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Ultimate Motorcycling

2022 Honda Africa Twin Review [A Personal Adventure Bike Test]

africa twin 1000 travel edition

Realistically, most of my adventure riding these days consists of long-distance road touring with dirt roads and trail riding at my destination. I realized a while ago that 500+ pound adventure bikes loaded with gear are not so much fun in very challenging off-road conditions. Don’t get me wrong. Having the flexibility to go down any road I find with the confidence that my bike can handle it is fantastic, and I love having that option even when I don’t exercise it.

The Honda Africa Twin is a perennial favorite and on any short list when considering the purchase of an adventure motorcycle. The AT sits in a bit of a unique spot. With a 1084cc engine and weighing in at 529 pounds with the DCT, it has the dimensions of an open-class adventure bike. However, with 100 horsepower on tap and more of a dirt bike look and feel, it has more in common with middleweights than the 1200-and-larger ADV motorcycles.

As an avid adventure bike tourer, I have ridden or owned many kinds of adventure touring bikes over the years. I gravitate towards the upright stance, and I love the versatility that comes with them. While the Africa Twin has been on my list for a long time, it has never made its way into my garage.

2022 Honda Africa Twin Review: Price

Despite its good looks, reputation, and reliability, the numbers never added up for me. A 529-pound motorcycle with only 100 horsepower and a seat that didn’t look super comfortable, the Africa Twin didn’t seem competitive with other bikes in the category for my needs. I knew there was probably more to the AT, so I was anxious to get to know the Honda better.

My first impressions when picking it up? The Africa Twin is good-looking. The front lights look serious and ready for business. The proportions and appearance of the AT make it look like an overgrown dirt bike that was ready for some fun, though the seat still didn’t look comfortable. The high stance and 21-inch front wheel made me think it wouldn’t be as fun in the twisty canyons around LA. However, once I threw my leg over the seat, it felt well-built and proportional.

Starting up the engine was a huge surprise for me. The reputation of Honda powerplants precedes it, so I was expecting some buttery smooth Japanese mill to fire up. Instead, I got a loud clattering engine more like a single-pot dirt bike than a buttery smooth adventure tourer. It didn’t sit right with me initially.

2022 Honda Africa Twin Review: DCT

The next impression wasn’t much better than the engine sound. Looking at the cockpit, all the switches and buttons on various parts of the handlebar, and the Africa Twin’s two screens, I immediately felt that it is too cluttered. I was certain I would find uses for all the controls, but there had to be a cleaner way to execute it. As I pulled out, searching for the turn signal, I immediately hit the horn, something I would do again and again as I rode the Africa Twin.

Out on the street and then accelerating onto the highway ramp, the Africa Twin’s engine started to show its character. The initial clattering sound gave way to a much smoother sound, providing linear power with much more thrust than I expected. Although there were still some vibes in the grips, the engine started to hum along in a very nice way. I wouldn’t say it is the fastest 1000+ cc adventure bike I’ve ever ridden, but I never felt it was underpowered.

Weaving through LA traffic, I got a feel for the AT’s nimbleness and maneuverability. Those feelings continued throughout the test, regardless of conditions. When it came time for sport riding, the Africa Twin provided very spirited canyon riding and high-speed passes on Angeles Crest Highway.

2022 Honda Africa Twin Review: MSRP

The standard model I tested has adjustable Showa suspension, though not the semi-active electronic suspension of the Adventure Sports ES edition. Fortunately, the suspension as it comes is terrific, providing a firm ride and well-planted feel.

The Africa Twin’s soaked up the various imperfections of the tarmac but never felt too soft or washy like some adventure bikes can. I did not make any adjustments to the suspension, though I would probably soften up the settings a little if I were to do long-distance touring and off-road. For the canyon riding and traffic dodging I did in Southern California, it was set up perfectly.

Like most adventure bikes, the Honda Africa Twin is not for the vertically challenged. At 6-foot with a 31-inch inseam, the balls of my feet were on the ground at stops, but the seat still felt high.

2022 Honda Africa Twin Review: Adventure Motorcycle

Most of my personal bikes are taller scramblers or adventure bikes, as I prefer the leverage of that height in the turns. The Africa Twin, with its 21-inch front wheel and long travel suspension, isn’t quick in transitions, but it never feels ponderous. On a day dedicated to photography in the Angeles National Forest, I was chasing Ultimate Motorcycling Editor Don Williams on a much faster BMW S 1000 XR. I kept up, though it’s possible Don was just being nice. Editor’s Note: He wasn’t.

Keeping up with a motorcycle like the XR requires setting up the Africa Twin in the right way to get the most performance for how I ride. Luckily the AT offers quite a bit of adjustability and customization.

Like many motorbikes today, the 2022 Honda Africa Twin has a variety of dash-controlled ride modes that allow you to adjust power, engine braking, traction control, wheelie control, and ABS (as well as suspension, if you have the Adventure Sports ES and its semi-active suspension). The AT comes with four preset riding modes, plus two fully customizable modes.

africa twin 1000 travel edition

The four preset modes are Tour, Urban, Gravel, and Off-road. Each mode has appropriate levels of electronic intervention, and allows for easy switching in different riding conditions. Oddly, there was no designated Sport mode, though the two User modes means you can customize a sport mode (or two) to your taste.

The Africa Twin I tested has the dual clutch transmission (DCT, an $800 option). Love it or not, it works very well. I will admit I am not a fan of automatic transmissions, as there is something about using a clutch and picking the shift points that appeals to me. That being said, I enjoy using a quickshifter on standard transmissions in certain circumstances, and I like the shiftless power delivery of electric motorcycles.

My biggest issue with DCT is that it tends to shift up too quickly and down too slowly, and I often found myself in 5th or 6th gear at much slower speeds than I would like. This made trying to keep up with Don challenging regardless of how much “power” I dialed in the User mode.

2022 Honda Africa Twin Review: TFT Dash

Luckily, the Honda has given the Africa Twin customizable power, ABS, traction control, engine braking, and shifting aggressiveness to tailor the experience to exactly what a rider wants. The AT also provides for manually changing gears with paddle shifters around the left grip, though they won’t allow you to upshift too soon or downshift too aggressively.

After experimenting with the various drive modes, I dialed in the User mode for more power and aggressive engine braking. DCT Sport level 2 executes sporty shift points without being too aggressive.

I like the three display modes the Africa Twin offers for its console. Each mode provides increasing levels of information on the display. I like a lot of information in front of me, so I settled on the highest level.

2022 Honda Africa Twin Review: For Salw

Honda throws quite a bit of technical wizardry at you, along with a cockpit that has a corresponding complexity. I was initially overwhelmed by it all. However, the more I rode the motorcycle, the more I got used to it. Once I adjusted everything to my liking, I truly enjoyed riding the Africa Twin. The 2022 Honda Africa Twin DCT is sporty and comfortable for road riding, yet it still feels like a big, fun dirt bike.

While I didn’t put it to the test in aggressive off-road riding, the times I did get into the dirt, the Africa Twin felt composed and confidence-inspiring despite riding on road-biased Metzeler Karoo Street tires. As mentioned above, the AT sits in a bit of an odd spot between the middleweight and heavyweight ADV segments.

The standard 2022 Honda Africa Twin with DCT is priced at $15,299, which compares to other middleweight ADV motorcycles. While the power-to-weight ratio may not appear favorable, the seat of the pants feel tells a different story. The Africa Twin should be on the shortlist for anyone wavering between the middleweights and heavyweights of the class.

Photography by Don Williams

RIDING STYLE

  • Helmet: Arai XD4
  • Communications: Cardo Packtalk Bold
  • Jacket: Alpinestars Valparaiso 2 Drystar
  • Gloves: Racer Gloves USA Kansas
  • Jeans: Alpinestars Pro Denim
  • Boots: The Executive by Cortech

2022 Honda Africa Twin DCT Specs

  • Type: Parallel-twin w/ 270-degree crankshaft
  • Displacement: 1084cc
  • Bore x stroke: 92.0 x 81.5mm
  • Compression ratio: 10.1:1
  • Valvetrain: SOHC, 4vpc
  • Fueling: Two 46mm throttle bodies
  • Transmission: 6-speed
  • Clutch: Fully and semi-automatic DCT w/ slipper function
  • Final drive: 525 chain
  • Frame: Steel, semi-double-cradle
  • Front suspension; travel: Fully adjustable Showa 45mm inverted fork: 9.1 inches
  • Rear suspension; travel: Linkage-assisted fully adjustable Showa shock; 8.7 inches
  • Wheels: Wire-spoke tubeless
  • Tires: Metzeler Karoo Street
  • Front tire: 90/90 x 21
  • Rear tire: 150/70 x 18
  • Front brakes: 310mm floating discs w/ radially mounted 4-piston calipers
  • Rear brake: 256mm disc w/ single-piston caliper
  • Parking brake: Cable-actuated single-piston caliper on rear disc
  • ABS: Standard (adjustable)

DIMENSIONS and CAPACITIES

  • Wheelbase: 62.0 inches
  • Rake: 27 degrees
  • Trail: 4.4 inches
  • Seat heights: 34.3 or 33.5 inches
  • Ground clearance: 9.8 inches
  • Fuel capacity: 5.0 gallons
  • Curb weight: 529 pounds
  • Color: Grand Prix Red

2022 Honda Africa Twin   DCT   Price: $15,299   MSRP

2022 Honda Africa Twin DCT Review Photo Gallery

africa twin 1000 travel edition

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Ultimate Motorcycling

2022 Honda CRF1100L Africa Twin Review: An Ideal Adventure Bike for the Price

It’s aged well.

Honda Reviews photo

jonathon_klein

Atop a ridgeline , I stopped to catch my breath. I’d been riding the 2022 Honda Africa Twin for nearly three hours off-road. I’d crossed two saddle-deep rivers, splashed through the mud and dirt, and bounced down some seriously steep grades of silty slick rock faces. But it had brought me here, overlooking this beautiful expansive valley. 

It was early fall, and the cooler-than-normal temperatures and snow the week before had caused the aspen leaves to become a vibrant yellow. They fluttered in the wind, giving the forest ahead a shimmering effect. Very few folks had been to where I was standing, apart from those with little mechanical sympathy. Or horses. But with the Africa Twin, I could skirt around most obstacles, ducking and diving the hazards that stopped others in their tracks. Including this overlook. 

<em>Jonathon Klein</em>

Honda’s Africa Twin isn’t billed as the best, most hardcore adventure motorcycle on the planet. This particular bike even has the company’s dual-clutch automatic transmission and less-than-optimal dual-sport tires. Yet, after years of refinement and Honda’s penchant for delivering over-engineered everything, the Africa Twin is capable of so much more than what its spec sheet may suggest. 

This is a motorcycle that’s comfortable, tall, athletic, and powerful, and it will give you the confidence to ride more. To ride further. And that’s exactly what you want in an adventure motorcycle. Something to push you off the map and find the untouched and peaceful. You want a motorcycle that helps you see a mountain, and the Africa Twin will do just that. 

2022 Honda CRF1100L Africa Twin Specs

  • Base price : $15,299
  • Type of motorcycle : Adventure
  • Powertrain : 1084cc liquid-cooled single-cam four-stroke parallel-twin | 6-speed dual-clutch automatic | chain drive
  • Horsepower : 100
  • Torque : 76 lb-ft
  • Brakes : Two four-piston hydraulic calipers w/ 310mm discs (front) | Single one-piston hydraulic caliper w/ 256mm disk (rear)
  • Suspension : 45mm inverted fork; 9.1 inches of travel (front) | Pro-Link® single shock with spring; 8.7 inches of travel (rear)
  • Seat height : 33.5-34.3 inches adjustable
  • Tires : Dunlop Trailmax Mission 
  • Curb weight : 529 pounds
  • Fuel tank : 5 gallons w/1-gallon reserve
  • Quick Take : When you want the backcountry to be comfortable.
  • Score : 8/10

<em>Jonathon Klein</em>

Touring Comfort

I’ve ridden the Africa Twin a few different times since its 2016 debut. From the twisty, turny mountain roads of Los Angeles to logging long-distance mileage, this is a motorcycle that’s always impressed me with its on-road capabilities. That sounds antithetical to something that bears the name “Africa” and conjures images of the Dakar, but a ton of folks are going to use the Africa Twin as a long-distance tourer and for good reason: it’s comfortable.

A height-adjustable seat takes center stage, as it accommodates riders of differing sizes—I’m six-foot-four—and allows them to comfortably plant their feet at a stop. Honda also paid special attention to the Africa Twin’s balance, as at 529 pounds wet, it’s a porker, and a top-heavy bike is the last thing you want. But there’s a sense of groundedness whenever you throw a leg over that can be lacking in other motorcycles of the same breed.  

<em>Jonathon Klein</em>

Powering the motorcycle is a 1,084cc parallel-twin engine that puts out 100 horsepower and 76 lb-ft of torque. If I’m being honest, that’s pretty low compared to other full-size competitors, like the 170 hp in Ducati’s Multistrada V4 S . But throughout my travels with the Africa Twin, I’ve never been left wanting more. Power is delivered quickly and efficiently through the six-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission, and that DCT has been retooled over the years to be better than it was when first introduced.

It was pretty clunky in those early models, but it’s slick today. There’s still a sense of the bike shifting for you, as you feel the motorcycle’s transmission do the work, but it’s far less bucking bronco through the gears. I also really enjoyed the DCT around town, as all you’re left worrying about is picking your line, your braking point, and the throttle. It feels … easy and I found myself far less tired after normal, everyday-type of rides. 

<em>Jonathon Klein</em>

The one option available from Honda that I would’ve liked on this particular bike was heated grips. The Africa Twin got dropped off late in the year and the temperatures dropped precipitously coming into November. While the brush guards kept the wind off my hands, and a set of Dainese and Alpinestars gloves did their best keeping my fingers warm, they couldn’t compete with 15-degree temperatures. Heated grips would’ve gone a long way.

Other than the lack of heated grips, I haven’t found too much to take issue with. But being the picky journalist I am, I’ll call out the dash interface. The bar-mounted controls and how it interacts with the TFT display feels needlessly complex when you first sit down. And if you’re not up on how to use it, it’s super annoying while riding and trying to scroll through the four riding modes—Tour, Urban, Gravel, and Off-road, plus two custom settings. I actually found myself picking a ride mode before I set off and sticking with it until I came to a stop. It could be more intuitive, especially when riding off-road. 

<em>Jonathon Klein</em>

Sheep on the Streets, Freak in the Trees

Just after the Honda arrived, I suited up and pointed it at the mountains across our valley. While I started at a trailhead I’d been to before , I veered off onto one of the unknown branches just before a section littered with deep sand. It was a choice, and one I almost regretted. 

This particular trail was not built for a full-size ADV, as it was narrow, tree-lined, and on a steep decline. But the Africa Twin actually handled it pretty well. That wasn’t necessarily my own experience, though. I felt a bit squeezed, but I kept chugging along with confidence, at least until I got to the base of the trail. Lying before me was a set of three two-foot-tall steps, and thank you, off-road ABS, for stopping me on a dime in the dirt. 

Now, it’s more than likely that pro off-road riders would’ve seen this obstacle and just jumped it. But again, the Africa Twin is 529 pounds. That’s a lot of weight to just yeet off a seven-foot drop, especially when it’s not your motorcycle. I decided to hop off and walk it down which worked. But I wasn’t out of the proverbial woods. 

Honda Reviews photo

A short distance after the steps, a small 30-foot-wide river welcomed me. Without thinking too hard, I grabbed a heaping, handful of throttle and powered the Africa Twin right through it. It didn’t even stutter and a smile crept onto my face. That elation quickly turned into anxiety as a mile up the trail, a far larger water crossing entered the picture. 

This was more of a small pond—you can see it from space—and the water was muddy. I tried the old using-a-stick-to-test-the-depth method, and it was deep enough that I’d be taking a bath had I attempted crossing. That left me with two options: go back the way I came or go around it. I chose the latter.

Along one side of the pond was marshland, while the other offered a trail with a seriously steep decline into a ditch with standing water and mud and a steep incline that reached salvation. There was no path out of the marsh, so the ditch was it. Standing at the top and looking 10 feet down the ravine was intimidating, especially since the mud below looked gooey. But I was committed. I dropped in, kept my throttle steady, and with mud splashing behind me, I exited very dirty . But I exited, which is all that matters. 

<em>Jonathon Klein</em>

What I want you to take away from those stories is two-fold. First, the Africa Twin showed up on dual-sport tires. They’re grippy, but they aren’t the off-road spec rubber that either the Ducati or the CRF300L Rally had equipped with. Yet, even with that handicap, it handled everything without issue thanks to a combination of excellent engineering and somewhat idiotic confidence on my part. This is a motorcycle that’s so well-engineered that you’d have to really put it out of its comfort zone to trip it up. Or be a complete moron. 

And secondly, I’ve become a massive fan of both electric and automatic motorcycles for off-road adventures. I get that there will be folks who say “They don’t provide the same level of interaction that a manual does!” But when you don’t have to think about shifting gears, especially on inclines or declines, or stalling in mud, through rivers, or whatever, you’re left to just explore and ride. I don’t have to think about my left hand or foot and I’m left to just enjoy the journey. I don’t know about you, but that’s where I get the most enjoyment, not the act of shifting gears. Sorry, purists. 

<em>Jonathon Klein</em>

Still Great

Honda’s Africa Twin is seriously good as both an on-road tourer or far-flung adventurer, and it does little wrong, including how much cash it commands. 

Priced at $15,299, it’s a bargain compared to its classmates. Just look at its competition: the Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 starts at $17,699, the KTM 1290 Super Adventure sits at $19,499, then you have the $22,500 Triumph Tiger 1200 Rally, followed by the $24,495 Zero DSR/X, the $25,259 BMW R 1250 GS Adventure, and finally the $27,195 Ducati Multistrada V4 S. The Honda might not have as much horsepower as some of those other motorcycles, but nothing comes close to its price-to-capability. 

Even after all these years, the Africa Twin remains one of the best adventure motorcycles available. It’s a motorcycle that you can just jump onto and ride off into the wilderness, taking you somewhere you’ve never experienced. It’s the platonic ideal of an adventure motorcycle and you’ll love it for years to come. 

  • Helmet: AGV AX9
  • Jacket: Dainese D-Explorer 2  
  • Gloves: Dainese Avila , Alpinestars Oscar Cafe Divine Drystar
  • Pants: Dainese D-Explorer 2
  • Boots: O’Neal Sierra WP Pro  
  • Backpack: USWE Core 25
  • Satellite Coms: Garmin inReach Mini 2

Got a question for the author? Hit me up: [email protected]

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2022 Honda Africa Twin Specifications

*Includes all standard equipment, required fluids and full tank of fuel—ready to ride Meets current EPA standards Models sold in California meet current CARB standards and may differ slightly due to emissions equipment Specifications subject to change

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  • 11485×8614 (23.36 MB)
  • 1200×900 (275 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (44.85 MB)
  • 1200×900 (542 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 8956×7717 (18.59 MB)
  • 1200×1034 (417 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 7340×5505 (11.70 MB)
  • 1200×900 (284 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (56.32 MB)
  • 1200×900 (493 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (44.30 MB)
  • 1200×900 (482 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 5326×3548 (11.12 MB)
  • 1200×799 (531 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (31.80 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (26.73 MB)
  • 1200×900 (397 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (59.76 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11105×8329 (65.05 MB)
  • 1200×900 (320 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11140×8355 (29.31 MB)
  • 1200×900 (488 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11322×8492 (48.45 MB)
  • 1200×900 (616 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11358×8518 (69.36 MB)
  • 1200×900 (662 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (28.82 MB)
  • 1200×900 (248 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11454×8591 (27.63 MB)
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2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (18.97 MB)
  • 1200×900 (292 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (66.52 MB)
  • 1200×900 (463 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (40.42 MB)
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2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11513×8635 (21.91 MB)
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2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11650×8744 (41.52 MB)
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2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (39.27 MB)
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2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (32.62 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 10670×8010 (28.28 MB)
  • 1200×901 (700 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11140×8355 (29.28 MB)
  • 1200×900 (494 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (26.14 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11312×8484 (37.05 MB)
  • 1200×900 (512 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11557×8668 (35.89 MB)
  • 1200×900 (440 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (27.25 MB)
  • 1200×900 (301 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (90.74 MB)
  • 1200×900 (970 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11651×8743 (36.70 MB)
  • 1200×900 (471 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (53.98 MB)
  • 1200×900 (615 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (37.32 MB)
  • 1200×900 (359 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 8622×6466 (31.98 MB)
  • 1200×900 (934 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 4080×2599 (5.22 MB)
  • 1200×764 (440 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (38.43 MB)
  • 1200×900 (341 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (47.37 MB)
  • 1200×900 (602 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (54.84 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (53.27 MB)
  • 1200×900 (372 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (44.77 MB)
  • 1200×900 (300 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11405×8609 (46.43 MB)
  • 1200×906 (405 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (41.03 MB)
  • 1200×900 (464 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (48.90 MB)
  • 1200×900 (439 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (57.87 MB)
  • 1200×900 (646 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (46.18 MB)
  • 1200×900 (327 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (55.43 MB)
  • 1200×900 (621 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (30.09 MB)
  • 1200×900 (579 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (42.96 MB)
  • 1200×900 (636 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11224×8418 (40.83 MB)
  • 1200×900 (424 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (22.20 MB)
  • 1200×900 (299 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (31.46 MB)
  • 1200×900 (549 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (56.58 MB)
  • 1200×900 (679 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11224×8418 (40.85 MB)
  • 1200×900 (427 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11648×8736 (51.80 MB)
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2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11224×8418 (40.61 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11405×8609 (49.06 MB)
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2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin

  • 11405×8609 (47.23 MB)
  • 1200×906 (417 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (43.34 MB)
  • 1200×900 (386 KB)

2022 Honda CRF1100L Africa Twin both versions

2022 Honda CRF1100L Africa Twin both versions

  • 11648×8736 (39.61 MB)
  • 1200×900 (425 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 9424×7068 (25.21 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (43.64 MB)
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2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (46.97 MB)
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2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 10000×6670 (48.73 MB)
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2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 5464×3640 (12.42 MB)
  • 1200×799 (643 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 5457×4093 (2.33 MB)
  • 1200×900 (105 KB)

2022 Honda CRF1100L Africa Twin both versions

  • 11648×8736 (42.46 MB)
  • 1200×900 (664 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 10000×6670 (34.94 MB)
  • 1200×800 (558 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (35.45 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 5457×4093 (3.09 MB)
  • 1200×900 (191 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (57.62 MB)
  • 1200×900 (676 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (44.76 MB)
  • 1200×900 (423 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 5457×4093 (2.24 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (39.91 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (60.44 MB)
  • 1200×900 (750 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (63.37 MB)
  • 1200×900 (739 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

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2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

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2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (67.09 MB)
  • 1200×900 (412 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 10509×7882 (45.11 MB)
  • 1200×900 (851 KB)

2022 Honda CRF1100L Africa Twin both versions

  • 11450×8588 (36.79 MB)
  • 1200×900 (398 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 5464×3640 (14.16 MB)
  • 1200×799 (718 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (46.28 MB)
  • 1200×900 (387 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 4452×2967 (8.32 MB)
  • 1200×800 (702 KB)

2022 Honda CRF1100L Africa Twin both versions

  • 11648×8736 (41.28 MB)
  • 1200×900 (608 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 5457×4093 (3.06 MB)
  • 1200×900 (201 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11333×8500 (39.00 MB)
  • 1200×900 (318 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (42.19 MB)
  • 1200×900 (509 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 5457×4093 (2.56 MB)
  • 1200×900 (118 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 7997×5335 (33.40 MB)
  • 1200×801 (881 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 5457×4093 (2.98 MB)
  • 1200×900 (195 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11189×8392 (21.79 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 5457×4093 (3.98 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (36.38 MB)
  • 1200×900 (472 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 10000×6670 (44.85 MB)
  • 1200×800 (717 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (40.93 MB)
  • 1200×900 (392 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 1200×900 (388 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (42.57 MB)
  • 1200×900 (411 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11615×8711 (21.80 MB)
  • 1200×900 (241 KB)

2022 Honda CRF1100L Africa Twin both versions

  • 11648×8736 (29.93 MB)
  • 1200×900 (561 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (34.18 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 5457×4093 (3.08 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (32.08 MB)
  • 1200×900 (406 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 9103×6072 (40.14 MB)
  • 1200×800 (680 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 10000×6670 (47.06 MB)
  • 1200×800 (679 KB)

2022 Honda CRF1100L Africa Twin both versions

  • 11648×8736 (31.14 MB)
  • 1200×900 (452 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (36.72 MB)
  • 1200×900 (468 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (29.72 MB)
  • 1200×900 (534 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 10000×6670 (53.25 MB)
  • 1200×800 (822 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11305×8479 (53.22 MB)

2022 Honda CRF1100L Africa Twin both versions

  • 11359×8519 (27.29 MB)
  • 1200×900 (475 KB)

2022 Honda CRF1100L Africa Twin both versions

  • 11648×8736 (48.26 MB)
  • 1200×900 (519 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11378×8534 (25.04 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 8736×11648 (62.21 MB)
  • 900×1200 (885 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11272×8454 (35.65 MB)
  • 1200×900 (269 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (54.48 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 10000×6670 (57.59 MB)
  • 1200×800 (870 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (36.33 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (46.14 MB)
  • 1200×900 (647 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

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  • 1200×900 (511 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

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  • 1200×855 (1.04 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (36.32 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 10000×6609 (42.76 MB)
  • 1200×793 (728 KB)

2022 Honda CRF1100L Africa Twin both versions

  • 11648×8736 (46.19 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (43.22 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 10000×6670 (59.17 MB)
  • 1200×800 (960 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (40.67 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 10419×7814 (38.51 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (43.26 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 10000×6670 (57.89 MB)
  • 1200×800 (829 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 10973×8230 (24.05 MB)
  • 1200×900 (443 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 10193×7645 (15.67 MB)
  • 1200×900 (422 KB)

2022 Honda CRF1100L Africa Twin both versions

  • 11648×8736 (28.36 MB)
  • 1200×900 (479 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 5457×4093 (14.24 MB)
  • 1200×900 (626 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (27.55 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 9566×6380 (44.65 MB)
  • 1200×800 (804 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (34.89 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (36.31 MB)
  • 1200×900 (470 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×11000 (60.08 MB)
  • 1200×1133 (551 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 10000×6670 (45.70 MB)
  • 1200×800 (819 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 8740×5830 (53.80 MB)
  • 1200×800 (1.04 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (50.21 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (40.96 MB)
  • 1200×900 (420 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 1200×900 (196 KB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (42.11 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (46.24 MB)

2022 CRF1100L Africa Twin Adventure Sports

  • 11648×8736 (47.13 MB)

2022 Honda CRF1100L Africa Twin both versions

  • 11287×8465 (32.82 MB)
  • 1200×900 (553 KB)

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africa twin 1000 travel edition

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africa twin 1000 travel edition

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SPECIFICATIONS

2021 overview africa twin, european models shown, 2021 africa twin, 2021 africa twin adventure sports es.

Destination Charge: $475.00

Available Colors

Make life an adventure, has there ever been a better time to be an adventure-bike rider and has taking your next vacation on an adventure bike ever looked better either honda’s africa twin lineup is so good it’s an embarrassment of riches. technology. comfort. reliability you can count on, come rain or shine, continent-crossing journeys or weekend getaways. features like cruise control and touch-screen technology make it a great tourer, while its rugged construction and off-road refinements let you wander from horizon to horizon on the path less travelled. and best of all, there are four different africa twins to choose from. our standard africa twin is a great choice for serious off-road enthusiasts. for long-distance adventure touring, check out our two africa twin adventure sports es models: they offer special features like electronically controlled suspension, an adjustable windscreen, larger fuel tank, heated grips, tubeless tires, and more. plus, both are available with either a manual transmission or honda’s automatic dct transmission, one of the best technical-riding advantages ever..

  • AFRICA TWIN
  • AFRICA TWIN DCT

AFRICA TWIN ADVENTURE SPORTS ES

  • AFRICA TWIN ADVENTURE SPORTS ES DCT
  • Exterior 360
  • Interior 360
  • Africa Twin Adventure Sports ES

Africa Twin Adventure Sports ES

Color Option

Darkness Black Metallic

 alt=

PRIOR YEAR ACCESSORIZED EUROPEAN MODEL SHOWN WITH NON-OEM TIRES

Africa Twin

Africa Twin

Africa Twin DCT

  • Africa Twin DCT

Africa Twin Adventure Sports ES DCT

  • Africa Twin Adventure Sports ES DCT

 alt=

Special Features

Base features.

africa twin 1000 travel edition

TRY THE NEW MULTI- INFORMATION DISPLAY WITH THIS SIMULATOR

The new 6.5-inch touch-panel LCD Multi-Information Display connects you to your Africa Twin like never before. To help bring it to life for you, we created an interactive simulator that demonstrates the main functions of the MID. You can customize how much information you see with three unique displays, integrate your phone with Apple CarPlay™, and much more.

  • MODELS WITH DCT

africa twin 1000 travel edition

WELCOME TO DCT

Honda's Automatic Dual-Clutch Transmission (DCT) is a breakthrough feature that makes riding easier and more fun.

HOW IT WORKS

africa twin 1000 travel edition

ENJOY THE FREEDOM

Our DCT enhances the riding experience by letting you focus on the most rewarding parts of your ride, making each mile even better.

africa twin 1000 travel edition

PADDLE SHIFTING

Choose Manual Mode, and you can override the automatic shifting on the fly with a pair of handlebar-mounted fingertip shifters.

africa twin 1000 travel edition

BETTER POWER DELIVERY

Seamless power delivery and no power interruptions mean you avoid momentary traction losses between shifts.

africa twin 1000 travel edition

PROVEN Honda DURABILITY

Because our DCT is built with steel gears inside, there are no drive belts to slip, break, or burn up, and there’s no torque converter either. They’re as tough and efficient as any manual gearbox.

africa twin 1000 travel edition

SELECTABLE RIDE MODES

Programmed Ride Modes like Drive, Sport and Manual allow you to adjust the Africa Twin’s ride character. There’s also a special G-Switch for off-road riding, that helps you slide the rear tire under throttle input, to help steer with the rear.

africa twin 1000 travel edition

TRUE ENGINE COMPRESSION BRAKING

Engine compression braking is key to bike control, especially when entering turns or on technical downhills off-road. Since DCT has manual-type gearbox internals, you get genuine compression braking—and control.

africa twin 1000 travel edition

REAL-WORLD CONVENIENCE

DCT means no hunting for neutral or reaching for a shifter when you’re standing on the pegs. Plus, your left hand is free to activate a garage-door opener, find a parking key card or pay at a toll booth.

africa twin 1000 travel edition

RACE-PROVEN TECHNOLOGY

Supercars and Formula 1 use paddle-shift transmissions because they offer the fastest, most efficient shifting and deliver consistent power to the ground.

africa twin 1000 travel edition

LOW-SPEED MANEUVERING

DCT’s seamless power delivery is a big benefit on steep hills or in low-speed situations.

africa twin 1000 travel edition

STEEP HILLS

Eliminate the drama that comes with stopping and restarting on a steep incline. DCT lets you twist and go.

africa twin 1000 travel edition

AVOID THE CLUNK

Ever knock helmets with your passenger when shifting? That won’t happen with DCT.

AFRICA TWIN MODELS AVAILABLE WITH DCT

africa twin 1000 travel edition

DISCOVER Honda’s DCT

Available on the Africa Twin, our Automatic DCT delivers huge advantages in performance and ride character.

africa twin 1000 travel edition

ENGINEERING

Convenience.

POWER

European Model Shown

1084cc twin-cylinder engine.

The CRF1100L Africa Twin sports one of the best engines ever in an adventure bike. The parallel-twin design is narrow, and delivers torque everywhere from idle to redline. You’ll have more grunt down low, and cruise easy on the open road.

ENGINEERING

CRUISE CONTROL

Here’s one of the worst-kept secrets in the motorcycling world—Honda’s Africa Twins make great long-distance touring bikes. To that end, we’ve equipped our Africa Twin models with cruise control, just like our Gold Wings. Your next adventure really starts a couple of hundred miles away? No problem!

HANDLING

LONG-TRAVEL FRONT SUSPENSION

The Africa Twin doesn’t just look like an adventure bike—it’s the real deal. Exhibit A: Check out its long-travel front suspension. The inverted Showa fork is fully adjustable with huge 45mm tubes and 9.1 inches of travel—the most front-end travel in the 1000cc off-road class.

CONVENIENCE

Apple CarPlay™

Apple CarPlay ™* seamlessly integrates your compatible iPhone ®* into your new Africa Twin. That means you can use your iPhone ® to access Apple Maps, Apple Music, and other services easily. You’ll have access to weather, playlists and telephone numbers while aboard. Available Bluetooth ®** -enabled wireless headsets let you communicate more easily than ever. And best of all, with more apps available every day, Apple CarPlay ™ keeps your bike’s technology and convenience on the cutting edge. *Apple CarPlay and iPhone are trademarks of Apple Inc. **For using Apple CarPlay, connection to a commercially available Bluetooth headset is necessary. See owner's manual for Bluetooth headset requirements.

SMARTPHONE SOFTWARE UPDATE

Updating your Africa Twin’s software helps you get the most out of your bike. Plus, those upgrades now include Android Auto compatibility, so you can use both your smartphone’s Android Auto or Apple CarPlay™ systems to give you navigational help, and more. Installation is easy and free to download—we’ll walk you through all the steps.

Engine Type

1084cc liquid-cooled Unicam® four-stroke 22.5º parallel-twin

Bore And Stroke

92mm x 81.5mm

Compression Ratio

PGM-FI electronic fuel injection (Throttle By Wire)

Full transistorized ignition

You are now leaving the Honda Powersports web site and entering an independent site.

American Honda Motor Co. Inc. is not responsible for the content presented by any independent website, including advertising claims, special offers, illustrations, names or endorsements. Thank you for visiting www.powersports.honda.com.

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Honda CRF1000L Africa Twin review and test

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That's South Africa. A dirt road and the Africa Twin. Potter is in heaven.

Honda claim the new CRF1000L Africa Twin offers true adventure with the comfort of a tourer and the agility of a commuter and the ability to make dirt roads a joy. All we know is the legendary Africa Twin name is back, and we've ridden it in South Africa. Here's our full review and test.

Africa Twin Full test and review

HONDA are properly serious about the new CRF1000L Africa Twin being a proper adventure bike. So much so that within ten miles of getting on the stunning new older brother to the original Africa Twin, that we were blasting down a fast South African gravel road at 70mph. And yes, South Africa. Where else could you launch to the world’s press Honda’s all-new adventure bike?

In near 40-degree heat and with standard Dunlop Trailmax tyres (complete with tubes) on and the standard manual transmission bike doing the work, instead of the fancier and more expensive DCT model which we’ll come to later, the bike was immediately impressive. All big roosting sideways drifts and the supple fully-adjustable conventional suspension soaking up the gravel and sandy roads.

Honda's CRF1000L Africa Twin. We're in Africa riding it. Full review here.

Where some big adventure bikes feel a bit unwieldy and like they’re leading you up the gravel path, when off-road, the CRF1000L Africa Twin is a bonafide impressive adventure bike from the word go.

And that’s in the next generation DCT twin clutch transmission or in manual, old school, foot on a gear lever mode.

But this is Africa, so today we were briefed to watch out for the baboons, occasional Wildebeest and random wild tortoises. If you ever wanted to test the levels of ABS control off-road, a baboon running out in front of you on a gravel road will do it. It doesn’t get any more ‘adventure’ than that.

It might share the name with the original and some of its styling DNA of the 57bhp Honda XRV650 of 1988 , and the later 1990 XRV750 Africa Twin which made 61bhp, but they are totally different machines.

The new CRF1000L Africa Twin combines the Africa Twin heritage and style cues but uses the best of Honda’s current technical philosophy. So there are two bikes. One at £11,299 using a DCT automatic gearbox with a mesmerising 80 possible mode settings from traction control and power delivery to levels of gear selection and hill control. And the second, more basic but blindingly good manual bike coming in to the UK at £10,499.

The price, and the spec of the 93.8bhp inline twin cylinder motor and it’s fancy Unicam system and 270 degree crank, puts the new Africa Twin right in the middle of bikes like the R1200GS and the F800GS. Both versions of the Africa Twin use the same CRF450 Rally bike inspired frame design and that fluid, linear twin cylinder oversquare motor. It’s no surprise that the bike’s chief designer, Italian Maurizio Carbonara, said the bike’s styling combines CRF Rally bikes and the original Africa Twin inspired lines.

It’s 1000cc for a reason. One because it’s the headline halo bike of Honda’s adventure range which includes the NC750X, the CB500X and the Crosstourer and Crossrunner, and two because it should make buyers question if they really need a 1200, or would a 1000cc do just fine? And if you’re looking to buy an 800 like the aforementioned BMW, or Triumph’s Tiger 800, then maybe a 1000 could be on the cards for a bit more dollar. It’s cleverly pitched.

Compared to a BMW R1200GS which makes around 125bhp, the Honda has rightfully been criticised for being under powered. A KTM 1190 Adventure making around 150bhp would smoke it. But that’s not the point. It slots neatly in the middle somewhere. And it can ride anywhere, just as Honda intended. You want escape? You want an Africa Twin.

Road, off-road, town or country. The Africa Twin is a great bike. Escape? It's right there in this picture.

The dual-clutch transmission is immediately obvious because the engine case sticks out slightly further, and there’s no clutch lever. Just a parking brake in its place, tucked away behind the handguards.

To use the DCT you simply start the bike, push the right-hand button into D for drive, or S for Sport and engage one of the three new sport settings. S1 is the entry-level to sports mode, then there’s S2 which hangs on to gears longer, and S3 which is used for more extreme sports riding and hangs onto gears till the redline.

Add in a G button for improved connection with the bike and the throttle when off-road, and the hill climb and descent technology which changes gear depending on the ascent or incline. We haven’t had much chance to use the G switch yet, but will get the chance again tomorrow on some more serious off-road sections.

Today we hit loads of fast, gravelly fire road sections on both the DCT and the standard ABS bike and were impressed. Seriously impressed.

Off-road the motor revs so flat and the delivery of it is so linear that it manages to feel connected to the rear tyre and yet find grip in a way no other big adventure bike can. There’s no big peaks so if it gets sideways on gravel then it just sorts itself out with the torque curve. And that’s without traction control on, Switch that on and at level 3 the bike could be ridden on ice and not slide, on level two it intervenes reasonably early, and on level one you can feel like a drift king. You know it’s working but it never gets in the way. In the manual bike it hangs in there until you decide to shift gears.

On the DCT bike it shifts seamlessly through the box, probably better than most humans can, so there’s no change in weight transfer. It just shifts, the number on the dash changes and the engine note changes. You can adjust it manually by using the forefinger and thumb buttons for + and – if you want to manually override. There’s even the option of a foot lever which is in the conventional gear lever place near your left foot, but acts as a switch, rather than physically moving cogs.

But it’s on-the-road where the new Africa Twin will be spending most of its life. In the same way a Range Rover owner wants to know that if they fancied driving to the top of Mount Snowdon they could, it’s the same deal for the Africa Twin. Most people will never take a £10,000+ motorcycle off-road any more than a gravel car park. But you could. And it does do it. Impressively so.

Adventure bikes are all things to all men, so one moment they need enough ground clearance to ride off-road, the next they’re two-up with a pillion going touring. They need to be ridden fast occasionally and do the regular commute. So it’s all credit to Honda they’ve managed to pull of such an accomplished bike that ticks all the boxes.

On the road the engine is smooth, the power delivery creamy. There’s not huge amounts of excitement. No big power steps, it’s just always there when you want it and it sounds really good for a bike that has to meet strict Euro 4 emissions and noise laws. But that hasn’t stopped me wanting one. It’s so incredibly capable.

Honda describe the exhaust noise as an angry CRF450. I’d say it’s more like a slightly miffed CRF450 with a tea towel down its exhaust, but it sounds good all the same.

DCT or manual. This is the manual bike. It's all about looking around, waking up somewhere new each day. Oh, and it will do the daily commute too.

In touring type riding, the DCT bike is a revelation. It gives you mental space to read the road, take in the spectacular mountain scenery and not have to think very hard about the bike at all.

As you might expect for a bike that’s all things to all men and fulfils the routing role perfectly, the riding position is ultra-comfortable. You sit very upright with big wide bars and somehow it feels reminiscent of the original Africa Twin’s riding position, a bike I was a big fan of in the nineties right up until it finished production in 2003.

Everything is easy. It all works and once out of town there’s enough stomp to make it entertaining. It’s not a powerhouse but there’s just enough go. Ride it in a leisurely touring fashion at it’s doing around 70mph at 4000rpm, though you’d need to shift down to overtake something at that speed. But it’s relaxed, smooth and the kind of bike you can do a lot of miles on. And more importantly, it feels right. There’s a subtle pulse to the engine and a good feeling from the throttle which feels direct.

I love the design of the bike, It’s aggressive looking, hints just enough at Dakar bikes, and the LED lights on the DCT bike give it a really distinct face when you see it on-the-road.

It's such an easy bike to get on and just ride, even if the scenery is this distracting.

Get it on to a twisty road and Honda’s claims of agility come true. The 21-inch front wheel means it’s more off-road biased than a BMW R1200GS with its 19-inch front and 17-inch rear, but it works on the road too.

Dual-purpose Dunlop Trailmax tyres give decent lean angles and feel, even in 40-degree heat when the road surface if melting. Though when riding really fast you could feel the 21-inch front almost tucking when you hit some oscillations in a corner a couple of times. Our guide, a local rider, says this is due to the road surface and not the bike. I take his word for it, But it did happen to a few British journalists who ride fast.

OTHER AFRICA TWIN STORIES YOU MIGHT LIKE:

CRF1000L Africa Twin specs and technical info

New Africa Twin spied!

Africa Twin name is back!

At the rear is an 18-inch which means plenty of proper knobble tyre options are available. I guess the tuck at the front when on the limit, is a warning not to over ride the bike, or try and ride it like a sports bike and shows one of the bike’s few compromises. It’s not easy being everything to every man.

On smoother, grippier roads it was never a problem and very impressive at goon riding. At 99 per cent, the bike can be hustled quickly. And it’s incredibly stable too. Again, it’s something when a bike is this agile and flickable on a tight and twisty road, yet so stable at high speed with a 43 degree steering head angle.

The motor performs best when kept above 5000rpm and running it up to around 7500rpm for maximum power.

Get it in the sweet spot and it will rev-on so you can blast between second and third gear corners using the bike agility to get it stuck in on the brakes and turned fast. The DCT in S3 setting holds gears nicely between corners too, letting you redline it before rolling off for the next tight bend. It’s not perfect but it’s very impressive and no doubt what the next generation of riders will be after. Something like 50 per cent of the nine bikes in Honda’s range with DCT available are now ordered with the system on. The traction control is best dialled down to its lowest level at number one where you never know it’s there. It’s easy to adjust with your finger on what we traditionally know as the headlight flasher switch.

The ABS is perfectly in tune with the bike, it rarely comes in and works well with just the occasional tiny squeak from the rear tyre if you’re trying hard on the way in. It’s exactly what you need when riding on some of the world’s most spectacular roads with sheer drops either side and massive cliff-drops if you get it wrong.

The Africa Twin finds grip anywhere. This is 100kmh, or about 60-plus mph.

The Showa 43mm upside down front forks and Showa rear shock are all fully-adjustable, and work great and the chassis set-up is impressive in that it can hustle fast, yet has plenty of feel and control off-road. The chassis man needs a gold star. It may not have the option of semi-active suspension but it doesn’t need it either.

All-round Honda have made a seriously capable adventure bike that ticks all the boxes of anything you’d ever want from an adventure bike. It’s well-made, looks right on trend with its Dakar Rally bike inspired-looks and rides well on and off-road. At this price, and this quality you’d be hard pushed to recommend anything else. The Africa Twin is back. And in spectacular, highly competent fashion. If you want an adventure bike that can take the rough with the smooth and bring a smile to your face every time you ride, there’s a new option. And it has a Honda badge on the tank.

The Africa Twin makes mere mortals into dirt riding gods, for an adventure bike at least. Potter is more than pleased with this shot!

Honda CRF1000L Africa Twin with DCT tested on the dirt!

IF you’d told me yesterday that I’d fall in love with an automatic transmission system on an off-road adventure bike I’d have laughed at you. But there we are, on top of a small mountain having ridden the new Honda CRF1000L Africa Twin with DCT on a challenging rocky, sandy and sometimes technical 14km loop and my left foot hasn’t done any work. Other than hang on and grip the frame protectors.

The DCT bike selects the right gear for the incline and descent.

But off-road the system is a revelation. For all-round 90 per cent of the time riding, and off-road I’d take it over the manual bike every time.

If you told me I would say that even yesterday I’d have laughed at you.

It changes the way big adventure bikes feel off-road and allows average off-road riders like me to go quicker, feel less tired, and saves 10 per cent of my brain power for looking where I’m going. Just hit the gas, feel the traction-control, or torque control system kick-in while it lets the bike slide (in setting one), and the bike charges forward in a big dust bowl of traction and revs while seemingly doing some of the hard bit for the rider.

My big reservation about the system was whether or not it would give enough engine braking and change down enough when tackling slippery, downhill descents. But after a few hundred feet I threw that reservation out of the window.

Chassis is predictable and the suspension good off-road. This is the manual bike.

Even on low-speed sandy corners where the front wants to dig in, and you’re going so slow a manual transmission bike would stall. On the DCT version it just drives out of the corner from seemingly zero revs. It’s impossible to stall. I tried it and couldn’t make it happen!

But it’s not just the DCT that makes the Africa Twin so competent off-road. The way the engine makes its lazy 270-degree crank grunt means it finds grip even with the traction off. It never feels wanting more power, the traction control system is brilliant, and the chassis is so competent it makes a big adventure bike lose its weight. You know it’s big, you know it’s heavy but the way it got round the 14km course for a couple of laps amazed me.

On Continental Twinduro tyres you could feel what the front tyre was doing, let it wash-out in sand and still get away with it. The ABS can be deactivated at the rear with a big button on the dash, while the front keeps the ABS on. Amazingly, it works just as well on the dirt as it does on the road and stops you quickly while still finding grip even on sand. If you’re a dirt god then you can always back it in on the rear brake.

Africa Twin and a happy Marc Potter. He's already thinking about his next off-road mission.

The suspension takes rocks and bumps even when a slightly ham-fisted off-road rider like me gets it wrong, and if you do land from a jump on to some loose rocks, the metal belly pan absorbs the rocks so the motor is tucked away safe from harm.

Honda didn’t have to make the Africa Twin this good off-road, but I’m glad they did. It gives the Africa Twin and its rider ultimate cred to know that you could enter an easy enduro on a real adventure bike and get away with it. Honda say it’s True Adventure, after the last two days I couldn’t agree more. The engineers behind this bike deserve a pay rise.

Honda Africa Twin looks good in any colour.

There are so many adventure bikes we could have listed, including the new Ducati Multistrada 1200 Enduro , and Triumph’s new Explorer range , and not forgetting the Yamaha XTZ1200 Super Tenere . But here are what we think will be the Africa Twin’s most direct rivals. We’ll hopefully bring you a full group test of all the big adventure bikes when we can get them all together.

Africa Twin ready for 2016

Honda Africa Twin

Price: from £10,499

Power: 93.8bhp

Wet Weight: 232kg (with ABS)

Tank size: 18.8 litres

Our verdict:  Read the test above!

BMW's all-conquering R1200GS

BMW R1200GS

Price: £12,100 otr

Engine: Air/liquid-cooled four-stroke boxer twin. 1170cc

Power: 125bhp

Wet Weight: 238kg

Tank size: 20 litres

Our verdict: The king of all adventure bikes still manages to cut that fine line between being a brilliant sports tourer and a bike that can really tackle off-road. It’s hard to beat as tens of thousands of UK buyers will testify.

KTM 1050 Adventure, new in 2015

KTM 1050 Adventure

Price: £10,999

Engine: Liquid-cooled  2-cylinder, 4-stroke, 75° V

Dry Weight: 212kg

Tank size: 23 litres

Our verdict: Gutsy engine defies its specs and it’s fun to ride, the 1050 Adventure also matches the Africa Twin on price. Can it do off-road? Well, yes, kind of, it’s a KTM after all, a brand built on its off-road heritage.

2016 HONDA CRF1000L AFRICA TWIN TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS:

Looking for bike insurance? Get a Honda motorcycle insurance quote with Bennetts today! 

2020 Africa Twin review now available here. 

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2018 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports CRF1000L2 Review

2018 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports CRF1000L2

NEW DAY, NEW ADVENTURES.

2018 honda africa twin adventure sports crf1000l2 review on total motorcycle :.

Get ready for an even better Africa Twin, the new Adventure Sports 30th Anniversary Edition. Same great engine, but now you get a bigger fuel tank, more suspension travel, throttle-by-wire, a larger skid plate, wider footpegs and a flatter seat. There’s even a rear rack.

When the CRF1000L Africa Twin was introduced in 2016 as an homage to the successful XRV650 and XRV750, the full-scale adventure motorcycle was immediately heralded for being equally capable of crossing rugged continents and highway cruising. Now, the “True Adventure” spirit of the award-winning model expands with the introduction of the CRF1000L2 Africa Twin Adventure Sports, which pushes the platform even further into the long-range off-road-ready territory. In addition, the standard CRF1000L Africa Twin has received important updates.

Similar in overarching design, both 2018 models offer a superb balance of power and light weight, a key component to the platform’s success and user-friendly nature. They also benefit from added electronic functionality and improved engine performance. To build on this and enhance its adventure-touring capabilities, the Adventure Sports model offers improved range through a larger fuel tank, more creature comforts for longer touring, and added ground clearance through increased suspension travel.

It’s been 30 years since the legendary Honda XRV650 Africa Twin first rolled into Europe and while the motorcycle that now bears its name – launched in 2016 as the CRF1000L Africa Twin – shares no common part with the forerunner it inherits the essence and spirit of what made the original so  good.

The balance between power and weight is the Africa Twin’s secret, then and now. The renewed machine has proved itself a modern-day all-rounder, popular with casual tourers and off-road adventurers alike (plus all riders in between) because it offers enjoyable and usable engine performance in a chassis that works as well on-road as it does off.

For 2018 Honda is building on the Africa Twin’s strengths, and its success. The base model CRF1000L Africa Twin receives a host of detail upgrades to both manual transmission and Dual Clutch Transmission (DCT) options that enhance the riding and owning experience, while the new CRF1000L Africa Twin Adventure Sports version extends the platform even further into long-range off-road ready territory.

A new version of Honda’s definitive full-size adventure machine is ready for Adventure Sports in 2018, with larger fuel tank for a range of over 500km, higher riding position, greater ground clearance, heated grips, extended fairing plus longer travel suspension. It also has Throttle By Wire with 3 riding modes, expanded Honda Selectable Torque Control parameters and revised intake and exhaust. The original Africa Twin’s 30th anniversary is celebrated with unique paint scheme.

Mr K. Morita, Large Project Leader (LPL) 2018 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports

“Our CRF1000L Africa Twin has proven itself a worthy successor to the original and very much the ‘ Go Anywhere’ machine that we set out to make. Over the last two years it’s a motorcycle that’s covered millions of kilometres, and we have received plentiful feedback from owners. For 2018, with the Africa Twin Adventure Sports we have used the revised CRF1000L as a starting point and added everything the long-distance rider needs to get the very most out of any adventure.”

Model Overview

Side-by-side with its sibling, the CRF1000L Africa Twin Adventure Sports is obviously taller, with a flatter seat profile and more upright riding position. The fairing and screen offer more wind protection and a large sump guard and side pipe fully protect the machine. An extra 5.4L fuel capacity extends range beyond 500km, while heated grips and an AC charging socket add comfort and convenience.

The Africa Twin Adventure Sports’ comprehensive abilities start with its engine, which has to perform in off-road situations as well as on-road, over long-range tours, short commutes and all points in between. As such, it provides an optimum balance between power, torque, mass and physical dimension.

The four-valve 998cc parallel twin Unicam unit’s tractable and usable all-day performance belies its extremely compact dimensions. They are the result of clever packaging touches such as housing the water pump within the clutch casing, and using the engine’s balancer shafts to also drive water and oil pumps. As a result, longitudinally, it is the same length as Honda’s popular 500cc engine, and its short height contributes to the Africa Twin Adventure Sport’s 270mm of ground clearance.

For 2018, a modified airbox improves the power unit’s mid-range response, as does a lighter balancer shaft weight. A revised exhaust serves up an even more evocative howl as revs rise and also contributes to the improved performance.

A significant addition to the Africa Twin platform for 2018 is its new Throttle By Wire (TBW) system, which brings with it 3 riding modes to adjust engine character and output to suit riding conditions. Also new is an extended range of Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC) input.

The unique DCT (Dual Clutch Transmission) version features the standard manual mode – allowing the rider to operate gearshifts through triggers on the left handlebar – and two automatic modes. D mode offers the best balance of fuel economy and comfort cruising whilst S mode gives three different, sportier shift patterns to choose from. The DCT is also fully equipped to operate in an off-road environment and off-road functionality is enhanced by the  G  button. Pushing the  G  button in any riding mode modifies the control of the clutch system to give a more direct drive.

The semi-double cradle steel frame provides the ideal balance of high-speed stability matched to genuine off-road ability by combining sheer strength with flexibility. The engine is mounted on 6 engine hangers, which keeps vibration to a minimum, avoiding the need for steering dampers. The new lithium-ion battery saves 2.3kg on the 2017 Africa Twin’s lead unit, and the Adventure Sports version shares several detail changes made to improve the platform’s off-road ability and durability.

Fully adjustable 45mm Showa inverted forks, fully-adjustable rear shock, dual radial-mount Nissin four-piston brake calipers and 310mm ‘wave’ style floating discs are unchanged for 2018. The 21-inch front and 18-inch rear spoked wheels are constructed from stainless steel. In addition to the standard dual-purpose 90 front/150 rear rubber, block tyres are also approved for fitment.

Dual LED headlights maintain the original Africa Twin’s presence and the seat height adjusts 20mm from the 900mm to 920mm (both respectively 50mm higher than the standard model). The 24.2L fuel tank – and the engine’s fuel efficiency of 21.8km/l (WMTC in DCT mode) – provides a range of over 500km.

The 2018 CRF1000L Africa Twin Adventure Sports will be available in one 30 th anniversary Tricolore paint scheme to celebrate the XRV650’s launch in 1988.

2018 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports CRF1000L2  Totalmotorcycle.com Key Features

Honda’s Africa Twin platform grows today with the announcement of the 2018 CRF1000L2 Africa Twin Adventure Sports, which was introduced alongside an updated standard 2018 CRF1000L Africa Twin at the EICMA motorcycle show in Milan. Following a European release early next year, both models will be available in the U.S. in summer of 2018. Suggested retail price for the Adventure Sports model is approximately $2,000 higher than that of the current Africa Twin.

Displayed previously in concept form, and developed as a powerful extension of the “True Adventure” mantra that drives the Africa Twin platform, the new Adventure Sports version features increased suspension travel, added ground clearance, enhanced creature comforts, and a larger fuel tank for extended range. Both the Adventure Sports and the standard Africa Twin feature a long list of updates to the engine, electronics, and rider interface, while continuing to offer an ideal balance of power and light weight.

“The Africa Twin’s success on showroom floors and in comparison tests is evidence of the platform’s profound capabilities, but the Adventure Sports model expands the possibilities by making it possible to ride further and more comfortably,” said Lee Edmunds, American Honda’s Manager of Motorcycle Marketing Communications. “We’ve enjoyed seeing our customers put their own interpretations on the Africa Twin’s ‘True Adventure’ ethos, and with the increased capabilities of the new Adventure Sports, as well as those of the updated standard Africa Twin, we expect that spirit will be applied in new and exciting ways.”

  • CRF1000L2 Africa Twin Adventure Sports: White/Blue/Red
  • CRF1000L Africa Twin: TBA
  • Availability: Summer 2018

KEY FEATURES

  • Africa Twin Adventure Sports has a larger fairing matched with an 80mm taller screen to offer greater wind protection, and comes standard with heated grips and a 12 volt accessory socket, facilitating longer tours in wide-ranging conditions
  • Adventure Sports model comes standard with larger sump guard and front light bars, as well as brushed-aluminum cowling panels, rear mudguard, and easily removable steel rack
  • Adventure Sports model has larger, 6.37-gallon fuel tank (compared to 4.97 gallons on the standard model), extending range
  • Both CRF1000L Africa Twin models now have auto-canceling turn indicators
  • Adventure Sports model’s seat features a flatter profile and a 1.2-inch-taller height than standard model. The seat adjusts .8 inches, for a seat height of either 35.4 inches or 36.2 inches (compared to 33.5 inches and 34.3 inches). Handlebar position is 1.3 inches higher and .2 inches rearward compared to the standard version
  • Adventure Sports model has a storage pocket on rear right
  • On both models, the rider’s foot pegs are now wider and affixed via stouter steel mounting plates, whereas the passenger foot-peg hangers have been redesigned to allow more room for the rider’s feet when standing
  • On both models, instruments are positioned at a shallower angle to allow the rider to see them more easily from a standing position
  • Adventure Sports model has updated, longer-travel Showa suspension, resulting in 10.6 inches of ground clearance (compared to 9.8 inches). On both models, shock preload, rebound damping, and compression damping are fully adjustable
  • Both models have compact two-piece, radial-mount, four-piston front-brake calipers and “wave” floating rotors front and rear. The lightweight two-channel ABS can be turned off at the rear
  • Both models feature front and rear wheels in size 21 and 18 inches, respectively, with stainless-steel spokes for improved durability
  • On both models, the 998cc SOHC eight-valve parallel-twin engine is updated with a new airbox, now featuring a 20mm longer funnel length and matched to redesigned exhaust internals that significantly improve midrange response and sound quality
  • On both models, the engine’s balancer-shaft weights have been lightened by 10.6 ounces for added character and feel in power delivery
  • Water pump is housed within the clutch casing, with a thermostat integrated into the cylinder head, while water and oil pumps are driven by the engine’s balancer shafts, contributing to a compact engine and optimum ground clearance
  • New for 2018, a lithium-ion battery is 5.1 lbs. lighter than the previous lead-acid unit
  • Both versions available with Honda’s advanced automatic Dual Clutch Transmission (DCT), delivering consistent, quick, seamless gear changes on-road or off. Rider can select from three different shifting modes, and a G switch enhances off-road functionality by reducing the amount of clutch slip during gear changes
  • New for 2018, both Africa Twin models have Throttle-By-Wire system (TBW), opening the door to four individual riding modes and an expanded Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC) system
  • HSTC now features seven levels (up from three), to adapt to a wide variety of conditions. HSTC can also be completely switched off, and three levels of power and engine braking are available

2018 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports CRF1000L2  Totalmotorcycle.com Features and Benefits

  • Longer travel suspension, flatter seat and more upright riding position
  • Extended fairing protection and taller screen
  • Heated grips as standard plus AC charging socket
  • Rider’s footpegs/pillion footpeg hangers designed for off-road use
  • Stainless steel spokes offer durability and ease of care
  • Emergency Stop Signal function for rear indicators

The Africa Twin Adventure Sports’ steel semi-double cradle frame provides nimble on-road manners plus high-speed stability matched to genuine off-road ability, agility and strength. Ground clearance is 270mm (20mm more than the Africa Twin) with wheelbase of 1575mm and rake and trail of 27.5°/115. Wet weight is 243kg (253kg DCT).

With stroke length of 252mm (up 22mm on the standard Africa Twin) the 45mm Showa cartridge-type inverted front fork offers excellent long-travel performance and control; rebound and compression damping are fully adjustable. A cast aluminium top yoke and forged bottom yoke – joined by hollow aluminium stem shaft – clamp the fork legs with two bolts each top and bottom.

Matching the supple front suspension the Showa rear shock delivers an extra 20mm travel, at 240mm. Its upper mount is set low for mass centralisation and it features a 46mm cylinder remote reservoir for stable damping control under more extreme off-road riding conditions. Spring preload can be adjusted via a dial on the shock body; rebound and compression damping are also fully adjustable.

There are some other updates shared between both Africa Twins that off-road riders are sure to appreciate: the rider’s footpegs are now wider, and feature beefed-up steel mounting plates. The pillion footpeg hangers have also been redesigned to allow more room for the rider’s feet when standing and the instruments are angled at a shallower angle to allow the rider to see them easily from a standing position.

The Africa Twin Adventure Sports’ styling is less minimalist than the Africa Twin; the dual headlights are shared but it has a larger fairing matched with an 80mm taller screen to offer greater wind protection. It also features heated grips as standard plus an AC socket.

A large sump guard is unique to the machine and protects the underside while the front side pipes guard the bodywork. Brushed aluminium cowling panels add tough appeal and class; the rear mudguard and stainless steel rack are also easily removed. Aluminium side cases will be available.

For extended off-road use the seat features a flatter profile – and is 50mm taller – than the standard CRF1000L Africa Twin. It adjusts 20mm to either 900mm or 920mm (compared to 850mm and 870mm); there’s also a rear side pocket tucked away on the right. To match the raised seat height the handlebar position is 32.5mm higher and pulled back 5mm.

The rear indicators now also offer an Emergency Stop Signal function. At a minimum speed of 53km/h, with either brake working, if negative acceleration of a minimum of 6.0m/s 2 is detected the hazard lights flash, warning other road users a hard stop is in process. At the same speed the threshold is reduced with ABS in play – for wet conditions ­– to a negative acceleration of a minimum 2.5m/s 2 .

The indicators now also auto-cancel. Rather than using a simple timer, the system compares front and rear wheel speed difference and calculates when to cancel the indication relative to the situation.

Compact two-piece radial-mount four-piston calipers work dual 310mm ‘wave’ floating discs through sintered pads and serve up consistent stopping power and feel on-road or off. The rear 256mm ‘wave’ disc features hole punching and shaping to deliver secure braking performance. Lightweight two-channel ABS can be turned off for the rear caliper only.

Like the CRF450R Rally, the CRF1000L Africa Twin Adventure Sports uses 21/18-inch front rear spoked wheels, wearing 90/90-21 and 150/70-18 tyres. The spokes are manufactured in stainless steel, for improved durability and ease of care.

Block pattern tyres (Continental 90/90-21M/C 545 and 150/70 B18M/C 70Q, rated at 180km/h and 160km/h respectively) are now approved by Honda for fitment to take full advantage of the Africa Twin Adventure Sports’ off-road abilities.

Engine Management Electronics

  • Throttle By Wire (TBW) brings with it 3 rider modes to tailor engine character and traction
  • The riding modes are comprised of different levels of Power (P), Engine Braking (EB) and Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC)
  • HSTC now has 7 levels and OFF

The Africa Twin Adventure Sports’ 998cc SOHC 8-valve parallel-twin engine’s 2018 upgrade sees it receive Throttle By Wire (TBW) plus riding modes and expanded Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC).

The use of TBW greatly expands the choices available to the rider to manage engine output, feel and rear wheel traction to suit different riding conditions. Whereas the 2017 Africa Twin had 3 Levels of HSTC, plus OFF, the new system features 7 Levels – from Level 1, for aggressive riding off-road on block pattern tyres, to Level 7 for maximum sense of security on slippery, wet tarmac. It remains possible to turn HSTC completely OFF.

There are also 3 levels of Power and Engine Braking available.

In a set-up first used on the RC213V-S – Honda’s street legal version of its MotoGP racer – three riding modes offer pre-set combinations of each parameter, suitable to different riding environments and scenarios:

TOUR employs the maximum Power (1), mid-range Engine Braking (2) and high HSTC (6).

URBAN uses mid-level Power (2) and Engine Braking (2) and high HSTC (6).

GRAVEL mode allows the lowest level of Power (3) and EB (3) with high HSTC (6).

A fourth mode – USER – allows the rider to set and save his or her preferred combination of Power, EB and HSTC levels. Both riding mode and level of HSTC can be changed at anytime using the controls on the left hand switchgear.

  • New intake design and exhaust aid mid-range response
  • New exhaust also designed to improve engine note
  • New lighter balance shaft weight
  • New lithium-ion battery saves 2.3 kg and enhances durability
  • Power is smooth and consistent, with linear torque delivery
  • Assist/slipper clutch helps upshifts and downshifts

Alongside the new engine management electronics for 2018, the airbox now features a 20mm longer funnel length, matched with redesigned exhaust internals to significantly boost mid-range response and sound. The 2-1 downpipe now feeds gas flow through two catalysers (rather than one) into a simplified, smaller volume (4.6L to 4L) muffler that houses two chambers rather three.

Peak power of 70Kw still arrives @ 7,500rpm, with 99Nm torque @ 6,000rpm. Bore and stroke are set at 92 x 75.1mm, with compression ratio of 10.0:1; the 270° phased crankshaft and uneven firing interval create the engine’s distinctive throb and feel for rear wheel traction.

Good ground clearance – crucial to off-road performance – starts with a compact, short engine. So the crankcases are split vertically; the water pump is housed within the clutch casing with a thermostat integrated into the cylinder head. Manual and DCT versions of the engine share common crankcases with only minor external differences. The water and oil pumps are driven by the engine’s balancer shafts; for 2018 300g has been shaved from the balance weight, reducing inertia by 306g/cm 2 , further adding to the character and feel of the power delivery.

Four-valve cylinder heads, fed by PGM-FI fuel injection, each employ twin spark plugs and dual and sequential ignition control for even combustion. Honda’s SOHC Unicam valve train is a feature of the CRF450R and the low-set position of the cast camshaft contributes to the compact nature of the cylinder head. The inlet valves are 36.5mm in diameter, the exhaust valves 31mm.

The engine uses a semi-dry sump and in-tank lower crankcase oil storage. This allows a lower pan depth, reducing overall engine height. As the pressure-fed pump is located within the tank where it delivers its oil from, there is no need for a pressure-feed passage; again saving weight and space.

Secondary vibrations are neutralised by the mutually reciprocating motion of the pistons, while primary inertial and coupling vibrations are cancelled by the use of biaxial balance shafts. The front balancer shaft uses two weights, the rear only a single weight in order to save weight.

The aluminium clutch centre and pressure plate use ‘assist’ cams to ease upshift and downshift (with light lever feel) and ‘slipper’ cams for deceleration and downshifting. The six-speed gearbox uses ‘pierced’ shape dogs for 1 st , 2 nd , 3 rd  and 4 th  gear, allowing use of a smaller, lighter clutch. Oil gathering ribs on the main journal side of the primary gear ensure consistent lubrication for the gear, damper spring and primary sub-gear.

The lightweight six-speed manual gearbox uses the same shift-cam design as found on the CRF450R to ensure positive changes, and is equipped with an aluminium assist slipper clutch.

New for 2018 a lithium-ion battery is 2.3kg lighter than the lead unit of the 2017 Africa Twin, and offers greater longevity, both in terms of life and the ability to hold onto a charge when left.

A quickshifter is available as an optional extra.

Dual Clutch Transmission (DCT)

  • Super-fast, seamless gear changes in Manual Transmission (MT) or Automatic D mode
  • S mode (with 3 levels) revs higher and downshifts sooner, for aggressive riding
  • G switch improves rear wheel traction when off-road
  • Incline detection adapts shift pattern depending on road gradient

Honda’s unique DCT delivers consistent, super-fast seamless gear changes, and very quickly becomes second nature in use. It uses two clutches: one for start-up and 1 st , 3 rd  and 5 th  gears: the other for 2 nd , 4 th  and 6 th , with the mainshaft for each clutch located inside the other for compact packaging.

Each clutch is independently controlled by its own electro-hydraulic circuit. When a gear change occurs, the system pre-selects the target gear using the clutch not currently in use. The first clutch is then electronically disengaged as, simultaneously, the second clutch engages.

The result is a consistent, fast and seamless gear change. Furthermore, as the twin clutches transfer drive from one gear to the next with minimal interruption of the drive to the rear wheel, any gear change shock and pitching of the machine is minimised, making the change feel direct as well as smooth.

The extra benefits of durability (as the gears cannot be damaged by missing a gear) impossibility of stalling, low stress urban riding and reduced rider fatigue add to the DCT’s appeal

Three modes of operation are available. MT mode gives full manual control, allowing the rider to shift with the handlebar trigger control buttons. Automatic D mode is ideal for city and highway riding, and achieves optimum fuel efficiency. Automatic S mode offers three levels of sportier riding, as the ECU lets the engine rev a little higher before shifting up, and shifts down sooner when decelerating for extra engine braking.

In either D or S mode, DCT offers immediate manual intervention if required – the rider simply selects the required gear using the up and down shift triggers on the left handlebar. At an appropriate time DCT seamlessly reverts back to automatic mode, depending on throttle angle, vehicle speed and gear position.

DCT for the Africa Twin is also fully equipped to operate in an adventure environment, with off-road functionality enhanced by the  G  switch positioned on the right side of the instrument panel. Pushing the  G  switch in any riding mode improves traction and machine control by reducing the amount of clutch slip during gear changes.

Further functionality for the DCT system comes in the form of incline detection, by means of which the gear shift pattern is adapted depending on the grade of an incline to provide optimum control.

Accessories

A full range of genuine Honda accessories are available for the CRF1000L Africa Twin Adventure Sports, including:

Touring bags

Rubber pillion footpegs

DCT foot shifter

Wheel stripes

Alarm system.

Centre stand

Two types of lower seat

Quickshifter

2018 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports CRF1000L2 – Totalmotorcycle.com USA Specifications/Technical Details US MSRP Price: $ USD

All specifications are provisional and subject to change without notice.

** Please note that the figures provided are results obtained by Honda under standardised testing conditions prescribed by WMTC. Tests are conducted on a rolling road using a standard version of the vehicle with only one rider and no additional optional equipment. Actual fuel consumption may vary depending on how you ride, how you maintain your vehicle, weather, road conditions, tire pressure, installation of accessories, cargo, rider and passenger weight, and other factors

2018 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports CRF1000L2 – Totalmotorcycle.com Canadian Specifications/Technical Details Canada MSRP Price: $ CDN

2018 honda africa twin adventure sports crf1000l2 – totalmotorcycle.com european specifications/technical details europe/uk msrp price: £ gbp (on the road inc 20% vat).

Manufacturer Specifications and appearance are subject to change without prior notice on Total Motorcycle ( TMW ).

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Ride Review: Assessing Honda's Africa Twin On the Road

Honda clearly misses the rains....

Ride Review: Assessing Honda's Africa Twin On the Road

Just about every review you'll read for Honda's new CRF1000L Africa Twin speaks to the bike's surprising usability off road. Honda seems eager to drive that home, to such an extent that the manufacturer had journalists gather in South Africa recently (our invite must have gotten lost in the mail) to spend two days in the dirt.

africa twin 1000 travel edition

Despite my own experience (I'll get to that in a moment), I don't doubt the Africa Twin's off-road chops, but it occurs to me the vast majority of the people who pay upward of $13,000 for this 511 lb. motorcycle are not actually going to go skipping off to the Kazakhstan steppe. I mean, if you really want an all-roads world-traveling Honda, surely you'd choose the Rally Raid CB500X instead. It costs and weighs less.

Instead, I think the Africa Twin will fall primarily into that awkward category of heavy adventure bikes that are perfectly capable, but unlikely to be used by the majority of its owners for anything more exotic than a rural dirt road.

So, I got in touch with Honda and asked to spend some time with the Africa Twin to assess the bike as a purely on-road tool.

Ride Review: Assessing Honda's Africa Twin On the Road

As an owner of a Suzuki V-Strom 1000—which has almost identical dimensions, weight, horsepower and torque figures—I wondered whether the Africa Twin was worthy of its larger price tag and all the praise it's received in the motorcycling press.

The short answer to that question is: maybe. It really depends on personal taste and how much the Honda badge means to you.

The Workings

There's no question the Africa Twin beats the 'Strom—and every other bike in its class—in terms of weight distribution. Center of gravity is kept nice and low, so it feels lighter than it actually is. At least, until you have to pick it up (again, I'll get to that in a moment).

Throwing a leg over the one-piece saddle I'm immediately impressed by how nimble this bike feels even at a standstill. At 6-foot-1, I've set the seat to its highest setting (34.2 inches) and have no trouble putting both feet flat on the ground. The seat can be adjusted to suit those with slightly less inseam, and doing so is simple. Really simple. Other manufacturers need to adopt this system.

The Africa Twin's dash contains a lot of info. Almost to a fault.

Honda have given me a model with all the bells and whistles: panniers, top box, touring screen, heated grips, crash bars, fog lights, etc. It's a good-looking package and there's a real feeling of quality—especially the bike itself. On each side an understated, but beautiful, Honda badge makes this feel like a premium product.

The dash is a bit small and so packed with information that, on the go, it can be a little difficult to pick out relevant information. I'm also not a fan of the digital tachometer, but to each his own; I'm certain you'd get used to it after a week.

Handlebars are wide, but not unnecessarily so, and hands fall naturally to the grips. Standard handguards help keep the weather off. In a move that makes sense if you think about it, Honda have done away with the idea of a separate starter button and incorporated it into the kill switch. Press down on the big red switch and the bike fires up with the healthy whirr of a modern machine.

Whoever designed the Africa Twin's clever seat and start-up system must have taken the day off when Honda was developing switchgear for the left handlebar. The button for the horn has swapped places with the switch for the bike's indicators. So, EVERY DAMN TIME you try to signal a turn, you end up honking the horn. There is no possible intelligent explanation for Honda having done this and you will never get used to it.

Wrong. Wrong. Wrong.

A less significant quibble is the button for Honda's integrated heated grips. It doesn't make a lot of sense; there is no up or down. But, again, it's the sort of thing you'd get used to. Or, you could just install an aftermarket set of heated grips, which would be cheaper and warmer.

I'm riding the manual version of the Africa Twin, and, man, is this transmission slick. Buttery smooth. Here, again, it beats everything in its class. It's definitely the sort of thing you'd appreciate over a multi-day excursion. Clutchless upshifts are effortless. It's rare that I shout, "Damn, you are so sexy!" at a gearbox, but here I'm given occasion to do so.

Would a transmission this smooth be a problem off road? Its light touch difficult to nuance with a heavy off-road boot? I don't know.

The 998cc parallel twin pulls strong from low revs. Power delivery is smooth and linear. On the highway, illegal speeds are found quickly. Above 85 mph the bike starts to run out of puff, and the gentile, tolerable vibration felt at lower speeds turns to a shudder. It's not a frightening shudder—the bike still feels stable—but it's not comfortable, either. A sign the Africa Twin might not be your first choice for the autobahn.

At 70 mph, the bike cruises comfortably at 4,000 rpm, which suggests Honda's claimed 60 mpg is achievable with a calm hand.

The feeling of lightness translates well into a decent flickability in corners. Roundabouts, twists and turns are fun on this machine and don't require much effort.

If you're reading this in the United States, the "Where did that car in my blind spot go?" feeling that comes when shooting through roundabouts may not be familiar to you. But it's something that makes one value good mirrors. The Africa Twin's set is OK but not great and I have to readjust frequently. After a few stops I accept the mirrors are not strong enough to hold my helmet.

The Africa Twin's off-road-friendly suspension travel means it can buck a little under hard acceleration or braking but that may be the sort of thing you're only going to discover when trying to find flaws. The same person who is disinclined to off road with this bike will probably also be disinclined to wring its neck through the twisties. Treat it like a tourer, for instance, and you'll never have issues.

For the Long Haul

And I can very much see this being used for long-distance trips. The seat is comfortable and offers plenty of space to move around. The optional touring screen keeps windflow just over my helmet. Though I would like the screen to be wider; my head is in a nice pocket of still air, but my shoulders are out in the cold.

My biggest qualm with the Africa Twin, especially as pertains to its value as a long-distance road machine, is the fact it has tubed tires. Ostensibly this is because tubed tires are preferable if you've launched your bike off a ridge or something and damaged the rim. For a road-only rider, though, they are a pain in the caboose— considerably more difficult to repair roadside, and, even in this day and age, more likely to blow up.

Honda has confided in me it plans to offer rims that accept tubeless tires in the not-too-distant future, which is a good thing. Hopefully quality road tires will soon be available in the bike's narrow sizes. At the moment, for example, the excellent Michelin Pilot Road 4 tire is not available.

The tires with which the Africa Twin comes standard, Dunlop Trailmax, provide a decent amount of grip but can kick on particularly slick surfaces, like raised pavement markers on a wet road.

Honda's adventure-looking panniers look well suited to extended travel, but a goof on my part helps expose a number of flaws.

Wait For the Drop

On a mountain road, I stop to take some pictures, steering the bike onto a patch of grass. As I do this, the bike lurches, stalls, and I suddenly find myself lying beneath it.

As stated above, I totally believe everyone else's claims about the Africa Twin's off-road capability. I don't have a great deal of experience off road, so it is entirely possible and indeed likely that this bike is in no way to blame for my dropping it in the exact same photo spot where I have taken half a dozen other bikes without incident—including the 900-pound Victory Vision .

I accept that I am a bonehead and any assertions that the Africa Twin is too inclined to stall are nothing more than desperate attempts to comfort my damaged ego. But hey, I've dropped this thing, so let's talk about that, shall we?

Fortunately, I have dropped it into some good ol' Welsh mud. I am able to slither out from under the Honda with ease. No damage to my person or, it appears, the bike. After a 30-second break to scream profanities at the sky, I turn my attention to the task of getting the bike upright.

Now, I cycle almost every day; I also lift weights, and part of my routine involves doing several dozen squats. I'm not Brian Shaw or anything, but I'm strong enough that I've not had difficulty picking up dropped bikes in the past. But Sweet Jeebus is it hard to pick up a 511 lb. motorcycle in the mud. Swearing, spitting, huffing, straining hard. Who would think that off-roading with this thing would be a good idea?!

After a minute of struggling, I get the bike up. And it's at this point I notice the left pannier is missing. The Honda panniers have an aluminum look but are really just plastic, attached via clever integrated mounts. I find the pannier in the mud a few feet away and instinctively look for all the shattered plastic bits that I expect to have come off with it. There aren't any, and to my surprise, I discover—after using the key to unlock its plastic clamping mechanism—the pannier clicks back on with ease.

I can't decide how I feel about this. The pannier has simply popped off, rather than shattering into pieces. I suppose the former scenario is preferable. But it doesn't really fit the rugged Africa Twin adventuring image.

These things can be forcibly removed with a swift kick. Clearly, they are only good for road use. Which then begs the question: why aren't they more aerodynamic, like luggage on the V-Strom 1000 or Kawasaki Versys 1000? As is, you have these honking big boxes hanging off your bike, creating all kinds of drag, without the indestructible benefits of say, a pair of Metal Mule cases.

When I take the bike to a nearby jet wash to clean off the mud, I discover another problem with the Honda luggage: it's not entirely waterproof. However, I also discover the Africa Twin is easy to clean. Hit it with a hose and not much else is required. That's certainly an advantage over my V-Strom 1000, which has nooks and crannies that will never be clean unless I remove the fairing.

All in all, then, the Africa Twin is well suited to the sort of road-only use most owners will ask of it. It is solid, nimble, all-day comfortable, easy to live with, and comes with the promise of Honda's famous reliability. It makes sense. This is a bike I would ride cross country. Though I'd personally not buy anything more than the actual bike, and not until tubeless tires are available. After that, perhaps some Shad cases for luggage, a Givi AirFlow to replace the too-narrow screen, Oxford heated grips, and so on. Because of the expected popularity of the Africa Twin, aftermarket companies are rushing to provide accessories for the bike, allowing you to turn it into your perfect machine.

The new Africa Twin is easy to clean.

As to the question of whether I think it's better than my V-Strom 1000, well...I don't. As good but not better . However, that's an emotionally driven opinion; if an Africa Twin owner were to contest it, I wouldn't argue.

The Africa Twin is a very, very, very good motorcycle. But for the person who has come to love his or her Suzuki V-Strom 1000, Kawasaki Versys 1000, Triumph Tiger 800 XR/C, BMW R800GS, KTM 1190 Adventure, or Yamaha Super Ténéré, it may not be so good as to be worth trading in for. Not on the road, at least.

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Follow on facebook:, honda crf1000l africa twin ‘baja’ build, a fully-customized africa twin built to explore the rugged terrain of baja..

Black Dog Africa Twin Build

The Honda CRF1000L Africa Twin was introduced last year to rave reviews from the motorcycle press. Bucking the trend toward ever-larger and less off-road-capable Adventure Bikes, the Africa Twin set a new course for the industry with its compact, mass-centralized design. And with a package that includes a torquey 998cc parallel-twin engine, off-road wheel sizes and capable chassis, it’s an impressive performer in the dirt. Even more impressive, they brought it to market with a reasonable price tag that would cause every competing manufacturer to reevaluate their offerings.

Truth be told, it’s hard to knock the value and versatility of the Africa Twin but in order to achieve its aggressive price point, there were some concessions made — primarily in the durability of some components or lack there of (“where’s the center stand?”). Yet, Honda didn’t skimp on the most important parts and the foundation of the bike remains solid. That has made the Africa Twin ripe for customizing, especially for those dirt aficionados that want to explore the full potential of the Africa Twin off-road.

During our recent trip to Overland Expo West we caught up with Kurt Forgét, owner of Black Dog Cycle Works , who had a fully-customized Africa Twin on display. Kurt was just getting back from their winter headquarters in Baja, Mexico, where he put more than 1,500 miles on the bike scouting for the Black Dog Baja Trail. “The route will go from the Tecate Border all the way down to beautiful Mulege on the Sea of Cortez, with multiple track options for riders to put together their own journey based on available time and skill level,” Kurt said as he walked us through his Africa Twin build.

Black Dog Honda Africa Twin Build

“The goal of the build was to armor the bike so it can survive travel over rugged terrain – Baja being a perfect example. Also to improve the carrying ability of the bike. Lighting is also important for night rides and for improved visibility during the day. This Africa Twin can now take a beating and carry what is necessary for extended travel over difficult terrain.”

This Africa Twin has been equipped with a selection of Black Dog Cycle Works components to improve its durability and carrying capacity. It also includes a variety of products from other top manufacturers, hand selected to enhance the bike’s overland travel capabilities. Kurt has already put the bike’s toughness to the test on some of the roughest routes in Baja and now with the bike back home in Idaho, he continues to explore its versatility in the rugged Bitteroot and Sawthooth mountains.

Below is a list of the aftermarket upgrades that make up the Black Dog Africa Twin Build:

Hepco-Becker Upper Crash Bars

Africa Twin Build: Hepco & Becker Upper Crash Bars

One of the first off-road upgrades an Africa Twin needs is a good set of crash bars to protect the bodywork when the inevitable fall or tip over occurs. Hepco & Becker Upper Crash Bars are unique for their double-walled 1-inch steel tubing design that offers increased strength with less bulk. They also feature direct mounting to the frame and a connecting crossbar that helps spread out impacts by transferring them to the opposite side of the bike. A powder coated black finish is also resistant to tarnishing, scratches and rock chips.

BDCW Lower Engine Bars and Connector Rods

Black Dog Africa Twin Lower Engine Bars

A set of lower crash bars are also essential for protecting the Africa Twin’s vulnerable engine casings. Black Dog Lower Engine Bars are made of 1-inch steel with a 0.83-inch wall thickness and are covered in a tough black powder coat finish. They mount directly to the frame and swingarm pivot for the strongest possible connection, and for extra piece of mind, Black Dog’s Billet Aluminum Connector Rods help provide additional strength and rigidity to the Upper Crash Bars by attaching them to the lower engine bars.

BDCW Ultimate Skid Plate

Africa Twin Build: Black Dog Skid Plate

The thin metal factory skid plate and exhaust header guard provide only minimal protection for parts that are some of the most susceptible to damage and expensive to repair. Black Dog skid plates are often considered to be the toughest on the planet and their ‘Ultimate’ Skid Plate offers complete protection for both the sump and the low-hanging exhaust header of the Africa Twin. It bolts directly to the frame, instead of the engine, and its 3/16-inch 5052 Plate Aluminum actually helps absorb impacts rather than transferring them. Designed to closely contour to the underbelly for maximum ground clearance and it features a completely smooth bottom surface that won’t snag on rocks or branches. It can also be removed quickly for maintenance with just two bolts. There are two versions of the skid plate — one that is compatible with a center stand and another that is not but provides extra coverage for the rear linkage. This Africa Twin build was equipped with a factory accessory center stand to make tire repairs in the field less of a hassle.

Cycra Handguards and DoubleTake Adventure Mirrors

Africa Twin Build: Mirrors and Hand Guards

Honda was nice enough to include a set of hand guards on the Africa Twin but sadly they are made of thin plastic that easily breaks on the smallest of falls. The stock mirrors also won’t last long on the trail and sooner or later they will snap off or shatter. It’s a good idea to be proactive and replace both with something that can handle off-road abuses. Few hand guards have a reputation for being tough like the Cycras. Their frame is made of CNC machined 6061 Billet Aluminum so they’re very hard to bend or distort, and they feature large plastic covers that give excellent protection from tree branches or the wind. DoubleTake Adventure Mirrors are another proven off-road upgrade. Designed to collapse inward out of the way on impact, making them virtually unbreakable. And with stout RAM mounting hardware, they provide a stable rear view even when speeds approach triple digits.

BDCW Radiator Guards

Black Dog Africa Twin Radiator Guards

The stock plastic radiator guard may be enough protection against kicked up pebbles on the street but if you intend to venture off the beaten path, you’re going to need more than that. Branches and roosted stones can easily breach the stock guard, leaving you with a pierced radiator. And when your sights are focused on the trail ahead, you may not ever notice the warning light on until the engine has fully cooked itself. The aircraft-alloy Black Dog Radiator Guard is lightweight, durable and offers a significant upgrade in protection. Its precision-cut design also ensures adequate airflow to pass through to the radiator for proper cooling.

BDCW Multi-Function Rear Rack and Pillion Rack

Black Dog Africa Twin Rear Luggage Rack

A solid platform to securely mount your gear is essential for long-distance off-road travel. If you aren’t riding two-up, you can maximize storage space by removing the passenger seat and installing a Black Dog Pillion Rack. They come pre-drilled for RotopaX mounting hardware that allows you to safely transport 1 gallon of extra fuel or water that can really come in handy traveling to remote locations. For even more carrying capacity, the Black Dog Multi-Function Rear Rack was added. It bolts directly onto the Africa Twin’s stock grab rails, giving you a large flat surface to mount a top bag. Or for those that want to enhance their ‘go-anywhere’ capabilities, you can bolt on a WARN XT17 winch! Both the Pillion Rack and Multi-Function Rear Rack are made of heavy-gauge 1/4-inch aluminum with several oversized tie-down holes to make positioning and strapping loads a breeze.

ProTaper Pastrana FMX Bars with BDCW Risers

Africa Twin Build: Black Dog Bar Risers for

Tall riders, and even those of average height, often complain about feeling cramped on the stock Africa Twin when standing up on the pegs. A set of Black Dog Risers really helps open up the riding position and bring the ergos into alignment. The bar risers are made of anodized billet aluminum and are available in either 1″ or 2″ sizes. And for those that prefer more height and a more aggressive bend, a set of ProTaper Travis Pastrana bars (he’s 6’2″) can provide the extra leverage you need.

BDCW Traction Platform Footpegs

Africa Twin Build: Black Dog Platform Footpegs

We’re not sure what Honda was thinking when they equipped the off-road-capable Africa Twin with those tiny, flimsy factory footpegs that look like they were sourced from a CRF50. Aside from a lack of grip, they cause you to constantly balance yourself on the pegs when standing. The BDCW Traction Footpegs provide several advantages: First, they offer a larger platform that provides more stability and leverage for steering the bike with your feet; Second, they feature aggressive serrated teeth that help lock-in your footing on technical terrain, and they come with a set of spikes that can be screwed in for added traction in mud; Third, their unique design extends inward around the footpeg mounting bracket to get your feet as close to the frame as possible for optimal ergonomics and to reduce your chances of catching protruding rocks on the trail; Lastly, they’re milled from aircraft-grade aluminum alloy, so they are virtually indestructible.

Touratech Headlight Guard

Africa Twin Build: Touratech Headlight Guard

The Africa Twin’s Dual Headlights are another vulnerability to be aware of because even though many of the bike’s parts are reasonable to replace (it’s a Honda Right?), the LED Headlight Assembly is not. Your buddy’s friendly attempt to roost you could result in a bill of more than $1100 to replace the stock unit. Not only is it costly, but it could be dangerous if it occurs when you are far from camp and nightfall is quickly approaching. A simple but effective solution is Touratech’s Quick-Release Headlight Guard. They’re like safety goggles for your bike, made of high-strength Macrolon clear plastic that can take a lot of of abuse. They’re also easily removed for cleaning, so you can get into those hard-to-reach crevices.

Rigid Dually Side Shooter LED Auxiliary Lights Kit

Africa Twin Build: Rigid Dually Side Shooters

Rigid Lights are known for their durability and brightness, and their Dually LED Auxiliary lights have long been a top choice among both automotive and motorcycle off-road enthusiasts. Now the new Side Shooter model brings side illumination to the Dually line, allowing you to light up those side ditches and shine light ‘through’ turns. They put out an impressive 3,308 lumens of light with a beam throw of 134 meters, yet only draw 24 watts of power per light. A set of 1-inch Black Dog mounts come with the kit, giving you the option to mount the lights to the lower or upper crash bars. Also included are a set of snap-on amber light covers that provide better visibility in fog or dust and make the bike stand out more to other motorists.

Hyper-Lite Flashing LED Auxiliary Brake Lights

Africa Twin Build: Hyper-Lites auxiliary brake lights

One of the most common types of accidents for motorcyclist is getting rear ended. If you travel a lot of miles on a motorcycle, improving your visibility from the rear can really improve your odds of avoiding this type of accident. Hyper-Lights offer a unique solution. They work as running lights at 30% power during normal driving. Then under braking, they begin to flash at 100% power to really grab the attention of drivers behind you. The small LEDs are extremely durable, lightweight and waterproof. It’s an easy way to improve your safety during those adventures into the urban jungle we all take at one time or another.

BDCW Rear Brake Reservoir Guard

Africa Twin Build: black dog brake reservoir cover

Sometimes it’s the smallest part that is the weak link in your armor. And even though the rear brake reservoir on the Africa Twin is somewhat tucked into the frame, it’s still vulnerable to side impact during a tip over or the inadvertent kick from a boot. If the plastic reservoir cracks, you’ve got no rear brake — a real safety concern. On those big trips where sourcing parts can be difficult, it could cause a huge delay. The Black Dog Rear Brake Reservoir Guard provides extra protection that just might help you avoid being affected by Murphy’s Law, and it also adds a nice custom touch to the bike.

Mosko Moto Backcountry 35L Panniers

Africa Twin Build: Mosko Moto 35L Backcountry Panniers

A durable, lightweight, soft luggage solution is a must on the remote trails of Baja and Mosko Moto’s Backcountry Panniers are up to the task. Constructed with a Ballistic Nylon outer shell and a 100% waterproof PVC removable inner liner, they can take the abuse of rugged off-road rides. A roll-top closure provides easy access to personal items, while six compression straps let you cinch down gear tight when riding through the rough stuff. Combined they offer 70L of internal storage, plus a beavertail stash pouch and rear pocket provide external storage for things you need quick access to. And if you need more capacity, military style MOLLE panels allow you to hook on MOLLE compatible accessories. What’s more, you can get the bags on and off the bike in seconds using the quick-mount wedge plates that are bolted onto Hepco & Becker Side Carrier Racks.

Africa Twin Build Parts List

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Author: Rob Dabney

Rob Dabney started a lifelong obsession with motorcycles at the age of 15 when he purchased his first bike – a 1982 Honda MB5. Through his 20’s and 30’s he competed in off-road desert races, including the Baja 250, 500 and 1000. Eventually, his proclivity for exploration led him to dual sport and adventure riding. Rob’s never-ending quest to discover what’s around the next bend has taken him on Adventures in Latin America, Africa, Europe, Asia, and throughout the American West. As a moto journalist, he enjoys inspiring others to seek adventure across horizons both near and far.

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That huge luggage platform is no good idea at all. Honda specifies 10kg max load and with the additional long lever the platform acts as, for sure the plastic back will brake sooner or later. Some cases are already documented.

ADV Pulse

Hey nordicbiker, all the manufacturers have a tendency to be conservative with their weight ratings on rear racks, possibly for liability reasons. Black Dog confirmed they thoroughly tested this rear rack, loaded with more than 25 pounds of tools, without experiencing any problems.

Paulo

LOL…..Thanks for the spec sheet reciting but I did the western have of the TAT on my Africa Twin with a Mosko setup, not to mention a set (TWO tires) of Tractionator ADV’s all striped to the back end (YOU SHOULD SEE THE PICTURES), had that thing WAY over your blah, blah, blah “no good idea”, “some cases already documented”…..broken rear ends. Go do this stuff instead of typing……you’d be amazed at what you read compared to what real life is like.

Kai

So far have done 19.000km on my AT since I bought it in September – scandinavian winter break of three months included. And yes, that was a lot of pavement but also quite some milage on gravel roads. Nothing like the TAT, admitted. However I am considering the design specifications of my equipment to avoid failures like this one, which I think is a clever thing to do! Others are ignoring those and then have to cope with the consequences, like expensive repairs and possibly a problem finishing the trip.

http://advrider.com/index.php?threads/africa-twin-another-broken-rear-rack.1226040/

Dosser

I’m sure you follow the speed limits too?

Mark Peters

Adding these to my birthday wishlist! Great build!

Albert White

Great article!

Bob

You’re parts list is a little short. You forgot the H&B side racks in the parts list. $700.00 for a couple roll top soft bags and mounting wedges, eh? Stuff’s expensive.

Good catch Bob! Added!

Darryl Cornell

Well you’ve now added $4.000 (excluding any shop labor) to your ‘low priced’ Honda adventure bike? Probably still cheaper than a BMW GS but time will tell if it has long term mechanical endurance???

Steven

Were the break lines long enough for the added height? I’m looking to add pro taper ATV high bars…

Here is the information you requested straight from Black Dog Cycle Works:

For the 2016 model there is plenty of lines / cable. We have found that Honda has significantly shortened the cables on the 2017 models. Some will accommodate a 1″ rise, others won’t and none of them will handle a 2″ riser. We had some special Galfer brake lines made up to accommodate the 1” and 2” risers on both the 2016s and 2017s.

Risers with optional brake lines: http://blackdogcw.com/handlebar-risers-honda-africa-twin/

Galfer complete set of stainless steel brake lines: http://blackdogcw.com/galfer-ss-brake-line-set-for-africa-twin-16/

BRADYbish

I know this is older but I am just seeing it. Do you know what size clamp you used for the Cycra handguards? All I see is 1-1/8″ and 7/8″.

Thanks much!

The Africa Twin has 1-1/8″ bars

Douie Quick

How much does all this collectively weigh? Sheesh the bike already is well over 1/4 ton! Not to mention there is close to $4000 worth of gear there if you include tax….meaning at full MSRP with tax and licence one would be spending close to $30k for the bike and gear! A package that has to approach 600lbs if I am any judge! Plus whatever you pack along…dang! Who could pick it up if dropped?

Al

I’ve ridden heavy Dual Sports for years, been over most of Colorado’s high passes, NEVER missed a center stand, and once when I rode another fells bike, found the stand to be annoying and just extra weight. I won’t be putting one on my AT.

Jeremy

How much this bike?

Alex

BDCW Connector Rods – $160.00 and blah blah blah…

$349.00 for an ordinary Skid Plate?

Seriously? F-off! Oh my God! jst, f-off!

Aksel Benjamin Hassel

I know this is an old article, but I’ll try commenting because I can’t seem to find an answer anywhere. It looks like you’ve adjusted the windscreen tilt angle for a more upright windscreen. How did you do that?

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Honda Africa Twin: models, rivals and verdicts

The 2016 manual Africa Twin battles the DCT version

Honda’s CRF1000L Africa Twin was launched in 2015 and has remained a serious contender in the large-capacity adventure bike market ever since.

  • Latest news: 2020 Honda Africa Twin review

A re-imagining of Honda’s earlier chunky-trailie sharing the same name, the bike has received one update in its near four-year lifespan in early 2018 - gaining a raft of improvements, including a larger 24.2-litre fuel tank offering a theoretical range of over 300 miles.

  • Early life for the Africa Twin
  • The 2015-16 re-birth of the Africa Twin
  • The 2018 updated Africa Twin

2020 Africa Twin: third time lucky?

  • Africa Twin rivals

Both models of Africa Twin have also come with the option of a Honda DCT gearbox, too. This removes the need for a clutch and renders the bike a semi-automatic. Although not to everyone's tastes, the lack of clutch is said to make elements of off-road riding easier, due to no fear of stalling. 

Despite now going toe-to-toe with the likes of the new BMW R1250GS and KTM’s rocket-propelled 1290 and 1090 Adventure models, the Africa Twin was actually originally a much smaller capacity machine, with the first road-going bike being the middleweight XRV650 Africa Twin appearing in 1988.

The first bike was based on the Honda NXR750 rally bike, which was developed by Honda Racing Corporation (HRC) in 1984 and went onto win the Paris-Dakar rally from 1986 to 1989.

Sold in the firm’s famous red, white and blue team colours, it was one of the few Honda road bikes allowed to be sold with HRC logos and it remained unchanged until 1993, before gaining a bigger 742cc motor, new frame, bodywork, fuel tank and a lower seat - known as the XRV750 Africa Twin .

The XRV750 Africa Twin battles its rivals

Other smaller tweaks throughout its life included a trip computer in 1992 and improvements to the seat and clutch in 1996.

This then remained on sale until 2003 and to this day is revered as one of the best adventure bikes ever made, thanks to its robust nature and sporting pedigree.

Although slightly heavier and with less spec than the earlier 650, it was a reliable workhorse with contemporary styling that still holds its value today. During its 14-year life, Honda also produced an XLV750R, which was a higher-spec machine complete with a shaft-drive, produced to compete at the Dakar Rally.

Honda have offered many adventure models since the demise of the XRV750, including the V4-powered VFR1200-derived Crosstourer and VFR800X Crossrunner , alongside the smaller CRF250L trail bike and commuter-friendly NC750X , however none have offered the same iconic presence as the Africa Twin - despite being perfectly competent in their selected field.

2016 Africa Twin: legend re-born

2016 Honda CRF1000L Africa Twin specs :

  • Engine: 998cc parallel twin
  • Max power: 94bhp
  • Torque: 68.6ft-lb
  • Weight: 232kg
  • Seat height: 870mm

A 2016 CRF1000L DCT Africa Twin in action

When the Africa Twin re-appeared at the back end of 2015 ahead of general release in 2016, it was an instant success. Awarded five stars by MCN (the most prestigious award a bike can get, don’t you know) it inspires confidence on the dirt immediately, regardless of your ability or off-road experience.

Compared to its 1200cc 150bhp+ rivals, it’s a less intimidating package that was aided by its physical size, thanks to the parallel-twin motor that’s both low and narrow. 

This off-road capability is also helped by the fuel tank, which allows the rider to get their weight forward over the front wheel while putting pressure through the footpegs, needed for steering and grip on rough terrain. 

Away from the mud, the Africa Twin also excelled in the touring department - as any premium adventure machine should. On board, it feels lightweight and is seriously frugal -making it one of the most impressive true adventure bikes you can buy.

2018 Africa Twin: part two

2018 Honda CRF1000L Africa Twin specs :

  • Engine: 998cc Liquid-cooled 4-stroke 8-valve Parallel Twin with 270° crank and uni-cam
  • Max power: 93.9bhp
  • Torque: 72ft-lb

MCN rides the 2018-on Africa Twin Adventure Sports

Now available as both the standard Africa Twin and an Adventure Sports model, the changes at the start of 2018 marked the first major tweaks to the bike since its re-birth. Despite serious sales success in the first variation, the bike underwent alterations in an attempt to keep up with the competition.

This included an increased fuel capacity from 18.8l to 24.2l for the Adventure Sports, giving the bike more presence due to its extra width. It also increases the tank range to a theoretical 300+ miles - placing it firmly among the adventure bike class’s grand tourers.

Despite such impressive long-distance manners and impeccable fuelling and throttle connection, the bike’s 94bhp motor fails to truly inspire. Lacking the bottom-end and mid-range engagement of the 125bhp BMW R1200GS boxer twin (which has since been bumped to a 1250), it also didn’t have anything close to the top end rush from KTM’s ballistic 150bhp 1190 Adventure.

However, that’s not to say it’s a slow bike - far from it! There is a decent torque figure of 68.6ftlb and a confidence-inspiring throttle-to-rear tyre connection means that it’s easy to access every bit of the power on offer.

We've now had a chance to test the 2020 Honda Africa Twin at the press launch, and it's better than ever before. 

Get full details in our 2020 Honda Africa Twin review .

Honda Africa Twin rivals

During such a long life span, it is unsuprising to note that the Africa Twin name has fanced a raft of stiff opposition.

The obvious comparison is the all-conquering BMW GS range, but there have also been the  Ducati Multistrada ,  Yamaha XT1200Z Super Tenere , Triumph Tiger ,  KTM Adventure ,  Suzuki V-Strom ,  Kawasaki Versys ,  Honda Transalp  and  Aprilia Caponord  variants.

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africa twin 1000 travel edition

Honda CRF1000L Africa Twin Adventure Sports 2018 review

africa twin 1000 travel edition

Bryn Davies heads to Malaga for the launch of the hotly anticipated Honda CRF1000L Africa Twin Adventure Sports …

Cast your mind back to 2016, when Honda brought the iconic Africa Twin back from the grave. It was possibly the most anticipated adventure motorcycle of the decade, with internet forums and social media pages abuzz with excitement and desire for the machine that connected with so many peoples’ nostalgia. The Africa Twins of old were thought of with very fond memories, and while production was ceased in 2003, they were still very desirable bikes to own.

It’s not very often that a remake is better than the original ( The Italian Job , anyone?), but the 2016 model was one heck of a bike that made a lot of customers very happy with their purchases, despite a few niggles here and there. Building on this, at the tail end of 2017 Honda unveiled a new, beefier Africa Twin, the Adventure Sports, with the promise that it will ‘go anywhere and go further’.

The new machine certainly looked hunkier than the standard model, and when we put out a poll on Facebook asking our followers which bike they were most excited to see in 2018, the Africa Twin Adventure Sports came out clear winner. With 20% of the votes, the Adventure Sports beat the Yamaha Tenere 700 World Raid Prototype (14%), BMW F850GS (11%) and Tiger 1200 (11%), amongst others. It wasn’t long after we ran this poll that I found myself on a flight to Malaga in southern Spain to attend the European press launch of the bike.

africa twin 1000 travel edition

Typically, motorcycle launches are held here in the winter as you’re almost guaranteed sun, and the temperatures are more than agreeable. On these three days in February however, the mercury had plummeted, and I was greeted by snow and ice instead of the sunshine and sangria that I’d expected. Nonetheless, my excitement to ride the bike, which was largely fuelled by the excitement of those who voted in our poll, meant that it was pretty easy to overlook the fact that I’d forgotten to pack thermals.

Before I get down to business, it’s worth me telling you what’s new on the Africa Twin Adventure Sports, and how it differs from the standard model. All Africa Twins have received a few upgrades for 2018, and these are carried throughout the range, including: a redesigned instrument panel, the introduction of throttle by wire, a few changes to the exhaust, new indicators and brake lights, a wider range of selectable torque control, new rider modes, redesigned rear footpegs, and an overall weight reduction of 2kg, which mainly comes from the addition of a new battery.

On top of that, the Adventure Sports offers: a higher touring screen, crash bars as standard, 20mm more suspension travel (which also results in more ground clearance), a beefed-up bash plate, a 24.2-litre fuel tank (over five litres larger than the standard model), an enduro-style seat, a more upright riding position and a more vibrant XRV colour scheme, which really pops and makes the bike stand out.

While visually it’s still very much ‘Africa Twin’, the Adventure Sports model has more to it; it looks more imposing, fiercer and has a more premium air about it. The new tri-colour scheme, which is pretty similar to that found on the standard Africa Twin, is just beautiful, and it makes that paint job of 2016 look muted and out of date. As far as looks are concerned, and I know this is subjective, as I stood admiring the bike in the flesh, I found myself thinking that this is one of the most beautiful adventure motorcycles on the market.

africa twin 1000 travel edition

Even before you consider the quality of the ride, the emotional pull of this machine is strong. The looks draw you in and you’ll want to be seen riding it, but when you press the ignition button is when the real magic happens. With an exhaust that’s been redesigned for improved sound and ‘throb’, the growl of the bike kicking into life is enough to bring a wry smile to your face, which quickly turns into a grin as you twist the throttle and hear the seductive roar.

Throwing your leg over the saddle, the first thing you’ll notice is just how high the machine is. As I mentioned, suspension travel has been increased by 20mm, and the seat height of the bike now sits at a mighty 920mm – 30mm higher than the KTM 1090 Adventure R, which I would class as a very tall bike. Being 6’2, I was tip-toeing around, and a member of our group who was 5’7 had no chance. Fortunately for him, the standard seat can be lowered to 900mm, while even lower options are available, which take it down to 890mm or 860mm. The larger tank is also immediately noticeable, adding significant girth to the machine between your legs (no sniggering). Extra fuel range isn’t the only benefit of this change though; weather protection on offer is improved significantly from the standard model.

Before we took off, I had a little play with the new and improved dash. The screen angle has been adjusted to make it easier to see when standing (and it is), and there are less areas for dust to accumulate when you’re riding off-road – both welcome additions. You’ll also notice that there’s a wealth of information displayed on the screen, and there’s no need to fiddle with buttons to show the information that you want to see. It was a case of information overload at first, but you get used to knowing where you need to look for certain figures, like which gear you’re currently in.

So, I was fully accustomed with the bike and it was time to go riding. The sound of 18 Africa Twins leaving the hotel compound was a formidable one, and riding in such a large group made me notice the impressive road presence of the bike behind me. The Adventure Sports looks menacing on the road, almost as battleship-esque as the monstrous BMW GS Adventure.

africa twin 1000 travel edition

As I mentioned, it was pretty chilly, so I decided to see how well the heated grips, which come as standard, worked. They’re easily operable via a dedicated button on the left grip, and there are five heat settings to flip between. In honesty, they weren’t great, and I was very thankful that the standard handguards do such a good job of deflecting wind away from your digits. Further weather and wind protection is provided by the inclusion of a taller touring screen, though it’s non-adjustable and I found it directed wind right at my forehead.

A few miles in and I was getting used to the machine – the flat seat felt comfortable, and pretty squishy (though admittedly, by the end of the day, I did have noticeable arse ache), and the upright riding position was spot on. With the increased seat height, Honda has made it so there’s less of a knee bend when you’re sat down, and this translates into better comfort over long distances and less need to stretch your legs, and within a few miles the benefit of this was already apparent.

Honda has added an extra 20mm to the front and rear suspension, while also adjusting the damping and compression for stronger bump absorption. On the road, this translates to a plush ride and a feeling that you’re riding a magic carpet, with the Adventure Sports soaking up the uneven mountain roads in a very gentle and comfortable manner. Off-road, and I’ll talk more about the bike’s off-road performance later, this’ll allow competent riders to get more from the bike when riding it to its limits.

The mountain roads of Andalucia provide the perfect testing grounds for motorcycles, and as our route took in a number of motorways and slower sections through towns, I was able to see how the bike and its four rider modes (Touring, Urban, Gravel and User) react in different environments.

The first three can be switched on the fly, with Touring offering a smooth ride that’s most suitable for when you’re riding two-up or with luggage, Urban is the bike’s sports mode (and it does give the bike a noticeably sportier boost), and Gravel is the off-road mode, with a gentler power delivery. Each of these modes tinker with the machine’s power, engine braking and traction control. While the power and engine braking isn’t customisable on the standard rider modes, in ‘User’ it’s fully customisable, and the great thing is that when you turn the bike off and on again, the system will revert back to your last used mode. None of the modes adjust the ABS setting, though you can turn it off at the front only, or off entirely, with a simple press of a button.

africa twin 1000 travel edition

It was at a quick lunch stop that I discovered a really handy little stowaway compartment on the fairing above the exhaust. It was apparently placed there in homage to the original Africa Twins, and is waterproof and large enough to hold a standard phone (though my Samsung Galaxy Note 8 wouldn’t fit) and could be really useful when on the road. Oddly, though, Honda has decided that the best way to secure this compartment shut is with screws, which means you’ll need an Allen key to get in and out of it. Of course, you’ll find one under your seat, but it’s a hassle, and the compartment went from being a really useful extra, to something I’ll probably never use.

New for the Adventure Sports is the inclusion of self-cancelling indicators. They’re a welcome addition, as I’ve lost count of the amount of times I’ve accidentally left my indicators on after making a turn, but they can be a bit frustrating at times. Rather than being on a timer, these monitor the speed of the wheels to decide when it’s time to turn off, the result is that you’ll often find them cancelling before you’ve even made your turn. Couple this with the fact that there’s no way to override the automatic switch-off (such as a long press), and I often found myself cursing them.

The next day afforded us the chance to test the Adventure Sports on some Spanish trails. It’s here that you’ll appreciate the brilliance of the bike’s traction control (TC) settings. With seven levels of adjustability (as opposed to three on older versions of the bike), you can get just the right amount of TC to suit your riding style and ability. Levels four to seven were a bit too intrusive for me, but three and below were perfect, and allowed a great amount of back wheel slide until the TC kicked in.

Like the standard Africa Twin, the Adventure Sports is a heavy bike at 243kg, though when you’re in the saddle it handles and feels like a much smaller and more manageable machine. Of course, if you drop it you’re going to need the help of your mates or a few months of gym training behind you to get it upright again. There’s a lot more to say about the bike as an off-roader, and we’ll be covering it from that angle in the next issue of the magazine.

The new Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports in action

The Honda CRF1000L Africa Twin Adventure Sports is a motorcycle that satisfies both the emotional and practical reasons for buying a bike. It looks, sounds and feels incredible, and the larger tank gives it a much-desired long tank range. The seat height may put some off, but consider that, with the lowest seat available, you can take it down from 920mm to 860mm, and it becomes far more manageable. On-road it’s great fun, and I personally thought there was more than enough get-up-and-go to have a fun, engaging ride.

ABR Verdict

As a commuter:  If your morning commute has you nipping through inter-city traffic, then there are more suitable bikes; it’s a large machine and the seat height could make for some nervy situations as you tip-toe around vehicles. If it involves any distance, then you’ll arrive at work with a smile on your face and looking forward to the ride home.

As a weekend tourer:  When fitted with luggage, the Africa Twin Adventure Sports is a perfect weekend tourer. The 24.2-litre tank size means you’ll have to worry less about fuel stops, and the seating position is comfortable enough to allow you to make the most of your precious two days.

As an off-roader:  For a bike of this size and weight, you’ll be surprised with how sure-footed and manageable the Africa Twin Adventure Sports is in the dirt. Technical riding would be reserved for only the most talented, but the high ground clearance, excellent levels of traction control, and improved suspension mean the bike can do it as long as you can.

As a continental road tourer:  I would rather the seat comfort provided by the standard Africa Twin, but the increased fuel tank size, taller touring screen and great riding position make the Adventure Sports one to consider for those forays over to the Alps.

As an RTW overlander:  Any bike can be a round the world overlander, but the Africa Twin Adventure Sports would allow you to take the roads less travelled… to an extent. You’re not going to want to drop this beast in the wilderness of Siberia, but with the increased fuel capacity and Honda reliability, it should get you round with no issues.

As a pillion carrier:  I’ve yet to test the bike with a pillion on board, though I’ll be getting my hands on one soon and will be sure to give it a shot. There’s plenty of seat room though, so I don’t forsee there being any issues in this department.

What’s next for the Africa Twin?

Eight months after Honda teased the Adventure Sports concept in 2016, the internet was drooling over a new concept that was revealed by the Japanese manufacturer – this time it was the Enduro Sports, an aggressive, sexy-looking machine that appeared to offer yet another variant of the hugely popular bike. You can read more about the bike by heading to this address: www.bit.ly/ATEnduroSports, and when I asked the team at Honda about the machine and whether we can expect to see it in production following the launch of the Adventure Sports, my question was met with a wry smile that might as well have said ‘wait and see’.

Honda CRF1000L Africa Twin Adventure Sports specs

Price (manual): £12,599 OTR. DCT; £13,549 OTR Engine: Liquid-cooled 4-stroke 8-valve parallel twin with 270° crank and uni-cam Power: 998cc Torque: 99Nm/6,000rpm Gearbox constant: mesh 6-speed MT / 6-speed DCT with on and off-road riding modes Suspension front: Showa 45mm inverted telescopic fork with hydraulic dial-style preload and damping adjuster, 252mm stroke, 224mm travel. Rear; Pro-Link with gas-charged damper, hydraulic dial-style preload adjuster and rebound damping adjustment, 240mm travel, 101mm stroke Brakes front: twin 310mm floating hydraulic disc, 4-piston calipers, sintered metal pads. Rear; single 256mm hydraulic disc 1-piston caliper, lever-lock brake system on DCT models Wheels front: wire spoke with aluminium rim, tubed 90/90 21”. Rear; wire spoke with aluminium rim, tubed 150/70 18” Seat height: 900/920mm (low position/standard) Weight: 243kg (manual transmission), 253kg (DCT) Tank capacity: 24.2 litres Fuel consumption: 21.7 km/l (claimed)

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Rider Magazine

2018 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports | Road Test Review

2018 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports

Honda’s reboot of the Africa Twin, a 998cc parallel twin-powered adventure bike that carries the dirt-worthy CRF1000L model designation, has been a hit. Introduced just two years ago, there are now more than 50,000 of them roaming back roads and trails around the world, with 8,000 in the U.S. alone, where the Africa Twin accounted for 20 percent of open-class ADV sales in 2017.

Read our 2016 Honda Africa Twin DCT touring review

2018 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports

To maintain that momentum, for 2018 Honda has updated the Africa Twin and added the Africa Twin Adventure Sports, a taller, longer-range, farkle-heavy model. Updates to the Africa Twin platform include a larger airbox with a longer intake funnel and a new exhaust for better midrange and richer sound, lighter balancer-shaft weights for smoother engine feel and a lithium-ion battery that saves 5.1 pounds. Thanks to a new throttle-by-wire system, there are now four riding modes (Tour, Urban and Gravel, plus a customizable User mode) that adjust throttle response, engine braking and traction control. Other changes include a redesigned instrument panel, wider footpegs with stronger steel mounts and lower-profile passenger footpeg brackets.

2018 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports

Greg’s Gear Helmet: Arai XD4 Jacket: Joe Rocket Alter Ego 4.1 Pants: Joe Rocket Ballistic Ultra Boots: Sidi Crossfire 3

Geared toward long-distance touring, the new Adventure Sports model gets all of these changes and more, including nearly an inch of extra suspension travel (9.9/9.5 inches front/rear) and ground clearance (10.6 inches), a 1.4-gallon larger fuel tank (6.37 gallons) and, due to the wider tank, a larger fairing. It also has a 3.1-inch taller windscreen, a 1.3-inch taller handlebar that’s positioned closer to the rider, a taller and flatter dual-height seat (35.4/36.2 inches), brushed-aluminum fairing accents, a 1.3-liter storage pocket in the left tail section and a removable rear fender (the license plate attaches to the rear fender, so this is useful in off-road-only situations). Accessories fitted as standard include heated grips, a 12V socket in the cockpit, a larger skid plate, crash bars and a steel luggage rack. The cherry on top is a 30th anniversary paint scheme with a white frame and gold rims.

Read our 2017 Honda Africa Twin vs KTM 1090 Adventure R comparison review

2018 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports

Our test of the new Adventure Sports model began in Prescott, Arizona, where Honda hosted a press launch with a 150-mile route split 60/40 between curvy pavement and graded dirt/gravel. All of the test bikes were equipped with Honda’s Dual Clutch Transmission (DCT), a $700 option that eliminates the clutch and shift levers and offers the convenience of automatic shifting or pushbutton manual shifting. There are four automatic modes—Drive, which upshifts early for fuel efficiency, and three Sport modes that hold gears progressively longer to maximize power delivery. Because the Africa Twin is designed to be ridden off-road, its DCT has incline detection, which delays upshifts during ascents to maintain higher rpm and downshifts earlier during descents for more engine braking, as well as a “G” switch, which eliminates clutch slip during gear changes.

2018 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports

In addition to fast, nearly seamless gear changes, a major advantage of the DCT is that, since it always shifts into neutral when coming to a stop, the bike never stalls. On the other hand, in the automatic modes gear changes can occur unexpectedly and, in technical situations, not having a clutch lever to feather can limit one’s sense of control. On the street, even during aggressive riding, the DCT works like a charm. I logged more than 200 miles off-road during this test, but very little of it was tip-toeing over tricky terrain, so the lack of a clutch lever was rarely a problem and I used the manual mode to control the timing of gear changes.

2018 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports

Changes to the intake/exhaust and balancer-shaft weights are subtle, adding a touch of refinement to the tractable, character-rich engine, which has a 270-degree crank with irregular firing intervals. The parallel twin configuration, Unicam SOHC head and various space-saving tricks (like putting the water pump inside the clutch case) keep the engine light and compact. When we tested a standard Africa Twin with a manual transmission last year, it made 79 horsepower at 7,300 rpm and 62 lb-ft of torque at 5,700 rpm at the rear wheel on Jett Tuning’s dyno, though these numbers are about 5 percent too low because the bike was run with knobby tires. With the Africa Twin’s horizon-flat torque curve and linear increase in horsepower, there’s always grunt when you need it and more power comes with more revs. The differences in throttle response and engine braking (there are three levels for each) between the riding modes are not dramatic, but they do allow the rider to tailor engine behavior to conditions, and traction control can be quickly changed among seven levels on the fly with a trigger on the left handlebar.

Read our 2017 Honda Africa Twin long-term review

2018 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports

With its larger tank, taller suspension, standard accessories and optional DCT (which adds 23 pounds), the Adventure Sports is a big machine, weighing 556 pounds wet. Factor in the 21-inch front wheel and long wheelbase, and it’s no surprise that handling favors stability over agility, but push that wide handlebar with authority and the Honda will go where you point it. The steel semi-cradle frame is strong and the triple-disc brakes are powerful and easy to modulate, with standard ABS that can be turned off at the rear wheel for off-road riding.

2018 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports

For a 6-footer like me, extra suspension travel, ground clearance and legroom are always welcome, but even I had a tough time throwing my leg over the tall seat. Once aboard, I found the Adventure Sports to be satisfyingly comfortable, with a supportive seat, spacious ergonomics and plenty of wind protection. During stand-up riding, I appreciated the taller handlebar and wider footpegs, but I had trouble reading the new instrument panel even though it’s positioned at a shallower angle and has a large sun shroud. The screen is overly busy with information and, as before, sun glare on the reflective face can make the screen unreadable.

2018 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports

The day after the press ride, I strapped a duffel and a tent to the luggage rack and headed north, taking a counterclockwise route around the Grand Canyon, from the South Rim to the North Rim, riding 60 miles down a dirt road to Toroweap Overlook. The last couple of miles to Toroweap are tricky, but the Adventure Sport’s big front wheel and generous ground clearance made it easy to crawl over the embedded rock and negotiate loose stones and sand. I put the kickstand down and walked to the edge of the abyss, where I stood 3,000 vertical feet above the Colorado River with no one else around as the sun began to set. That’s exactly what an adventure bike should do—have the comfort, the range and the capability to take you wherever you want to go.

2018 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports

Honda’s Africa Twin has as much or more off-road can-do as any other adventure bike on the market. But, since most owners spend the majority of their time on pavement, its high seat, tube-type tires and lack of cruise control are major drawbacks. The Adventure Sports is an even more formidable tourer on- and off-road, and, at just $1,500 over the standard model, it’s a great value.

2018 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports

Check out more new bikes in  Rider ’s guide to new/updated 2018 motorcycles

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2018 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports Specs Base Price: $14,999 Price as Tested: $15,699 (DCT) Warranty: 1 yr., unltd. miles Website: powersports.honda.com

2018 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports North Rim Grand Canyon

CHASSIS Frame: Steel semi-double cradle w/ cast aluminum swingarm Wheelbase: 62.2 in. Rake/Trail: 27.3 degrees/4.4 in. Seat Height: 35.4/36.2 in. Suspension, Front: 45mm USD fork, fully adj., 9.9-in. travel Rear: Single reservoir shock w/ Pro-Link, fully adj., 9.4-in. travel Brakes, Front: Dual 310mm floating discs w/ 4-piston opposed radial calipers & ABS Rear: Single 256mm disc w/ 2-piston caliper & ABS plus parking brake (as tested) Wheels, Front: Spoked aluminum, 2.15 x 21 in. Rear: Spoked aluminum, 4.00 x 18 in. Tires, Front: 90/90-21, tube-type Rear: 150/70-18, tube-type Wet Weight: 556 lbs. (as tested) Load Capacity: 399 lbs. (as tested) GVWR: 955 lbs.

Colorado River Grand Canyon Toroweap Overlook

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Very nice Honda very Honda Honda! But against a KTM? Dynamically no, durability and dependablelity most definitely.

Never cease to amaze me at this point in time to build such a capable machine and eliminate a large percent of the market with the taller is better idea, and leave off cruise control and shaft drive and tires which are hard to plug when you pick up a nail it just makes me realize that BMW will always be the high water mark and maintenance being high enough on my bMW at least I know it will get me where I wan’t to go and keep me entertained the whole way . Honda no doubt makes this Adventure a dirt bike devil of a bike and more power to them, but once again , I have to pass . Bad fit not the right amenities for real Adventure on real roads for us older guys . Comfort reins supreme and I don’t have to flat foot a bike to ride it but the taller the bikes the less fun they are especially when they weight over 700 pounds with rider and an overnight load of amenities

Good luck with that Honda. Young guys will love it , us older folk will stick with our Beemers .

Disagree. After 30 years of various beemers, Dakars, RT’s, etc., Iwent with the 2017 ST with DVD with no regrets. It’s a great bike. Oh yea, I just turned 67.

Typos here. Should say AT, not ST and DCT, not DVD.

I would take the DCT also. I am in my 50’s, and if given the choice I would choose the KTM.

And just which one of those bulletproof bimmers do you ride? I’ve owned 3 and all were a maintenance nightmare plus the cost of consumable parts were ridiculous. I’m just glad I’m man enough I don’t have to trash a bike just cause my nose is high in the air and think an adventure ride is across a Starbucks parking lot. Keep your bimmer dude, no one with a pair wants it.

Bimmers are cars. Creates doubt. It’s “Beemers.”

Ive got 153k miles on my GS. I ride the crap out of it. I regularly go on 2k mi camping trips. Man your nose is high up chute, dude. IMHO all bikes are worthy. Your’s obviously just sense your crappy vibs.

Too often in the comments sections I read about people complaining about this bike, or that bike being too tall. Well at 6′ 4″ I have had to modify my bike (if possible) to fit my height. Most bikes I ride make me feel cramped. I can’t comfortably stand up while off road riding and my legs are quite bent while sitting. Kudos to Honda for making a bike for the taller rider. My current ride is a V-Strom 1000. I have tried handlebar risers. Doesn’t work. The cables are too short. My CRF450X has 30mm bar risers, and a taller than stock handle bar and I still have to reach down a little while standing. I’m excited to throw a leg over the new ATAS to see how it feels and hope to put one in my garage this summer. Thanks Honda.

how did it go? i’m 6′.6″

im 6′ 4” and i sometimes have to tippy toe this bike. its a refreshing feeling :’]

With today’s tire technology, I can live with the tube type tires. Also, having a 36″ inseam, the seat height isn’t an issue. No cruise control? That’s a deal breaker for me. Some 3k-4k mile adventures just beg for cruise. Sorry Honda..

Sounds like a great bike if you do a lot of off road riding. But my Super Tenere is decent on dirt roads and has cruise control and shaft drive….and never breaks down. I am 66 and do a lot of 400 plus mile days….so cruise control is a must.

Hope the New 700 Tenere’ comes with shaft drive and cruise control > with a 32″ seat height. I’m pushing 64 Years and need a comfortable dualsport these days. Motocross/ Cross Country Racing left me in 1983 at 28 Years old. The 2013 KLR 650 is ok but it needs more horsepower and better suspension. Show us something soon Yamaha > Honda is working on a new Africa Twin 650/750. They might beat you to it!

Yamaha is just pulling our chains!!! It will never happen.

Nice bike with a good pedigree..

As a current KTM 1190 Adventure owner, this bike really has me thinking of a change. I love the KTM, does everything great. But it will burn you out of it on a warm day. Yes, it has technical features the Honda does not, but the KTM is HOT! I have 24K in 2 years of ownership, and 34 years of riding. On a warm day, the KTM is just not fun in any type of riding, so I am ready to try something else. I hear a lot of talk about no cruise control on the Honda, well, I have never had cruise control on a bike, so It wont be a deal breaker for me. The great thing about motorcycles is that there is one for everybody. Doesn’t matter how tall/short you are or your financial status, we can each figure out what works for us and go ride.

This is such a great bike I went out and bought one. I’ve owned every GS going back to the R-100 GS Bumble Bee and they are great bikes but over the years have become prohibitively expensive and all the techno doo dads mean more stuff to go wrong. Keyless ignition, really? That’s like the answer to the question nobody asked. KTM’s? I’ve also owned every KTM Adventure Bike starting with the 990. They are an absolute blast to ride but 130 rear wheel horsepower means lots of electronic intervention to keep you from killing yourself. Did I mention engine heat? If the 130 hp doesn’t kill you you’ll be roasted alive by that rear cylinder and exhaust pipe. Nope, the Honda is the current bike for me and what it lacks in ridiculous horsepower and keyless ignition it more than makes up for with Honda Reliability, a fun package, and a reasonable purchase price. Now the KTM 1090 Adventure R? Hmmmm … I wonder if it would cook me?

Hi everyone my Name is Tom from Australia just reading some of the reviews I’m 63 years I have just purchased a Africa Twin DCT absolutely love it you can’t beat an Honda product keep all the other over rated stuff Triumphs, Bms, Ktms servicing costs are so high on these bikes friends tell me Honda is the best F.. K the rest cheers Tom

I’m about to join the addiction for a new ATAS in black & white… The pros for the Honda are logically answered here by others. I look and read about all the contenders but keep coming back to the raw sensibility and cost of ownership in having the Honda… Keeping it simple for me is the winner for me.. cheers!

I’m also of the opinion that there is a great bike out there for everyone and I really appreciate the ATAS being a 6’3″ rider with lots of dirt bike background. I have 1000 miles on my @ and am very happy with how smooth and responsive it is on the road but 500+# is an awful lot for any kind of dirt biker to handle off pavement so I’m glad Honda left off anything that adds extra weight. Suspension is fully adjustable and pretty good at controlling the weight and I love the adjustable seat height as it changes the riding dynamic for longer rides. Overall I am very happy with what Honda did in giving us a bike at a very good value ($11,500 for mine!). With the price gap to the KTM 1090 or even the upcoming 790 Adventure let alone the various GSs, I have lots of room for personalizing the bike.

YAs the Aussies say, “You got a tri cola.” Looks sweet. I was gonna to buy one. Then I saw the 1090 and decided that the AT looks like a toy. LOL.

It is always interesting to read the comments . I ride with a group of street oriented gents and most have gone to BMW . Hell , I even had GS 800 for a year . (It left me sitting a few times, too many ) Ride what you like . Being a dirt racer ,I appreciate the comfort and simplicity of the HONDA . The BMWs do have a lot of cool gadgets but I’ve watched them fail in the middle of nowhere . Ride what you like Shut up and Ride

Just bought a 2018 DCT, after taking a 20+year break from riding now I’m back at it. The DCT is superb. There is also a manual paddle shifter but I rarely use it. So nice to concentrate on riding and obstacles and not have to shift or stall. DCT is here to stay. I’ve only put about 300 Miles on her (@My600lbgirlfriend) but so far I could not be happier.

I’ve just done the same as Douglas. Love the dct box, a work of art. I’m 5ft 9 in my heels and had an issue with the height even in the low position. Took the seat to Viking seats in Kent and had it re shaped Lower by another 30 mm. much happier as I couldn’t get the low seat due to Honda not making it anymore. Apparently. Last bike was 20 yrs ago and that was a blade and loved it. I do feel with the Africa twin like all other adventure bikes is the weight of them all. I’m having to be very cautious when it comes to stopping. I seem to be using the brakes much too early when I come to junctions. So trying to get used to it will take practice. I have only had the bike for a week. When out for a blast today and was fantastic. Mike

I love my 2018 AT because it’s great for standing to stretch on those longer rides. It’s not the fastest bike out there but it’s pulls good enough to get up to speed or pass with ease, most of the time. It’s certainly never under power when it comes to dirt and gravel roads. It’s just about as manageable as my older water cooled 650R because of a better suspension, even though it’s a quite of bit heavier.

Its not what you drive, Its where have you driven too. I met a Japanese Female sole riding all through south America, even going into Brazil . All on a cheap Chinese 200 cc endure

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Published: March 29, 2010

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RBTH releases a special brochure – Moscow Traveller

Moscow Traveller

Moscow Traveller

The Russian capital has gone through countless changes since its founding in 1147. Today this bustling city is one of the world's great metropolises — full of exhibitions and performances, new art spaces, modern parks and expanded sports venues. In recent years, Moscow has attracted the best Russian and foreign architects and urban planners, who have made significant changes not only in the city's visible fabric but also in the patterns of urban life.

This largest city in Europe is managing its growth through the expansion of subway lines, launching new forms of public transportation and an expansion of bicycle lanes. New stadiums are being built for large-scale international sporting competitions and former factories are being turned into spaces for creative expression. People of any age and profession can find a way to fit into life here. Young artists can express themselves through street art; ambitious entrepreneurs can find support for social and ecological projects. New green spaces and farmers markets are helping people embrace a healthy lifestyle.

Moscow today is a city in transition, developing a new identity for the 21st century.

RBTH is taking a deep look onto all these angles of new Moscow in our special print edition – Moscow Traveller.

Click here to get a PDF version of our brochure.

Read more about Moscow at RBTH Travel section

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africa twin 1000 travel edition

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IMAGES

  1. Honda Africa Twin Travel Edition (2018

    africa twin 1000 travel edition

  2. Honda Announces Prices for the CRF1000L Africa Twin Travel Edition

    africa twin 1000 travel edition

  3. Honda Africa Twin DCT Travel Edition (2018

    africa twin 1000 travel edition

  4. Honda CRF 1000 L AFRICA TWIN Adventure Sports 2018

    africa twin 1000 travel edition

  5. Descubre la nueva (y clásica) Honda CRF1000L Africa Twin Adventure

    africa twin 1000 travel edition

  6. Honda Africa Twin CRF 1100L Adventure Sports Travel Edition (2020

    africa twin 1000 travel edition

VIDEO

  1. ÁFRICA TWIN 1100 2022

  2. Africa Twin1100

  3. Africa Twin 2018: техническое обновление

  4. AFRICA TWIN 1000L #africatwin1000

  5. AFRICA TWIN 1100 no OFF-ROAD

  6. QUALE PREFERISCI? Honda Africa Twin 1000 o 1100? #moto

COMMENTS

  1. Africa Twin Adventure Sport ES

    BASE MSRP: $14,499 Destination Charge: $475.00 Freight Surcharge: $300.00 Available Colors BUILD Get My Quote Offers Available RIDE THE WORLD Adventure bikes are super-popular these days, and it's easy to see why. They let you ride just about anywhere. Plus, their upright seating and sensible riding position let you rack up the miles in comfort.

  2. 2022 Honda Africa Twin Review [A Personal Adventure Bike Test]

    The Honda Africa Twin is a perennial favorite and on any short list when considering the purchase of an adventure motorcycle. The AT sits in a bit of a unique spot. With a 1084cc engine and...

  3. 2022 Honda CRF1100L Africa Twin Review: Ideal Adventure ...

    Base price: $15,299 Type of motorcycle: Adventure Powertrain: 1084cc liquid-cooled single-cam four-stroke parallel-twin | 6-speed dual-clutch automatic | chain drive Horsepower: 100 Torque: 76...

  4. 2022 Honda Africa Twin Specifications

    Africa Twin Adventure Sports ES DCT: Africa Twin Adventure Sports ES: Africa Twin DCT: Africa Twin: ENGINE : Type: 1,084cc liquid-cooled Unicam® four-stroke 22.5º parallel-twin: ... 9.1 in. wheel travel: 45 mm inverted Showa telescopic fork; 9.1 in. wheel travel: Rear: Pro-Link® system w/ single Showa shock w/ EERA; 8.7 in. travel:

  5. Honda Announces Prices for the CRF1000L Africa Twin Travel Edition

    The CRF1000L Africa Twin Travel Edition package consists of side cases, a top case, crash bars, heated grips, central stand, LED fog lights, and a 12V socket. Bought separately, these add...

  6. Africa Twin

    2021 Africa Twin 2021 Africa Twin Adventure Sports ES BASE MSRP: $14,399 Destination Charge: $475.00 Freight Surcharge: $300.00 Available Colors BUILD Get My Quote Make Life an Adventure Has there ever been a better time to be an adventure-bike rider? And has taking your next vacation on an adventure bike ever looked better either?

  7. HONDA CRF1000L AFRICA TWIN (2016

    Ride quality & brakes 4 out of 5. Ride quality is great, seating position is commanding and comfortable. Brakes are great as well but due to the nature of the bike heavy front braking creates a ...

  8. HONDA CRF1100L AFRICA TWIN (2020

    Used £9,000 - £13,000 View bikes for sale Overall rating Next up: Ride & brakes 4 out of 5 (4/5) Author: Jon Urry Published: 27 August 2021 Updated: 28 April 2023 The third generation of Honda...

  9. 2020 Honda Africa Twin CRF1100L Adventure Sports ES

    Honda's CRF1000L Africa Twin was a little late to the adventure-bike party when it was introduced for 2016, but the bike immediately established itself as a solid performing, less-expensive...

  10. Honda CRF1000L Africa Twin Review and Test

    The new CRF1000L Africa Twin combines the Africa Twin heritage and style cues but uses the best of Honda's current technical philosophy. So there are two bikes. One at £11,299 using a DCT automatic gearbox with a mesmerising 80 possible mode settings from traction control and power delivery to levels of gear selection and hill control.

  11. 2018 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports CRF1000L2 Review

    Model Overview Side-by-side with its sibling, the CRF1000L Africa Twin Adventure Sports is obviously taller, with a flatter seat profile and more upright riding position. The fairing and screen offer more wind protection and a large sump guard and side pipe fully protect the machine.

  12. Ride Review: Assessing Honda's Africa Twin On the Road

    As an owner of a Suzuki V-Strom 1000—which has almost identical dimensions, weight, horsepower and torque figures—I wondered whether the Africa Twin was worthy of its larger price tag and all...

  13. 2016 Honda CRF1000L Africa Twin

    2016 Honda CRF1000L Africa Twin | First Ride Review By Greg Drevenstedt - December 18, 2015 The Honda Africa Twin offers good road comfort but modest power compared to many open-class ADV...

  14. Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports long-term review

    Honda CRF1000L Africa Twin Adventure Sports specs. Price (manual): £12,599 OTR. DCT; £13,549 OTR. Engine: Liquid-cooled 4-stroke 8-valve parallel twin with 270° crank and uni-cam. Gearbox constant: mesh 6-speed MT / 6-speed DCT with on and off-road riding modes.

  15. Honda CRF1000L Africa Twin 'Baja' Build

    The Honda CRF1000L Africa Twin was introduced last year to rave reviews from the motorcycle press. Bucking the trend toward ever-larger and less off-road-capable Adventure Bikes, the Africa Twin set a new course for the industry with its compact, mass-centralized design.

  16. Honda Africa Twin

    2016 Honda CRF1000L Africa Twin specs: Engine: 998cc parallel twin. Max power: 94bhp. Torque: 68.6ft-lb. Weight: 232kg. Seat height: 870mm. When the Africa Twin re-appeared at the back end of 2015 ...

  17. Honda CRF1000L Africa Twin Adventure Sports 2018 review

    Honda CRF1000L Africa Twin Adventure Sports specs. Price (manual): £12,599 OTR. DCT; £13,549 OTR Engine: Liquid-cooled 4-stroke 8-valve parallel twin with 270° crank and uni-cam Power: 998cc Torque: 99Nm/6,000rpm Gearbox constant: mesh 6-speed MT / 6-speed DCT with on and off-road riding modes

  18. 2018 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports

    May 21, 2018 For 2018 Honda has updated its Africa Twin adventure bike platform and added a new model, the Africa Twin Adventure Sports, shown above. (Photos by Steve Cox) Honda's reboot of...

  19. Honda Africa Twin 1000 Travel Edition 2016

    About Press Copyright Contact us Creators Advertise Developers Terms Privacy Policy & Safety How YouTube works Test new features NFL Sunday Ticket Press Copyright ...

  20. CRF1000A Africa Twin on icy road from Moscow to Germany)

    Africa is just amazing..no spikes, mitas-e-07 tires... Please do not repeat, it is really dangerous. But she can do this)) video taken by somebody from the c...

  21. Twin Bombings in Moscow

    Sources: Satellite image by Geoeye; map data from OpenStreetMap, Cloudmade and KartaMetro.info; Russia Department of Emergency Situations; Yuri Popov, University of Michigan

  22. Xi Jinping visit aims to boost ties with Moscow

    Xi Jinping to make first foreign visit to Moscow on Saturday. The choice is symbolic and demonstrates warming ties between the two countries. Trade between the two countries reached $88.1 billion ...

  23. RBTH releases a special brochure

    RBTH is taking a deep look onto all these angles of new Moscow in our special print edition - Moscow Traveller. Click here to get a PDF version of our brochure. Read more about Moscow at RBTH ...