Do I need a visa for Puerto Rico?

Vanessa Ramos

Dec 17, 2023 • 4 min read

A woman walks on a beach in San Juan, Puerto Rico on a bright sunny day.

Don't let a visa mix-up end your Puerto Rico vacation before it begins © Maremagnum / Getty Images

With world-renowned beaches, mesmerizing bioluminescent bays and tropical rainforests, it’s no wonder Puerto Rico is growing in popularity among travelers.

It's also a low-maintenance choice for many regarding travel admin – Puerto Rico is a visa-free destination for over 40 countries and territories. Here’s everything you need to know about whether you need a visa and how to get one before visiting  Puerto Rico .

Who can travel to Puerto Rico without a visa?

Puerto Rico is an unincorporated territory of the United States, meaning you must follow the same visa requirements  as the US before visiting.

The good news is US citizens, including those living in other US territories , can travel visa-free to Puerto Rico. Since it’s considered a domestic destination, US mainland travelers don’t need a passport either. An official state-issued ID such as a driver's license is still a requisite, however.

Citizens from an additional 41 countries can visit Puerto Rico without a visa under the Visa Waiver Program (VWP) for up to 90 days. The list of visa-exempt countries includes most European nations as well as countries in Latin America, East Asia and Oceania.

Although they are visa-exempt, VWP travelers must have an approved  Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA) and a valid e-passport for up to six months after the trip.  Canadians and Bermudians can travel visa-free to Puerto Rico, but they must have a passport or valid ID.

How do I get an ESTA?

The ESTA is a digital system accessed through the US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) website that determines if VWP applicants are eligible to travel visa-free to the United States.

You'll need to provide your home and email addresses, phone numbers and emergency contact information. The application costs US$21 and must be paid online. Once approved, the ESTA stays valid for two years.

People walking along a street in San Juan, Puerto Rico

How do I get a tourist visa?

Citizens from over 140 countries located between Africa , Asia , Oceania and the majority of Latin America need a non-immigrant visa to visit Puerto Rico, whether it will be for business (B-1) or tourism (B-2) purposes.

Applying for a Puerto Rico tourism visa has essentially two steps: submitting a DS-160 form application and doing an interview at your local US embassy or consulate.

You need a passport, a digital passport-style photo , plus your travel itinerary and travel history to complete your DS-160 form. You might need additional supporting documents about your visit’s purpose, profession and salary.

Once you've finished the application, print out your confirmation page – you'll need it to make a payment and for your interview. Each official US embassy webpage details the protocol for paying your application and making an appointment.

While some embassies require bank transfers or in-person payments, most will redirect you to third-party websites like Official US Visa Information and Appointment Services or UsTravelDocs to pay the non-refundable US$185 fee for non-immigrant visas. Both websites allow you to schedule appointments at a US embassy, the second step in your visa application process.

For the in-person interview, you must submit the following:

  • A printout of the DS-160’s confirmation page with ID number
  • Printed recent passport-style photo
  • Receipt or evidence of visa fee payment
  • Copy of appointment letter
  • Intended travel itinerary
  • Supporting documentation (assets and employment proof, bank statements, etc)

Your visa application process isn’t finished until you complete both steps. An additional reciprocity fee applies in some cases on the interview day. Once approved, your visa will be delivered to you via courier.

Can I extend my stay in Puerto Rico?

You can extend your stay in Puerto Rico by applying to the US Citizenship and Immigration Services before the period established in your I-94 form expires.

The CBP stamp on your travel document and the I-94 website also displays your authorized period of stay. A tourist visa duration could differ from your visa expiration date , which goes from 6 months to 10 years.

Keep in mind you need a valid reason for your extension, and you have to prove you intend to leave the country to get approved.

A young girl petting horses on the beach in Puerto Rico

How do I get a holiday working visa for Puerto Rico?

The J-1 visa allows university students and professors to study and work for up to four months in Puerto Rico. Applying for a J-1 and a B-2 tourist visa is a similar process, except you need to find a sponsor company and be accepted on the Exchange Visitor Program first.

You also have to register at the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) and pay a US$220 fee, before proceeding with the J-1 visa application. Find out more about J-1 requirements for Puerto Rico at the local Department of State website .

Explore related stories

Help-Me-LP-March.jpg

Destination Practicalities

Mar 1, 2024 • 3 min read

If you're going to lots of different countries, it can be hard to know the best way to stay in contact and avoid expensive roaming charges. We can help.

Tourist watching an elephant crossing a river in the Chobe National Park in Botswana, Africa; Concept for travel safari and travel in Africa

Feb 20, 2024 • 17 min read

Philippino beaches or see elephants in Sri Lanka

Feb 14, 2024 • 8 min read

travel to puerto rico visa

Feb 1, 2024 • 7 min read

travel to puerto rico visa

Jan 30, 2024 • 9 min read

travel to puerto rico visa

Jan 26, 2024 • 6 min read

A man hiking in El Yunque National Forest in Puerto Rico

Jan 14, 2024 • 6 min read

1290933961

Jan 5, 2024 • 20 min read

Four people in a red truck drive off road in Puerto Rico.

Jan 5, 2024 • 7 min read

Three friends walking along a cobbled street in San Juan, Puerto Rico

Dec 4, 2023 • 6 min read

travel to puerto rico visa

The Government of Puerto Rico is a territory of the United States of America. As a consequence of this political relationship, control of ingress and egress to and from the territorial limits of Puerto Rico is vested in the Federal Government.

The Puerto Rico Department of State guides foreigners interested in visiting the Island and serves as a liaison with federal authorities to clarify or expedite the procedures to obtain a visa.

Individuals visiting Puerto Rico have the same immigration restrictions and privileges as if they were visiting any other destination in the U.S. For immigration purposes, travel from anywhere in the U.S. to PR does not constitute a departure from the U.S. as long as the flight is directly from a state to Puerto Rico. Similarly, when travelers arrive in the U.S. from PR, they do not have to go through immigration, as long as the flight is direct from PR to a state. However, for identification purposes, you must carry some form of an identity document, such as your driver's license, an ID issued by a state or federal agency, or an original birth certificate.

Foreigners visiting PR are also subject to the same U.S. immigration rules and laws, so be sure to comply with immigration and visa requirements.

Download Visitor's Guide

travel to puerto rico visa

Office of Orientation and Services to Immigrants in Puerto Rico

The Office of Orientation and Immigration Services of Puerto Rico was created by Act No. 254 of October 28, 2002, whose purpose and we quote is "to assist and orient foreign persons living in Puerto Rico so that through their own efforts they may develop alternatives to solve their particular problems and needs, promoting the strengthening of their relations with the community."

To provide tools to foreign citizens living in Puerto Rico that will facilitate their full integration into society to improve their quality of life, emphasizing education, health, and socioeconomic development.

To be the main liaison between the resident alien community and the Government of Puerto Rico, so that the needs of this population can be addressed in a sensitive and diligent manner.

  • Encourage the participation and integration of foreign citizens in public life and develop a sense of belonging as members of the Puerto Rican Society with all its rights, privileges and obligations.
  • Channel urgent cases for immigrants and follow up on these cases until they are resolved.
  • Establish efficient working relationships with the Consular Corps accredited in Puerto Rico.
  • Establish programs to strengthen the areas of education.
  • To observe compliance with the provisions that cover the rights of immigrant citizens in Puerto Rico.

The main purpose of the Immigrant Orientation and Services Office is to facilitate the full integration of the foreign population living in Puerto Rico. In our office you can receive orientation about:

  • Equivalence fourth year, Law 217
  • Conversational English Courses
  • Civic Education (citizenship)
  • Assistance in the completion of the following forms necessary in procedures with the Citizenship and Immigration Services Department.
  • Citizenship Application (N-400)
  • Application for Fee Waiver (I-912)
  • Green Card Changes (I-90)
  • Change of Direction (AR-11)
  • Referrals and follow-up of urgent cases for immigrants and follow-up of such cases until resolution is achieved.

If any of the above requirements are not met, the interview will be conducted in English.

Applying for Naturalization (U.S. Citizenship)

Qualification requirements.

  • 18 years of age or older
  • Have 5 years of permanent residence
  • 3 years of permanent residency if married and living with a U.S. citizen
  • Good moral character
  • Not to exceed 915 days (30 months) outside the United States in the last 5 years.

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS

  • Complete Form N-400
  • Permanent residence
  • Passport in the last 5 years
  • 2 photos 2 x 2
  • Money order of $725.00

ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXCEPTIONS

To take the interview in the language of your choice you must:

  • Be fifty (50) years of age and twenty (20) years or more with permanent residence.
  • Be fifty-five (55) years of age and fifteen (15) years or more of permanent residence.
  • Be sixty-five (65) years of age and twenty (20) years or more of permanent residency (you will only need to learn twenty (20) U.S. history and civics questions).

TO QUALIFY FOR THE I-912 FEE WAIVER

If you receive government assistance:

  • Certification of government assistance received: PAN (food stamps), Medicaid (MA-10), Public Housing, Session 8, in English.

If household members' income qualifies: must be below the following table:

Evidence of annual income of household members: latest tax return, W-2, Social Security or Pension Certification

If you have financial problems:

  • Evidence of your annual income
  • Provide the value of assets that you can easily convert to cash
  • Evidence of monthly expenses
  • Evidence of an organization that provides you with assistance

You may apply for a payment reduction if your income is at 150%.

For more information access the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services website: https://www.us.cis.gov/es or call

San José St. San Francisco St. Corner; Old San Juan

OWA / Webmail

Mailing Address

PO Box 9023271 San Juan, PR 00902-3271

Facebook Logo

Accesibilidad PRITS-010824-ESTADO-ENG Conforme a la Ley 229 de 2003

OIG Logo

Frommers logo default 2015

Puerto Rico

Travel guide.

  • Things to Do
  • Spectator Sports
  • Suggested Itineraries
  • Escorted & Package Tours
  • Entry Requirements & Customs
  • Visitor Information
  • Getting Around
  • Tips on Accommodations
  • Calendar of Events
  • Health & Safety
  • Getting There
  • Tips for Families
  • Tips for Gay and Lesbian Travelers
  • Tips for Senior Travelers
  • Tips for Travelers with Disabilities
  • Staying Connected
  • Regions in Brief
  • Driving Tours
  • Active Pursuits

Powered booking

Entry Requirements and Customs in Puerto Rico

Entering Puerto Rico During the Covid-19 Pandemic

In response to the global coronavirus pandemic, Puerto Rico has established the following rules for entering the island:

Each visitor must complete the Travel Declaration Form via the government's online portal .

Fully vaccinated travelers entering via domestic flights (from the U.S. mainland) will need to upload copies of their vaccination cards . Those travelers are not required to submit Covid-19 test results.  

Each unvaccinated or international visitor  must submit negative results from a PCR or antigen test  taken no more than 72 hours prior to visiting the island. Those who arrive without having uploaded results will receive a $300 fine. 

Because Puerto Rico is a U.S. territory, American citizens who visit the island are exempt from the CDC requirement to provide negative Covid-19 test results before returning to the mainland .  

For a complete rundown of Puerto Rico's entry requirements and safety restrictions while on the island, visit the official tourism site,  DiscoverPuertoRico.com .  

And for a helpful overview of pandemic travel rules in Puerto Rico and other Caribbean destinations, visit Frommer's frequently updated resources page . 

U.S. citizens coming from mainland destinations do not need passports to enter Puerto Rico. However, it is necessary to produce a government-issued photo ID to board a plane.

Visitors from other countries, including Canada, need a valid passport to land in Puerto Rico. For those from countries requiring a visa to enter the U.S., the same visa is necessary to enter Puerto Rico.

It is advised to always have at least one or two consecutive blank pages in your passport to allow space for visas and stamps that need to appear together. It is also important to note when your passport expires. Many countries require your passport to have at least 6 months left before its expiration in order to allow you into the destination.

Passport Office Links for Select English-Speaking Countries

  • Australian Passport Office (tel. 131-232 )
  • Canada Travel and Tourism Services
  • Ireland Passports  
  • New Zealand   Online Passport Service  (tel. 0800/225-050 )
  • United Kingdom Passports   (tel. 0300/222-0000 )
  • United States Passports

The U.S. Department of State has a Visa Waiver Program (VWP) allowing citizens of participating countries to enter the United States without a visa for stays of up to 90 days. To find a list of participating countries and other info about the program, visit the website of the U.S. State Department .  

Citizens of all other countries must have 1) a valid passport that expires at least 6 months later than the scheduled end of the visit to the U.S. and 2) a tourist visa.

For information about U.S. visas, go to travel.state.gov .

U.S. citizens do not need to clear Puerto Rican Customs upon arrival by plane or ship from the U.S. mainland.

International travelers should consult the official website of U.S. Customs and Border Protection for information on what can be brought into Puerto Rico.  

Before departing the island, U.S.-bound travelers must have their luggage inspected by the U.S. Department of Agriculture due to laws that prohibit bringing fruits and plants to the U.S. mainland. Otherwise, you can bring back as many purchased goods as you want without paying duty.

For information on what non-U.S. citizens can bring home from Puerto Rico, be sure to check with your home country. Some helpful links for several English-speaking nations:

• Australia :  abf.gov.au  (click "Entering and leaving Australia")

• Canada :   cbsa-asfc.gc.ca

• New Zealand : customs.govt.nz

• United Kingdom :   gov.uk

Medical Requirements

If you have a medical condition that requires syringe-administered medications, carry a valid signed prescription from your physician; syringes in carry-on baggage will be inspected. Insulin in any form should have the proper pharmaceutical documentation. If you have a disease that requires treatment with narcotics, you should also carry documented proof with you—smuggling narcotics aboard a plane carries severe penalties in the U.S.

Note : This information was accurate when it was published, but can change without notice. Please be sure to confirm all rates and details directly with the companies in question before planning your trip.

Frommer's EasyGuide to Puerto Rico

  • All Regions
  • Australia & South Pacific
  • Caribbean & Atlantic
  • Central & South America
  • Middle East & Africa
  • North America
  • Washington, D.C.
  • San Francisco
  • New York City
  • Los Angeles
  • Arts & Culture
  • Beach & Water Sports
  • Local Experiences
  • Food & Drink
  • Outdoor & Adventure
  • National Parks
  • Winter Sports
  • Travelers with Disabilities
  • Family & Kids
  • All Slideshows
  • Hotel Deals
  • Car Rentals
  • Flight Alerts
  • Credit Cards & Loyalty Points
  • Cruise News
  • Entry Requirements & Customs
  • Car, Bus, Rail News
  • Money & Fees
  • Health, Insurance, Security
  • Packing & Luggage
  • -Arthur Frommer Online
  • -Passportable
  • Road Trip Guides
  • Alaska Made Easy
  • Great Vacation Ideas in the U.S.A.
  • Best of the Caribbean
  • Best of Mexico
  • Cruise Inspiration
  • Best Places to Go 2024
  • How to Tie a Tie
  • Best Coffee Beans
  • How to Shape a Beard
  • Best Sweaters for Men
  • Most Expensive Cognac
  • Monos vs Away Luggage
  • Best Luxury Hotel Chains
  • Fastest Cars in the World
  • Ernest Hemingway Books
  • What Does CBD Feel Like?
  • Canada Goose Alternatives
  • Fastest Motorcycles in the World

Do you need a passport to go to Puerto Rico? What to know before your trip

What documentation is needed to travel to puerto rico.

Passport

Do you need a passport to go to Puerto Rico? Planning a trip to Puerto Rico often raises questions about travel documentation. As an unincorporated territory of the United States, Puerto Rico enjoys a unique status that affects the travel requirements needed to enter the area. So, do you need a passport for Puerto Rico? Let’s dive into the details to provide clarity on this matter.

Do you need a passport to go to Puerto Rico? The bottom line

Book your trip to puerto rico today.

No, you do not need a passport to go to Puerto Rico as a United States citizen. Puerto Rico is part of a group of U.S. territories that does not require travelers to present a passport at the border. However, if you are not a United States citizen, different entry requirements may apply, and it is always a good idea to double-check the details of your specific situation.

Can I travel to Puerto Rico with just my driver’s license?

The short answer is yes. U.S. citizens can travel to Puerto Rico using only a government-issued photo ID , such as a driver’s license or state ID card. However, starting on May 7, 2025, if you do not have a passport, you will need a REAL ID to fly domestically in the United States , which includes the territory of Puerto Rico. Without the ID, you can still use a passport.

  • How to renew Global Entry (and when you should do it)
  • The government just banned this airline practice every traveler hates
  • When is the best time to visit Italy? This is when you should go

What documents do I need to go to Puerto Rico?

As long as you are a U.S. citizen, a valid government-issued photo ID, such as a driver’s license, suffices for travel to Puerto Rico. However, make sure you double-check your ID’s expiration date before your trip to ensure that it remains valid throughout your stay in Puerto Rico. 

What islands can you go to with just a passport?

While Puerto Rico may not require a passport, other destinations in the Caribbean do. So, if you plan on traveling to multiple different destinations, make sure you research entry requirements for other islands in the region. 

Many Caribbean nations and territories, such as the Bahamas, Jamaica, and the Dominican Republic, require U.S. citizens to present a valid passport upon entry. However, other U.S. territories like American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, and the U.S. Virgin Islands do not require travelers to hold a valid passport.

Is Puerto Rico a domestic flight?

Yes, flying to Puerto Rico from the mainland United States is considered a domestic flight. Since Puerto Rico is a part of the United States, flights are treated similarly to domestic flights within the contiguous U.S. This means that you will undergo security screening but won’t encounter customs and immigration procedures when arriving in Puerto Rico.

Traveling to Puerto Rico is quite straightforward when it comes to documentation. A valid government-issued ID is all you need to explore this exciting Caribbean destination. However, it is never a bad idea to bring along a backup form of identification , and a passport is a perfect choice!

Editors' Recommendations

  • These popular Delta Amex credit cards — made from a Boeing 747 — are back
  • Drink up at these amazing bars — they’re favorites of famous authors
  • Go on a dream trip: These are the best places to visit in May
  • You’ll soon need a visa to visit this incredible country
  • The Airbnb cancellation policy is changing for summer — what you need to know
  • Advice and how-tos
  • Advice and insights

Amanda Teague

Going on a trip to a new and exciting destination is a great chance to explore new cultures and make memories that will last a lifetime. However, amidst the thrill of travel, it’s essential to exercise caution when purchasing souvenirs and other items. From legal considerations to practical concerns like suitcase space and saving money, understanding what to avoid can enhance your travel experience and ensure smooth sailing through the airport. Check out these travel tips for making the most out of your adventures while staying within your budget and avoiding unnecessary purchases.     Fragile items

Refraining from purchasing fragile items on vacation is a smart decision for several reasons. Firstly, the rigors of travel, including packing and transportation, increase the likelihood of fragile items being broken or damaged. Fragile souvenirs like glassware and ceramics aren’t likely to make it to your final destination in one piece, especially if they are in your checked baggage. 

Red-eye flights, named for their tendency to depart late at night and arrive early in the morning, offer a wide range of benefits for travelers looking to save money and optimize their time. From the luxury of saving daylight hours to the chance for lower rates, red-eyes are an appealing option for many. These flights often feature less congestion at airports and shorter security lines, leading to a more relaxed overall travel experience.

Despite their advantages, red-eye flights can also cause issues such as disrupted sleep patterns, cramped quarters, and fatigue upon arrival. However, with the right strategies and a little bit of preparation, you can turn your red-eye experience into a smooth and stress-free adventure. These are just a few red-eye flight tips to consider. 1. Match your flight to your sleep habits

Air travel opens the door to global exploration. On a sleek, fast airplane, you can reach faraway destinations in hours, not days, paving the way to new experiences. Have you always wanted to ski the Swiss Alps? Just book a flight, and you’ll be there in no time. Not to mention, you’ll enjoy the stunning views from above.

On the other hand, when returning home, getting through security can be a chore. Long lines and lengthy processes put a dent in your memorable trip. It’s a real hassle.

  • Travel Document

Puerto Rico Travel Guide: All you need to know to visit Puerto Rico in 2024

Welcome to Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico, an island in the Caribbean, is a tropical haven with many kilometers of white sand beaches, clear waterways, and verdant jungles. You should discover its scenic beauty and cultural richness on your upcoming vacation. Here is the best Puerto Rico travel guide to help you plan a trip there!

Document checklist for Puerto Rico

  • Return airline ticket
  • Valid passport
  • Health Declaration
  • Sufficient funds

Essential Puerto Rico travel information

Currency  – The US dollar (USD) is the island’s currency.

Daily budget for 1 person  – USD 174.

Languages  – Puerto Ricans speak English and Spanish.

Socket type  – There are two plug kinds, designated as types A and B, for Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico uses a 120V supply voltage and 60Hz for operation.

Time zone  – Atlantic Standard Time (GMT-04:00).

Top 3 cities to visit  – Carolina, Ponce, and San Juan.

The top 3 landmarks/monuments  are San Juan Old Town, Forts, and Yunque National Park.

Typical costs and budget for Puerto Rico

Daily spending per person  – The daily budget for one individual might be around USD 174.

Meals  – USD 31.

Transport  – Local transportation is USD 14.

Hotel  – A room costs around USD 111 for a single individual and USD 222 for a pair.

A weeklong trip to Puerto Rico typically costs USD 1,219 for one person. As a result, a weeklong trip for two people to Puerto Rico costs about USD 2,438.

Puerto Rico’s modes of transportation 

You may get about Puerto Rico in various ways depending on where you are. Taxis, buses, ferries, trains, and Uber are examples of public transit alternatives.

Safety in Puerto Rico

It is safe to travel across Puerto Rico. However, to be safe, you must take some measures, such as protecting your possessions by keeping them close by and never losing sight of them. Natural catastrophes are also a significant issue in the nation. Some travel advice:

  • For your vacation, purchase international travel insurance.
  • Plan your vacation to Puerto Rico carefully so that everything is well-organized.
  • To feel more at home, learn some simple Spanish or English words.

Weather in Puerto Rico

The ideal season to travel to Puerto Rico is from April to June since it is a time of tropical weather, following the winter season and before the rainy summer. The travel season in the spring is favorable. At the end of the island’s hurricane and rainy seasons, we advise going between August and November if money is limited.

Famous cities and towns in Puerto Rico

San Juan  serves as Puerto Rico’s capital. San Juan has many excellent restaurants, historic buildings, chic stores, and clubs to make for an exciting evening. You may also stroll around Old San Juan, one of the most amazing areas with historic and gorgeous architecture.

Ponce  is a city on Puerto Rico’s southern coast. Ponce is home to one of Puerto Rico’s significant monuments and a lovely historic district. The local food is also hip, and the stunning ancient town’s architecture will narrate fantastic tales.

Carolina , the fourth-most populous city in Puerto Rico, is home to Isla Verde, a region with various hotels, eateries, and pubs where you can have a good time.

Must do and see in Puerto Rico

Discover the magnificent beaches – Puerto Rico is home to several breathtaking beaches.

Visit San Juan Old Town – San Juan Old Town offers many activities. For example, you may go hiking or take a horse-drawn carriage ride in addition to shopping for items made by regional artists.

Visit Culebra Island:  Culebra is a small island near Puerto Rico. Its scenery varies from cliffs and lush woods to extensive expanses of golden sand beaches. Many minor towns exist, including Sainte Marie and Salinas.

Typical Puerto Rican food to try

White rice, beans, olives, capers, tomato sauce, spice, and sofrito make up the majority of restaurants’ offerings of  arroz con gandules.  Pork is occasionally included when cooking cilantro, onion, peppers, and tomatoes to give the sofrito additional flavor.

Tostones:  In Puerto Rican cuisine, bananas are a common ingredient. Because of this, they are utilized to make tostones, which are fried, unripe green bananas. You should try them when you visit the island; they are a delectable salty snack.

During the Christmas season,  coquito , a beverage made from coconut milk, is highly popular. Rum, vanilla, cinnamon sticks, sweetened condensed milk, coconut cream, and evaporated milk are all ingredients in Coquito.

Vaccine information for Puerto Rico

Check the CDC website to learn more about the Covid vaccine and other vaccinations needed to enter Puerto Rico.

Fun facts about Puerto Rico

  • San Juan was the birthplace of the Pia Colada.
  • The quantity of gold Spanish colonists discovered on the island led to the adoption of the name “Puerto Rico.”
  • Although Spanish is the most generally spoken language on the island, Spanish and English are official languages.

Related Articles

Recent News

Uzbekistan visa guide for Indians- visa types, visa costs, validity, documents, criteria, processing time and more

Plan your visit to Uzbekistan and explore its diverse architecture, delicious food, serene beauty, historical sites, rich culture, activities, and spectacular shopping experience. Uzbekistan is an alluring country with various

Recent News

The Ultimate Travel Guide to Turkey : Top Destinations and Hidden Gems

Welcome to the extraordinarily beautiful  travel guide to Turkey, a place where the history of ancient times  without any sudden changes, interruptions, or problems blends with warm hospitality, stunning landscape,

Recent News

Must-See Attractions in Taiwan for Every Traveler

Taiwan is  an island that is  a comfortable nation, protected in the heart of East Asia, summoned with gestures of hand travelers with its rich pictures of woven  history, breathtaking

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique.

Yes, all Indian citizens with passports must travel to Puerto Rico.

From the date of issuance, the Puerto Rico visa is suitable for 90 days.

The bearer of a visa with a single entrance restriction can only enter and exit Puerto Rico once; however, a visa with multiple entry restrictions may permit many entries and exits.

The actual passport will be stamped with the visa by the embassy. The passport must thus include two blank pages. Additionally, the validity of your passport should extend at least six months after the desired stay.

Typically, it takes 15 working days to process a visa application.

Get your visa from VISABUD today.

Login into your account and apply for your visa online, through our online visa application form.

Visabud

A beginner's guide to visiting Puerto Rico: Everything you need to eat, see and do

Victoria M. Walker

Puerto Rico is beloved by travelers around the world, and for good reason.

From bioluminescent bays, pristine Caribbean beaches and lush forests to historic streetscapes, a vibrant local food scene and fascinating cultural attractions, each region of Puerto Rico offers visitors a distinct experience.

And there's simply never a bad time to visit. Better yet, you can often find cheap nonstop flights to both San Juan's Luis Muñoz Marín International Airport (SJU) and Aguadilla's Rafael Hernández Airport (BQN) on the stunning northwest coast. If you're traveling from the U.S., you don't even need a passport or have to change your money.

It's a perfect tropical weekend getaway from the Eastern Seaboard; you can board an early morning flight and enjoy lunch and a pina colada with your toes in the sand.

In short: Paradise awaits.

travel to puerto rico visa

Where to eat and drink in Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico is a wonderful destination for foodies. Along the cobblestone streets of Old San Juan, you'll find gourmet cuisine served in elegant, historic townhomes rubbing shoulders with atmospheric hole-in-the-walls that serve traditional fare.

Following Hurricane Maria, restaurants became ever keener to support local agriculture and celebrate food that is grown entirely on the island. The result is farm-fresh, hyper-seasonal cuisine infused with Creole, Taino and Spanish influences.

The much-loved national dish is mofongo — deep-fried mashed plantains served with a side of seafood or meat and chicken broth soup. Among the best places to try it are Santaella in San Juan and Mi Casita in Pinones.

travel to puerto rico visa

Lechon — a whole pig roasted over a fire for at least four hours — is another hearty mainstay of traditional Puerto Rican cuisine. Around an hour's drive south of San Juan, dozens of lechoneras dot the famed Ruta de Lechon, or "Pork Highway," where trays of succulent, tender pork are served at communal tables, usually accompanied by copious cold beer and live music.

If you want to graze on authentic local delicacies beachside, head for Luquillo (near El Yunque National Forest), where more than 60 kiosks ranging from rustic beach bars to full-service restaurants serve authentic Creole cooking as well as Latin American signature cuisine.

A colorful pit spot while exploring San Juan's trendy Santurce district, Alcapurria Quema is a no-frills Santurce locale that's one of the best places to try Puerto Rico's ubiquitous local snack, alcapurrias: deep-fried fritters made from plantains (or grated yucca) stuffed with flavorful beef, pork or fish.

Fine dining in Puerto Rico

If you want to splurge, San Juan has plenty of upscale dining venues.

Located inside the elegant Condado Vanderbilt Hotel, 1919 is widely hailed as the best fine dining restaurant in Puerto Rico. Helmed by Juan José Cuevas, who worked at the Michelin-starred Blue Hill in New York, menu highlights include scallops with organic mushrooms, kale and sunchoke, as well as robalo (snook) with pistachio, local white beans and dill. For an unforgettable dining experience, opt for the chef's menu ($199) accompanied by sommelier-selected wine pairings. Make a reservation, dress the part and enjoy every moment. It's one of the island's most expensive restaurants, but worth it.

Vianda 's stylish midcentury modern-style bar and sleek, moody dining room draw well-dressed locals with its innovative mixology and farm-to-table cuisine. Vianda means "root vegetable," and the small, seasonal menu riffs on Puerto Rico's rich culinary heritage while showcasing the island's incredible bounty of tropical fruits, vegetables and herbs. Start the evening with a Corazon de Melon ($15) cocktail, made with tequila, watermelon, cucumber, mint and rosemary, followed by a signature entree such as the Mar y Tierra, a rich medley of cod loin, crispy pork belly, mussels, sofrito butter and white beans ($44).

Most epicureans will have heard of Marmalade , the internationally renowned restaurant credited with putting Puerto Rico on the foodie map. It remains one of the best gourmet dining experiences on the island. Iowa native chef Peter Schintler deftly blends indigenous and international ingredients to produce a truly memorable five-course prix fixe menu ($135 per person). It changes frequently, but menu classics include local organic rabbit with black olive garganelli and grilled ahi tuna with peanut-miso broth.

Chef José Santaella 's namesake restaurant is a lively, fun place to dine on nouvelle Puerto Rican cuisine with family and friends. The edgy industrial decor (it used to be a hardware store) contrasts with the menu's vibrant "tropical creole" gastronomy. Arrive early for cocktail hour and try a Lady Bullet (Woodford Reserve bourbon, fig marmalade, lavender syrup, orange bitters and lime juice; $16) and stay for the duration, grazing on delectable small plates, including wagyu sliders ($26), grilled Spanish octopus ($32) and escargot ($18).

What to see and do in Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico has a ton of sightseeing you'll want to add to your itinerary, too.

El Yunque National Forest is just 45 minutes from San Juan and is the only tropical rainforest on U.S. soil. It's famous for its incredible hiking, an abundance of waterfalls and endemic wildlife.

travel to puerto rico visa

There are just five bioluminescent bays in the world, and Puerto Rico is home to three: Bahia Mosquito, Laguna Grande and La Parguera. To access Puerto Rico's bio bays via kayak or paddleboard, you'll need to paddle through dark mangrove channels — signing up with a tour operator is definitely the way to go. Most companies operate two tours each night, at sunset and 9 p.m.

The protected wildlife reserve of Bahia Mosquito is located on Vieques, an island municipality a short flight from San Juan. Famed for its picture-perfect crescents of sand, boutique hotels and crystalline waters, Vieques is the quintessential Caribbean idyll. Boasting the highest concentration of phosphorescent dinoflagellates (plankton that make the water sparkle with just the touch of a hand), Mosquito Bay is the brightest of the world's five bio bays.

For travelers with limited time, Laguna Grande is the most accessible bio bay in Puerto Rico, less than an hour's drive from San Juan on the northeast coast. What sets Laguna Grande apart is that the bay is actually a lagoon nestled within an area of spectacular natural beauty.

Puerto Rico is replete with gorgeous, sandy beaches. Near Luquillo, La Pared is an often deserted stretch of almost golden sand. The beach town of Naguabo, in the southeast corner of the island, is also incredibly quiet, and palm trees frame the soft, sandy beach and turquoise water.

travel to puerto rico visa

Ponce is Puerto Rico's second-largest city. Located on the island's southern coast, it's chock-full of history. Be sure to check out Plaza Las Delicias, which has a cathedral as well as an old firehouse (Parque de Bombas) that's now a museum.

Museo de la Musica Puertoriquena has a rich history dating back to the 19th century. Here, you'll find traces of Taino, Spanish and African influences. You'll also learn about Puerto Rico's musical history, which you can now hear throughout other parts of the Caribbean, the mainland and around the world.

Where to stay in Puerto Rico

Hyatt regency grand reserve puerto rico.

Fresh from a multimillion-dollar face-lift, this 579-key beach resort reopened in 2019 as the Hyatt Regency Grand Reserve.

Rooms (starting at 520 square feet), suites and villas are contemporary and inviting, with simple wooden furnishings, marble floors, a white-on-white color palette and furnished terraces and patios. Bathrooms feature rainfall showers with separate tubs and Pharmacopia toiletries.

Beyond the hotel's natural assets — a beautiful white-sand beach and 72 acres of flamboyant tropical vegetation — amenities include a lagoon-style pool, a state-of-the-art fitness center, a luxurious spa, two Tom Kite-designed 18-hole championship golf courses and several upscale restaurants serving everything from Pacific Rim cuisine and sushi at Nori Asian to prime cuts of beef and seafood at Prime 787, a contemporary American steakhouse.

The hotel can arrange a number of activities nearby, including horseback riding, an all-terrain-vehicle excursion at nearby Carabali Rainforest Adventure Park and hikes through El Yunque National Forest.

Rates at the Hyatt Regency Grand Reserve start at $300 or 12,000 World of Hyatt points per night.

Hilton Ponce Golf & Casino Resort

The rambling 255-key Hilton Ponce Golf & Casino Resort is the only Hilton hotel outside of the San Juan area.

While rooms are rather spartan and generic, they have an inviting beachy vibe with a green-and-white color palette, light wood furnishings, tiled floors and balconies with ocean views (in most rooms). Comfort-enhancing modern touches include coffee makers, minifridges and flat-screen televisions.

At this amenity-rich, family-friendly resort, there's plenty to keep adults and children entertained, including two expansive pools, a 27-hole championship golf course, a miniature golf course, tennis courts, a playground and a splash park. It's also home to one of the largest casinos in Puerto Rico and four restaurants: El Bohio, La Cava, La Terraza and Sancho's Sushi Bar.

While it isn't the splashiest Hilton property in Puerto Rico, it's a great base for exploring Puerto Rico's southwest coast.

Rates at the Hilton Ponce Golf & Casino Resort start at $230 or 50,000 Hilton Honors points per night.

The St. Regis Bahia Beach Resort

travel to puerto rico visa

Located between El Yunque National Forest and Espiritu Santo River State Preserve, The St. Regis Bahia Beach Resort places guests within striking distance of two of Puerto Rico's top attractions.

Designed by Puerto Rican fashion designer Nono Maldonado, the spacious (and completely refurbished) accommodations channel a breezy Caribbean aesthetic with a serene white-and-cream color palette, abstract artworks and sleek, modern furnishings.

However, it's the luxe details and exquisite service that really set this property apart. There's the cozy pillow-top bed dressed with a cashmere throw, the marble spa-style bathroom with a centerpiece deep soaking tub that's stocked with luxe Frette bathrobes, and, of course, the St. Regis' private butler service.

A surfeit of amenities include a beautifully landscaped swimming pool, a lavish spa, a Robert Trent Jones Jr.-designed golf course and three acclaimed restaurants.

Rates at The St. Regis Bahia Beach Resort start at $695 or 70,000 Marriott Bonvoy points per night.

Dorado Beach, a Ritz-Carlton Reserve

Puerto Rico's most exclusive resort, Dorado Beach, a Ritz-Carlton Reserve , combines unbridled luxury and impeccable attention to detail with a sustainable ethos. Built by the Rockefeller family in the 1950s, it remains a magnet for tycoons, celebrities and, these days, cryptocurrency investors.

Nestled on a glorious 2-mile beach amid a riot of mature tropical vegetation, beautifully appointed rooms and suites are equipped with every creature comfort imaginable and assigned their own private butler. Standard rooms are huge (they start at 1,000 square feet), while deluxe suites also feature private plunge pools.

The resort's amenities are, as you'd expect, exceptional. There are two gorgeous pools fronted by swaying palms, three Robert Trent Jones Sr.-designed golf courses and one of Puerto Rico's finest restaurants: Coa, a culinary homage to the region's Taino roots. A roster of family-friendly activities includes the signature Jean-Michel Cousteau's Ambassadors of the Environment program.

Rates at Dorado Beach, a Ritz-Carlton Reserve start at $1,995 or 170,000 Marriott Bonvoy points per night.

Related: Puerto Rican renaissance: A review of Dorado Beach, a Ritz-Carlton Reserve

The details

Getting there.

If you're interested in visiting Puerto Rico, flights are plentiful. There are more than 120 nonstop flights between the island and major mainland U.S. cities, according to Discover Puerto Rico . That means you can fly nonstop between the island and cities like New York, Miami, Fort Lauderdale and Chicago. Most of the nonstop routes are to San Juan.

While the cheapest available flights to Puerto Rico typically range from $300 to $600, you can pick up deals with both legacy carriers as well as low-cost carriers such as Spirit Airlines and Frontier Airlines .

Of course, a cheap deal isn't the only way to get to the island.

You can easily use points and miles to get you from major cities to Puerto Rico. American Airlines , for example, offers off-peak MileSAAver awards from 17,000 miles one-way in economy or 59,000 in business class.

With United Airlines , expect to spend between 20,000 and 65,000 miles for a one-way ticket from cities like Newark and Chicago.

But perhaps the best way to use points to visit Puerto Rico is through JetBlue .

travel to puerto rico visa

On JetBlue, you have several destinations beyond San Juan to consider. For instance, you could fly round-trip from New York to Aguadilla for just $274 or 23,000 TrueBlue points in August this year, or to Ponce for $386 or 31,000 TrueBlue points round-trip.

You can transfer Chase Ultimate Rewards points to JetBlue at a 1:1 ratio, but this might not be the best use of your Chase points .

JetBlue is a transfer partner of American Express Membership Rewards as well, but TPG doesn't recommend transferring Amex points to JetBlue because of the limited value you'll get. Additionally, points transfer at a weak 250:200 transfer ratio.

You can also transfer Citi ThankYou Rewards to JetBlue, though the transfer ratio isn't great — either 1:0.8 or 1:0.5, depending on which Citi card you have.

Do you need a passport to go to Puerto Rico?

Nope! Puerto Rico is an unincorporated U.S. territory, so you don't need a passport or a visa to visit if you're a U.S. citizen. Just bring your state ID and you'll be good to go.

Getting around

Ride-hailing Uber is the only ride-hailing app that made its way to Puerto Rico and survived the pandemic. The mobile app is equally as effective as it is on the mainland and is very popular with locals for its competitive rates (compared to local taxis), efficiency and reliability.

Taxis Within San Juan, taxis are frequent, reliable and comfortable; look for white cabs labeled Taxi Turistico. Designated taxi stands are located at key tourist points in San Juan (including cruise ship piers, major hotels, Plaza de Armas and Plaza Colon). Taxis operate a fixed-rate system according to specified zones, but they can be pricey. Once you leave the metro area, it becomes increasingly expensive to travel between towns.

If you plan to stay in neighborhoods like Old San Juan, you probably won't need a car, Uber or taxi since the area is pretty walkable.

If you're a public transportation geek like me, make sure the Tren Urbano is on your radar. It's an 11-mile rapid transit system that serves San Juan, Guaynabo and Bayamon. The trip between Bayamon and San Juan is just 30 minutes, and the one-line train system has 16 stops; it passes through the University of Puerto Rico as well as the Santa Rosa shopping mall. It's very affordable, too: A regular fare is just $1.50 and if you're between the ages of 60 and 74, just 75 cents. Better yet, if you're 6 years of age or younger, or 75 or older, it's free.

Renting a car in Puerto Rico is pretty straightforward with all the major rental companies to consider, including Avis, Enterprise and Hertz, each of which is located at the airport.

The best times to visit Puerto Rico

The majority of hurricanes in Puerto Rico typically occur between August and October, while hurricane season runs from June 1 to Nov. 30, according to the U.S. National Weather Service . Notably, Hurricane Maria made landfall on Sept. 20, 2017.

Many people I spoke with on the island said, "Summertime is all the time" in Puerto Rico, with temperatures hovering in the 80s daily. If you're trying to avoid the infamous daily Caribbean rains, you'll want to plan to visit between January and March, as precipitation is low .

travel to puerto rico visa

If you want to avoid the hordes of people traveling during spring break but still want to visit before hurricane season kicks in, the spring is the best time to score flight and hotel deals. As an added bonus, you'll have the beach all to yourself.

Bottom line

Puerto Rico has come a long way since Hurricane Maria in 2017 and Fiona in 2022. Let it be known that the island is open for travelers — and eager for the business. From beach resorts to landmarks, excellent food and great hospitality, there's something for everyone who makes the short flight down to visit.

Related reading:

  • The best hotels in Puerto Rico
  • 8 reasons to visit Puerto Rico in 2023
  • Best points hotels in the Caribbean
  • Start booking your summer trips now — here's why
  • The 26 best Marriott hotels in the world

HandyVisas logo

  • Handyvisas.com >
  • Visa Policy by Nationality >

Puerto Rico Visa Policy

Check the visa policy of Puerto Rico to discover if you need a travel authorization for this archipelago in the Caribbean.

Visa policy for Puerto Rico

The Puerto Rico visa policy determines who may enter the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico without a visa and which foreign citizens need a visa to travel to this archipelago in the northeast Caribbean Sea.

As Puerto Rico is an unincorporated territory of the United States, it shares the US visa policy and imposes the same immigration rules and regulations on foreign citizens. As Puerto Ricans have been US citizens since 1917, they are granted freedom of movement between the island and mainland USA.

At present, there are currently 40 nationalities who do not need a visa for Puerto Rico , including citizens of Canada who may enter the archipelago simply by presenting a valid Canadian passport at border checkpoints.

Under the terms of the US visa waiver program, all other visa-exempt nationalities are required to have an approved US ESTA (Electronic System for Travel Authorization) visa waiver to travel to Puerto Rico. This electronic travel authorization is available through a simple online application .

An approved ESTA for Puerto Rico allows a stay of 90 days with each entry for tourism, transit, or business purposes , and is valid for a total of 2 years from issue, meaning there is no need to re-apply for every trip to US territories.

To visit Puerto Rico for other purposes or longer periods of stay, visa waiver citizens are required to apply for a Puerto Rican embassy visa from a US diplomatic government office.

Additionally, over 190 nationalities need to apply for a visa from an embassy no matter the intended duration of stay or travel purpose.

At present, there is a Puerto Rican visa ban in place for roughly 5 nationalities worldwide.

Discover further information about the different entry types for Puerto Rico below.

Tourist Visa Policy for Puerto Rico

The Puerto Rico immigration policy for tourism currently states that visitors from over 230 countries worldwide need a Puerto Rican tourist visa or travel authorization to enjoy a vacation in the territory regardless of the period of intended stay.

If a foreign national is a passport holder of a country included in the US visa waiver program, then they are required to have an approved ESTA for Puerto Rico to visit for tourism .

To obtain this electronic tourist visa waiver, eligible citizens need to fill in an online form with personal and passport information and basic travel details , which can be completed in a matter of minutes. It is also necessary to answer a few questions related to health and security matters before a Puerto Rican ESTA for tourism can be approved.

Foreign nationalities who are not eligible to submit a tourist ESTA application are required to apply for a visa for Puerto Rico for tourism from the nearest US consulate or embassy.

This process should be initiated well in advance of the intended travel dates, as it may take several weeks for a tourist embassy visa to be processed and approved.

Further information about these different types of visa for Puerto Rico can be found below.

ESTA for Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico immigration requirements according to US visa law state that citizens of approximately 40 countries worldwide are required to have an approved ESTA to visit the country for short stays.

The ESTA was introduced in 2009 for all nationalities included in the US visa waiver program and it is a travel authorization system that allows those who register multiple entries to Puerto Rico, mainland USA, and all incorporated territories of the United States including the District of Columbia and the US Virgin Islands during its validity.

Once approved, an ESTA for Puerto Rico allows a stay of 90 days within every 180-day period with each entry to US territory, and it is valid for a total of 2 years from the date of issue.

In order to register for a US visa waiver for Puerto Rico, applicants need only complete an electronic form with some personal data, passport information, and basic travel plans. After answering a few health and security questions, uploading supporting documents, and paying a small processing fee, they can then submit their application online.

A Puerto Rico ESTA is usually processed within a few business days and is electronically linked to the traveler’s passport once approved, removing the need to present additional documents upon arrival at US border control.

Check the nationalities eligible for an ESTA for Puerto Rico in the list below.

Embassy or Consular Visa Required

Travel visa restrictions for Puerto Rico identify approximately 190 nationalities who need a visa from an embassy or consulate to visit the territory, no matter the intended duration of stay or the purpose of travel.

This is a mandatory requirement for these foreign citizens regardless of whether they require a tourist visa, business visa, student visa, work visa, transit visa, resident visa, or other visa option.

To obtain an embassy visa for Puerto Rico, it is first necessary to make an appointment at the nearest US government diplomatic office and complete a consular visa application form to bring along to the in-person interview alongside varying supporting documents depending on the visa type required.

At the embassy appointment, it will be necessary for the applicant to supply a consular official with these documents as well as to pay a mandatory visa fee before the request can be processed .

As it may take several weeks for a consular visa to be approved, the traveler is advised to initiate the application protocol well in advance of the intended arrival date in Puerto Rico.

Applicants should note that the stay permitted and total validity of a visa for Puerto Rico from an embassy will vary depending on the selected purpose of their visit.

Find a full list of countries that need an embassy visa for Puerto Rico below.

Embassy or Consular Visa Required: Country list

  • Afghanistan
  • Aland Islands
  • American Samoa
  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • British Indian Ocean Territory
  • British Virgin Islands
  • Burkina Faso
  • Cayman Islands
  • Central African Republic
  • Christmas Island
  • Cocos Islands
  • Cook Islands
  • Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Dominican Republic
  • El Salvador
  • Equatorial Guinea
  • Falkland Islands
  • Faroe Islands
  • French Guiana
  • French Polynesia
  • Guinea Bissau
  • Isle of Man
  • Ivory Coast
  • New Caledonia
  • Norfolk Island
  • North Korea
  • Northern Mariana Islands
  • Palestinian Territory
  • Papua New Guinea
  • Philippines
  • Pitcairn Islands
  • Republic of Cyprus
  • Russian Federation
  • Saint Barthelemy
  • Saint Helena
  • Saint Kitts and Nevis
  • Saint Lucia
  • Saint Martin
  • Saint Pierre and Miquelon
  • Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Sao Tome and Principe
  • Saudi Arabia
  • Sierra Leone
  • Sint Maarten
  • Solomon Islands
  • South Africa
  • South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands
  • South Sudan
  • Svalbard and Jan Mayen
  • Timor Leste
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • Turkmenistan
  • Turks and Caicos Islands
  • United Arab Emirates
  • Vatican City
  • Wallis and Futuna

Visa Not Required

At present, the visa laws of Puerto Rico and the US identify up to 10 countries and territories whose citizens are not required to have either a visa or travel authorization in order to visit, the majority of which are neighboring jurisdictions.

This includes nationals of Canada , who are also able to obtain authorization to work in Puerto Rico and the US through a simplified procedure under the North American Free Trade Agreement.

British Overseas Territories citizens of Bermuda also do not need a visa for Puerto Rico for stays up to 180 days under most circumstances.

Citizens of other neighboring jurisdiction s, such as the Bahamas, and British Overseas Territories citizens of the British Virgin Islands, the Cayman Islands, and the Turks and Caicos Islands, are also permitted visa-free entry to Puerto Rico under certain conditions .

The majority of these citizens are simply required to present a valid passport at border checkpoints to gain entry to Puerto Rico, although in some circumstances additional supporting documents such as a police certificate indicating no criminal record must also be presented.

Discover the full list of visa-exempt nationalities of Puerto Rico below.

Visa Not Required: Country list

  • Federated States of Micronesia
  • Marshall Islands
  • United States
  • United States Virgin Islands

Visa requirements checker

Related news.

keeping travel documents safe

In today’s world, traveling has become an integral part of our lives. Be it for leisure or work, many of us find ourselves regularly on the move across borders. However, one integral aspect that you may overlook is the safety of your travel documents. Losing these critical papers can turn a dream holiday into a

Strangest Visa Questions from Around The World

Venturing abroad is an exciting experience, filled with new cultures to explore, foods to taste, and vistas to see. However, before immersing oneself in these novel experiences, one must navigate the labyrinthine process of obtaining a visa. While the general rule of thumb dictates that visa requirements ask you for a sober, straightforward exchange of

Hardest Visas to Get

Traveling the world can be an enriching experience, opening doors to new cultures, customs, and unforgettable memories. However, not all countries are as welcoming to tourists, and obtaining a visa can be a daunting task. In this article, we’ll explore the hardest countries to get a visa for, and the reasons behind their strict visa

world's most powerful passports

A passport is the key to traveling abroad. However, some passports are considered to be “stronger” than others. The world’s most powerful passports are those that offer the greatest travel freedom. The strongest passports are those that allow the holder to enter the most countries easily, without extra entry requirements, such as visas. There are

Disclaimer Handyvisas.com is not owned by, or affiliated with any government agency. We are a private, online agency that provides assistance in submitting applications for tourist visits to different countries around the world. Applications can also be made directly through government websites.

Do You Need a Passport to Visit Puerto Rico?

A simple question with a simple answer: do you need a passport to visit Puerto Rico?

No, you don't need a passport if you are a U.S. citizen.

Puerto Rico is a U.S. territory, and U.S. citizens do not need a passport to go to Puerto Rico (or any other US territory.) In fact, traveling to a U.S. territory from the mainland United States is the same as driving from Illinois to Iowa, or taking a flight from New York to Los Angeles. You're still within the United States' legal jurisdiction, so you can travel with other forms of legal ID, such as a driving license, just like anywhere else in the country. 

And here's a fun fact for students: Puerto Rico's legal drinking age is 18, so not only do you not need a passport to visit this beautiful island but if you're under 21, you can grab a cold beer on a warm beach when you get there. Perfect for spring break! 

The only thing is to take note of your flight routings.

If you don't have a passport, you'll want to make sure that your flight to Puerto Rico doesn't pass through any international countries (Mexico, the Caribbean , etc), because you'll need a passport to transit through them. Because of this, you'll only want to buy direct flights. 

Likewise, on your return trip home, make sure you fly directly to the United States or you will be in trouble when you attempt to transit through a country without a passport. 

Who Needs a Passport

Quite simply: everyone else! If you need to apply for a U.S. visa before visiting the United States, you'll need to do exactly the same before your trip to Puerto Rico. If you normally can apply for an ESTA in advance, you'll want to do that in advance of your departure date. As always, make sure that you have at least six months validity in your passport or you won't be allowed into the country. 

In some instances, you'll be expected to show proof of onward travel (an airline ticket proving you'll be leaving the country), so be sure to book this before you arrive. I either print out this ticket and carry it in my purse or save a screenshot of it to my phone so that I can easily show immigration officials my proof. Unfortunately, most immigration officers don't accept overland travel as proof that you'll be leaving, so make sure you do have a flight out of the country to show as you arrive. 

Other U.S. Territories

You may be surprised to discover that there are quite a few U.S. territories spread out across the world, and you won't require a passport to visit any of them. If you're therefore dreaming of a luxury adventure to a paradise island, but don't yet have a passport, checking out the U.S. Virgin Islands, American Samoa , and, of course, Puerto Rico is a great way to treat yourself to an island getaway.

The U.S. commonwealths/territories are as follows: American Samoa, Baker Island, Howland Island, Guam, Jarvis Island, Johnston Atoll, Kingman Reef, Midway Islands, Navassa Island, Northern Mariana Islands, Palmyra Atoll, Puerto Rico, the  U.S. Virgin Islands (St. Croix, St. John and St. Thomas), and Wake Island. 

How to Apply for Your First U.S. Passport

If you found your way to this article, you probably don't have a U.S. passport, but I'd highly recommend applying for one, even if you don't need it for your holiday to Puerto Rico.

Having a passport opens up the world to you, and travel is something I firmly believe everyone should do. It challenges your perceptions, it gets you out of your comfort zone, it introduces you to new ideas, it teaches you life skills, and it shows you how much the rest of the world has to offer. Travel gave me confidence, a greater sense of empathy, and an enormous improvement in my mental health. Yes, I credit travel with eliminating my anxiety disorder from my life!

Fortunately, it's very easy to apply for a U.S. passport . 

This article has been edited and updated by Lauren Juliff . 

5 Tropical Islands Americans Can Visit Without a Passport

Visiting the Caribbean Without a Passport

Do You Need a Passport to Go to the U.S. Virgin Islands?

The 9 Most Popular Places for Destination Weddings

What Documents Do I Need for Mexico Travel?

How to Plan a Caribbean Vacation

How to Travel to Cuba If You Are an American

How To Get a U.S. Passport or Passport Card

Top 9 Mexico Travel Myths Debunked

Where to Go on a Family Vacation in 2019

What Travel Documents Are Needed for Your Caribbean Vacation?

How to Get a Passport in the U.S.

What You Need to Know About Visiting Canada From the U.S.

Marriage Laws for Caribbean Destination Weddings

How to Get a COVID-19 Test on a Trip

Best Honeymoon Destinations in Puerto Rico

travel to puerto rico visa

An official website of the United States government

Here's how you know

Official websites use .gov A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS A lock ( Lock Locked padlock ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

Language Icon

Watch Live at 11:30 a.m. ET: Results of Nationwide Law Enforcement Effort Press Conference

View the latest ICE guidance on COVID-19

ICE Check-in for Noncitizens

Get information about how to check in with your local ICE Office here .

Reportándose con ICE: Obtenga información sobre cómo reportarse a su oficina local de ICE aquí .

View in other languages

If you are aware of student visa fraud or nonimmigrant students working unlawfully in the U.S., report it here: Email or Call 1-866-DHS-2-ICE

Home

Call 1-866-DHS-2-ICE to report suspicious activity Report Crime

SEVP made every effort to provide complete answers to these common questions. However, each person’s individual circumstances differ. So while these questions and answers serve as a general guide, they may not provide all the information you need to determine whether it is appropriate to travel or whether U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) will re-admit you to the United States. You can contact your designated school official, officials at your embassy or consulate or your legal counsel for further assistance.

Please remember that the CBP officer at the port of entry decides whether to admit non-immigrants into the United States. The facts and circumstances presented at the time you apply to enter are the basis of this decision. SEVP cannot guarantee that CBP will admit or re-admit you into the United States.

Travel Re-entry: F Visa

Re-entry for f-1 non-immigrants travelling outside the united states for five months or fewer.

This section of the FAQ applies to continuing F-1 students who travel outside the United States for five months or less.

Students should consult their Designated School Official (DSO) prior to travelling. Your DSO generally works in the International Student Office. You must have a current SEVIS Form I-20 endorsed for travel and your DSO needs to be able to verify that your SEVIS record is accurate and up-to-date.

What are the basic requirements for an F-1 to re-enter the United States after travelling abroad on pleasure or personal business?

  • A Form I-20, endorsed for travel and signed by your DSO
  • You have been out of the United States for less than five months
  • A current passport valid for at least six months after the date of your reentry or, if you are from one of the countries listed below, a passport that is current through the date of entry
  • A valid, current visa or you travelled to contiguous country or adjacent island for less than thirty days
  • Financial information showing proof of necessary funds to cover tuition and living expenses

If you are from a visa exempt country, you do not need a visa to reenter the United States from the western hemisphere, but make sure that you present your I-20 to be admitted as an F-1 student and not a visitor.

What if I have an expired passport or one that will expire in less than six months?

You must renew your passport before re-entering the United States. In most cases, to enter the United States, you must have a passport that is valid for at least six months after the date you enter or re-enter.

However, the countries listed below have an agreement with the United States that allows you to enter on a current passport up to the actual date of expiration.

Try to keep your passport current at all times. You need to determine your country’s requirements and timelines for renewing passports. Many countries will allow you to renew your passport while in the United States. The other alternative is to renew your passport when you return home for a visit.

In some cases, you may want to delay leaving the United States until you have renewed your passport. You will not be able to re-enter the United States without a valid passport. If your expired passport has a valid visa, you can still use that visa if you kept the old passport. Present the old passport, along with the new passport when you reenter the country. The countries that have an agreement with the United States allowing entry with a passport until the date of expiration are as follows:

  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Bosnia-Herzegovina
  • Cote D’Ivoire
  • Czech Republic
  • Dominican Republic
  • El Salvador
  • Hong Kong (certificates of identity and passports)
  • Liechtenstein
  • Netherlands
  • New Zealand
  • Philippines
  • St. Kitts and Nevis
  • St. Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Slovak Republic
  • South Africa
  • Switzerland
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • United Arab Emirates
  • United Kingdom

What if my F-1 student visa has expired?

You can stay in the United States on an expired F-1 visa as long as you maintain your student status. However, if you are returning home or traveling to a country where automatic revalidation does not apply, you must have a valid visa to return to the United States.

Ensure that you have all the documentation you need for your visa application and allow sufficient time for processing a new visa. The documentation you may need for a new visa includes, but is not limited to the following:

  • A Form I-20, endorsed for travel and signed by your DSO (see your DSO before you travel)
  • Original evidence showing proof of necessary funds to cover tuition and living expenses
  • Evidence showing your intention to return to your home country upon program completion, including evidence of compelling social and economic ties to your home country
  • If you have applied for or had optional practical training (OPT) approved, bring a copy of your Form I-20 endorsed for OPT and your Employment Authorization Document (EAD), if you have one

The Department of State recommends that you apply for a visa in your home country. For more information about visa applications visit the Department of State (DoS) website at http://travel.state.gov/ .

You can apply in a third country for a visa, but you will not be able to return to the United States until DoS issues your visa. In some cases, this could take several weeks if DoS requires a background check. If DoS denies your visa, you will not be able to return to the United States. Be sure to check the DoS website for specific information pertaining to each embassy or consulate.

If you have an expired visa and a terminated record, we strongly advise that you do not travel outside the United States until your SEVIS record shows that you are in active status. If you do travel, you may not be able to renew your visa or return to the United States.

As a continuing student, will I need to pay the I-901 SEVIS fee if I travel outside the United States?

No. See the I-901 FAQ for detailed information on the I-901 SEVIS fee.

I wish to travel to Canada, Mexico, or one of the islands adjacent to the United States. Can I return if my visa is expired?

Yes, in most cases. You can usually revalidate an expired visa automatically when returning from a visit of less than thirty days to Canada, Mexico, or one of the islands adjacent to the United States provided that you have a valid Form I-20 and a valid unexpired Form I-94. This process is known as automatic visa revalidation.

Which islands are defined as “adjacent islands”?

The adjacent islands are:

  • Saint Pierre
  • The Dominican Republic
  • The Bahamas
  • The Windward and Leeward Islands
  • Other British, French, and Netherlands territory or possessions in or bordering on the Caribbean Sea

(INA, Section 101(b)(5))

Can I travel to Cuba and return to the United States?

Yes, provided that you have a valid visa to return and are otherwise admissible. Please note that Cuba may require you to apply for a visa in order to enter that country.

Do I need a valid visa to visit Puerto Rico, or the U.S. Virgin Islands, or the Northern Mariana Islands?

No, unless your travel plans include entry to any other country en route to these U.S. territories. You will need a valid Form I-20 and a valid unexpired Form I-94. Be sure that you do not have a terminated SEVIS record indicating that you are out of status.

How do I know if I have a terminated record in SEVIS?

Your DSO can tell you your SEVIS record status and give you appropriate travel related advice.

I want to travel outside the United States, but my SEVIS record is in terminated status. Can I return if I travel?

If you need to travel on a terminated record, you must first visit your DSO. If your school has requested a correction request or data fix, the DSO will put your correction request or help desk ticket number on your Form I-20 and report your pending travel to SEVP.

There is no guarantee that Customs and Border Protection (CBP) will readmit you to the United States if you travel on a terminated record. In most cases, CBP inspectors will allow you to reenter the United States if you are otherwise admissible and your DSO has properly annotated your Form I-20. It is likely, however, that the CBP officer at the port of entry will send you to secondary inspection while they determine whether you are eligible to return to the United States.

If you have an expired visa and a terminated record, SEVP advises you not to travel outside the United States until your SEVIS record shows that you are in Active status. If you do travel, you may not be able to renew your visa or return to the United States.

Can I travel outside the United States if I have a Form I-485 adjustment of status application pending?

No, not without advance permission. If you depart the United States with a pending Form I-485, you have abandoned your application unless you receive permission in advance from USCIS to return to the United States. We call this Advance Parole . Additionally, CBP may also consider you ineligible to return to the United States as an F-1 student because your application to change status to that of a permanent resident is evidence of intent to immigrate, which is inconsistent with nonimmigrant student status.

Can I re-establish F-1 student status by obtaining a new initial Form I-20 and reentering the United States?

Yes. However, you will be considered an initial student for SEVIS purposes. You will have to pay the I-901 SEVIS fee again and you will lose any time that you have accrued toward qualification for training (OPT) or employment .

You must have the new Form I-20 showing that you are entering on a new SEVIS ID number.

You should be aware that the CBP inspecting officer will determine whether or not to admit you to the United States with the new Form I-20. If you did not comply with the terms of your status during a prior stay in the United States, the CBP officer may decide that you are not eligible to reenter.

Can I reenter during the 60-day period after finishing my program or OPT?

No. The 60-day “grace” period is only to prepare to leave the country.

Can I reenter if my request for OPT is pending?

Yes, but traveling during this time should be undertaken with caution. USCIS may send you a request for evidence while you are away, however, so you would want to make sure you have provided a correct U.S. address both to your DSO and on the application and would be able to send in requested documents. Also, if USCIS approves your OPT application, you will be expected to have your EAD in hand to re-enter the United States. Like a request for further information, USCIS can only send the EAD to your U.S. address.

Can I reenter if I left while on OPT?

If USCIS has approved your OPT you will be expected to have your EAD in hand to re-enter the United States, in addition to your Form I-20, valid passport and visa, and a letter of employment if you have one. If you exceed the limits on unemployment while outside the United States, you will not be eligible to re-enter the United States in F-1 status.

Are there any other requirements for travel outside the United States?

The questions above outline the general requirements for reentry for F-1 students. However, because individual circumstances vary, consult your DSO, embassy, or legal advisor before traveling. Planning for your trip early ensures that you have enough time to get all of your travel documents in order.

If you are not returning to your home country, you should check the requirements of the country you are visiting. Some countries require a visa. You may also need a transit visa for countries where you are making a connecting flight. Be sure to check before you travel. Most countries have immigration websites that provide visa information. If you have additional questions, please contact SEVP at [email protected] or call us at 703-603-3400.

Renewing Your F-1 Student Visa

Can i stay in the united states if my student visa has expired.

Yes, as long as you are maintaining your status, you may legally remain in the United States with an expired F-1 or M-1 visa.

Can I renew my student visa while in the United States?

No. For more information about visa applications, visit the Department of State (DoS) website .

Can I renew my visa while outside the United States in a country other than my home country?

Yes, but the Department of State recommends that you apply for a visa in your home country. For more information about visa applications, visit the DoS website.

Before you travel to a country other than yours to renew your visa, contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in that country.

If you exit the United States and apply for a visa, you cannot return to the United States until DoS issues you a new visa. This could require a lengthy stay. If DoS denies your visa application, you will not be able to return to the United States as a student.

Can I go to Canada or Mexico and apply for a new visa?

In some cases, you can. Contact the individual U.S. Embassy or Consulate in Canada or Mexico. However, you cannot return to the United States until DoS issues you a new visa. If DoS denies your visa application, you will not be able to return to the United States as a student. For more information about visa applications, visit the DoS website . You can also visit travel.state.gov , for more information on how to apply for a U.S. visa in Canada and Mexico.

Applying for a new visa is not the same as automatic visa revalidation. You cannot apply for a new visa and take advantage of automatic visa revalidation at the same time.

What is automatic visa revalidation?

Automatic visa revalidation allows most F-1 students to take a trip of less than 30 days to countries contiguous to the United States and reenter on an expired visa provided you have proper documentation and have not applied for a new visa during the visit. This process revalidates your visa (making it eligible for the single trip), but does not renew it.

Re-entry for F-2 Non-immigrants

What documents do the dependants (accompanying spouse and minor children) of a continuing f-1 or m-1 student need for readmission to the us....

What documents do the dependants (accompanying spouse and minor children) of a continuing F-1 or M-1 student need for readmission to the United States after travelling abroad?

If you are the dependent of a continuing F-1 or M-1 student, previously admitted into the United States in F-2 or M-2 status, traveled outside the United States, and are now seeking readmission, you need to have the following:

  • A current Form I-20 in your name that certifies your admissibility, (i.e. DSO signature on page 3 approving travel (Each dependent must have an individual Form I-20)
  • A valid visa unless you are from Canada or Bermuda
  • The primary (F-1 or M-1) must be in active student status - check with DSO before traveling to verify the primary's status
  • Form I-94 Arrival/Departure Record

Do dependents have to travel with the primary?

No. However, your primary must be maintaining status. Consult the DSO from your primary’s school to ensure your primary is in status before traveling. You will need a valid passport. See Re-entry for F-1 Non-immigrants Travelling Outside the United States for Five Months or Fewer above

If your primary stays in the United States and has a request for optional practical training (OPT) pending or approved, you will need additional documentation. Make a copy of the primary’s Form I-20 with the page 2 annotations and/or employment authorization document (EAD) and be prepared to present it at the port of entry.

If the primary travels, can dependents remain in the United States?

Dependents may stay in the United States without the primary if the primary:

  • Is in valid status
  • Will return after a temporary absence using the same SEVIS ID number

What if I do not have a valid passport?

See the related questions in the F-1 section or M-1 section.

What if my visa expired?

If you are not traveling with the primary visa holder and your primary has a request for optional practical training (OPT) approved or pending, you will need additional documentation. Make a copy of the primary’s Form I-20 or EAD and be prepared to present it at the U.S. Embassy or Consulate and the port of entry.

Are there any other requirements for dependents to travel outside the United States?

The questions above outline the general reentry requirements for dependents. If you have questions, consult with the DSO at your primary’s school or seek advice from your embassy or legal advisor. However, if you are not returning to your country of citizenship, you should check the requirements of the country you are visiting. Some countries will require a visa. You may also need a visa for countries where you are making a connecting flight. Be sure to check before you travel.

Travel Re-entry: M Visa

Re-entry for m-1 nonimmigrants traveling outside the united states for five months or fewer.

This section of the FAQ applies to continuing M-1 students who travel outside the United States for five months or less.

An M-1 student should consult the designated school official (DSO) before traveling. Your DSO generally works in the international student office. You must have a current Form I-20, “Certificate of Eligibility for Nonimmigrant Student Status,” endorsed for travel, and your DSO must be able to verify that your SEVIS record is accurate and up-to-date.

What are the basic requirements for an M-1 student to re-enter the United States after traveling abroad on pleasure or personal business?

  • A Form I-20, endorsed for travel and signed by your DSO (talk to your DSO before you travel)
  • A current passport valid for at least six months after the date of your re-entry or, if you are from one of the countries listed below, a passport that is current through the date of entry
  • A valid, current visa (unless you are a citizen of Canada or Bermuda or you traveled to a contiguous country for less than thirty days)
  • Be sure that you are able to return before your current program end date

Bringing your most recent Form I-94, “Arrival/Departure Record,” will facilitate your re-entry through a land port of entry.

If you are from a visa exempt country, you do not need a visa to re-enter the United States.

You must renew your passport before you re-enter the United States. Usually, to enter the United States, you must have a passport that is valid for at least six months after the date you enter or re-enter.

However, some countries have an agreement with the United States that allows you to enter on a current passport up to the actual date of expiration. Try to keep your passport current at all times. You need to know your country’s rules for renewing passports as well as the amount of time it will take.

Many countries will allow you to renew your passport while in the United States. The other alternative is to renew your passport when you return home for a visit.

You may want to delay leaving the United States until you have renewed your passport. You must have a valid passport to re-enter the United States. If your expired passport has a valid visa, you may still use it if you kept the old passport. Present both the old and new passports when you re-enter the United States.

The countries that have an agreement with the United States allowing entry with a passport until the date of expiration are the following:

  • Hong Kong (identity certificates and passports)

What if my M-1 student visa has expired?

You must maintain your student status to stay in the United States on an expired M-1 visa. If you are returning home or traveling to a country where automatic revalidation does not apply, you must have a valid visa to return to the United States.

The Department of State recommends that you apply for a visa in your home country. For more information about visa applications, visit the Department of State website .

You can apply in a third country for a visa, but you cannot return to the United States until the Department of State issues you a new visa. In some cases, this could take several weeks if a background check is necessary. If the Department of State denies your visa, you cannot return to the United States.

If you must re-apply for a visa, remember to bring the following items with you:

  • A Form I-20, endorsed for travel and signed by your DSO and your original Form I-20 (talk to your DSO before you travel)
  • Original evidence showing proof of necessary funds to pay for tuition and living expenses
  • Evidence showing your intent to return to your home country upon program completion with evidence of compelling social and economic ties to your home country
  • For more information, please visit the Department of State’s website.

As a continuing student, must I pay the I-901 SEVIS fee if I travel outside the United States?

I want to travel to canada or mexico. may i return to the united states if i have an expired visa.

Yes, in most cases CBP will allow re-entry to the United States. Usually, you can revalidate an expired visa automatically if you meet all of the following criteria:

  • Returning from a visit of fewer than thirty days to Canada or Mexico
  • Have a valid Form I-20
  • Have a valid unexpired Form I-94

This process is known as automatic visa revalidation.

However, if you meet any one of following criteria, 8 CFR 214.1(b)(3) mandates that you cannot automatically revalidate your visa:

  • You applied for a new visa, and DoS has not issued it.
  • You applied for a new visa, and DoS denied it.
  • You have a terminated SEVIS record indicating that you are out of status.
  • You have been out the United States for more than thirty days.
  • North Korea

I want to travel to one of the islands adjacent to the United States. May I return if my visa has expired?

Yes. Regulations state that an M student or dependent can be readmitted under automatic visa revalidation if they are:

  • Admissible;
  • Seeking readmission after an absence not exceeding thirty days solely in contiguous territory;
  • In possession of a valid passport; and
  • Presenting a Form I-94, “Arrival-Departure Record,” from the previous admission or stay and a Form I-20, ‘Certificate of Eligibility for Nonimmigrant Student Status,” signed for travel by the DSO.

The definition of adjacent islands is in INA, Section 101(b)(5) :

Do I need a valid visa to visit Puerto Rico or the U.S. Virgin Islands?

No. You will need a valid Form I-20 and a valid, unexpired Form I-94. Be sure that you do not have a terminated SEVIS record indicating that you are out of status.

Your DSO can tell you your SEVIS record status and give you appropriate travel-related advice.

I want to travel outside the United States, but my SEVIS record is in Terminated status. May I return if I travel?

If you need to travel on a terminated record, you must talk to your DSO. A DSO who has requested a data fix will put your Help Desk ticket number on your Form I-20 and report your pending travel to SEVP.

There is no guarantee that CBP will readmit you to the United States if you travel on a terminated record. In most cases, CBP will allow you to re-enter the United States if you are otherwise admissible and your DSO has properly annotated your Form I-20. It is likely, however, that CBP will send you to secondary inspection while they determine whether you are eligible to return to the United States.

May I travel outside the U.S. if I have a Form I-539, “Application to Extend/Change Nonimmigrant Status,” request for extension of stay...

May I travel outside the U.S. if I have a Form I-539, “Application to Extend/Change Nonimmigrant Status,” request for extension of stay application pending?

Yes, you may travel. However, you must return at least 15 days prior to your current program end date.

May I re-establish M-1 student status by obtaining a new initial Form I-20 and re-entering the United States?

Yes, you may re-establish M-1 student status. However, in SEVIS, you will be an Initial student. You must pay the I-901 SEVIS fee, and you will lose any time that you have built up towards qualification for practical training.

May I re-enter the United States during the 30-day grace period after finishing my program or after finishing practical training?

The 30-day grace period is intended to prepare for departure. CBP would make the decision whether or not to re-admit you during your grace period.

May I re-enter the United States if I have a pending request for practical training?

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services may consider your practical training request abandoned if you depart the United States while it is pending. The same is true if you needed to file for an M-1 extension in addition to the practical training application. CBP would make the decision whether or not to re-admit you in this situation, depending upon the timing and whether you are still in M-1 status.

May I re-enter the United States if I left while on OPT?

If USCIS and your DSO have approved your OPT but you depart before you get a job, your OPT ends and you cannot re-enter. If you have a job, however, you may travel and re-enter to resume work.

Previous questions give the general requirements for M-1 student re-entry. However, because individual circumstances vary, consult your DSO, embassy officials or legal advisor before traveling. Discussing your travel plans as soon as possible will allow time to ensure you have proper documentation for travel.

Some countries will require a visa. If you are not returning to your home country, check the requirements of the destination country. You may also need an in-transit visa for countries where you are making a connecting flight. Be sure to check before you travel. Most countries have immigration websites that provide visa information.

Renewing Your M-1 Student Visa

Yes, as long as you are student in good standing and have not violated your status, you may legally remain in the United States with an expired M-1 visa. As an M-1, you may stay for up to one year from the date you arrive in the United States, also according to your Form I-20 in SEVIS, but may apply for extensions.

No. For more information about visa applications visit the Department of State website at http://travel.state.gov/ . If you need to stay longer than one year to complete your program of study, you may work with your school official to apply for an extension with USCIS.

Yes, but the Department of State recommends that you apply for a visa in your home country. For more information about visa applications visit the Department of State website at http://travel.state.gov/ .

Before you travel to a country other than yours to renew your visa, contact the U.S. embassy or consulate.

If you exit the United States and apply for a visa, you cannot return to the United States until the visa is issued. This could require a lengthy stay. If the visa is denied, you will not be able to return to the United States as a student.

In some cases, you can. Contact the individual U.S. embassy or consulate in Canada or Mexico. However, you cannot return to the United States until your visa is issued. If the visa is denied, you will not be able to return to the United States as a student. For more information about visa applications visit the Department of State website at http://travel.state.gov/ .

Automatic visa revalidation allows most M-1 students to take a trip of less than thirty days to countries contiguous to the United States and reenter on an expired visa provided you have proper documentation and have not applied for a new visa during the visit. This process revalidates your visa (making it eligible for the single trip), but does not renew it.

Re-entry for M-2 Nonimmigrants

What documents do the spouse and minor children of a continuing m-1 student need to reenter to the united states after traveling abroad.

If you are the spouse or minor child of a continuing student you need to have the following:

  • A current SEVIS Form I-20 in your name (and one for each M-2 traveling)
  • A valid passport
  • A valid visa unless you are from a visa exempt country or, in some cases, you are traveling to a contiguous country
  • The primary (M-1) must be in active student status

Do M-2 nonimmigrants have to travel with the primary (M-1)?

No. However, you must be able to show that your primary (M-1) has been admitted and has maintained student status. We recommend that you consult with the DSO from your primary’s school to ensure the M-1 is in status before traveling. You will need the documents, which are listed in the “What documents do the spouse and minor children of a continuing M-1 student need to reenter to the United States after traveling abroad?” FAQ.

If your primary has practical training approved, you will need additional documentation. Make a copy of the primary’s Form I-20 with the page 2 annotations and/or EAD (employment authorization document) and be prepared to present it at the consulate and POE.

If the primary (M-1) travels, can the M-2 nonimmigrant family members remain in the United States?

M-2 nonimmigrant family members may stay in the United States without the primary if the primary:

See What if I have an expired passport or one that will expire in less than six months? in the M-1 section.

What if my M-2 visa expired?

See What if my M-1 student visa has expired? in the M-1 section.

I wish to travel to Canada, Mexico, or one of the islands (other than Cuba) adjacent to the United States. Can I return if my M-2 visa is expired?

See I want to travel to Canada or Mexico. May I return to the United States if I have an expired visa? in the M-1 section

Can I re-enter if my primary has practical training pending?

It is best to travel after practical training is approved.

Are there any other requirements for M-2 nonimmigrants to travel outside the United States?

The questions above outline the general reentry requirements for M-2 nonimmigrants. If you have questions, consult with the DSO at your primary’s school or seek advise from your embassy or legal advisor. However, if you are not returning to your country of citizenship, you should check the requirements of the country you are visiting. Some countries will require a visa. You may also need a visa for countries where you are making a connecting flight. Be sure to check before you travel.

Local Footer Navigation

  • Information Library
  • Contact ICE

travel to puerto rico visa

15 Essential Travel Hacks When Visiting Puerto Rico

R ich in history and awash in tropical landscapes, it's easy to see why Puerto Rico is such a popular travel destination. There's so much to experience on this compelling Caribbean island, from sugary white sand beaches to ancient Taino sites, fantastic festivals, and a smorgasbord of delicious eats. If you're planning a trip to Puerto Rico, it helps to come armed with a bit of knowledge so that you can make the most of your time on this incredible island.

While Puerto Rico has been a territory of the United States since the late 19th century, it's actually quite different from the mainland. From the tropical landscapes to the Spanish language and the traditional foods that blend Taino, African, and European influences, the island has its own unique identity and customs. There's so much to discover, but also a lot to be aware of. Don't worry, though, because we've compiled some essential travel hacks that can help you navigate the island with ease. Follow these tips on transportation, accommodation, packing, and more to set yourself up for an unforgettable holiday on "The Island of Enchantment."

Read more: Under-The-Radar Beaches You Need To Visit In The Caribbean

Check The Entry Requirements

People often ask whether a trip to Puerto Rico requires a passport . If you're American, the answer is no. Puerto Rico is a U.S. territory, so Americans don't need a passport to enter. However, you will need some form of government-issued photo ID to fly there. According to the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) , this could include a state-issued driver's license, permanent resident card, or a federally recognized Tribal Nation card. Keep in mind that as of May 2025, your identification must be REAL ID compliant to fly within the states and to its territories. If your ID has a star in the top right corner, it is already REAL ID compliant. If not, you will need to upgrade your identification.

All other nationalities will need a passport and possibly even a visa to enter Puerto Rico. The island has the same entry requirements as the mainland U.S.A., so it's important to check what documents you will need before you travel. If you need a visa to enter the United States, you will also need one to enter Puerto Rico. In addition, anyone planning to drive in Puerto Rico will need an official driver's license. If you're American, you can use your U.S. driver's license. People from other countries will need a valid driver's license and an International Driving Permit.

Forget About All-Inclusives

The Caribbean is known for having some incredible all-inclusive resorts . But, if you're looking for a package deal to Puerto Rico that includes your accommodation, meals, drinks, and activities all for one set price, you won't find it. According to Vanessa Ramos on Travel Lemming , "Puerto Rico doesn't have all-inclusive resorts mostly because of the island's safety and the high production costs of all-inclusive resorts." She explains that Puerto Rico is generally safe enough that tourists don't need to be cloistered in an all-inclusive resort. In addition, the costs of running an all-inclusive resort are higher than in other places in the Caribbean, so it doesn't make economic sense for hotels or guests.

That's not to say that Puerto Rico doesn't have some incredible resorts with great food and drinks on offer. It just means that your resort stay might cost more than expected in bar and restaurant bills. If budget is an issue, you may want to steer clear of the high-end resorts altogether and book into a parador (a small, family-run hotel or guesthouse) or an Airbnb. Some vacation rentals have kitchens, so you can save money by picking up food at markets or grocery stores and cooking your own meals.

Rent A Car To Explore The Island

With so much to see and do in Puerto Rico, you'll definitely want to get out and see some of the sights. The best way to do that is by renting a car. Take it from a local. Angel Acevedo López says on Quora , "Public transportation is scarce and mostly unreliable. Taxis are too expensive here and there are many places that are worth visiting outside the metropolitan area." If you're not afraid of a few potholes and traffic jams, there are plenty of places where you can rent a car in Puerto Rico. 

Many well-known car rental companies operate in Puerto Rico, including Hertz, Thrifty, and National. The requirements for renting a car are similar to those in the United States. You need to be 25 years or older and have a valid driver's license. In most cases, you'll also need a credit card. The rental price will typically include mandatory compulsory liability insurance that protects you from liability in the case of an accident. 

Download Citywiz To Find Restaurants, Hotels, And Attractions

Whether you're a first-time visitor to Puerto Rico or a veteran traveler to the island, it can be difficult to know what spots to hit up for the best food, shopping, and entertainment. Citywiz is a free travel app created specifically for Puerto Rico. You can use it to search for places to eat, hotels, fun events, or cool attractions to visit across the island. The interactive map will show you what spots are nearby, or you can search for specific places to get directions and read reviews from other travelers. You can also save your favorite spots for future reference.

Travel apps are a blessing when you're in a new place where things might not be so familiar. Besides Citywiz, some of the best travel apps to download for your Puerto Rico trip could include Google Translate or DeepL for fast and accurate translations. Google Maps and Waze both work in Puerto Rico and can help you with navigation for everything from walking tours to road trips. Uber is also available in Puerto Rico.

Time Your Excursions To Avoid Crowds

Puerto Rico's beaches, lakes, and mountains are popular with tourists and locals alike, so they can be very busy on weekends and holidays. To avoid crowds, consider visiting well-known spots on a weekday. If you can't avoid visiting on a weekend, try to leave early to beat the traffic and other day trippers. If you're heading out from San Juan, keep in mind that rush hour traffic typically takes place from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. and from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Another thing to consider if you don't like crowds is the time of year you travel. Puerto Rico's peak tourist season runs from December to April. During this time, visitors flock to the island to escape colder climes. July and August can also be busy at beaches and top attractions, as many locals and people on the mainland and further abroad have summer holidays during these months. You may find that if you visit in the shoulder seasons between May and June or September to November, prices are lower, and there are fewer crowds.

Brush Up On Your Spanish

Puerto Rico may be a U.S. territory, but the dominant language is Spanish. In 1902, Spanish and English were declared the official languages of Puerto Rico. However, Spanish remains the main language used in schools, business, and government. While many people can speak English, there is a large percentage that does not. The farther you get from San Juan and tourist areas, the more likely you are to run into people who don't speak any English at all.

Knowing even just a few words of Spanish can go a long way on the island, and it's a great way to  be a considerate tourist when visiting Puerto Rico . The locals will likely appreciate your efforts even if you mispronounce a few words. Language apps like Duolingo and Babbel can help you nail down some basics. And if you want to take your Spanish to the next level, there are several Spanish language courses you can take in San Juan.  ISLA offers Spanish immersion courses that run from Monday to Friday mornings from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. The school can also arrange homestays for a fully immersive experience.

Eat For Cheap At Street Food Stalls And Panaderías

One of the reasons Puerto Rico is considered one of the most budget-friendly beach destinations in the Caribbean is there are so many cheap eats on offer. If you want to save money on food, head to the spots where locals go. Street food stalls are a great way to sample the diverse flavors of Puerto Rico without breaking the bank. You can find food kiosks on busy city streets, in front of the entrances to popular attractions, and in food truck parks. Popular street eats include alcapurrias (deep-fried fritters filled with meat), lechón (slow-roasted pork), and tripletas (sandwiches filled with steak, ham, and roasted pork).

Panaderías provide additional options for delicious, wallet-friendly food. Pop in one of these bakeries to grab some freshly baked bread for your road trip or sample tasty treats like quesitos (pastries filled with cream cheese), mallorcas (sweet bread rolls), or brazo gitano (a rolled cake filled with guava). Many panaderías also sell breakfast and lunch dishes like scrambled eggs, sandwiches, and soups.

Take Note Of The Warning Flags On The Beach

Puerto Rico's beaches are some of the biggest draws for travelers. However, it's important to be aware that some of the beaches can be dangerous. For example, you might want to think twice before swimming on popular Condado Beach . The waves can be very strong, and rip currents have pulled more than a few people out to sea. Playa Jobos is another beach notorious for having strong currents and riptides.

No matter what beach you're on, it's important to check the flags to see what the conditions are like before you jump in the water. Yellow flags mean there are moderate currents and surf. Red flags indicate dangerous conditions like rip tides or rough surf, so you probably don't want to enter the water even if you're a good swimmer. Double red flags mean the water conditions are extremely dangerous and off-limits to the public. If you don't see any flags on the beach and you're not sure what the conditions are like, it's best to stay out of the water altogether.

Get Off The Beaten Path

While Puerto Rico's most popular attractions are definitely worth checking out, some lesser-known spots can offer experiences that are just as rewarding, if not more so. For example, if the thought of battling the crowds on Condado Beach or Isla Verde Beach doesn't appeal to you, consider making a trip to Playa Caracas. This under-the-radar Caribbean beach is located on the south coast of Vieques Island, and it features incredibly clear waters and a wide strip of white sand that is rarely crowded.

If you want to explore pristine nature without vying for space with the masses, head to Toro Negro State Forest. This natural reserve is home to the highest mountain in Puerto Rico and the second-largest forest. There is a camping site in the park where you can pitch a tent amid lush greenery, although you'll need a permit to camp in the park. The permit costs $30 for up to six people, and it can be reserved through Amigos del Bosque Toro Negro. There are also numerous hiking trails in the park, some of which lead to natural pools perfect for swimming.

Don't Underestimate The Size Of The Island

Puerto Rico may seem small on the map, but it's bigger than it looks. It spans roughly 5,500 square miles and includes the islands of Vieques and Culebra off the east coast and Mona Island off the west coast. Depending on where you want to go, driving to your final destination could take a few hours, especially if traffic is heavy. Plus, you'll probably want to factor in some extra time for stops along the way at roadside food stalls, interesting towns, or gorgeous viewpoints.

Locals suggest not trying to cram too many things into your itinerary. If you only have a few days on the island, you might want to consider staying in the capital and exploring the historic sites in Old San Juan and beaches close to town, like Escambrón Beach or Ocean Park Beach. You could take a day to hike in El Yunque National Forest or sample local dishes in Piñones. If you have more time, you can head further abroad to the popular surf town of Rincón or the spectacular beaches of Culebra.

Tread Lightly When Talking About Politics

Politics can be a touchy subject in Puerto Rico. The territorial status of the island is a topic that many people feel strongly about one way or the other, and debates over it can get quite intense. Some people believe Puerto Rico should be an independent country, while others feel it should be a U.S. state with all the rights that come with that. Others are fine with the island being a U.S. territory. It's a complicated topic and one that might make people uneasy. 

It's best not to bring up issues of statehood or independence. If it does come up in conversation, try to be respectful of other people's opinions and mindful of the fact that it might be a sensitive topic for some. In addition, keep in mind that while Puerto Ricans are American citizens, most identify as Puerto Ricans first. Most Puerto Ricans are incredibly proud of their culture, and visitors should be respectful of that. As one  Quora user commented, "We are so much more than a tiny island. We may be Americans (by law), but the vast majority of boricuas will proudly identify themselves as one. I love my birthplace. I may gripe about it often, as it is my right to do, but I will defend it, tooth and nail, if someone messes with it."

Keep Hurricane Season In Mind

Like many islands in the Caribbean, Puerto Rico can experience hurricanes and tropical storms. In 2017, two major hurricanes rocked the island just weeks apart from one another. Hurricane Irma and Hurricane Maria caused widespread damage, including knocking out power to most of the island and flooding entire towns. In 2022, Hurricane Fiona ripped across the island, wiping out over 90% of crops. According to WorldData , Puerto Rico experiences about five hurricanes a year. While massively destructive storms are not a common occurrence, it's something to consider when planning your trip.

The hurricane season in Puerto Rico runs from June to November, with August and September typically seeing the most tropical storms and hurricanes. Many people avoid traveling to the island during this time. If you decide to travel during hurricane season, be aware that flights might be canceled due to bad weather. Check with your airline, hotel, and travel insurance provider to see what their policies are on natural disasters. 

Pack Some Outfits That Aren't Beach Attire

Swimsuits and flip-flops are perfectly fine for the beach or resort, but you'll need something nicer to wear if you want to visit restaurants, museums, and some attractions in Puerto Rico. Most Puerto Ricans dress conservatively or even formally when they're going about their daily business or heading out for a night on the town, so you'll probably get a few strange looks if you hit the city streets in beach wear. And while casual dress is acceptable in many establishments, you might feel underdressed compared to the locals if you hit the nightclub or a nice restaurant in shorts and sandals.

When packing for Puerto Rico, consider bringing a few dressier items with you for nights out or more formal restaurants. Keep in mind that it's not acceptable to enter government offices wearing shorts, sandals, or clothing that shows bare shoulders. For hiking trips and excursions, close-toed shoes will come in handy. Depending on where you're visiting, you might also want to bring some long-sleeved shirts and pants, as the temperatures can be cooler in the mountains.

Tipping Is Expected

Just like the rest of the United States, Puerto Rico has a tipping culture. Tips are much appreciated and, in some cases, expected by most people who provide services. This includes bartenders, taxi drivers, hair stylists, and servers. It's common practice to tip 20% of your total bill or cost. For hotel porters, $1 per bag is the norm, and for housekeepers, most people tip between $2 and $5 a day. 

Most businesses in Puerto Rico accept credit cards, so you can usually add a tip when you pay by card. However, it's a good idea to bring some cash with you for tips as well. With a cash tip, you can ensure the extra money goes to the person who provided the service. In addition, many people prefer cash tips because it's money they can take home that day instead of having to wait for the credit card transaction to be finalized or for their employer to distribute the money.

Be Aware That Puerto Rico Uses Both Metric And Imperial Measurement Systems

Puerto Rico can be confusing when it comes to measuring distances, speed limits, and volumes because they use both the metric system and the imperial systems. The reason for this is history. During colonial times, the Spanish implemented the metric system, so distances were measured in kilometers. Then, when Puerto Rico became a U.S. territory, the imperial system came into use. It's important to know which one is used when you're traveling around the island.

The general rule of thumb when driving in Puerto Rico is that distance is measured in kilometers, and the speed limit is in miles per hour. Gas is sold in liters, not gallons, so you may not be getting the great deal you think you are. If the price seems too good to be true, that's probably why. Other liquids are measured in gallons. Weight is measured in pounds, height in feet, and temperature in degrees Fahrenheit. If you're not used to using both systems, you may want to download an app that converts the units.

Read the original article on Explore .

Fajardo, Puerto Rico

  • Skip to main content
  • Skip to "About this site"

Language selection

Search travel.gc.ca.

Help us to improve our website. Take our survey !

COVID-19: travel health notice for all travellers

Puerto Rico travel advice

Latest updates: Health - editorial update

Last updated: May 6, 2024 10:38 ET

On this page

Safety and security, entry and exit requirements, laws and culture, natural disasters and climate, puerto rico - take normal security precautions.

Take normal security precautions in Puerto Rico

Back to top

Petty crime, such as pickpocketing and purse snatching, are prevalent. Violent crime also occurs.

Ensure that your belongings, including your passports and other travel documents, are secure at all times.

Demonstrations

Demonstrations occur from time to time. Even peaceful demonstrations can turn violent at any time. They can also lead to disruptions to traffic and public transportation.

  • Avoid areas where demonstrations and large gatherings are taking place
  • Follow the instructions of local authorities
  • Monitor local media for information on ongoing demonstrations

Mass gatherings (large-scale events)

Women’s safety

Women travelling alone may be subject to some forms of harassment and verbal abuse.

Advice for women travellers

Power and telecommunications outages

Puerto Rico experiences frequent disruptions to power and telecommunications services after Hurricane Maria destroyed much of the power grid in 2017.

Water activities

Coastal waters can be dangerous. Riptides are common.

  • Consult residents and tour operators for information on possible hazards and safe swimming areas
  • Follow the instructions and warnings of local authorities

If you participate in water sports, such as diving:

  • choose a well-established and reputable company that has insurance
  • ensure that your travel insurance covers the recreational activities you choose

If in doubt concerning the safety of the facilities or equipment, don’t use them.

Water safety abroad

Adventure tourism

If you engage in adventure tourism:

  • never do so alone
  • always hire an experienced guide from a reputable company
  • buy travel insurance that includes helicopter rescue and medical evacuation
  • ensure that your physical condition is good enough to meet the challenges of your activity
  • ensure that you’re properly equipped
  • ensure that you’re well informed about weather and other conditions that may pose a hazard
  • inform a family member or friend of your itinerary obtain detailed information on each activity before setting out

Road safety

Road conditions and road safety vary greatly throughout the island.

Drivers may be aggressive, and few use their signals. There is heavy traffic in larger centres, particularly San Juan.

Roads in mountain areas can be narrow, winding, and poorly paved.

Public transportation

Bus and light rail services.

Bus and light rail (Tren Urbano) services are available in the metropolitan San Juan area.

Ferries travel to and from the islands of Culebra and Vieques, as well as the Dominican Republic.

Taxis are widely available. Fares are metered, except for major tourist destinations in San Juan, where they are fixed. Tourist taxis are white and have a “Taxi Turístico” label on the door.

We do not make assessments on the compliance of foreign domestic airlines with international safety standards.

Information about foreign domestic airlines

Every country or territory decides who can enter or exit through its borders. The Government of Canada can’t intervene on your behalf if you don’t meet your destination’s entry or exit requirements.

Puerto Rico is a territory of the United States. We have obtained the information on this page from the American authorities. It can, however, change at any time.

Confirm entry, exit and visa requirements prior to travelling:

  • Entry and exit requirements for the United States
  • U.S. Customs and Border Protection
  • U.S. Embassy and Consulates

Entry requirements vary depending on the type of passport you use for travel.

Before you travel, check with your transportation company about passport requirements. Its rules on passport validity may be more stringent than the country’s entry rules.

Regular Canadian passport

Your passport must be valid for the duration of your stay.

Passport for official travel

Different entry rules may apply.

Official travel

Passport with “X” gender identifier

While the Government of Canada issues passports with an “X” gender identifier, it cannot guarantee your entry or transit through other countries. You might face entry restrictions in countries that do not recognize the “X” gender identifier. Before you leave, check with the closest foreign representative for your destination.

Other travel documents

Different entry rules may apply when travelling with a temporary passport or an emergency travel document. Before you leave, check with the closest foreign representative for your destination.

Useful links

  • Foreign Representatives in Canada
  • Canadian passports

Other entry requirements

Customs officials may ask you to show them a return or onward ticket and proof of sufficient funds to cover the cost of your stay.

Children and travel

Learn more about travelling with children .

Yellow fever

Learn about potential entry requirements related to yellow fever (vaccines section).

Relevant Travel Health Notices

  • Global Measles Notice - 13 March, 2024
  • Zika virus: Advice for travellers - 31 August, 2023
  • COVID-19 and International Travel - 13 March, 2024
  • Dengue: Advice for travellers - 6 May, 2024

This section contains information on possible health risks and restrictions regularly found or ongoing in the destination. Follow this advice to lower your risk of becoming ill while travelling. Not all risks are listed below.

Consult a health care professional or visit a travel health clinic preferably 6 weeks before you travel to get personalized health advice and recommendations.

Routine vaccines

Be sure that your  routine vaccinations , as per your province or territory , are up-to-date before travelling, regardless of your destination.

Some of these vaccinations include measles-mumps-rubella (MMR), diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, varicella (chickenpox), influenza and others.

Pre-travel vaccines and medications

You may be at risk for preventable diseases while travelling in this destination. Talk to a travel health professional about which medications or vaccines may be right for you, based on your destination and itinerary. 

Yellow fever is a disease caused by a flavivirus from the bite of an infected mosquito.

Travellers get vaccinated either because it is required to enter a country or because it is recommended for their protection.

  • There is no risk of yellow fever in this country.

Country Entry Requirement*

  • Proof of vaccination is not required to enter this country.

Recommendation

  • Vaccination is not recommended.

* It is important to note that country entry requirements may not reflect your risk of yellow fever at your destination. It is recommended that you contact the nearest diplomatic or consular office of the destination(s) you will be visiting to verify any additional entry requirements.

About Yellow Fever

Yellow Fever Vaccination Centres in Canada

There is a risk of hepatitis A in this destination. It is a disease of the liver. People can get hepatitis A if they ingest contaminated food or water, eat foods prepared by an infectious person, or if they have close physical contact (such as oral-anal sex) with an infectious person, although casual contact among people does not spread the virus.

Practise  safe food and water precautions and wash your hands often. Vaccination is recommended for all travellers to areas where hepatitis A is present.

Measles is a highly contagious viral disease. It can spread quickly from person to person by direct contact and through droplets in the air.

Anyone who is not protected against measles is at risk of being infected with it when travelling internationally.

Regardless of where you are going, talk to a health care professional before travelling to make sure you are fully protected against measles.

  Hepatitis B is a risk in every destination. It is a viral liver disease that is easily transmitted from one person to another through exposure to blood and body fluids containing the hepatitis B virus.  Travellers who may be exposed to blood or other bodily fluids (e.g., through sexual contact, medical treatment, sharing needles, tattooing, acupuncture or occupational exposure) are at higher risk of getting hepatitis B.

Hepatitis B vaccination is recommended for all travellers. Prevent hepatitis B infection by practicing safe sex, only using new and sterile drug equipment, and only getting tattoos and piercings in settings that follow public health regulations and standards.

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious viral disease. It can spread from person to person by direct contact and through droplets in the air.

It is recommended that all eligible travellers complete a COVID-19 vaccine series along with any additional recommended doses in Canada before travelling. Evidence shows that vaccines are very effective at preventing severe illness, hospitalization and death from COVID-19. While vaccination provides better protection against serious illness, you may still be at risk of infection from the virus that causes COVID-19. Anyone who has not completed a vaccine series is at increased risk of being infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 and is at greater risk for severe disease when travelling internationally.

Before travelling, verify your destination’s COVID-19 vaccination entry/exit requirements. Regardless of where you are going, talk to a health care professional before travelling to make sure you are adequately protected against COVID-19.

 The best way to protect yourself from seasonal influenza (flu) is to get vaccinated every year. Get the flu shot at least 2 weeks before travelling.  

 The flu occurs worldwide. 

  •  In the Northern Hemisphere, the flu season usually runs from November to   April.
  •  In the Southern Hemisphere, the flu season usually runs between April and   October.
  •  In the tropics, there is flu activity year round. 

The flu vaccine available in one hemisphere may only offer partial protection against the flu in the other hemisphere.

The flu virus spreads from person to person when they cough or sneeze or by touching objects and surfaces that have been contaminated with the virus. Clean your hands often and wear a mask if you have a fever or respiratory symptoms.

In this destination, rabies  may be present in some wildlife species, including bats. Rabies is a deadly disease that spreads to humans primarily through bites or scratches from an infected animal. 

If you are bitten or scratched by an animal while travelling, immediately wash the wound with soap and clean water and see a health care professional. 

Before travel, discuss rabies vaccination with a health care professional. It may be recommended for travellers who will be working directly with wildlife. 

Safe food and water precautions

Many illnesses can be caused by eating food or drinking beverages contaminated by bacteria, parasites, toxins, or viruses, or by swimming or bathing in contaminated water.

  • Learn more about food and water precautions to take to avoid getting sick by visiting our eat and drink safely abroad page. Remember: Boil it, cook it, peel it, or leave it!
  • Avoid getting water into your eyes, mouth or nose when swimming or participating in activities in freshwater (streams, canals, lakes), particularly after flooding or heavy rain. Water may look clean but could still be polluted or contaminated.
  • Avoid inhaling or swallowing water while bathing, showering, or swimming in pools or hot tubs. 

Typhoid   is a bacterial infection spread by contaminated food or water. Risk is higher among children, travellers going to rural areas, travellers visiting friends and relatives or those travelling for a long period of time.

Travellers visiting regions with a risk of typhoid, especially those exposed to places with poor sanitation, should speak to a health care professional about vaccination.  

Insect bite prevention

Many diseases are spread by the bites of infected insects such as mosquitoes, ticks, fleas or flies. When travelling to areas where infected insects may be present:

  • Use insect repellent (bug spray) on exposed skin
  • Cover up with light-coloured, loose clothes made of tightly woven materials such as nylon or polyester
  • Minimize exposure to insects
  • Use mosquito netting when sleeping outdoors or in buildings that are not fully enclosed

To learn more about how you can reduce your risk of infection and disease caused by bites, both at home and abroad, visit our insect bite prevention page.

Find out what types of insects are present where you’re travelling, when they’re most active, and the symptoms of the diseases they spread.

There is a risk of chikungunya in this country.  The risk may vary between regions of a country.  Chikungunya is a virus spread through the bite of an infected mosquito. Chikungunya can cause a viral disease that typically causes fever and pain in the joints. In some cases, the joint pain can be severe and last for months or years.

Protect yourself from mosquito bites at all times. There is no vaccine available for chikungunya.

  • In this country,   dengue  is a risk to travellers. It is a viral disease spread to humans by mosquito bites.
  • Dengue can cause flu-like symptoms. In some cases, it can lead to severe dengue, which can be fatal.
  • The level of risk of dengue changes seasonally, and varies from year to year. The level of risk also varies between regions in a country and can depend on the elevation in the region.
  • Mosquitoes carrying dengue typically bite during the daytime, particularly around sunrise and sunset.
  • Protect yourself from mosquito bites . There is no vaccine or medication that protects against dengue.

Zika virus is a risk in this country. 

Zika virus is primarily spread through the bite of an infected mosquito. It can also be sexually transmitted. Zika virus can cause serious birth defects.

During your trip:

  • Prevent mosquito bites at all times.
  • Use condoms correctly or avoid sexual contact, particularly if you are pregnant.

If you are pregnant or planning a pregnancy, you should discuss the potential risks of travelling to this destination with your health care provider. You may choose to avoid or postpone travel. 

For more information, see Zika virus: Pregnant or planning a pregnancy.

Animal precautions

Some infections, such as rabies and influenza, can be shared between humans and animals. Certain types of activities may increase your chance of contact with animals, such as travelling in rural or forested areas, camping, hiking, and visiting wet markets (places where live animals are slaughtered and sold) or caves.

Travellers are cautioned to avoid contact with animals, including dogs, livestock (pigs, cows), monkeys, snakes, rodents, birds, and bats, and to avoid eating undercooked wild game.

Closely supervise children, as they are more likely to come in contact with animals.

Person-to-person infections

Stay home if you’re sick and practise proper cough and sneeze etiquette , which includes coughing or sneezing into a tissue or the bend of your arm, not your hand. Reduce your risk of colds, the flu and other illnesses by:

  •   washing your hands often
  • avoiding or limiting the amount of time spent in closed spaces, crowded places, or at large-scale events (concerts, sporting events, rallies)
  • avoiding close physical contact with people who may be showing symptoms of illness 

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) , HIV , and mpox are spread through blood and bodily fluids; use condoms, practise safe sex, and limit your number of sexual partners. Check with your local public health authority pre-travel to determine your eligibility for mpox vaccine.  

Medical services and facilities

Good health care is available but conditions may vary throughout the island.

Ensure you have sufficient medication for your stay and extra in case of emergency. It can be difficult to get prescriptions refilled.

Medical evacuation can be very expensive and you may need it in case of serious illness or injury.

Make sure you get travel insurance that includes coverage for medical evacuation and hospital stays.

Travel health and safety

Keep in Mind...

The decision to travel is the sole responsibility of the traveller. The traveller is also responsible for his or her own personal safety.

Be prepared. Do not expect medical services to be the same as in Canada. Pack a   travel health kit , especially if you will be travelling away from major city centres.

You must abide by local laws.

Learn about what you should do and how we can help if you are arrested or detained abroad .

Penalties for possession, use or trafficking of illegal drugs are severe. Convicted offenders can expect jail sentences and heavy fines.

Drugs, alcohol and travel

Dual citizenship

Dual citizenship is legally recognized in the United States.

If you are a Canadian citizen, but also a citizen of the United States, our ability to offer you consular services may be limited while you're there. You may also be subject to different  entry/exit requirements .

  • General information for travellers with dual citizenship
  • Dual Nationality  - U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs

International Child Abduction

The Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction is an international treaty. It can help parents with the return of children who have been removed to or retained in certain countries in violation of custody rights. The convention applies between Canada and the United States.

If your child was wrongfully taken to, or is being held in Puerto Rico, and if the applicable conditions are met, you may apply for the return of your child to the Puerto Rican court.

If you are in this situation:

  • act as quickly as you can
  • contact the Central Authority for your province or territory of residence for information on starting an application under The Hague Convention
  • consult a lawyer in Canada and in Puerto Rico to explore all the legal options for the return of your child
  • report the situation to the nearest Canadian government office abroad or to the Vulnerable Children’s Consular Unit at Global Affairs Canada by calling the Emergency Watch and Response Centre

If your child was removed from a country other than Canada, consult a lawyer to determine if The Hague Convention applies.

Be aware that Canadian consular officials cannot interfere in private legal matters or in another country’s judicial affairs.

  • List of Canadian Central Authorities for the Hague Convention
  • International Child Abduction: A Guidebook for Left-Behind Parents
  • Travelling with children
  • The Hague Convention - Hague Conference on Private International Law
  • Canadian embassies and consulates by destination
  • Emergency Watch and Response Centre

You can drive in Puerto Rico with a valid Canadian driver’s licence for up to 90 days. If you plan to stay longer, you must obtain a Puerto Rican licence.

The currency of Puerto Rico is the U.S. dollar (USD). Credit cards are widely accepted.

Hurricane season

Hurricanes usually occur from mid-May to the end of November. During this period, even small tropical storms can quickly develop into major hurricanes.

These severe storms can put you at risk and hamper the provision of essential services.

If you decide to travel to a coastal area during the hurricane season:

  • know that you expose yourself to serious safety risks
  • be prepared to change your travel plans on short notice, including cutting short or cancelling your trip
  • stay informed of the latest regional weather forecasts
  • carry emergency contact information for your airline or tour operator
  • follow the advice and instructions of local authorities
  • Tornadoes, cyclones, hurricanes, typhoons and monsoons
  • Large-scale emergencies abroad
  • Active storm tracking and hurricane watches and warnings  - United States’ National Hurricane Center

Puerto Rico Emergency Management Bureau  - United States Homeland Security

Local services

Dial 911 for emergency assistance.

Consular assistance

Florida, Puerto Rico, US Virgin Islands

For emergency consular assistance, call the Consulate General of Canada to the United States, in Miami, and follow the instructions. At any time, you may also contact the Emergency Watch and Response Centre in Ottawa.

The decision to travel is your choice and you are responsible for your personal safety abroad. We take the safety and security of Canadians abroad very seriously and provide credible and timely information in our Travel Advice to enable you to make well-informed decisions regarding your travel abroad.

The content on this page is provided for information only. While we make every effort to give you correct information, it is provided on an "as is" basis without warranty of any kind, expressed or implied. The Government of Canada does not assume responsibility and will not be liable for any damages in connection to the information provided.

If you need consular assistance while abroad, we will make every effort to help you. However, there may be constraints that will limit the ability of the Government of Canada to provide services.

Learn more about consular services .

Risk Levels

  take normal security precautions.

Take similar precautions to those you would take in Canada.

  Exercise a high degree of caution

There are certain safety and security concerns or the situation could change quickly. Be very cautious at all times, monitor local media and follow the instructions of local authorities.

IMPORTANT: The two levels below are official Government of Canada Travel Advisories and are issued when the safety and security of Canadians travelling or living in the country or region may be at risk.

  Avoid non-essential travel

Your safety and security could be at risk. You should think about your need to travel to this country, territory or region based on family or business requirements, knowledge of or familiarity with the region, and other factors. If you are already there, think about whether you really need to be there. If you do not need to be there, you should think about leaving.

  Avoid all travel

You should not travel to this country, territory or region. Your personal safety and security are at great risk. If you are already there, you should think about leaving if it is safe to do so.

  • Status of my visa
  • Choose a visa Angola Antigua and Barbuda Armenia Australia Azerbaijan Bahrain Benin Brazil Cambodia Canada Colombia Cuba Djibouti Dominican Republic Egypt Ethiopia Europe Georgia Guinea India Ivory Coast Kenya Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Madagascar Mexico Montserrat Myanmar Nepal New Zealand Oman Papua New Guinea Puerto Rico Russia Rwanda Saudi Arabia Singapore Sri Lanka Tanzania Thailand Turkey Uganda United Arab Emirates United States Vietnam Zambia Zimbabwe

Change language

Puerto Rico Visa

How to get a puerto rico visa (esta).

travel to puerto rico visa

Complete online application

Prepare your passport and fill in our simple online form in 5 minutes

travel to puerto rico visa

Receive your travel visa

We will send you your approved document within 24 hours - without you having to go anywhere!

travel to puerto rico visa

Start your journey

Show your passport and the visa we sent you when you arrive at your destination.

PUERTO RICO VISA REQUIREMENTS

Do you need more information? See our complete guide: How to get a visa for Puerto Rico

Our customers say

Google logo

FAQ ABOUT THE PUERTO RICO VISA

Do you need a visa to go to puerto rico, can i use visa invitation letters in puerto rico, do u.s. citizens need a visa for puerto rico, can i go to puerto rico with a u.s. visa, what are the puerto rico entry requirements, check your eligibility.

Yes, you are eligible for ESTA Puerto Rico!

VISA FOR PUERTO RICO: MORE INFORMATION

Puerto Rico is an associated but unincorporated free state of the United States of America. It has the same entry requirements to the country as any other associated state. The ESTA (Electronic System for Travel Authorization), is the online visa with which you can travel to Puerto Rico or any other state of the United States. This Puerto Rico visa allows multiple entries within 2 years, with a maximum stay of 90 days per entry. The Puerto Rico visa does not allow you to work or reside in Puerto Rico, or in any of the United States. The government authorities of Puerto Rico, reserve the right of admission to the country. If your presence causes a threat to the security or national interests, your entry will be denied.

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE VISA TO PUERTO RICO

Puerto Rico currency

travel to puerto rico visa

An official website of the United States government

Here’s how you know

Official websites use .gov A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS A lock ( Lock Locked padlock icon ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

Visit the USAGov homepage

Do you need a passport to travel to or from U.S. territories or Freely Associated States?

The travel documents you need as a U.S. citizen to travel to or from a U.S. territory or Freely Associated State depend on your destination.

U.S. citizens do not need a passport to travel between the U.S. and these territories:

  • American Samoa
  • Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands
  • Puerto Rico
  • U.S. Virgin Islands

U.S. citizens do need a passport to travel to these Freely Associated States:

  • The Federated States of Micronesia
  • The Republic of the Marshall Islands
  • The Republic of Palau

LAST UPDATED: January 12, 2024

Have a question?

Ask a real person any government-related question for free. They will get you the answer or let you know where to find it.

talk icon

Featured on

IN Flag

  • What is a visa?
  • Electronic Visa (eVisa)
  • Visa on Arrival
  • Appointment Required Visa
  • Invitation Letter
  • Arrival Card
  • Passport Renewal
  • Project Kosmos: Meet the man with the world's most challenging travel schedule
  • Australia Visa and ETA requirements for US citizens explained
  • Brazil eVisa for US citizens
  • India Tourist Visa for UK citizens
  • Possible B1/B2 Visa questions during the interview

Select Your Language

  • Nederlandse
  • 中文 (Zhōngwén), 汉语, 漢語

Select Your Currency

  • AED United Arab Emirates Dirham
  • AFN Afghan Afghani
  • ALL Albanian Lek
  • AMD Armenian Dram
  • ANG Netherlands Antillean Guilder
  • AOA Angolan Kwanza
  • ARS Argentine Peso
  • AUD Australian Dollar
  • AWG Aruban Florin
  • AZN Azerbaijani Manat
  • BAM Bosnia-Herzegovina Convertible Mark
  • BBD Barbadian Dollar
  • BDT Bangladeshi Taka
  • BGN Bulgarian Lev
  • BIF Burundian Franc
  • BMD Bermudan Dollar
  • BND Brunei Dollar
  • BOB Bolivian Boliviano
  • BRL Brazilian Real
  • BSD Bahamian Dollar
  • BWP Botswanan Pula
  • BZD Belize Dollar
  • CAD Canadian Dollar
  • CDF Congolese Franc
  • CHF Swiss Franc
  • CLP Chilean Peso
  • CNY Chinese Yuan
  • COP Colombian Peso
  • CRC Costa Rican Colón
  • CVE Cape Verdean Escudo
  • CZK Czech Republic Koruna
  • DJF Djiboutian Franc
  • DKK Danish Krone
  • DOP Dominican Peso
  • DZD Algerian Dinar
  • EGP Egyptian Pound
  • ETB Ethiopian Birr
  • FJD Fijian Dollar
  • FKP Falkland Islands Pound
  • GBP British Pound Sterling
  • GEL Georgian Lari
  • GIP Gibraltar Pound
  • GMD Gambian Dalasi
  • GNF Guinean Franc
  • GTQ Guatemalan Quetzal
  • GYD Guyanaese Dollar
  • HKD Hong Kong Dollar
  • HNL Honduran Lempira
  • HTG Haitian Gourde
  • HUF Hungarian Forint
  • IDR Indonesian Rupiah
  • ILS Israeli New Sheqel
  • INR Indian Rupee
  • ISK Icelandic Króna
  • JMD Jamaican Dollar
  • JPY Japanese Yen
  • KES Kenyan Shilling
  • KGS Kyrgystani Som
  • KHR Cambodian Riel
  • KMF Comorian Franc
  • KRW South Korean Won
  • KYD Cayman Islands Dollar
  • KZT Kazakhstani Tenge
  • LAK Laotian Kip
  • LBP Lebanese Pound
  • LKR Sri Lankan Rupee
  • LRD Liberian Dollar
  • LSL Lesotho Loti
  • MAD Moroccan Dirham
  • MDL Moldovan Leu
  • MGA Malagasy Ariary
  • MKD Macedonian Denar
  • MNT Mongolian Tugrik
  • MOP Macanese Pataca
  • MUR Mauritian Rupee
  • MVR Maldivian Rufiyaa
  • MWK Malawian Kwacha
  • MXN Mexican Peso
  • MYR Malaysian Ringgit
  • MZN Mozambican Metical
  • NAD Namibian Dollar
  • NGN Nigerian Naira
  • NIO Nicaraguan Córdoba
  • NOK Norwegian Krone
  • NPR Nepalese Rupee
  • NZD New Zealand Dollar
  • OMR Omani Rial
  • PAB Panamanian Balboa
  • PEN Peruvian Nuevo Sol
  • PGK Papua New Guinean Kina
  • PHP Philippine Peso
  • PKR Pakistani Rupee
  • PLN Polish Zloty
  • PYG Paraguayan Guarani
  • QAR Qatari Rial
  • RON Romanian Leu
  • RSD Serbian Dinar
  • RUB Russian Ruble
  • RWF Rwandan Franc
  • SAR Saudi Riyal
  • SBD Solomon Islands Dollar
  • SCR Seychellois Rupee
  • SEK Swedish Krona
  • SGD Singapore Dollar
  • SHP Saint Helena Pound
  • SLL Sierra Leonean Leone
  • SOS Somali Shilling
  • SRD Surinamese Dollar
  • SVC Salvadoran Colón
  • SZL Swazi Lilangeni
  • THB Thai Baht
  • TJS Tajikistani Somoni
  • TOP Tongan Pa anga
  • TRY Turkish Lira
  • TTD Trinidad and Tobago Dollar
  • TWD New Taiwan Dollar
  • TZS Tanzanian Shilling
  • UAH Ukrainian Hryvnia
  • UGX Ugandan Shilling
  • USD United States Dollar
  • UYU Uruguayan Peso
  • UZS Uzbekistan Som
  • VND Vietnamese Dong
  • VUV Vanuatu Vatu
  • WST Samoan Tala
  • XAF CFA Franc BEAC
  • XCD East Caribbean Dollar
  • XOF CFA Franc BCEAO
  • XPF CFP Franc
  • YER Yemeni Rial
  • ZAR South African Rand
  • ZMW Zambian Kwacha

We've updated our app!

Download it now

Apply Online for the Puerto Rico B1/B2 visa

1.2M  happy customers

24/7 support

travel to puerto rico visa

+46,000 reviews

10  years of experience

98%  visa approval rate

How to Apply: B1/B2 Visa

Complete our user-friendly online application in just 20 minutes, or feel free to take breaks and return at your convenience.

Move closer to an approved visa with our team of iVisa Experts, who not only review your answers but also provide you with the necessary tools to prepare.

Make use of our feedback and free templates to confidently submit accurate information, and experience a surprisingly stress-free process!

Once government-approved, your visa will be ready for collection, marking the start of your travels.

How to Apply: Embassy Registration

Complete our easy online application and pay with credit card or PayPal

Your embassy will assist you if an emergency (eg. Natural disasters, civil unrest, etc) occur

Why Register with the Embassy

Required information to apply.

Once You Have Registered With Your Embassy Or Consulate, You Will Need To Update Your Data If:

  • your contact details change,
  • your civil status changes,
  • you are going back to your home country.

Learn More: B1/B2 Visa

What you need to know.

The Puerto Rico B1/B2 Visa is a multiple-entry travel document that allows you to enter Puerto Rico and it is a combination of a tourist and business visa.

Citizens from countries that are part of the Visa Waiver Program don’t need to apply for the Puerto Rico B1/B2 Visa, but they will need to apply for an ESTA.

You can also apply with iVisa for an ESTA here .

First-time and renewal applicants must have a valid passport for at least 6 months from the intended arrival date to Puerto Rico to apply for the visa.

Your reason for traveling must be for business, tourism, or medical treatment.

Renewal applicants cannot have exceeded the 6 months of stay allowed on past trips to Puerto Rico.

Applicants that qualify for an Interview Waiver only need to drop off the required documents at the Drop-Off Location we will indicate.

In some cases, applicants do not need to go in person to leave their documents; that decision depends on The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS).

The DHS is the only one who can decide on the interview appointment date. Currently, some locations have an interview waitlist of more than 12 months.

After your interview appointment, it will take at least 4 weeks until your passport is ready with your new stamped visa.

At iVisa, we do all the paperwork for you and assign you an iVisa Expert who reviews your application to be 100% government compliant and avoid rejections.

iVisa is a legitimate company, accredited and recognized by the International Air Transport Association (IATA). For more information, see the FAQs below.

Last update, May 2023

Travel to Puerto Rico B1/B2 Visa! Apply with iVisa!

Puerto Rico is a tropical paradise , located in the Caribbean, east of the Dominican Republic, that welcomes tourists with unbelievably beautiful beaches and plenty of activities to engage in. It is definitely a destination that you should go to!

Puerto Rico is also a self-governing commonwealth of the United States , so if you are wishing to visit this beautiful island you will most likely need a Puerto Rico B1/B2 Visa . The process to apply for this visa is the same as the one from the American B1/B2 visa.

Filling out the DS-160 form properly is the most important element of the application that will definitely increase your approval chances of getting your Puerto Rico B1/B2 Visa for the first time or renewing it successfully.

That's why at iVisa , we not only created a simplified DS-160 form by making it 50% shorter , faster, and very easy to answer; we also assign you an iVisa Expert who will guide you throughout the process from start to end, and help you avoid rejections.

Apply for your Puerto Rico B1/B2 Visa here!

Benefits of applying for your Puerto Rico B1/B2 Visa with iVisa

Application 100% Government Compliant. Our team of iVisa Experts will review each one of the answers you give on the form and adjust them to be 100% compliant with the government requirements.

Unlimited Access to your iVisa Expert : At iVisa, we assign you an iVisa Expert to guide you through the entire application from start to end and solve any questions you may have about the process.

Simplified DS-160 Form. While on the Embassy website, you will have to answer 150 confusing and tedious questions, at iVisa, you will only have to answer a 50% shorter form with more clear questions. It will be like filling out a short survey.

Fill out the form at your own pace. With the iVisa platform, you can fill out the form at your own pace, make changes whenever you want, and save your progress, so you do not have to start from scratch, unlike the embassy website which cuts you off from their website every time you take a break.

Guide Manual. Once you apply, at iVisa we give you a Didactic Guide Manual with all the tips you need to know to answer the difficult sections and the step-by-step of what you need to do to get your new visa without problems.

iVisa values your safety. That is why we have a solid security system to protect your personal information. We recommend you go over to our reviews section and read what our past customers have said about our services. We’re sure you’ll find them to your liking.

Get your Puerto Rico B1/B2 Visa with iVisa!

What is the Puerto Rico B1/B2 Visa?

The Puerto Rico B1/B2 Visa is a multiple-entry travel document that allows you to enter Puerto Rico and it is a combination of the tourist and business visa.

The business visa (B1 Category) is for travelers who want to do business in the country, or for people who want to participate in business meetings, events, congresses, fairs, or scientific, educational, or professional conventions.

The tourist (B2 Category) is for people who want to travel for tourism, pleasure, or also because they want to have medical treatment.

Another benefit of this visa is that you can use it for medical reasons.

Puerto Rico B1/B2 Visa validity time

The Puerto Rico B1/B2 Visa is valid for 10 years after being issued . With this type of visa, you can stay in Puerto Rico for periods of up to 180 days Per Entry during a temporary stay, and for a specific purpose.

Click here to apply!

What you can do with the Puerto Rico B1/B2 Visa

  • Buy goods or real estate
  • Visit friends or family
  • Take a short recreational course (not for credit)
  • Participate in fairs
  • Participate in congresses as a listener or as a speaker (without charging fees)
  • Medical treatments
  • Consultations with a doctor
  • Signing of contracts
  • Business meetings

What you CAN NOT do with the Puerto Rico B1/B2 Visa

  • You can not work
  • You can not study temporarily
  • You can not reside permanently in the country
  • You can not get a driver's license
  • You can not authorize a child to study in a public school in the country.

Start your application here!

Who doesn’t need to apply for the Puerto Rico B1/B2 Visa?

United States citizens can travel to Puerto Rico without a passport.

To see if you are visa exempt or not, you can go to the top of this page and use iVisa’s Visa Checker by selecting your passport’s country.

Are you eligible? Apply here!

If your country is part of the Visa Waiver Program you can also apply with iVisa for an ESTA here .

The process to get the Puerto Rico B1/B2 Visa

To apply for or renew the Puerto Rico B1/B2 Visa with iVisa you just have to follow these steps:

Fill out the simplified iVisa form here and pay for the service with a debit or credit card.

Receive support from your iVisa Expert from start to end.

Send the required documentation according to the instructions we give you or attend the interview if necessary.

Pick up your passport with your new visa and get ready to travel!

We will contact you if we need any more information about your application.

Once the eVisa is approved you will receive it via email . You should keep an electronic and printed copy of the visa to show on arrival to Puerto Rico.

Pretty easy right? Apply now!

Is it always required to attend an interview to get the Puerto Rico B1/B2 Visa?

It is very likely that you will be required to attend an interview at an embassy or consulate.

Remember that you will know at the end of your interview if you’re eligible or not for the visa. The decision will be made by the consular officer.

Don’t worry! At iVisa we will provide you with all the information you need to have a successful interview!

Requirements to renew your visa without an interview

If you want to apply to renew your last Puerto Rico B1/B2 Visa without having to go to an interview or appointment, you must meet one of the following requirements:

Your last US visa cannot have expired more than 24, 36, or 48 months ago (depending on your nationality), or it must still be valid.

Applicants under 13 or over 80 years of age can also apply for the visa renewal without having to attend an interview.

Get your visa here!

How long does it take to receive my new Puerto Rico B1/B2 Visa?

Once we send your application 100% government-compliant, the United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) will list the available dates for your interview or drop-off appointment, and we will choose the closest one for you.

Keep in mind that given the high demand for applications, some locations have an interview waitlist of more than 12 months. Therefore, we always recommend applying several months before your intended trip to Puerto Rico.

Start your application today!

Where can I learn more?

In case you have any questions about the Puerto Rico B1/B2 Visa or any other travel document, you can reach out to our outstanding customer support team online or by email: [email protected] . They are available 24/7 to assist you in case you run into any difficulties.

Visit the FAQs below to solve any other questions you may have about this type of travel document.

Related Articles

Best Fun Things To Do In Puerto Rico cover image

  • Best Fun Things To Do In Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico Travel Restrictions: All You Need to Know cover image

  • Puerto Rico Travel Restrictions: All You Need to Know

Puerto Rican Food: Discovering the Flavors of Puerto Rico cover image

  • Puerto Rican Food: Discovering the Flavors of Puerto Rico

Is iVisa.com a legitimate company?

Our Company is accredited and recognized by the International Air Transport Association (IATA) and has a validated IATA Agency Code. If you want to check this information you can verify our membership using our bearing No. 23716873 at http://store.iata.org/ieccacfree .

Remember that the customer service team at iVisa.com is here 24/7 to answer any questions you may have about our service.

How long does it take to apply for a Puerto Rico Visa?

It will only take around 20 minutes to fill out our simplified form online.

What do I need to apply for the Puerto Rico Visa?

We require the following documents to submit your application:

Your photo for the visa.

Picture of your valid Passport.

For renewal applicants: Picture of your last Puerto Rico Visa.

We advise you to have extra documents to explain the purpose of your trip and to prove that you have enough funds to support your trip. These extra documents could be your last bank statements or employment proof.

Can I get the Puerto Rico Visa for free?

No, you can’t. There is a USD $160 government fee that you will need to pay.

We charge a small fee but remember that by applying beforehand with iVisa, you can avoid any delays or errors. iVisa also offers you a visa expert to review and guide you through your application to minimize the likelihood of errors to guarantee you a smooth entry to Puerto Rico.

Apply with iVisa!

My application couldn’t be completed due to an error. What now?

My visa application has been refused. why can't i get my money back, do i need a puerto rico visa if i’m only transiting through puerto rico, my old passport has already expired. my visa to travel to puerto rico is still valid but in my expired passport. do i need to apply for a new visa with my new passport, my visa will expire while i am in puerto rico. is there a problem with that, my passport with my visa was stolen; what should i do.

You have to report the loss or theft to the Puerto Rico Embassy. If it was stolen, you must also report it to the police. Then, you must apply for a new visa by submitting a new application.

My visa was damaged. What should I do?

You must apply for a new visa. You’ll need to fill out a new application and pay the fee, just like the last time.

Who can I talk to if I have more questions?

Can i go to puerto rico with a u.s. visa, how do processing times work, where can i read more.

  • Best Beaches In Puerto Rico
  • Is there a 24-hour Negative COVID-19 Test Requirement to Enter Puerto Rico?

Other Available Visas: Puerto Rico?

  • B1/B2 Visa Application
  • ESTA Application
  • iVisa is NOT affiliated with any government agency. This site does not provide legal advice and we are not a law firm. None of our customer service representatives are lawyers and they also do not provide legal advice. We are a private, internet-based travel and immigration consultancy provider dedicated to helping individuals travel around the world. You may apply by yourself directly on the various government websites. The source of information: https://www.statedepartment.pr.gov/foreigners

This is a privately owned website and not a government agency. FTC Disclosure: We may be compensated if you make a purchase via a link on this site.

Uspassporthelpguide.com is a privately owned website. Privacy

menu-icon

Puerto Rico Visa – Visa & Travel Requirements for a Puerto Rican Visa

travel to puerto rico visa

Will you be traveling to beautiful Puerto Rico on your next vacation? Being that Puerto Rico is a United States territory, you will not need to obtain a Puerto Rico Visa in order to travel to Puerto Rico.

You will not need a passport to travel as a United States citizen that is returning from or traveling to any U.S. territories. You will need a valid driver’s license or state-issued photo identification.

The following list will provide you with destinations that are United States territories and will not need a passport or visa to travel to.

The U.S. Territories are as follows:

Puerto Rico

The U.S. Virgin Islands

American Samoa

Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands

Swains Island

Any U.S. citizen that returns directly from and U.S. territory has not been considered to have left the U.S. and does not need to have a passport present.

However, if you want to travel to other neighboring islands of Puerto Rico, then we advise that you make sure your passport is in order and up to date to avoid difficulties that may arise when traveling to nearby countries.

Your passport should have a minimum of 6 months validity left on it when you end your trip to Puerto Rico. Some countries will require a certain validity time frame after you leave that country. Some countries will require 1 month, some will require 6 months. It will all depend on the country you plan to visit. We recommend that you inquire with the country’s Embassy in which you wish to travel before traveling there.

Also, your passport should have at least (2) blank visa pages. The blank visa pages will allow for any visa stamps that need to be placed in your passport. At the time, issues have arisen due to the lack of visa pages in a passport book. So to avoid any difficulties while traveling, we recommend that you keep these two guidelines in mind.

NOTE: US Passport Help Guide has no Embassy or Consulate information for Puerto Rico.

Additional Puerto Rico Information

Related topics.

travel to puerto rico visa

Top 10 Countries Every First-Time Traveler Must Visit

travel to puerto rico visa

Travel Photography 101: How To Take Great Travel Photos?

air travel

7 Air Travel Tips to Have an Enjoyable Flight

Choose your passport office location, passport services.

travel to puerto rico visa

  •  New Passport
  •  Passport Renewal
  •  Child Passport
  •  Passport Replacement
  •  Name Change
  •  Lost Passport
  •  Passport Correction
  •  Second Passport
  •  Passport Card

Where to Apply

travel to puerto rico visa

  •  Passport Offices
  •  Expedited Services
  •  Regional Passport
  •  Expedited Visa & Passport Directory
  •  Acceptance Agent

Passport Forms

passport-form

  •  Passport Photos
  •  Passport Requirements
  •  Passport Fees
  •  Passport Books
  •  Passport Applications
  •  International Drivers Permit
  •  Travel Visa

Do you really want to delete this post ?

Understanding The Visa Requirements For Travel To Panama

  • Last updated May 06, 2024
  • Difficulty Beginner

Viajera Compulsiva

  • Category Travel

is a visa required for travel to panama

Are you planning a trip to Panama? Before you pack your bags, it's essential to understand the visa requirements for travel to this vibrant Central American country. Whether you're a tourist, business traveler, or someone visiting family or friends, knowing the intricacies of Panama's visa regulations can make your journey hassle-free. In this guide, we'll delve into the various types of visas, the application process, and any additional requirements you need to be aware of. So grab your passport and let's navigate the visa landscape of Panama together!

What You'll Learn

Visa requirements for panama: a breakdown of the process, exemptions: countries exempt from needing a visa for panama travel, applying for a panama visa: step-by-step guide and requirements, travel tips: what to know about visas before visiting panama.

quartzmountain

If you are planning a trip to Panama, it is important to know the visa requirements to ensure a smooth travel experience. The visa requirements for Panama vary depending on the purpose and duration of your visit. In this blog post, we will provide a breakdown of the visa process for different types of travelers.

Tourist Visa:

For citizens of most countries, a tourist visa is not required to enter Panama. If you are planning to stay in Panama for tourism purposes for up to 180 days, you can enter the country with a valid passport. However, it is important to note that your passport must have at least six months of validity remaining from the date of entry.

Business Visa:

If you are traveling to Panama for business purposes, you may need a business visa. To obtain a business visa, you will need to provide a letter of invitation from a company or organization in Panama, stating the purpose and duration of your visit. Additionally, you may be required to provide proof of sufficient funds to cover your expenses during your stay in Panama.

If you are planning to work in Panama, you will need to obtain a work visa before entering the country. To apply for a work visa, you will need to have a job offer or employment contract from a company in Panama. The company will usually be responsible for initiating the visa application process and providing the necessary documentation.

Student Visa:

If you are planning to study in Panama for an extended period, you will need to apply for a student visa. To obtain a student visa, you will need to provide a letter of acceptance from a recognized educational institution in Panama. You may also need to provide proof of financial means to cover your tuition and living expenses during your stay in Panama.

Other Visa Categories:

Panama offers various other visa categories, such as the investor visa, retiree visa, and journalist visa. Each category has its own requirements and eligibility criteria. It is advisable to consult the nearest Panamanian embassy or consulate or visit the official website of the Panama National Immigration Service for detailed information on these visa categories.

In conclusion, the visa requirements for Panama depend on the purpose and duration of your visit. For tourism purposes, a visa is generally not required for stays up to 180 days. However, for other purposes such as business, work, study, or other specific categories, a visa may be necessary. It is important to research and understand the specific requirements for your intended purpose of travel to ensure a hassle-free experience.

Exploring the Travel Restrictions and Privileges for U Visa Holders

You may want to see also

If you are planning a trip to Panama, you might be wondering whether you need a visa to enter the country. The good news is that citizens of several countries enjoy visa exemptions and can travel to Panama without the need for a visa. This means that if you hold a passport from one of these exempt countries, you can simply pack your bags and head to Panama without the hassle of applying for a visa.

Here is a list of countries whose citizens are exempt from needing a visa for travel to Panama:

  • United States of America (USA): If you hold a valid US passport, you are exempt from needing a visa for travel to Panama. You can visit for tourism or business purposes for up to 180 days.
  • Canada: Canadian citizens also enjoy visa exemptions for travel to Panama. Similar to US citizens, Canadians can stay in Panama for up to 180 days for tourism or business.
  • European Union (EU) countries: Citizens of all EU member states, including the United Kingdom, Germany, France, Italy, Spain, and many others, can travel to Panama without a visa. The visa exemption allows for a maximum stay of 90 days for tourism purposes.
  • Australia: Australian citizens can travel to Panama without a visa for up to 180 days for tourism or business purposes.
  • New Zealand: Like Australians, citizens of New Zealand can visit Panama without a visa for up to 180 days for tourism or business.
  • Japan: Japanese citizens enjoy the same visa exemption as Australians and New Zealanders and can stay in Panama for up to 180 days for tourism or business.
  • South Korea: Citizens of South Korea have a visa exemption for travel to Panama, allowing them to stay for up to 180 days for tourism or business purposes.
  • Singapore: Singaporean citizens also enjoy a visa exemption and can stay in Panama for up to 90 days for tourism or business.
  • Malaysia: Similar to Singapore, citizens of Malaysia can travel to Panama without a visa and stay for up to 90 days for tourism or business.
  • Israel: Israeli citizens have a visa exemption for travel to Panama, allowing them to stay for up to 180 days for tourism or business purposes.

It's important to note that while these countries are exempt from needing a visa, travelers must still meet certain requirements upon arrival in Panama. These requirements include having a valid passport with a minimum validity of six months, proof of onward travel or return ticket, and sufficient funds to cover the duration of the stay.

If you are a citizen of one of these countries, you can start planning your trip to Panama without having to worry about visa formalities. Enjoy exploring the beautiful beaches, vibrant cities, and rich cultural heritage of Panama without the hassle of visa applications.

Exploring Canada on a Valid H1B Visa: Unveiling Travel Opportunities for Tourists

Traveling to a new country can be an exciting experience, but before you pack your bags and start planning your itinerary, it's important to make sure you have all the necessary travel documents in order. If you're planning a trip to Panama, you may be wondering whether or not you need a visa. In this guide, we will provide you with a step-by-step process on how to apply for a Panama visa and the requirements you need to fulfill.

Step 1: Determine the type of visa you need

The first step in applying for a Panama visa is to determine the type of visa you need. Panama offers several types of visas, including tourist visas, business visas, student visas, and work visas. The type of visa you need will depend on the purpose of your visit. For example, if you're planning to travel to Panama for tourism purposes, you will need to apply for a tourist visa.

Step 2: Gather the required documents

Once you have determined the type of visa you need, you should gather all the required documents. The specific documents you need will vary depending on the type of visa you're applying for, but generally, you will need the following:

  • A completed visa application form: You can find the visa application form on the website of the Embassy of Panama in your country. Make sure to fill out the form accurately and completely.
  • Passport: Your passport should be valid for at least six months beyond your intended stay in Panama. It should also have at least two blank visa pages for the visa stamp.
  • Passport-sized photos: You will need to provide recent passport-sized photos along with your visa application. The specific size and number of photos required may vary, so check the requirements of the Embassy of Panama in your country.
  • Proof of travel: You may be required to provide a copy of your flight itinerary or a confirmed round-trip ticket as proof of your travel plans.
  • Proof of accommodation: You will need to provide proof of accommodation, such as hotel reservations or a letter of invitation if you're staying with a friend or family member.
  • Financial documents: You may be asked to provide proof of sufficient funds to cover your expenses during your stay in Panama. This can include bank statements, credit card statements, or a letter from your employer.
  • Vaccination certificate: Depending on your country of origin, you may be required to provide a vaccination certificate for certain diseases, such as yellow fever.

Step 3: Submit your application

Once you have gathered all the required documents, you can submit your visa application. Visit the Embassy of Panama in your country or the nearest Panamanian consulate to submit your application in person. It's recommended to make an appointment in advance to avoid any unnecessary delays.

During the application process, you may be required to pay a visa fee. The fee amount will vary depending on the type of visa you're applying for, so make sure to check the current fee before submitting your application.

Step 4: Wait for the visa approval

After submitting your visa application, you will need to wait for the visa approval. The processing time can vary, so it's important to apply well in advance of your planned travel dates. Depending on the country you're applying from, you may be able to track the status of your application online.

Step 5: Collect your visa

Once your visa is approved, you can collect your visa from the Embassy of Panama or the consulate where you submitted your application. Make sure to bring the necessary identification and any additional documents that may be required for the collection.

In conclusion, applying for a Panama visa involves a step-by-step process that includes determining the type of visa you need, gathering the required documents, submitting your application, waiting for visa approval, and collecting your visa. By following this guide and ensuring that you have all the necessary documents in order, you can make the visa application process smoother and enjoy your trip to Panama.

Is it possible to travel to Puerto Rico with an expired F1 visa?

If you're planning a trip to Panama, one of the first things you need to consider is whether or not you need a visa. Panama welcomes many tourists from around the world, and its visa policy is generally quite relaxed. However, there are still a few important details you need to know before your trip. In this article, we will provide you with all the essential information about visas for visiting Panama.

First and foremost, it's essential to determine if you need a visa at all. Panama has a visa exemption policy that allows citizens from many countries to enter without a visa for tourism or business purposes. Citizens from the United States, Canada, the European Union, Australia, New Zealand, and many other countries can enter Panama without a visa and stay for up to 180 days.

However, visa exemption does not apply to all countries. Some countries, such as India, China, and Russia, require a visa to enter Panama. If you are unsure about your visa requirements, it is always recommended to check with the Panamanian embassy or consulate in your home country or visit their official website for the most up-to-date information.

If you are a citizen of a country that requires a visa, the next step is to determine the type of visa you need. Panama offers various types of visas, including tourist visas, business visas, and student visas, among others. The requirements and application process for each visa type may vary, so it is essential to consult the specific requirements for your visa category.

For a tourist visa, the application process is relatively straightforward. Generally, you will need to provide a valid passport with at least six months of remaining validity, a completed visa application form, proof of sufficient funds to cover your stay in Panama, and a return ticket or proof of onward travel. Some countries may also require additional documents, such as a letter of invitation or proof of accommodation. It is vital to check the specific requirements for your country before applying.

To apply for a visa to Panama, you will need to visit the Panamanian embassy or consulate in your home country. In some cases, you may also be able to apply online or through a visa agency. It is recommended to start the visa application process well in advance of your intended travel dates to allow for any processing delays.

Once you have obtained your visa, it is important to understand the visa conditions. For tourist visas, Panama typically allows a stay of up to 180 days. However, it is essential to check the visa stamp upon entry as immigration officials have the final say on the duration of stay. Overstaying your visa can result in fines or other penalties, so it is crucial to adhere to the visa conditions.

In conclusion, while most tourists can enter Panama without a visa, it is essential to check the specific requirements for your country before you travel. Understanding the visa process and requirements will ensure a smooth and hassle-free trip to Panama. Remember to consult the official Panamanian embassy or consulate for the most up-to-date information, and plan your visa application well in advance to avoid any last-minute complications. Enjoy your trip to Panama!

Exploring Paradise: Can US Visa Holders Travel to the Bahamas?

Frequently asked questions.

Yes, most travelers will need a visa to enter Panama. However, citizens from certain countries are exempt from this requirement.

You should consult the official website or embassy of Panama to see if your country is one of the exempted nations. Alternatively, you can contact a travel agent or visa processing agency for assistance.

The requirements can vary depending on your nationality and purpose of travel. In general, you will need a valid passport, completed visa application form, proof of accommodation, return ticket, and sufficient funds to support your stay in Panama.

The processing time can vary, but it is typically between 5 to 10 business days. It is recommended to apply for a visa well in advance of your planned travel dates to allow for any delays.

No, visas are not available for on-arrival issuance in Panama. You must obtain your visa before traveling to Panama.

Viajera Compulsiva

  • Viajera Compulsiva Author Editor Reviewer

Karisa Garcia

  • Karisa Garcia Author Reviewer Traveller

It is awesome. Thank you for your feedback!

We are sorry. Plesae let us know what went wrong?

We will update our content. Thank you for your feedback!

Leave a comment

Travel photos, related posts.

Exploring the Possibility: Can You Travel on Your Boyfriend's Visa?

Exploring the Possibility: Can You Travel on Your Boyfriend's Visa?

  • Mar 28, 2024

Nigeria's Travel to America: Exploring Visa-Free Entry in the 1980s

Nigeria's Travel to America: Exploring Visa-Free Entry in the 1980s

  • Apr 01, 2024

Achieving a Hassle-Free China Travel Visa: A Step-by-Step Guide

Achieving a Hassle-Free China Travel Visa: A Step-by-Step Guide

  • May 04, 2024

Exploring the Possibility: Can J1 Visa Residents Travel to Puerto Rico?

Exploring the Possibility: Can J1 Visa Residents Travel to Puerto Rico?

  • Mar 24, 2024

Navigating Travel Plans While Your O1 Visa is Pending

Navigating Travel Plans While Your O1 Visa is Pending

  • Mar 31, 2024

Understanding Visa Requirements for Australians Traveling to the US

Understanding Visa Requirements for Australians Traveling to the US

  • May 07, 2024

American Airlines

Flights to Puerto Rico with American Airlines

Popular flights to puerto rico.

Newcastle upon Tyne (NCL) to

London (LON) to

London (LCY) to

London (LGW) to

London (LHR) to

Manchester (MAN) to

*Fares displayed have been collected within the last 24hrs and may no longer be available at time of booking. Some fares listed may include one or more connections that are Basic Economy, which class is subject to additional terms and conditions . Modifying this information may result in a different fare. To find the most updated fare, please visit aa.com. Additional baggage fees and charges for optional products and services may apply.

More Destinations Together

Our partnership with British Airways gives you access to the U.S. and beyond.  When you fly with American or British Airways, you can earn and redeem AAdvantage® Miles, plus, enjoy the benefits of your AAdvantage® status on both airlines.

travel to puerto rico visa

Discover best flight deals to Puerto Rico

  • Newcastle upon Tyne - Puerto Rico
  • London - Puerto Rico
  • Manchester - Puerto Rico

IMAGES

  1. How to apply for Puerto Rico tourist visa?

    travel to puerto rico visa

  2. Puerto Rico passport online e visa countries to travel in 2024

    travel to puerto rico visa

  3. Apply for a Visa in a Few Clicks!

    travel to puerto rico visa

  4. Experience the culture and scenery of Puerto Rico: a complete guide

    travel to puerto rico visa

  5. Tipos de Visa para Puerto Rico: Guía Completa

    travel to puerto rico visa

  6. Puerto Rico Visa. Travel To Puerto Rico Focusing on Word VISA, 3D

    travel to puerto rico visa

COMMENTS

  1. Visa requirements for Puerto Rico

    Applying for a Puerto Rico tourism visa has essentially two steps: submitting a DS-160 form application and doing an interview at your local US embassy or consulate. You need a passport, a digital passport-style photo, plus your travel itinerary and travel history to complete your DS-160 form. You might need additional supporting documents ...

  2. Puerto Rico entry requirements: Essential travel guide

    One of Puerto Rico entry requirements is to have some sort of travel authorization. Some countries enjoy visa-free travel to the U.S. based on bilateral agreements. If that's your case, you'll need to apply for a Puerto Rico visa (Puerto Rico ESTA) and obtain authorization to stay on the island for up to 90 days without a visa.

  3. How to get a visa for Puerto Rico

    For people who want to apply for the ESTA travel authorisation, it can be applied for at any time, and it is usually sufficient to give 72 hours notice before your trip to Puerto Rico. However, it is always worthwhile to apply at least 10 days in advance, in case of any delays. Visagov.com has an express service, where you can have your visa in ...

  4. Puerto Rico Travel Requirements: What Travelers Need to Know

    Puerto Rico should be high on their list as Americans can visit without a passport. That's a significant advantage given the current extended wait time for a new travel document. Routine processing times are up to 10-13 weeks while expedited processing (for an additional $60) can still take as long as 7-9 weeks.

  5. Extranjeros

    The Puerto Rico Department of State guides foreigners interested in visiting the Island and serves as a liaison with federal authorities to clarify or expedite the procedures to obtain a visa. Individuals visiting Puerto Rico have the same immigration restrictions and privileges as if they were visiting any other destination in the U.S.

  6. Entry Requirements and Customs in Puerto Rico

    Visitors from other countries, including Canada, need a valid passport to land in Puerto Rico. For those from countries requiring a visa to enter the U.S., the same visa is necessary to enter Puerto Rico. It is advised to always have at least one or two consecutive blank pages in your passport to allow space for visas and stamps that need to ...

  7. What documentation is needed to travel to Puerto Rico?

    The short answer is yes. U.S. citizens can travel to Puerto Rico using only a government-issued photo ID, such as a driver's license or state ID card. However, starting on May 7, 2025, if you do ...

  8. Puerto Rico Visa Guide

    3. Tourist visa. Puerto Rico Tourist visa stay is usually short. Applicant is not required to be present when applying for visa.Puerto Rico is a US territory, which means that the US Visa Policy applies to travel to Puerto Rico. All the rules and requirements that apply to the US visa also apply to Puerto Rico.

  9. Travel Guidelines

    Puerto Rico is enforcing local measures developed by the Puerto Rico Tourism Company (PRTC), alongside U.S. Travel Association (USTA) guidelines, such as social distancing, mandatory face coverings in public areas, and a variety of mandates for businesses - including, but not limited to, reduced capacities and high standards of cleanliness in accordance with CDC and EPA guidelines.

  10. Frequently Asked Questions

    Puerto Rico was voted one of the top travel destinations for 2019 by a variety of major media outlets. The island is one of the easiest places to visit in the Caribbean, especially if you're a U.S. citizen. ... Travelers from other countries visiting Puerto Rico have the same visa and passport requirements that would apply if visiting the ...

  11. Puerto Rico Tourist Visa

    What are the visa requirements for Puerto Rico tourist visa? 3 documents required for Puerto Rico eVisa. Passport Copy. Original Passport or Travel document of Puerto Rico with at least 6 months remaining validity on the date of travel and have at least 2 visa pages clear of any markings. Travel Bookings.

  12. Puerto Rico Travel Visa Guide : VisaBud

    Essential Puerto Rico travel information. Currency - The US dollar (USD) is the island's currency. Daily budget for 1 person - USD 174.. Languages - Puerto Ricans speak English and Spanish. Socket type - There are two plug kinds, designated as types A and B, for Puerto Rico.Puerto Rico uses a 120V supply voltage and 60Hz for operation.

  13. A beginners guide to visiting Puerto Rico

    With United Airlines, expect to spend between 20,000 and 65,000 miles for a one-way ticket from cities like Newark and Chicago. But perhaps the best way to use points to visit Puerto Rico is through JetBlue. ZACH GRIFF/THE POINTS GUY. On JetBlue, you have several destinations beyond San Juan to consider.

  14. Visa policy of Puerto Rico: Check your country

    The Puerto Rico immigration policy for tourism currently states that visitors from over 230 countries worldwide need a Puerto Rican tourist visa or travel authorization to enjoy a vacation in the territory regardless of the period of intended stay.. If a foreign national is a passport holder of a country included in the US visa waiver program, then they are required to have an approved ESTA ...

  15. Do You Need a Passport to Visit Puerto Rico?

    No, you don't need a passport if you are a U.S. citizen. Puerto Rico is a U.S. territory, and U.S. citizens do not need a passport to go to Puerto Rico (or any other US territory.) In fact, traveling to a U.S. territory from the mainland United States is the same as driving from Illinois to Iowa, or taking a flight from New York to Los Angeles.

  16. Travel

    Before you travel to a country other than yours to renew your visa, contact the U.S. embassy or consulate. If you exit the United States and apply for a visa, you cannot return to the United States until the visa is issued. This could require a lengthy stay. If the visa is denied, you will not be able to return to the United States as a student.

  17. 15 Essential Travel Hacks When Visiting Puerto Rico

    All other nationalities will need a passport and possibly even a visa to enter Puerto Rico. The island has the same entry requirements as the mainland U.S.A., so it's important to check what ...

  18. Travel advice and advisories for Puerto Rico

    Puerto Rico is a territory of the United States. We have obtained the information on this page from the American authorities. It can, however, change at any time. Confirm entry, exit and visa requirements prior to travelling: Entry and exit requirements for the United States; U.S. Customs and Border Protection; U.S. Embassy and Consulates

  19. Puerto Rico Visa

    The ESTA (Electronic System for Travel Authorization), is the online visa with which you can travel to Puerto Rico or any other state of the United States. This Puerto Rico visa allows multiple entries within 2 years, with a maximum stay of 90 days per entry. The Puerto Rico visa does not allow you to work or reside in Puerto Rico, or in any of ...

  20. Puerto Rico Visa

    Puerto Rico is following the US rules for travel, and restrictions are being lifted domestically. Valid national passport with at least 6 month remaining validity after the date of departure. Please see the instructions above if visa is needed and apply. 😷 in enclosed public places. COVID-19 travel restrictions by country.

  21. Do you need a passport to travel to or from U.S. territories or Freely

    U.S. citizens do not need a passport to travel between the U.S. and these territories: American Samoa. Guam. Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. Puerto Rico. U.S. Virgin Islands. U.S. citizens do need a passport to travel to these Freely Associated States: The Federated States of Micronesia.

  22. Puerto Rico B1/B2 Visa

    What you need to know. The Puerto Rico B1/B2 Visa is a multiple-entry travel document that allows you to enter Puerto Rico and it is a combination of a tourist and business visa. Citizens from countries that are part of the Visa Waiver Program don't need to apply for the Puerto Rico B1/B2 Visa, but they will need to apply for an ESTA.

  23. Puerto Rico Visa

    Some countries will require 1 month, some will require 6 months. It will all depend on the country you plan to visit. We recommend that you inquire with the country's Embassy in which you wish to travel before traveling there. Also, your passport should have at least (2) blank visa pages. The blank visa pages will allow for any visa stamps ...

  24. Understanding The Visa Requirements For Travel To Panama

    Is it possible to travel to Puerto Rico with an expired F1 visa? You may want to see also. Travel tips: What to know about visas before visiting Panama. If you're planning a trip to Panama, one of the first things you need to consider is whether or not you need a visa. Panama welcomes many tourists from around the world, and its visa policy is ...

  25. American Airlines®

    Find American Airlines flights to Puerto Rico and book your trip! Enjoy our travel experiences and fly in style!