, the exhibition will provide an insight into the modern world of miniature art.

On display will be drawings, paintings, original prints, mixed media, sculptures, hand-made books and more, all the best of their kind. The subject matter and techniques are just as varied, ranging from traditional landscapes and still lifes to abstract contemporary work. All miniature 2D artworks have a perimeter of no more than 40 cm, and miniature sculptures must be no more than 15 cm in any direction.

Entries come from all over Australia, with many artists being recognised for their larger work as well as their exquisite miniatures. This year’s entries will be judged by award-winning artist, Yvonne East.

Location - Laurel Street 33 North Willoughby NSW 2068 Australia

Accessibility

Does not cater for people with access needs.

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18+ Best Cities In The World To Live: Top Livable Cities In The World

Having a chance to visit all the best cities in the world to live in is every traveller's dream. Does it matter which cities we live in? To many people, living in one of the safest countries in the world where healthcare is easily accessible, personal safety is guaranteed, and quality of life is ensured is a life's goal. To others, having an inspiring city culture and access to educational opportunities matter greatly.

Whether you are thinking about moving or visiting a new city on your next trip, one of these wonderful cities should be your top spot. Try out new experiences at exotic restaurants, famous museums and inspirational art shows. Spend time learning new things in diversified communities with welcoming locals. Here is the list of the best liveable cities in the world .

Top 20 Most Liveable Cities In The World

  • Vienna, Austria
  • Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Zurich, Switzerland
  • Vancouver, Canada
  • Geneva, Switzerland
  • Frankfurt, Germany
  • Sydney, Australia
  • Toronto, Canada
  • Amsterdam, Netherlands
  • Osaka, Japan
  • Wellington, New Zealand
  • New York. United States
  • London, United Kingdom
  • Tokyo, Japan
  • Auckland, New Zealand
  • Paris, France
  • Barcelona, Spain
  • Madrid, Spain
  • Melbourne, Australia

Common Traits Of The Best Cities In The World

Best Cities In The World To Live - CabinZero

Green space is an ideal place to reconnect with nature and spend more time outdoors. Photo by Cavan for Adobe on stock.adobe.com

Living in a big city certainly has its unique sides and interesting features. For example, everything is more diverse, from the dining options to the forms of entertainment. However, not all cities are created equal. There are certain traits and factors that make some cities more livable than others. Here are what the most livable cities in the world have in common.

Green Space And Public Space

Lively outdoor spaces and vibrant public parks can make a city more livable. Cities such as San Francisco have gorgeous city parks, breathtaking views of the Bay Area and green hiking trails. Studies have shown that visiting urban green spaces can have positive effects on residents' emotions and stress levels.

Public spaces can enhance community spirit, helping residents make new friends and establish connections between locals and their surroundings.

Reliable Healthcare System

Even the best cities in the world to live in are affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. However, a strong healthcare system in the top livable cities can minimise the negative health effects, resulting in lower COVID-19 deaths as compared to big numbers of life losses across cities around the world.

Healthy population growth is a great indicator of a good-quality healthcare system. Specifically, the costs of healthcare and the effects of ageing are important factors of a livable city.

Thriving Economy And Career Opportunities

When choosing cities for relocation, the country's economy and the city's job market are two important factors to consider. A booming economy often presents promising career opportunities to young professionals. 

Accessibility Within The Best Liveable Cities

Best Cities In The World To Live - CabinZero

Having access to a variety of transportation systems can make a city more accessible to both local residents and visitors. Photo by Samson Katt on Pexels

Regional and local transit systems in the best cities to live in should be able to support the growing demand of their citizens. From being the fastest way to commute to be the most reliable and cost-effective, public transportation systems in cities should be comprehensive and convenient.

As one of the biggest cities with a large population, New York City has an extensive network of transportation, and New Yorkers have many different ways to get around . Residents and visitors can choose the iconic yellow cabs, buses from the New York Metropolitan Transport Authority (MTA), the New York Subway, the railway lines, city bikes or even the city ferries. 

Environmental Sustainability

Promoting a sustainable and environmentally friendly lifestyle should be one of the main initiatives of the most livable cities. Ensuring the environment is safe for local residents and controlling pollution levels are among the top health concerns for most European cities.

Another example of an eco-friendly city is Wellington from the beautiful country of New Zealand. As one of the most eco-friendly cities in the world, Wellington has the lowest emissions per capita, with low-carbon transportation systems and sustainable local homes.

An Inspirational Local Community

A livable city is one where there is a great sense of community among its citizens. Being included, having a sense of belonging and feeling inspired are qualities people often look for in a new city.

Top 20 Best Cities In The World To Live In

Best Cities In The World To Live - CabinZero

Job opportunities and the availability of good education are important factors used to determine a city’s quality of life. Photo by Keira Burton on Pexels

Every year, there are various rankings of the best cities in the world to live in such as the Global Liveability Index by the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU), Expat City Ranking by InterNations and Quality Of Life Survey by Monocle . City rankings allow us to have a general view of how living conditions vary around the world, giving insights into individuals' lifestyles and quality of life.

Different factors are used to determine countries' rankings, such as accessibility to green space, availability of education and reliability of healthcare systems, quality of life and job opportunities. Here are our picks of the top 20 best cities in the world to live in.

Top 1: Vienna In Austria 

Best Cities In The World To Live - CabinZero

Vienna tops the list thanks to its outstanding medical care. Photo by Ekaterina Pokrovsky on stock.adobe.com

According to the Global Liveability Index 2022 and Mercer's Quality of Living Ranking 2019, Vienna is the best city to live in. The city's infrastructure and public transportation system are among the best in the world.

  • Why Vienna Is Great For Travellers: Having a vibrant cultural scene, Vienna is a must-visit destination for travellers for many reasons. This beautiful urban charm is made of rich history, stunning architecture and diversified culture.

Top 2: Copenhagen In Denmark

Best Cities In The World To Live - CabinZero

The colourful and distinctive harbour of Copenhagen, Denmark. Credit: @globetrottingsu

Ranked in first place in Monocle's Quality of Life Survey, the city has world-class museums, great initiatives toward eco-living and high living standards. Embrace the Danish concept of “hygge” and happiness, and you’ll be happier.

  • Why Copenhagen Is Great For Travellers: The city attracts foreign travellers across the globe with its excellent cuisine, easily accessible transportation system and a wide variety of entertainment options.

Top 3: Zurich In Switzerland 

Best Cities In The World To Live - CabinZero

Zurich is one of the most beautiful cities in Europe. Photo by rh2010 on stock.adobe.com

Zurich is one of the best cities in the world to live in for both Swiss citizens and expats, with state-of-the-art infrastructure and high living standards. Zurich also has a number of recreation areas in beautiful locations, such as Lake Zurich and the Alps.

  • Why Zurich Is Great For Travellers: The city's greenery is the highlight for nature lovers. Travellers can hike in the Schauenberg Nordic Trail or admire the many scenic parts of the great outdoors around Zurich. 

Top 4: Singapore

Best Cities In The World To Live - CabinZero

Singapore is filled with green spaces and parks. Photo by wirojsid on stock.adobe.com

Ranked at 4th place in Global Finance's World's Best Cities to Live 2022, Singapore is a modern and comfortable city to live in. Good infrastructure and quality health care are two of the city’s highlights.

  • Why Singapore Is Great For Travellers: Multi-cultural city with many sightseeing spots and modern green urban areas are the top impressions for visitors in Singapore.

Top 5: Vancouver In Canada 

Best Cities In The World To Live - CabinZero

Skiing in Canada is among the most popular activities for people who love winter sports. Photo by ronniechua on stock.adobe.com

Residents in Vancouver enjoy good stability, a top-class healthcare system and quality education. Living in Vancouver opens up many summer and winter sports options for sports lovers and outdoor enthusiasts.

  • Why Vancouver Is Great For Travellers: The city is ideal for year-round discovery. With its scenic location, Vancouver offers visitors a lot, from stunning snow-capped mountains to vibrant cosmopolitan life.

Top 6: Geneva In Switzerland 

Best Cities In The World To Live - CabinZero

An idyllic view of Geneva’s beautiful landscapes. Photo by Robert Stokoe on Pexels

Geneva is among the best cities in the world to live in for various reasons. Being an international city with many international organisations and financial institutions available, Geneva's residents have many job opportunities. 

  • Why Geneva Is Great For Travellers: The city is famously known for its stunningly beautiful scenery. From the Alps and Jura mountains to Lac Leman's shores, visitors will be charmed by this beautiful European city.

Top 7: Frankfurt In Germany 

Best Cities In The World To Live - CabinZero

There are various entertaining options for visitors to choose from in Frankfurt. Photo by william87 on stock.adobe.com

Ranked at 7th place in both Mercer's Quality of Living Ranking 2019 and EIU’s Global Liveability Index 2022, Frankfurt is a cultural hub with a rich history and diverse culture. With over 180 nationalities in the city, the cultural blends and hospitable atmosphere are hearty and welcoming.

  • Why Frankfurt Is Great For Travellers: The city's world-class museums and delicious local food scene will charm any visitors.

Top 8: Sydney in Australia 

Best Cities In The World To Live - CabinZero

The Sydney Harbour offers stunning views and fresh ocean air to its citizens. Photo by Peter Kolejak on stock.adobe.com

Listed in the top 10 liveable cities in 2018 by the EIU, Sydney is blessed with lovely beaches all over the city and plenty of options for outdoor activities. There is so much to see and stunning ocean air to enjoy.

  • Why Sydney Is Great For Travellers: Its year-round sunny weather and the world’s famous landmarks attract visitors from all corners of the Earth.

Top 9: Toronto In Canada 

Best Cities In The World To Live - CabinZero

An impressive view of Toronto’s skyline on a beautiful day. Photo by TOimages on stock.adobe.com

Toronto is a vibrant city with access to almost everything. Toronto residents' quality of life is high, with many green spaces and a universal healthcare system.

  • Why Toronto Is Great For Travellers: As Canada's biggest city, Toronto offers travellers around the world fun travel experiences. From festivals around the city to an exciting scene of nightlife entertaining options.

Top 10: Amsterdam In the Netherlands

Best Cities In The World To Live - CabinZero

Amsterdam’s charming canals are one of the most loveable things about the city. Photo by Adrien Olichon on Pexels

As a UNESCO World Heritage Site, Amsterdam is an exciting hub of cultural activities and entertainment. Scoring perfectly on the healthcare category, the city indeed belongs to the top most livable cities in the world.

  • Why Amsterdam Is Great For Travellers: Charming canals, excellent museums, and friendly locals are just a few of the top reasons why travellers love Amsterdam.

Top 11: Osaka In Japan 

Best Cities In The World To Live - CabinZero

Japan is an interesting destination for both travellers and expats around the world. Photo by PR Image Factory on stock.adobe.com

Osaka is among the safest and top cities to live in the world. For expats, Osaka is your go-to country if you love the unique Japanese culture. The 3rd largest city in Japan offers an entire feeling to its more famous sibling, Tokyo.

  • Why Osaka Is Great For Travellers: Osaka has family-friendly activities and attractions. Popular activities for travellers are visiting Osaka's famous aquarium, spending time in Universal Studios and trying out favourite Japanese dishes.

Top 12: Wellington In New Zealand 

Best Cities In The World To Live - CabinZero

Wellington is easy to get around, a small city with a big heart. Photo by Milosz Maslanka on stock.adobe.com

Ranked by Deutsche Bank as the most liveable city twice in a row, Wellington is known for its high quality of life and low pollution level. The Kiwis are friendly, you’ll feel safe walking to any part of the place.

  • Why Wellington Is Great For Travellers: The world's famous cafe culture attracts travellers for its renowned culinary scene, thriving cultural hubs and stunning natural beauty.

Top 13: New York In the United States

Best Cities In The World To Live - CabinZero

New York’s skyline and its skyscrapers. Photo by Roberto Vivancos on Pexels.com

Recognised as Global Finance's 9th best city to live in 2022, New York is the land of opportunity loved for its cultural diversity and artistic scene. The financial capital of the world does offer many job opportunities as well.

  • Why New York Is Great For Travellers: There are many reasons to visit New York, from popular attractions such as the Statue of Liberty and the Brooklyn Bridge to the famous Broadway Shows.

Top 14: London In the United Kingdom 

Best Cities In The World To Live - CabinZero

London is one of the world’s oldest cities with a rich history. Photo by Tomas Marek on stock.adobe.com

Voted as the best city to live in 2022 by Global Finance, London is the most culturally diverse city in the UK, with good quality of life and many job prospects.

  • Why London Is Great For Travellers: London has so much to see and do. Everyone should visit London to discover the city's rich history and visit world-famous sights such as Buckingham Palace and Big Ben.

Top 15: Tokyo In Japa n 

Best Cities In The World To Live - CabinZero

Fascinating cuisine attracts visitors worldwide to Japan every year. Photo by THANANIT on stock.adobe.com

Ranked among the top 10 best cities in the world to live in by Monocle and Global Finance, Tokyo is famous for its world-renowned transportation infrastructure, excellent nightlife scene and convenient modern life.

  • Why Tokyo Is Great For Travellers: Tokyo is an attractive destination for visitors around the world for its unique Japanese culture, fascinating cuisine and full-of-surprise entertaining options.

Top 16: Auckland In New Zealand 

Best Cities In The World To Live - CabinZero

Auckland is a city of natural beauty and stunning beaches. Photo by Rodrigo on stock.adobe.com

It was rated as Monocle's 16th best city to live in 2022 and Mercer's 5th city with the highest quality of living in 2019. Auckland is a stable and culturally diverse city with great living standards.

  • Why Auckland Is Great For Travellers: Beautiful beaches and plenty of natural landscapes are just two of the many reasons that make travellers love the city.

Top 17: Paris In France 

Best Cities In The World To Live - CabinZero

Paris is a city famously known for many things, including art, culture and architecture. Photo by Lina Kivaka on Pexels

Paris is ranked second in Resonance's annual ranking of the world's best cities in 2023. The famous landmarks and the rich cultural and art scene are among the perks of living in Paris.

  • Why Paris Is Great For Travellers: There are plenty of reasons to visit Paris, not just once. From the famous cafe culture to the sophisticated cuisine and stunning architecture, there is something for every traveller.

Top 18: Barcelona In Spain 

Best Cities In The World To Live - CabinZero

Barcelona is an artistic city of vibrant colours. Photo by Pawel Pajor on stock.adobe.com

Being an ideal European city with great weather all year-round, Barcelona is one of the most liveable cities in the world. With stunning beaches, expansive greenery and great quality of life, residents of Barcelona are happy to call this city home.

  • Why Barcelona Is Great For Travellers: Home to a thriving art community, wonderful food scene and Gaudi's well-known architecture, there is so much to love about Barcelona.

Top 19: Madrid in Spain 

Best Cities In The World To Live - CabinZero

The Plaza Mayor de Madrid is one of the top visited places for visitors. Photo by Alliance on stock.adobe.com

The Spanish capital offers a vibrant social life, rich cultural heritage and a comfortable climate. There is also an interesting blend of art and culture in the city.

  • Why Madrid Is Great For Travellers: Travellers love to explore Madrid by strolling on its trendy boulevards, joining in the fun-filled fame shows and having a great time with the nightlife scene.

Top 20: Melbourne In Australia 

Best Cities In The World To Live - CabinZero

Hidden gems and interesting dining options are scattered between laneways across the city. Photo by FiledIMAGE on stock.adobe.com

In previous years, Melbourne was crowned as the top livable cities in the world  by the EIU in 2015, 2016 and 2017. Melburnians benefit from the city's world-class healthcare system, diverse public transportation system and low crime rates. 

  • Why Melbourne Is Great For Travellers: The sun-filled streets with iconic urban laneways, unique vibes and pleasant climate all year-round are top reasons that attract travellers to visit Melbourne.

Best Cities In The World To Live - CabinZero

There are various factors to consider before deciding to move or take your next international trip to a foreign country. Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels

1. Which City Is The Best To Live In?

Vienna is the top livable city in the world in the 2022 annual rankings by the Economist Intelligence Unit and in the 2019 city rankings by Mercer .  The Hague in the Netherlands is voted first place in the top city rankings based on the quality of life in 2023 by Numbeo.com.

Great healthcare, great stability and great quality of life are generally factors that top cities the most livable. In previous years, Auckland in New Zealand was the most livable city in the world in 2021, while Vienna held the first place in 2019 and 2018. 

2. Which City Is The Most Expensive To Live In?

According to the Worldwide Cost Of Living Index released by the Economist Intelligence Unit in 2022, the top 5 most expensive countries to live in are Singapore, New York, Tel Aviv, Hong Kong and Los Angeles.

The cost of living in these cities are determined by average income and prices within the area. The lifestyle of local residents and costs such as healthcare, education and transportation are factors to affect the cost of living index.

3. Which City Is The Cheapest To Live In?

Whether it is for a retirement plan, a new job or a new life direction, relocating to a cheaper city can clearly stretch one's savings. According to the Economist Intelligence Unit, the cheapest cities to live in the world in 2022 are:

  • Damascus in Syria
  • Tripoli in Libya
  • Tehran in Iran
  • Tunis in Tunisia
  • and Tashkent in Uzbekistan. 

4. Is It Expensive To Live In The Top Livable Cities?

The cost of living can influence the quality of life for local residents and destination picking for international travellers. Even though the cheapest city in the world to live in fails in comparison to the best livable one by many standards, the overall costs certainly have the power over relocation and travel planning.

To better prepare for your next international trip or moving plan, looking at economic factors such as average rent rates, average costs of households' necessities, and utilities is a way to determine how pricey a city is. 

Best Cities In The World To Live In

Here are the best cities in the world to live in, based on different rankings and indexes. Despite the negative effects of COVID-19 on the liveability index for two consecutive years, there are positive improvements in healthcare, education, culture and environment in cities across the world.

Whether you are a world traveller, a digital nomad or a soon-to-be expat with plans to relocate, these cities are definitely great destinations to start looking at. 

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  1. Sydney Modern Project

    Plan your visit. New art, exhibitions and spaces are ready for you to explore. Find out more. ... The $344 million Sydney Modern Project is the most significant cultural development in the city since the opening of the Sydney Opera House nearly half a century ago. Together with the NSW Government's $244 million in funding, the Art Gallery has ...

  2. Sydney Modern Project

    The Sydney Modern Project was completed in 2022 and opened to the public on 3 December 2022. The $344 million transformation and expansion of the Art Gallery of New South Wales created a new art museum experience across two buildings connected by a public art garden. The new building has almost doubled exhibition space, delivering rich and ...

  3. AGNSW opens the doors to Sydney's absolutely huge new modern art

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  5. Our art museum campus

    Welcome to Sydney's newest landmark, where art, architecture and landscape connect. The Sydney Modern Project has transformed the Art Gallery of New South Wales into a unique art museum campus with two buildings and an art garden, on Gadigal Country, overlooking one of the world's most beautiful harbours. From our reimagined original ...

  6. About the project

    March 2013: Launch of the Sydney Modern strategic vision and master plan to transform the Gallery into an art museum of the 21st century June 2013: NSW Government committed $10.8 million to advance plans for the Gallery expansion September 2014: Jury announced for Sydney Modern Project competition October 2014: Twelve shortlisted architects announced for Stage 1 submission

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    December 2, 2022. Normal text size. Larger text size. Very large text size. Sydney's new $340 million modern art gallery is officially open to the public this weekend. But what can you expect to ...

  10. About

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  11. Sydney Modern Museum / SANAA

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  14. Sydney Modern Project: Inside The Art Gallery of NSW's New $344 Million

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    Billed as one of the most celebrated events on Australia's cultural calendar, Sydney Contemporary has established itself as a must-attend art event and the perfect place to discover and collect modern and contemporary art. Wednesday 4 September Collector Preview 2pm-8pm. Thursday 5 September General Admission 11am - 5pm Art Night 5:30pm-9pm.

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    Best for: those who want a vibe A former wool warehouse and terminal for large ships entering Sydney Harbour turned ultra-stylish boutique hotel, the Ovolo Woolloomoloo is a delightful haven situated on a historic wharf. The interior is playful with an industrial edge, housing spacious rooms and split-level lofts, many with water views, that feature vibrant pops of colour and modern art ...

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    With over 100 artworks on show, the exhibition will provide an insight into the modern world of miniature art. On display will be drawings, painting Australian Society of Miniature Art (NSW) National Awards Exhibition | Sydney, Australia - Official Travel & Accommodation Website

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