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Lonely Planet Not For Parents Travel Book 1st Ed.: Cool Stuff to Know About Every Country in the World

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Lonely Planet Not For Parents Travel Book 1st Ed.: Cool Stuff to Know About Every Country in the World Hardcover – Oct. 1 2011

  • Print length 208 pages
  • Language English
  • Publisher Lonely Planet Kids
  • Publication date Oct. 1 2011
  • Dimensions 24.13 x 1.91 x 31.75 cm
  • ISBN-10 1742208142
  • ISBN-13 978-1742208145
  • See all details

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Product details

  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ Lonely Planet Kids (Oct. 1 2011)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • Hardcover ‏ : ‎ 208 pages
  • ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 1742208142
  • ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-1742208145
  • Item weight ‏ : ‎ 1.32 kg
  • Dimensions ‏ : ‎ 24.13 x 1.91 x 31.75 cm
  • #1,410 in Children's Books on Travel

About the authors

Lonely planet.

With over 150 million guidebooks in print, Lonely Planet is a trusted source for any traveler. Since our inception in 1973, we've inspired generations of travelers to discover amazing places and enabled curious travelers to get off the beaten paths to appreciate different cultures and become agents of positive change.

Lonely Planet Kids

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Frugal Traveler

To Protect Your Miles, Be Careful How You Book

American Airlines recently announced new restrictions on point allocation based on how you book a flight. What does that mean for loyalty members?

A commercial airplane with red and blue stripes on its tail and the word "American" in large blue letters on the side of the aircraft, takes off from an airport runway.

By Elaine Glusac

Elaine Glusac is the Frugal Traveler columnist, focusing on budget-friendly tips and journeys.

Earlier this month, American Airlines announced that beginning May 1, it will require travelers to book directly with the airline, partner airlines or “preferred travel agencies” in order to receive points in its loyalty program.

The unprecedented move confused many travelers eager to protect their mileage currency, prompting posts like this one on X: “@AmericanAir your news about earning miles/loyalty points is a bit concerning — we’re loyal to you no matter who we book through!”

In an email, a representative of the airline said that the approved list of travel agencies would not be published until April.

While there is much to be determined about the new policy, a battle for customers between the airline and third-party ticket sellers, which includes online travel agencies like Orbitz, has emerged. Here’s what travelers should know before booking their next flight.

What are the new points rules at American?

Currently, the biggest domestic carriers — including Delta Air Lines , United Airlines , Southwest Airlines and American — award points and miles to members of their loyalty programs on most tickets regardless of where they are sold.

American’s new rules state that in order to receive miles and points, travelers must book through its website, a Oneworld partner airline or approved travel agencies (with exceptions for those enrolled in its business program, which targets small companies, or with a corporate contract).

Also beginning May 1, fliers booking basic economy fares, the airline’s cheapest fares, may only earn points by booking through American’s website or its airline partners.

What’s behind the switch?

According to analysts, this is largely a behind-the-scenes fight over technology.

Travel agencies have long used distribution systems like Sabre and Amadeus to sell airline tickets. But many airlines are interested in using an emerging channel developed by the International Air Transport Association called New Distribution Capability . It offers airlines a more direct means of communicating with passengers, whom they can target with personalized fares or bundled offers not available in the traditional systems, providing opportunities to sell more services.

The “preferred” agencies that American said it will announce in April will be those making a substantial number of bookings on the new platform.

“American is dead set on being a more efficient airline and reducing its cost of sales, so they have issued this new edict and travel agents who choose not to follow along will find themselves on the losing end of the battle,” said Henry Harteveldt, a travel industry analyst and the founder of the Atmosphere Research Group.

Many travel agents object to the speed of adopting a technology they say still has bugs. In a recent letter to the 18,000 member agencies of the American Society of Travel Advisors , the president and chief executive of the trade organization Zane Kerby called it “an underdeveloped technology,” with “basic servicing” issues that include problems with cancellations, booking multiple people on the same itinerary and rebooking.

Mr. Kerby cited a heightened risk to most business travelers using external agencies to make their bookings. “It feels like American Airlines is disenfranchising or willing to disenfranchise its most profitable and lucrative segment, which is the frequent business traveler,” he said.

In American’s new requirement that basic economy fliers book directly with the airline to earn miles, Brian Sumers, who writes the Airline Observer newsletter, sees a play for greater loyalty from thrifty travelers at a time when many airlines have abandoned them. Delta , for instance, no longer awards points to its basic economy passengers. United restricts basic economy fliers to one personal item carried aboard when flying domestically.

American wants those basic economy passengers, Mr. Sumers said. “The end goal is to get people so excited about having AAdvantage points and using them all the time, because that’s where they’re making money.”

How should I book to ensure I’m awarded miles for American flights?

If you are accustomed to booking online with the airline directly, earning miles is not endangered.

If you use a travel agency, including online sites like Expedia or Orbitz, check the list of approved agencies when it is published in April.

But even for travelers who are accustomed to D.I.Y. bookings, the new American policy poses some threat to earning miles. If you use a travel agent to plan a more complicated trip — say, an African safari or a trek to Machu Picchu in Peru — make sure the agent is approved by American or be prepared to make the booking yourself to earn miles.

“American is counting on the fact that travelers engaged with AAdvantage will want to remain engaged, so that if their travel agent is not onboard, the customer will find a different travel agent or opt to book directly,” Mr. Harteveldt said.

Will other airlines follow suit?

Experts say commercial aviation is a copycat industry; if a policy is successful, others are likely to follow. But it may not happen quickly in this case.

“There are some very expensive tickets that go through using the older system,” Mr. Sumers said, describing other airlines as “taking a watch-and-wait approach” to see if any defections from former American customers boost their business.

“By no means has this play reached its conclusions,” Mr. Harteveldt said. “We are in the first part of the first act.”

Follow New York Times Travel on Instagram and sign up for our weekly Travel Dispatch newsletter to get expert tips on traveling smarter and inspiration for your next vacation. Dreaming up a future getaway or just armchair traveling? Check out our 52 Places to Go in 2024 .

Open Up Your World

Considering a trip, or just some armchair traveling here are some ideas..

52 Places:  Why do we travel? For food, culture, adventure, natural beauty? Our 2024 list has all those elements, and more .

Mumbai:  Spend 36 hours in this fast-changing Indian city  by exploring ancient caves, catching a concert in a former textile mill and feasting on mangoes.

Kyoto:  The Japanese city’s dry gardens offer spots for quiet contemplation  in an increasingly overtouristed destination.

Iceland:  The country markets itself as a destination to see the northern lights. But they can be elusive, as one writer recently found .

Texas:  Canoeing the Rio Grande near Big Bend National Park can be magical. But as the river dries, it’s getting harder to find where a boat will actually float .

White House says Kamala Harris will travel to Arizona after state Supreme Court abortion ban ruling

Vice President Kamala Harris will travel to Arizona on Friday, the White House announced Tuesday, shortly after the state Supreme Court upheld a near-total abortion ban .

Harris will travel to Tucson, the White House said in an advisory, "to continue her leadership in the fight for reproductive freedoms." It noted that it will be the vice president's second trip to Arizona this year and her fifth time since being sworn in.

"Last month, the Vice President visited Phoenix, AZ to highlight how extremists in states across the country have proposed and enacted abortion bans that threaten women’s health, force them to travel out of state to receive care, and criminalize doctors," the White House said.

The White House said that the trip was part of Harris' nationwide "Fight for Reproductive Freedoms" tour "that included stops in Wisconsin, California, Georgia, Michigan, Arizona, and Minnesota."

Vice President Kamala Harris at Planned Parenthood

Since the Supreme Court's ruling overturning Roe v. Wade, Harris has held more than 80 events on reproductive rights in 20 states, the White House added.

The announcement about her upcoming trip came just about an hour after the Arizona Supreme Court ruled that a 160-year-old near-total abortion ban still on the books in the state could be enforced. Under the law from 1864, anyone who performs the procedure or helps a woman access that care could face felony charges and up to two to five years in prison. The  law  — which was codified in 1901, and again in 1913 — includes an exception to save the woman’s life.

President Joe Biden, Harris and Democrats in general are hoping that existing abortion bans and threats to expand them nationwide will help them win their races in this November's general election.

not for parents travel book

Rebecca Shabad is a politics reporter for NBC News based in Washington.

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The Crumbleys Are Being Scapegoated for America’s Gun Failures

A society that has refused to regulate guns is now punishing parents for not doing so on their own at home.

Jennifer Crumbley looks at her husband James Crumbley during their sentencing on four counts of involuntary manslaughter for the deaths of four Oxford High School students by their son, mass school shooter Ethan Crumbley, on April 9, 2024 at Oakland County Circuit Court in Pontiac, Michigan.

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Produced by ElevenLabs and News Over Audio (NOA) using AI narration.

Yesterday, a Michigan judge sentenced James and Jennifer Crumbley to 10 to 15 years in prison for failing to stop their son Ethan from murdering four students in 2021. The cases grabbed headlines because prosecutors aggressively charged the parents with the actual killings, as though they had pulled the trigger themselves, rather than pressing lesser offenses such as child neglect and failure to comply with gun-safety laws. Separate juries had convicted them of manslaughter. The harsh sentences may presage more criminal liability across the country for shooters’ family members and other caregivers, such as teachers and security guards, who theoretically could have stepped in to prevent the worst from happening. The people who possess real power to slow the scourge of gun violence in America—legislators, gun-industry executives, and the U.S. Supreme Court—now have in their hands a new means of pointing blame and evading accountability.

The tragedy occurred on November 30, 2021, when 15-year-old Ethan took a gun from his home and brought it to Oxford High School in his backpack. According to the evidence presented at trial, his parents had bought the gun and taken Ethan to a shooting range just days before the killings, ignoring multiple warning signs that he was experiencing severe psychiatric distress, including mental hallucinations, and contemplating violence. When Ethan asked to see a doctor, his dad told him to “suck it up.” His mom laughed. After the school alerted the parents that their son was searching for ammunition online, she texted him: “LOL I’m not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught.” On the morning of the murders, a teacher found a drawing he had made depicting a person bleeding, along with the words “The thoughts won’t stop help me.” The parents were called in for a meeting, but they declined to take him out of school. Shortly thereafter, Ethan removed the gun from his backpack in a bathroom and opened fire on his classmates.

From the March 2024 issue: To stop a shooter

Prosecutors calculated the sentencing-guideline range as if the Crumbley parents were each responsible for all four of the murders. “At the end of the day,” Jennifer’s counsel argued, “Mrs. Crumbley shouldn’t be sentenced as if she could control that four people were murdered, or if she had shot 100 people.” She had a point.

Oakland County Circuit Court Judge Cheryl Matthews emphasized at the sentencing that the evidence went beyond just bad parenting. The Crumbleys ignored “things that make a reasonable person feel the hair on the back of their neck stand up,” the judge said. “Opportunity knocked over and over again, louder and louder, and was ignored. No one answered. And these two people should have and didn’t.” Matthews went on to criticize James for “unfettered access to a gun or guns as well as ammunition in your home,” and Jennifer for having “glorified the use and possession of these weapons.”

But here’s the thing: Michigan law at the time allowed for unlimited firearms access and storage in the home. The Crumbleys acted in compliance with the law. Michigan’s new secure-gun-storage law took effect only in February of this year—long after the murders; by then, the Crumbleys had already served nearly two years in jail. Nobody contended that either of these two parents poses a further threat to society, and if they were hypothetically inclined to repeat their bad deeds (their son is in prison for life after pleading guilty to four counts of first-degree murder, one count of terrorism causing death, and 19 other related charges), a law is now in place to dissuade them.

The Crumbleys are being punished for failing to do what society writ large did not ask of them. For the most part, legislators across the country continue to sit on their hands, routinely peddling “thoughts and prayers” rather than enacting gun-control laws. Congress gets credit for the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act , which bars civil lawsuits against firearms manufacturers, distributors, and dealers for harm caused by “the criminal or unlawful misuse” of a firearm, and says that “the possibility of imposing liability on an entire industry for harm that is solely caused by others is an abuse of the legal system.” The Supreme Court, too, has done its part to perpetuate America’s gun-violence crisis. In 2022 , a 6–3 majority struck down as unconstitutional a 111-year-old New York State law that required applicants seeking a concealed-carry license to show a special need that distinguishes them from the general public. Absent a constitutional amendment, the ruling effectively bans states from enacting similar laws in the name of public safety despite voter preference and historical practice.

While Congress, state legislators, gun manufacturers, and the Supreme Court have done worse than nothing, parents are now headed to prison for not taking steps to impose commonsense restrictions on their own at home. This regime has it exactly backwards. In a civil society, laws exist to protect us against our negligence and bad instincts. Putting someone’s mother and father in jail as a warning sign to others is no substitute.

Watch CBS News

Biden is canceling $7.4 billion in student debt for 277,000 borrowers. Here's who is eligible.

By Aimee Picchi

Edited By Alain Sherter

Updated on: April 12, 2024 / 3:29 PM EDT / CBS News

The Biden administration on Friday said it's canceling $7.4 billion in student debt for 277,000 borrowers, with the recipients scheduled to receive emails today to alert them to their loan discharges. 

The latest effort extends the debt relief provider under President Joe Biden after the Supreme Court last year blocked  his administration's plan for broad-based student loan forgiveness. With the latest batch of loan cancellations, the White House said it has forgiven about $153 billion in debt for 4.3 million student borrowers. 

Biden, who had made student loan relief a major campaign pledge, is tackling an issue that affects about 43 million Americans with a combined  $1.7 trillion in student debt. It's a burden that some borrowers and their advocates say has harmed their ability to save for a home or achieve financial milestones, an issue that was echoed by Education Secretary Miguel Cardona in a conference call with reporters. 

"I talked to a teacher in New York this week who took out a loan for $30,000," Cardona said Friday, "and after over a decade of paying and being a teacher the debt was $60,000, and she was saying that the interest was so high that the payments that she was making wasn't even touching her principal."

He added, "We are fixing a broken system. We're relentless and taking steps to transform a broken system into one that works people across the country."

Here's what to know about who is eligible for the latest round of forgiveness.

Who qualifies for the student loan forgiveness?

Three groups of people qualify under the latest round of debt relief, the White House said. 

  • $3.6 billion for 206,800 borrowers enrolled in the SAVE plan.

About $3.6 billion will be forgiven for nearly 207,000 borrowers enrolled in the Saving on a Valuable Education (SAVE) plan, an income-driven repayment program, or IDR, that the Biden administration created last year. 

The White House said borrowers who are getting their debt discharged under SAVE had taken out smaller loans for their college studies. The plan allows people to receive forgiveness after they made at least 10 years of payments if they originally took out $12,000 or less in loans to pay for college; borrowers with larger loans are eligible after 20 or 25 years of repayment, depending on what types of loans they have. 

 "You sacrifice and you've saved for a decade or more to make your student loan payments, and you originally borrowed $12,000 or less, you're going to see relief," Cardona told reporters. "An overwhelming number of those who qualify for SAVE were eligible for Pell grants and come from low- and middle-income communities."

  • $3.5 billion for 65,700 borrowers in income-repayment plans.

These borrowers will receive forgiveness through "administrative adjustments" to repayment plans where loan servicers had made it tougher for some borrowers to qualify for relief.  

"These are people who paid for a long time but were being deprived of relief because of administrative and servicing failures," Cardona said. "These people met the contract of their loan" and will receive forgiveness.

  • $300 million for 4,600 borrowers through Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF).  

The PSLF program is designed to help public servants like teachers and government employees achieve debt forgiveness after 10 years of repayment. It's a program that started in 2007 but had been plagued with complex rules that effectively hampered people from getting their debt discharged, with only 7,000 receiving loan forgiveness prior to the Biden administration. 

With the latest round of discharges, the Biden administration has forgiven $62.8 billion in loans for 876,000 borrowers through PSLF. 

Are there legal challenges to Biden's debt forgiveness plans?

In two separate lawsuits, Republican attorneys general in 18 states are pushing to have the SAVE plan tossed and to halt any further student debt cancellation. They say the SAVE plan oversteps Biden's authority and makes it harder for states to recruit employees. They also contend the plan undermines a separate cancellation program that encourages careers in public service.

It's unclear what the suits could mean for loans that have already been canceled. A court document filed by Kansas' attorney general says it's "unrealistic to think that any loan forgiveness that occurs during this litigation will ever be clawed back."

—With reporting by the Associated Press.

  • Biden Administration
  • Student Loan

Aimee Picchi is the associate managing editor for CBS MoneyWatch, where she covers business and personal finance. She previously worked at Bloomberg News and has written for national news outlets including USA Today and Consumer Reports.

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Mind-Expanding Reads: 18 Must-Read Books for Intellectuals

Posted: October 18, 2023 | Last updated: December 28, 2023

<p>Diana is a Middle Eastern woman from Scotland who moved three hours away from home to attend university. Scotland pays for their students to attend classes and doesn’t require repayment. This program helps Diana financially as she’s able to pay rent, utilities, and groceries from her on-campus job as an auxiliary nurse. Diana loves to enjoy crazy, wholesome nights with friends, make memories, and destress from classes and work.</p>

In today’s fast-paced world, it’s easy to get caught up in a cycle of endless scrolling and shallow entertainment. But for those looking to stimulate their intellectual curiosity, diving into a carefully curated book list can offer a much-needed respite. Below are 18 must-read books that promise not just to entertain, but to broaden your intellectual horizons.

<p><span>George Orwell’s “1984” is a dystopian classic that offers a terrifying glimpse into a world governed by totalitarianism and constant surveillance. Orwell masterfully uses language as both a tool and a weapon, showcasing how the manipulation of words can reshape reality. The book remains alarmingly relevant today, as it grapples with issues such as the loss of privacy and the erosion of individual liberties.</span></p>

“1984” by George Orwell

George Orwell’s “1984” is a dystopian classic that offers a terrifying glimpse into a world governed by totalitarianism and constant surveillance. Orwell masterfully uses language as both a tool and a weapon, showcasing how the manipulation of words can reshape reality. The book remains alarmingly relevant today, as it grapples with issues such as the loss of privacy and the erosion of individual liberties.

<p><span> Do you ever use it, or did you buy it because you thought you had to? Did you also buy a couch </span><i><span>and</span></i><span> a loveseat, only to find that they make the room feel squeezed?</span></p>

“Sapiens” by Yuval Noah Harari

Yuval Noah Harari’s “Sapiens” delves deep into the history and impact of Homo sapiens, tracing human evolution from hunter-gatherer societies to the digital age. The book challenges us to question our deeply-held beliefs about humanity and inspires a new understanding of our impact on the environment, economics, and international relations. It’s a riveting journey through human history that’s both educational and thought-provoking.

<p><span>“In Search of Lost Time” is an expansive literary work that delves into the nuances of human emotion, memory, and the passage of time. Marcel Proust masterfully employs the concept of involuntary memory as a lens through which to view the world. Its complex narrative and in-depth psychological explorations make it a challenging but deeply rewarding read for the intellectually curious.</span></p>

“In Search of Lost Time” by Marcel Proust

“In Search of Lost Time” is an expansive literary work that delves into the nuances of human emotion, memory, and the passage of time. Marcel Proust masterfully employs the concept of involuntary memory as a lens through which to view the world. Its complex narrative and in-depth psychological explorations make it a challenging but deeply rewarding read for the intellectually curious.

<p><span>Fyodor Dostoevsky’s “Crime and Punishment” is a penetrating look into the psychological complexities of a man who rationalizes murder for a supposed greater good. The story explores the depths of guilt, moral dilemmas, and the psychological torment of its protagonist, Raskolnikov. This compelling narrative provides a profound exploration of the complexities of human nature and the moral implications of extreme actions.</span></p>

“Crime and Punishment” by Fyodor Dostoevsky

Fyodor Dostoevsky’s “Crime and Punishment” is a penetrating look into the psychological complexities of a man who rationalizes murder for a supposed greater good. The story explores the depths of guilt, moral dilemmas, and the psychological torment of its protagonist, Raskolnikov. This compelling narrative provides a profound exploration of the complexities of human nature and the moral implications of extreme actions.

<p><span>“The Republic” by Plato is an enduring masterpiece of Western philosophy. It presents a detailed exploration of justice, the ideal state, and the education necessary to achieve a virtuous life. Framed as a Socratic dialogue, the text delves into intricate arguments that have shaped political philosophy and ethics for millennia, making it an indispensable read for anyone interested in the underpinnings of Western thought.</span></p>

“The Republic” by Plato

“The Republic” by Plato is an enduring masterpiece of Western philosophy. It presents a detailed exploration of justice, the ideal state, and the education necessary to achieve a virtuous life. Framed as a Socratic dialogue, the text delves into intricate arguments that have shaped political philosophy and ethics for millennia, making it an indispensable read for anyone interested in the underpinnings of Western thought.

<p><span>Douglas Hofstadter’s “Gödel, Escher, Bach” is a unique interdisciplinary examination of formal systems, art, and human cognition. By drawing unexpected connections between mathematician Kurt Gödel, artist M.C. Escher, and composer Johann Sebastian Bach, the book explores the very essence of human thought and creativity. It’s a rich tapestry of ideas that provoke and challenge intellectual boundaries.</span></p>

“Gödel, Escher, Bach” by Douglas Hofstadter

Douglas Hofstadter’s “Gödel, Escher, Bach” is a unique interdisciplinary examination of formal systems, art, and human cognition. By drawing unexpected connections between mathematician Kurt Gödel, artist M.C. Escher, and composer Johann Sebastian Bach, the book explores the very essence of human thought and creativity. It’s a rich tapestry of ideas that provoke and challenge intellectual boundaries.

<p><span>Thomas Kuhn’s groundbreaking book redefined our understanding of scientific progress by introducing the idea of paradigm shifts. Kuhn dismantles the notion of science as a linear accumulation of facts and instead paints a nuanced picture of how scientific revolutions occur, transforming the way we perceive and understand the world.</span></p>

“The Structure of Scientific Revolutions” by Thomas Kuhn

Thomas Kuhn’s groundbreaking book redefined our understanding of scientific progress by introducing the idea of paradigm shifts. Kuhn dismantles the notion of science as a linear accumulation of facts and instead paints a nuanced picture of how scientific revolutions occur, transforming the way we perceive and understand the world.

<p><span>Leo Tolstoy’s epic novel “War and Peace” offers a panoramic view of Russian society during the Napoleonic Wars. The book is not just a historical account but a philosophical treatise and a study of the human condition. Characters are presented in their full complexities, and the narrative encompasses grand historical events alongside intimate human dramas, making it an intellectually enriching experience.</span></p>

“War and Peace” by Leo Tolstoy

Leo Tolstoy’s epic novel “War and Peace” offers a panoramic view of Russian society during the Napoleonic Wars. The book is not just a historical account but a philosophical treatise and a study of the human condition. Characters are presented in their full complexities, and the narrative encompasses grand historical events alongside intimate human dramas, making it an intellectually enriching experience.

<p>While some individuals may initially fare well in solitude, extended periods of isolation can harm physical and mental well-being, as the National Institute on Aging highlights. Research indicates prolonged isolation can lead to severe health issues, including depression, anxiety, cognitive decline, high blood pressure, obesity, weakened immune function, and heart disease. Older adults are particularly susceptible to social isolation and loneliness due to various factors such as health changes, decreased social connections, hearing or vision loss, memory decline, physical limitations, and the loss of loved ones.</p> <p>To combat these challenges, the NIA suggests engaging in activities aligned with personal interests, such as volunteering, auditing college classes, adopting a pet (if feasible), participating in exercise classes, reviving old hobbies or exploring new ones, visiting senior centers or libraries regularly, and utilizing technology to stay connected with family and friends through video chats or other communication platforms. Proactively addressing isolation can promote overall well-being and enhance the quality of life during aging.</p>

“The Prince” by Niccolo Machiavelli

Niccolo Machiavelli’s “The Prince” is a seminal work on power politics and strategy. Its candid and sometimes controversial discussion of power dynamics has made it a staple in political theory and ethics. Written over 500 years ago, the book’s insights into human behavior and governance remain remarkably relevant today.

<p><span>Bella says that Brittany’s comments are like a slap in the face. She also admits that she and Johnny separated just before Christmas to give him some space. She has been raising their three children, all under the age of two, all by herself.</span></p>

“Brave New World” by Aldous Huxley

Aldous Huxley’s “Brave New World” provides a harrowing vision of a future society where individuality is sacrificed for societal stability. The book raises critical questions about the role of technology in shaping human behavior and the cost of progress. Its themes of dehumanization and the loss of personal freedoms make it a cautionary tale that resonates even in the modern world.

<p>Challenging and dispelling the misconceptions surrounding American history is crucial for fostering a more accurate and nuanced understanding of the past. By examining the complex realities behind these 20 prevalent falsehoods, we can uncover the diverse perspectives, untold stories, and hidden complexities that have often been overshadowed. We can reshape our collective narrative through critical analysis and a commitment to historical truth, ensuring a more inclusive and comprehensive representation of the nation’s rich and intricate history.</p>

“Beloved” by Toni Morrison

Toni Morrison’s “Beloved” is a haunting tale that deals with the scars of slavery, racial injustice, and the complexities of memory. It’s a story that invites readers to confront uncomfortable truths about America’s past while delving deep into the emotional landscapes of its characters. The book offers an essential perspective on the African American experience and the enduring impact of historical trauma.

<p><span>Siddhartha Mukherjee’s “The Gene” takes readers on an expansive journey through the history of genetics, starting from its discovery to its groundbreaking applications in gene editing and medicine today. The book raises ethical and philosophical questions about the potential impact of genetic manipulation, making it a thought-provoking read on the intersection of science and morality.</span></p>

“The Gene: An Intimate History” by Siddhartha Mukherjee

Siddhartha Mukherjee’s “The Gene” takes readers on an expansive journey through the history of genetics, starting from its discovery to its groundbreaking applications in gene editing and medicine today. The book raises ethical and philosophical questions about the potential impact of genetic manipulation, making it a thought-provoking read on the intersection of science and morality.

<p>Life is complicated enough without adding malicious activities to your day. Kelly clearly knew where Paul stood on children. Paul couldn’t have known how Kelly fit because her actions were in direct contradiction to the words she was saying. When Paul moved on and met Angela, was he supposed to check in with Kelly to see if she approved of their marriage or getting pregnant? Divorce and infertility suck so much, but it’s no cause for Paul to hide his wife or downplay his own happiness to shield his ex-wife from something hurtful.</p>

“The Stranger” by Albert Camus

Albert Camus’ “The Stranger” is an existential classic that explores the themes of absurdity, alienation, and the meaninglessness of life. Through its detached protagonist, Meursault, the novel examines the consequences of living an inauthentic life, devoid of conventional morals and emotions. It’s a provocative book that challenges conventional societal norms and questions the essence of human existence.

<p><span>“Cosmos” by Carl Sagan is a magisterial account of the universe, from its origins in the Big Bang to the challenges and opportunities facing humanity’s future in space. Written in accessible language, the book celebrates the grandeur and mystery of the cosmos, inspiring readers to appreciate the complexity and beauty of the universe we inhabit.</span></p>

“Cosmos” by Carl Sagan

“Cosmos” by Carl Sagan is a magisterial account of the universe, from its origins in the Big Bang to the challenges and opportunities facing humanity’s future in space. Written in accessible language, the book celebrates the grandeur and mystery of the cosmos, inspiring readers to appreciate the complexity and beauty of the universe we inhabit.

<p><span>Stephen Hawking’s “The Theory of Everything” is an enlightening and accessible guide to the intricacies of the universe. The book covers complex topics such as the nature of space-time and the origin of the cosmos, distilling them into understandable concepts. It offers readers a concise and comprehensible overview of some of the most mind-bending ideas in physics.</span></p>

“The Theory of Everything” by Stephen Hawking

Stephen Hawking’s “The Theory of Everything” is an enlightening and accessible guide to the intricacies of the universe. The book covers complex topics such as the nature of space-time and the origin of the cosmos, distilling them into understandable concepts. It offers readers a concise and comprehensible overview of some of the most mind-bending ideas in physics.

Regarding job interviews, certain red flags can instantly disqualify job seekers from consideration. These dealbreakers serve as warning signs for employers, indicating potential issues with ...

“Thinking, Fast and Slow” by Daniel Kahneman

In “Thinking, Fast and Slow,” Daniel Kahneman explores the intricate psychology behind decision-making and rationality. The book unveils the dual systems—the fast, intuitive thinking and the slow, deliberate thinking—that govern human thought. Kahneman’s insights into cognitive biases and heuristics can change the way you approach problems and make decisions, making it a transformative read.

<p>Unsurprisingly, the internet is a relatively recent phenomenon that has impacted all areas of our lives. However, remember that boomers were an entire generation who went through reference books and encyclopedias to write research papers instead of scrolling through webpages from the comfort of their homes.</p>

“The Selfish Gene” by Richard Dawkins

Richard Dawkins’ “The Selfish Gene” changed the landscape of evolutionary biology by introducing the idea of genes as the primary agents of natural selection. This thought-provoking book examines how the selfish behavior of individual genes leads to the emergence of complex social behaviors and survival strategies, reshaping our understanding of evolution and life itself.

<p>For all you bookworms, the second-hand book world is a sanctuary of literary delights. Second-hand bookstores are a haven for bibliophiles seeking new adventures.</p> <p>You can get everything from dog-eared classics to hidden gems on dusty shelves. Embrace the worn pages, the handwritten notes, and the sense of history that comes with each pre-loved book.</p>

“Infinite Jest” by David Foster Wallace

“Infinite Jest” is a sprawling, labyrinthine novel by David Foster Wallace that explores an array of themes, from the pitfalls of entertainment and addiction to existential despair. The narrative structure is complex, involving multiple storylines and a wealth of characters, making it a challenging read but one that offers endless intellectual and emotional stimulation.

<p><span>The dynamics of public travel are evolving, and not always for the better. A recent troubling trend dubbed “seat kidnapping” is making waves in the travel community. This audacious act sees travelers brazenly occupy seats not assigned to them. Through the eyes of travel writer Benet Wilson, let’s examine the shocking account of a seat kidnapping event and its subsequent implications.</span></p>

Seat Snatchers on the Rise! The Alarming New Trend of Brazen Traveler’s ‘Kidnapping’ Seats

The dynamics of public travel are evolving, and not always for the better. A recent troubling trend, “seat kidnapping,” is making waves in the travel community. This audacious act sees travelers brazenly occupy seats not assigned to them. Through the eyes of travel writer Benet Wilson, let’s examine the shocking account of a seat kidnapping event and its subsequent implications. Seat Snatchers on the Rise! The Alarming New Trend of Brazen Traveler’s ‘Kidnapping’ Seats

<p>In occasional emotional outbursts, we all stumble upon moments of colorful expletives – a release, if you will. However, the public sphere and the sanctum of our homes demand a more refined approach to language. It’s a universally prudent choice to sidestep the utilization of such explicit expressions. But then comes the intriguing conundrum: how can one replicate that raw emotional intensity without resorting to the familiar arsenal of expletives? Fear not, for we’ve compiled a selection of compelling alternatives that might do the trick for you.  </p>

Generation Gap on Wheels: 18 Classic Cars Boomers Love but Leave Millennials Scratching Their Heads

There’s often a generational divide in appreciation for classic cars. Many baby boomers have a nostalgic fondness for certain vehicles that younger generations, particularly millennials, find hard to comprehend. These are the motorized time capsules, the rides that elicit sighs of nostalgia and stories from the past. These vehicles have stood the test of time, from muscle cars to luxury cruisers. Yet, their charm and historical significance often baffle millennials. Let’s explore 18 of these revered vehicles. Generation Gap on Wheels: 18 Classic Cars Boomers Love but Leave Millennials Scratching Their Heads

Be Assertive Without Swearing: 17 Profanity-Free Words That Command Attention

In occasional emotional outbursts, we all stumble upon moments of colorful expletives – a release, if you will. However, the public sphere and the sanctum of our homes demand a more refined approach to language. It’s a universally prudent choice to sidestep the utilization of such explicit expressions. But then comes the intriguing conundrum: how can one replicate that raw emotional intensity without resorting to the familiar arsenal of expletives? Fear not, for we’ve compiled a selection of compelling alternatives that might do the trick for you. Be Assertive Without Swearing: 17 Profanity-Free Words That Command Attention

<p><span>Misconceptions and myths abound in our world, often taking root in our collective consciousness despite being contrary to scientific evidence. Many beliefs persist simply because they’ve been passed down through generations, unchallenged and accepted as fact. The reality, however, is quite different. Here, we debunk 18 popular myths that, despite their widespread acceptance, are flatly contradicted by scientific knowledge.</span></p>

18 Myths You Thought Were True, But Science Says You’re An Idiot

Misconceptions and myths abound in our world, often taking root in our collective consciousness despite being contrary to scientific evidence. Many beliefs persist simply because they’ve been passed down through generations, unchallenged, and accepted as fact. The reality, however, is quite different. Here, we debunk 18 popular myths that, despite their widespread acceptance, are flatly contradicted by scientific knowledge. 18 Myths You Thought Were True, But Science Says You’re An Idiot

<p>Generation Z does countless things that drive older generations up a wall! At times, it feels like they exist in a separate universe from the rest of society. Recently, men and women met in an online discussion to reveal all the stupid things Gen-Zers do that make the rest of us shake our heads in confusion.</p>

15 Reasons No One Cares About Gen X

Amidst the ongoing generational debate, the often-overlooked cohort of Gen X stands as a curious anomaly. Neither commanding the sensationalist headlines like the preceding Baby Boomers nor attaining the trendsetting status of the succeeding Millennials, Gen Xers exude a quiet yet captivating charm. This intriguing paradox prompts us to delve deeper into the factors that relegate them to the sidelines of discourse. Their preference for a more discreet existence might be a deliberate choice, allowing them to evade the relentless scrutiny accompanying the spotlight. This contemplative stance aligns with their desire for a life free from the excesses of constant attention. 15 Reasons No One Cares About Gen X

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  1. Not for Parents Travel Book: Children's Publication(Lonely Planet Not

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  2. Lonely Planet's Not-For-Parents Series

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  3. Not For Parents

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  4. Not-For-Parents Travel Series

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  5. The Not-for-Parents Travel Book

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  6. Lonely Planet's "Not For Parents" Series Makes Travel Planning Fun For Kids

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COMMENTS

  1. Lonely Planet Not-for-Parents the Travel Book

    This item: Lonely Planet Not-for-Parents the Travel Book . $16.96 $ 16. 96. Get it Dec 27 - 28. Only 2 left in stock - order soon. Ships from and sold by Revolver Market. + The Travel Book: A Journey Through Every Country in the World (Lonely Planet) $24.49 $ 24. 49. Get it as soon as Wednesday, Dec 27.

  2. Not-for-Parents Book Series

    The Not-for-Parents book series by multiple authors includes books Not For Parents Travel Book, Not-for-parents U.S.A. everything you ever wanted to know, How to Be a World Explorer, and several more. See the complete Not-for-Parents series book list in order, box sets or omnibus editions, and companion titles.

  3. The not-for-parents travel book : Dubois, Michael

    The not-for-parents travel book Bookreader Item Preview ... Lonely Planet's Travel Book especially for kids. Takes the inquisitive, data-hungry explorer on a tour of 200 countries. Packed with iconic images, evocative stories and informative facts and stats. In-the-know info on captial cities, language, currency, epic events, hideous histories ...

  4. Not For Parents Travel Book

    Books. Not For Parents Travel Book. Lonely Planet. Lonely Planet Publications, Nov 1, 2012 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 207 pages. This is not a guidebook. And it is definitely 'not-for-parents'. Cool stuff to know about every country in the world. Everyone knows which is the world's highest mountain, but do you know which country banned chewing gum ...

  5. Lonely Planet Not For Parents: Travel Book 1st Ed.: Cool Stuff to Know

    Lonely Planet's Travel Book especially for kids. Takes the inquisitive, data-hungry explorer on a tour of 200 countries. Packed with iconic images, evocative stories and informative facts and stats. In-the-know info on captial cities, language, currency, epic events, hideous histories, food, festivals and wildlife. ...

  6. The Travel Book

    The world is a very big place, and in The Not-for-Parents Travel Book we've concentrated on the really interesting bits to create a snapshot of what each country is like. (Warning to parents: these might not be the same "really interesting bits" that you like...where to buy coffee, how many stars the hotel has, what's the phone number for the ...

  7. Lonely Planet Not For Parents Travel Book 1st Ed.: Cool Stuff to Know

    Lonely Planet: The world's leading travel guide publisher* Shortlisted in the 2012 Australian Book Industry Awards in the Book of the Year for Older Children (age range 8 to14 years) category. Cool stuff to know about every country in the world. Everyone knows which is the world's highest mountain, but do you know which country banned chewing gum?

  8. Lonely Planet Not-for-Parents the Travel Book Hardcover

    Frequently bought together. This item: Lonely Planet Not-for-Parents the Travel Book. $7987. +. The Travel Book: A Journey Through Every Country in the World. $999. Total Price: Add both to Cart. One of these items dispatched sooner than the other.

  9. Not for Parents : The Travel Book

    Lonely Planet's Travel Book especially for kids. Takes the inquisitive, data-hungry explorer on a tour of 200 countries. Packed with iconic images, evocative stories and informative facts and stats. In-the-know info on captial cities, language, currency, epic events, hideous histories, food, festivals and wildlife.

  10. Lonely Planet Not-for-Parents the Travel Book

    Factoids sure make compulsive reading and The Not For Parents Travel Book hits the nail on the head. There is a huge amount of content within the hardback covers, with every country (200) offering up around eight wacky facts, accompanied by either a photo (as you'd expect from a lonely planet book) or an illustration (to mix up the style and add humour).

  11. Not for Parents : The Travel Book

    Lonely Planet: The world's leading travel guide publisher* Shortlisted in the 2012 Australian Book Industry Awards in the Book of the Year for Older Children (age range 8 to14 years) category. Cool stuff to know about every country in the world. Everyone knows which is the world's highest mountain, but do you know which country banned chewing gum?

  12. Not for Parents Travel Book By Lonely Planet

    Not for Parents Travel Book Summary Not for Parents Travel Book by Lonely Planet. Lonely Planet: The world's leading travel guide publisher* Shortlisted in the 2012 Australian Book Industry Awards in the Book of the Year for Older Children (age range 8 to14 years) category. Cool stuff to know about every country in the world.

  13. Lonely Planet Not-for-Parents U.S.A.: Everything You Ev…

    Lonely Planet: The world's leading travel guide publisher* This is not a guidebook. And it is definitely 'not-for-parents'. It is the real, inside story about one of the world's most exciting countries - the United States of America.In this book you'll hear fascinating tales about the Wild West, cockroach races, a massive canyon and weddings in Vegas.

  14. Lonely Planet Not-for-Parents Extreme Planet

    Michael DuBois, Katri Hilden, Lonely Planet (Creator) Lonely The world's leading travel guide publisher* Follow up to the best-selling Not-For-Parents Travel Book , Extreme Planet is a whirlwind tour of the globe, seeking out the highest, deepest, widest, narrowest, coolest, hottest, scariest, smelliest... things on the planet.

  15. Not for Parents Travel Book: Children's Publication(Lonely Planet Not

    The world is a very big place, and in The Not-for-Parents Travel Book we ve concentrated on the really interesting bits to create a snapshot of what each country is like. In this book are the epic events, amazing animals, hideous histories, funky foods, and crazy facts that make the world s 200 countries so fascinating.

  16. Not For Parents Travel Book Hardcover

    Here atLonely Planet we decided to make a book about the world's countries for children, not parents. Read more Report an issue with this product. Previous page. Print length. 208 pages. Language. English. Publisher. Lonely Planet. Publication date. 1 October 2011. Dimensions. 24 x 1.9 x 31.2 cm. ISBN-10. 9781742204963. ISBN-13.

  17. Lonely Planet Not-for-Parents the Travel Book Hardcover

    Here at Lonely Planet we decided to make a book about the world's countries for children, not parents. The world is a very big place, and in The Not-for-Parents Travel Book we've concentrated on the really interesting bits to create a snapshot of what each country is like. (Warning to parents: these might not be the same "really interesting ...

  18. Not for Parents Travel Book by Michael DuBois

    Very Good. Sewn binding. Cloth over boards. 207 p. Contains: Illustrations. Lonely Planet Not for Parents Travel Book. Intended for a juvenile audience. Cool stuff to know about every country in the world. Everyone knows which is the world's highest mountain, but do you know which country banned chewing gum? Or what's the world's stinkiest fruit?

  19. The not-for-parents travel book : Dubois, Michael

    The not-for-parents travel book Bookreader Item Preview ... Lonely Planet's Travel Book especially for kids. Takes the inquisitive, data-hungry explorer on a tour of 200 countries. Packed with iconic images, evocative stories and informative facts and stats. In-the-know info on captial cities, language, currency, epic events, hideous histories ...

  20. Paris

    Be sure to also check out Not for Parents London, Rome and New York City, as well as the Not for Parents Travel Book - a journey though every country in the word. Also, download the FREE Not for Parents eBook to get a sample of the entire Not for Parents series. ...read more. Format. ebook. ISBN. 9781742208176. Series. Childrens. Author ...

  21. To Protect Your Miles, Be Careful How You Book

    Beginning May 1, American Airlines will require travelers to book directly with the airline, partner airlines or "preferred travel agencies" in order to receive loyalty points.

  22. White House says Kamala Harris will travel to Arizona after state

    The Arizona Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that a 160-year-old near-total abortion ban still on the books in the state can be enforced. ... Harris will travel to Tucson, the White House said in an ...

  23. Save 25% Now

    Terms and conditions. Book a Southwest ® flight on Southwest.com or swabiz.com using your Rapid Rewards® points from April 12 through April 15, 2024 (the "Booking Period") and receive 25 percent off when you fly between April 12-September 30, 2024 with travel blacked out May 23, May 24, May 27, July 7, July 14, July 21, and July 28, 2024 (the "Travel Period").

  24. The Crumbleys Are Being Scapegoated for America's Gun Failures

    The parents were called in for a meeting, but they declined to take him out of school. Shortly thereafter, Ethan removed the gun from his backpack in a bathroom and opened fire on his classmates.

  25. Biden is canceling $7.4 billion in student debt for 277,000 borrowers

    White House announces new round of student loan cancelations 03:17. The Biden administration on Friday said it's canceling $7.4 billion in student debt for 277,000 borrowers, with the recipients ...

  26. Mind-Expanding Reads: 18 Must-Read Books for Intellectuals

    The book challenges us to question our deeply-held beliefs about humanity and inspires a new understanding of our impact on the environment, economics, and international relations.