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2020 KTM 690 Enduro R

Ready for when the asphalt ends.

ktm 690 enduro travel

The KTM 690 Enduro R is a favorite among big single-cylinder adventure riders . And for good reason: The Enduro R blends off-road focus with streetbike functionality (namely ride by wire, rider aids, and even a quickshifter) for an anywhere-anytime attitude. It is powered by KTM’s 690cc LC4 engine that delivers usable on- and off-road power, and is equipped with large 21- and 18-inch wheels and fully adjustable WP Xplor suspension to flaunt its prowess when the asphalt ends.

2020 KTM 690 Enduro R Reviews, Comparisons, And Competition

Dirt Rider tested the 2019 machine and found that, “While riding at highway speeds the bike feels more like a twin than a single; its smooth character is capable of slaying comfy miles.” Further, “This updated LC4 engine proves to be the best yet with its plentiful torque, smooth delivery, and extremely tractable power. It has an exhilarating engine character that is capable of third-gear wheelies and cracking triple-digit speeds.”

We ran the 2019 690 Enduro R on our in-house dyno to find the rear wheel numbers recorded: 59.2 hp at 8,200 rpm and 43.4 pound-feet of torque at 6,800 rpm.

Competition includes its Husqvarna stable mate, the 701 Enduro, Honda XR650L , and Suzuki DR650S.

KTM 690 Enduro R Updates For 2020

It was highly revamped in 2019 , but no major updates for 2020. It did increase in price by $200 from 2019.

2020 KTM 690 Enduro R Claimed Specifications

ktm 690 enduro travel

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Ultimate Motorcycling

2023 KTM 690 Enduro R Buyer’s Guide [Specs, Price + Photos]

2023 KTM 690 Enduro R Buyers Guide: MSRP

Despite its name, the 2023 KTM 690 Enduro R does not part of KTM’s Enduro lineup. Instead, this rangy trellis-framed motorcycle is slotted as a Travel bike, placing it in the same category as KTM ’s Adventure models. Powered by a 693cc single, the 690 Enduro R weighs 350 pounds with its 3.6-gallon underseat fuel tank filled, so it legitimately sits between KTM’s dirt-focused Enduro bikes and the more streetable Adventure lineup.

2023 KTM 690 Enduro R Buyers Guide: Price

Certainly, the 2023 KTM 690 Enduro R is dirt-capable. The WP Xplor suspension offers nearly ten inches of high-quality wheel travel at both ends, plus a pure-dirt 21-/18-inch wheelset with D.I.D Dirtstar rims. However, ADV-style tires and high gearing will keep you away from technical trails. However, when a high-quality dirt road makes itself available, 100 mph is not out of the question, thanks to a six-speed transmission.

2023 KTM 690 Enduro R Buyers Guide: For Sale

KTM gives the 690 Enduro R plenty of electronics you wouldn’t expect on a big single ready for the dirt. There’s a quickshifter and two power modes (Street and Offroad), plus traction control and Bosch ABS (both cornering aware and defeatable). There’s also an optional Offroad ABS that turns off the rear wheel ABS, but leaves a bit of ABS in reserve for the front wheel. We found this all out last time we tested the KTM 690 Enduro R .

The 2023 KTM 690 Enduro R has a price tag a buck short of $13k, and comes in one color—we’re sure you can guess what that is.

2023 KTM 690 Enduro R Specs

  • Type: Four-stroke single
  • Displacement: 693cc
  • Bore x stroke: 105 x 80mm
  • Valvetrain: SOHC, 4 valves
  • Fueling: Keihin EFI w/ 50mm throttle body
  • Ignition: Keihin EMS w/ ride-by-wire
  • Transmission: 6-speed w/ quickshifter
  • Clutch: Hydraulically actuated assist-and-slip
  • Final drive: 520 X-ring chain
  • Frame: Chromoly steel trellis
  • Subframe: Self-supporting polymer fuel tank
  • Handlebar: Tapered aluminum
  • Front suspension; travel: Fully adjustable WP Xplor 48mm inverted fork; 9.8 inches
  • Rear suspension; travel: Linkage-assisted fully adjustable WP Xplor shock; 9.8 inches
  • Wheels: Wire-spoke w/ D.I.D DirtStar rims
  • Front wheel: 21 x 1.85
  • Rear wheel: 18 x 2.50
  • Front tire: 90/90 x 21
  • Rear tire: 140/80 x 18
  • Front brake: 300mm disc w/ Brembo caliper
  • Rear brake: 240mm disc w/ Brembo caliper
  • ABS: Standard w/ Cornering and optional Offroad mode

DIMENSIONS and CAPACITIES

  • Wheelbase: 59 inches
  • Rake: 27.7 degrees
  • Seat height: 35.8 inches
  • Ground clearance: 10.6 inches
  • Fuel capacity: 3.6 gallons
  • Curb weight: 350 pounds

2023 KTM 690 Enduro R Price: $12,999 MSRP

2023 KTM 690 Enduro R Photo Gallery

2023 KTM 690 Enduro R Buyers Guide: MSRP

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2024 KTM 690 Enduro R Guide

2024 KTM 690 Enduro R

Review – Key Features – Features & Benefits – Specifications

2024 KTM 690 Enduro R

2024 KTM 690 Enduro R: THE LIGHTWEIGHT KING OF VERSATILITY.

Introducing the 2024 KTM 690 Enduro R…

Ride from home and feel the adrenaline build while chasing tarmac curves towards your favourite offroad location. No trailer required just twist the throttle of the KTM 690 ENDURO R, which really comes into its own when the dirt begins and the trail gets more extreme. Its lightweight chassis, aggressive styling, and trusted 690 LC4 motor, are enhanced by the latest electronics and WP XPLOR suspension. Master more challenging terrain on this lightweight, high-performance king of versatility.

2024 KTM 690 Enduro R Totalmotorcycle.com Key Features

2024 ktm 690 enduro r totalmotorcycle.com features and benefits.

The engine combines powerful acceleration from the very lowest revs with an outstanding free-revving nature and refined engine running. Another big plus: It’s extremely economical with fuel.

Cylinder Head

A lightweight, compact cylinder head contains four valves and a single camshaft placed over the intake valves, with a secondary balancer shaft driven by the timing chain. The intake valves are actuated by finger followers and the exhaust valves by a rocker arm.

Resonator Chamber

A resonator chamber balances out pulses in the intake tract and makes the throttle response smoother with reduced vibrations.

Balancer shaft

Twin balancer shafts, one in front of the crankshaft and the other in the cylinder head, reduce vibration for a smoother ride.

The lightweight and durable forged piston is designed to reduce reciprocating mass which improves engine response.

Plain bearings are used in the conrod to ensure a reduced reciprocating mass, which helps the engine run smoother and therefore enhances its lively character.

PASC Clutch

The PASC (Power Assist Clutch) ensures the rider needs minimal input to operate it, due to reduced engine torque transferring to the clutch plates. The slipper clutch prevents rear wheel lock-up under aggressive downshifting, which reduces destabilizing rear wheel chatter on the tarmac when braking sharply or decelerating into turns.

The smooth 6-speed gearbox with Quickshifter+ allows quicker clutchless up and downshifts when you’re in the thick of the action. This not only enables the rider to be in more control of the motorcycle by keeping a full grip of the handlebars, but also improves rear wheel traction.

Ride-by-wire

The KTM 690 ENDURO R is equipped with ride-by-wire system, which processes throttle twist grip movements with the help of electronic sensors and activates the throttle valves to control throttle action. This significantly improves the response, giving the rider better throttle control of the potent single-cylinder and a smoother ride.

Injection / Engine Management

Electronic fuel injection and engine management allow performance perfectly suited to the riding conditions. The result: even more and even better controlled power, lower fuel consumption, and less emissions, plus the benefit of features like MTC (Motorcycle Traction Control), MSR (Motor slip regulation), and Quickshifter+. The rider has the choice between two different mappings to influence the engine characteristics. A twin-plug ignition system controls two differently sized spark plugs in the cylinder head independently from each other, for more efficient combustion and a smoother, precisely controlled combustion sequence at all times.

Long service intervals

Besides its fuel efficiency the KTM 690 ENDURO R saves its owner even more money, thanks to long service intervals of 10,000 km.

Slipper clutch

Annoying rear wheel chatter? This is prevented by the slipper clutch that’s fitted as standard.

The KTM 690 ENDURO R features a specifically developed exhaust system made from the highest-quality stainless steel, which is not only compact and optimized for offroad use, it is emissions compliant too.

Accessing the airfilter during a ride is easy thanks to the airbox being located under the seat. This makes servicing the bike simple, and stress free, when you’re off the beaten track.

MASTER THE RIDE

The trellis frame is manufactured from lightweight sections of top-quality chrome-molybdenum steel tubing of varying thicknesses. This type of balanced frame design provides high torsional rigidity for best handling and rideability, while a more specifically-tuned longitudinal flexibility can absorb the wheel impact energy, supporting the suspension for reduced rider fatigue.

The innovative use of the rear fuel tank as the main structural element of the subframe, keeps weight low and eliminates design complexity.

The swingarm design allows for an optimal mounting position of the rear shock ensuring a high progression rate. The single-component casting process eliminates any inconsistencies and weak points that would be inherent in a welded swingarm.

Frame and swingarm

Despite its thoroughbred offroad chassis, the KTM 690 ENDURO R also numbers among the curve-bandits on the road. Two major contributors to its excellent tracking stability are the lightweight tubular trellis frame made from chrome-molybdenum steel and the high-quality die-cast swingarm – both of them extremely torsion-resistant.

PRECISE HANDLING

Triple clamp

Highly rigid forged triple clamps with an offset of 24 mm (adjustable to 22 mm), provide a solid grip on the forks for precise handling. They allow forwards and backwards adjustment of the handlebars in four different positions for optimum rider ergonomics.

Riding over rough terrain is made easier with the WP XPLOR 48 upside-down fork. The KTM 690 ENDURO R’s split fork design was originally developed by WP and KTM for the EXC models. It is fitted with springs on both sides with separate damping functions – compression on the left and rebound on the right-hand side. They have no negative influence on each other. Therefore, damping can easily be adjusted via the dials on top of both fork tubes, with 30 clicks of adjustment each.

The WP XPLOR shock absorber is connected to the swingarm by a linkage. This ensures a progressive suspension character and a high resistance to bottoming out. Fully adjustable, including high and low-speed compression, you can set up the shock absorber to any circumstances and rider preference.

Wheels & tires

The KTM wheels use lightweight, CNC-machined hubs and high-end 21″ and 18″ rims to combine maximum strength with minimum weight. The rims are wrapped with Continental TKC 80 tires – offering excellent grip and great lifespan.

Sublime class-leading BREMBO brakes combined with lightweight wave discs – 300 mm diameter front and 240 mm on the rear wheel – to provide a crucial combination of stopping power and a consistent brake feel.

The large fuel tank has a capacity of 3.6 gal / 13.5 liters. It is also a load bearing part of the chassis, making it stiffer for optimal feeling and control.

Suspension components

By professionals for everyone: The KTM 690 ENDURO R’s WP upside-down fork, with a whole 250 mm of suspension travel and 48 mm outer tubes, is adjustable in many ways and masters the balancing act between every day, road and offroad use with the greatest of ease. It is designed as a split fork with separate damping circuits (compression damping on the left fork tube, rebound damping on the right) that can be adjusted independently from each other. This means that they cannot interact as they do in conventional open bleed systems – thus guaranteeing even sportier, more purposeful and rider-optimized ride characteristics. The pivot-arm articulated WP pressurized-gas monoshock with 250 mm of travel even features high-speed and low-speed compression adjustment.

Ergonomics & Comfort

The lightweight tapered 808 mm wide handlebars are rubber mounted to reduce vibrations. Their width and shape are aimed at providing maximum control in all situations.

Sophisticated “No Dirt” foot pegs prevent jamming up of the pegs, even when digging your way through deep ruts or navigating wet terrain. Rubber inserts can be mounted for street use to help reduce any vibration that might be felt through the pegs on smooth roads.

The KTM 690 ENDURO R seat does three things. Firstly, it allows fluid rider motion when shredding offroad, thanks to its ergonomic shape and 910 mm seat height. Secondly, it provides good comfort when you need to cover the ground between trails. And lastly, it looks the part, thanks to an all-new durable and grippy orange seat cover.

Software & Electronics

Keeping true to its enduro roots, the KTM 690 ENDURO R sports a simple, but effective dashboard. Providing riders with essential information its slimline design keeps the view forward clear of any obstructions. After all, when you’re blasting across challenging terrain, you don’t want any distractions.

Electronic fuel injection, ride-by-wire and the engine management system (EMS) make it possible to offer innovative yet easy-to-use electronic rider aids. These features can be selected, deselected and utilized to put the potent new-generation LC4 motor to effective use in a much wider range of terrain types and conditions.

Two ride modes (1) Street mode (2) Offroad mode: “Street mode” for sporty throttle response where wheel slip and wheelies are kept to a minimum for optimal street performance. “Offroad mode”, by contrast, produces smooth throttle response with Offroad Traction Control, which allows wheel slip and front wheel lifting without hindering performance. The modes are easily switched over from the handlebar, making adjustment to the character of the engine possible on the fly. Traction control can be disabled if needed.

Lean Angle Sensor

A lean-angle sensor keeps track of the angle of the bike and send information to the ECU and relevant control units, which use this data to adjust traction control and ABS actuation.

MTC (Motorcycle Traction Control)

The MTC (Motorcycle Traction Control) lean-angle sensitive traction control system reacts immediately the instant the rear wheel rotation speed becomes disproportionate to the riding situation. In mere milliseconds MTC reduces engine output with an extremely smooth, barely perceptible intervention at the throttle valves, until slippage is reduced to optimum proportions for the selected ride mode and current angle of lean. For particularly ambitious riders, the traction control can also be switched off.

Quickshifter+

Quickshifter+ uses two sensors, where one sensor on the shift arm detects the movement on the shift lever rod when the rider upshifts and the system cuts the injection instantaneously. As soon as the second sensor detects the gear engagement it reapplies the injection and opens the butterfly valve, ensuring fast and smooth action at all throttle openings and engine speeds. When downshifting, the system matches the engine speed to the speed of the lower gear.

Cornering ABS

Keeping you cranked over in full confidence, Cornering ABS allows riders to use full braking power in all conditions, even at big lean angles. This is particularly useful when you have twisty tarmac between you and your offroad destination of choice. If you choose the optional Offroad ABS mode (dongle required), ABS is deactivated on the rear wheel, while only working on the front wheel, with cornering sensitivity disabled. Should you decide to go at it alone, ABS can be completely disabled for extreme scenarios without using an ABS dongle.

Offroad ABS

Optional Offroad ABS quite literally pulls out all the stops when riding in the dirt. When activated, ABS is reduced on the front wheel effective deceleration on loose surfaces, but completely disabled on the rear. This allows you to lock up the rear when navigating tight turns and gives you full control in tough terrain.

2024 KTM 690 Enduro R – Totalmotorcycle.com  International Specifications/Technical Details US MSRP Price: $ See Dealer for pricing in USD Canada MSRP Price: $ See Dealer for Pricing in CDN Europe/UK MSRP Price: £ See Dealer for pricing in GBP (On The Road inc 20% Vat)

Engine Transmission 6-speed Cooling Liquid cooled Power in KW 55kW Starter Electric starter Stroke 80mm Bore 105mm Clutch PASC (TM) slipper clutch, hydraulically actuated Displacement 692.7cm³ EMS Keihin EMS with RBW, twin ignition Design 1-cylinder, 4-stroke engine Lubrication Forced oil lubrication with 2 oil pumps Chassis ABS Bosch 9.1 MP (incl. Cornering-ABS and offroad mode, disengageable) Front brake disc diameter 300mm Rear brake disc diameter 240mm Chain 520 X-Ring Frame design Chrome-moly tubular space frame, powder-coated Front suspension WP XPLOR-USD, Ø 48 mm Rear suspension WP XPLOR with Pro-Lever linkage Steering head angle 62.3°

Manufacturer Specifications and appearance are subject to change without prior notice on Total Motorcycle ( TMW ).

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2023 KTM 690 Enduro R and 690 SMC R | First Look Review

2023 KTM 690 SMC R

KTM has announced updates to the aesthetics of the KTM 690 Enduro R and KTM 690 SMC R for 2023.

See all of Rider ’s KTM coverage here.

Both bikes still feature the liquid-cooled 693cc LC4 single-cylinder engine, which KTM says has “proven to be the ideal baseline for the KTM 690 range,” as well as a 6-speed gearbox with Quickshifter+, throttle-by-wire, a PASC slipper clutch, and dual balancer shafts.

The LC4 machines also still benefit from cornering ABS, Motorcycle Traction Control (MTC), and two ride modes: Street and Offroad on the 690 Enduro R and Street and Sport on the 690 SMC R.

2023 KTM 690 Enduro R

On the 2023 KTM 690 SMC R, the optional Supermoto ABS mirrors this feature. When activated, ABS sensitivity is reduced on the front wheel and completely disabled on the rear, which KTM says allows for “big drifts into corners and tire-smoking powerslides out of the apex.”

2023 KTM 690 SMC R

An optional Offroad ABS (just add a dongle) on the 2023 KTM 690 Enduro R reduces ABS intervention on the front wheel and completely disables ABS on the rear, allowing riders to lock up the rear when they need to slide the rear into a tight turn or drag the brake down a technical descent.

The 2023 KTM 690 Enduro R has adjustable WP XPLOR suspension with separate damping circuits and 9.8 inches of travel. Stopping power is provided by Brembo brakes with wave discs, 300mm on the front and 240mm on the rear. The 2023 KTM 690 SMC R has adjustable WP APEX suspension with separate damping circuits, 9.8 inches of travel, and Brembo brakes with 320mm front and 240 rear discs.

Related Story: 2017 KTM 690 Enduro R | Long-Term Ride Review

2023 KTM 690 Enduro R

From an aesthetics standpoint, the 2023 KTM 690 Enduro R takes its styling cues from the competition-Enduro range, and the KTM 690 SMC R brings an all-new blue and orange adornment to the fray.

2023 KTM 690 SMC R

KTM says the 2023 KTM 690 Enduro R and KTM 690 SMC R models will be available at authorized KTM dealers from November onward. Pricing is TBD.

For more information on KTM’s full model range, visit the KTM website .

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2019 KTM 690 Enduro R Review

Ryan Adams

Spending time with KTM's biggest Single

ktm 690 enduro travel

The 2019 KTM 690 Enduro R fills a niche within a niche. Ask riders of different disciplines where the 690 Enduro R falls among motorcycle segments and you’re likely to get two different answers. To off-road riders, the 690 is an adventure bike. Its big Single is smoothed out by dual counterbalancers, and a nice electronics package sets it apart from the 350 or 500 EXCs and two strokes available in KTM’s enduro/dual-sport range. Ask the same question to a street rider and you get, “It’s a dirtbike”. Dirtbike ergos, dirtbike looks, a big ol’ 693 cc Thumper, and its relatively small size – compared to 1290s – place the Enduro R in off-road territory for asphalt-locked motorcyclists.

2019 KTM 690 Enduro R

It’s true, the 690 does slide into an interesting space in KTM’s lineup just between the 790 Adventure and 500 EXC-F and with no real direct competitors from any other manufacturer – aside from a certain white one that may even share some componentry – it’s basically in a field of one.

It’s been more than a minute since KTM’s big Single graced the presence of MO’s digital pages, nearly five years to be exact . Yours truly felt that was entirely too long and with the host of upgrades for the 2019 model year, there was no time like the present to jump on the 2019 KTM 690 Enduro R to see what this newly revised travel enduro is capable of.

2019 ktm 690 enduro r review, Blasting out of the desert into higher elevation Dirt asphalt Photo by Sam Bendall livemotofoto

Kennedy Meadows seemed like a great place to put the Enduro R through its paces (despite MO’s previous misfortunes in the area). The 400-plus mile round trip of mostly freeway riding would provide a great test of the bike’s comfort for longer hauls while the varying trails of the eastern Sequoia National Forest would provide a scenic backdrop with a multitude of terrain options for assessing the off-road performance of the 690.

The night before I planned to set off, I arrived at my first issue. After compiling camping gear and other essentials, I realized neither of the two universal luggage options I had were going to work on the Enduro R; there is simply nowhere to strap anything to the tail of the motorcycle. Not to mention the 3.6-gallon fuel tank – an increase of .4 gallons from 2018 – makes up the subframe of the motorcycle which means even if I was able to strap a bag to the tail section, I would need to remove it in order to gas up. Fortunately, the 690 Enduro R has been around for a while so if you’re a fan of the bike, the aftermarket likely has a solution for most needs from rear racks, to side luggage mounts. I opted to go the minimalist route – not that I had a choice – and packed my Kriega R25 to the max and would simply deal with carrying a backpack. Not a big deal.

2019 ktm 690 enduro r review, The rear fuel tank subframe makes mounting a bag on the tail impossible or at the very least inconvenient If you did have luggage that you were able to somehow mount you d need to remove it to refuel Photo by Kiyoji Whitener

A fair amount of the changes for 2019 add to the Enduro R’s road-going prowess. The latest edition of the large 693cc Single-cylinder LC4 engine’s vibes are tamed by not one, but two counterbalancers, one located on the crankshaft and one in the cylinder head. The engine is incredibly smooth at highway speed for having a big ol’ 105 mm piston bouncing up and down in there.

2019 ktm 690 enduro r review, The 690 Enduro R is the only model in what KTM calls its Travel segment that doesn t come with or have the option to install electronic cruise control Maybe I ve been hanging out with John Burns too much lately but hey it has ride by wire throttle so what gives Photo by Sam Bendall livemotofoto

The ride-by-wire throttle and the inclusion of an IMU combine to allow the addition of two ride modes as well as lean sensitive traction control and ABS to the 690. Ride mode one, the street setting, delivers smooth throttle response with cornering-sensitive traction control keeping wheel spin and wheelies to a minimum. Ride mode two is the off-road setting with more aggressive throttle response and offroad traction control allowing rear wheel spin up to a certain degree plus lofting the front wheel. Both traction control and ABS can be disabled in either mode by holding the TC button on the left side of the handlebar for exactly five seconds (no more and no less or it won’t work) while ABS is disabled by holding the triangular ABS button on the dash until it lights up. An accessory dongle can also be purchased to enable off-road ABS which disconnects the system from the rear wheel and uses a slightly less intrusive algorithm for the front. KTM has also thrown its Quickshifter + on the 690 which allows for clutchless upshifting and downshifting, more on that later.

2019 ktm 690 enduro r review, The latest LC4 Single is a thoroughly modern engine with dual counterbalancers IMU based electronics and dual spark ignition to ensure efficiency Major service intervals come around every 6 200 miles Photo by Kiyoji Whitener

The droning freeway miles up to Kennedy Meadows were easily managed by the updated LC4 engine. Cruising at freeway speeds for hours on end is an easy task that leaves more than enough power and torque in reserve to pull away from cars when needed well into triple-digit speeds. KTM claims 74 horses and 54 lb-ft of torque from the 690 Enduro R. With fuel mileage consistently delivering around 55 mpg, in theory, that puts estimated range at nearly 200 miles from the 3.6-gallon subframe, but if I’m honest, I fueled up with plenty of miles left in the tank each time to ensure that if I did come across the odd dirt road in need of exploration I’d have the range to do so comfortably. There’s also the fact that the seat is so stiff that I could hardly handle going more than 100 miles at a time. An aftermarket seat would be first on the upgrade list for me with the 690.

2019 ktm 690 enduro r review, Photo by Sam Bendall livemotofoto

After a stop at the bottom of 9 Mile Canyon Road my photographer and I ascended into the mountains thoroughly stoked to get off of the scorching valley floor, away from straight roads, and eventually onto the dirt. The smooth and powerful torque delivery on twisty roads is addictive. The motor pulls hard all the way through the rev-range which makes blasting out of corners a thrilling experience. Thrilling until you need to shift. The Quickshifter+ fitted to the 690 Enduro R I was piloting was perhaps the worst I’ve ever used, certainly the worst on a KTM. Upshifts required an enormous amount of pressure regardless of rpm while downshifts were only slightly easier. I quickly abandoned trying to use the quickshifter as it basically felt like it wasn’t equipped. Thankfully, KTM’s Power Assist Clutch does a great job of smoothing out aggressive downshifts and pull at the lever from the hydraulically actuated system is smooth and effortless.

Quickshifter be damned, my excitement as we rolled up to the General Store before heading to score a campsite couldn’t be diminished… or so I thought. The moment the rubber of the 21-inch Conti TKC80 touched the dirt parking lot, horrible sounds began emanating from the right side of the motor, accompanied by a near total loss of pressure at the clutch lever. Unable to disengage the clutch I came to a controlled stop/stall and began to assess the situation. After some deliberation, including a call to KTM and Evans, it was decided that we would need to be rescued. Although I was carrying a tool kit that could have dismantled most of the motorcycle, the lack of replacement parts was the cause of concern from KTM’s side of things. No reason to pull the clutch cover off or clutch slave cylinder if parts needed to be replaced, and since I wasn’t stranded in the middle of nowhere, I didn’t need to resort to measures that could otherwise harm the motorcycle. I had to concede.

2019 ktm 690 enduro r review, Just pointing out that we d need to remove the footpeg in order to access all of the bolts in the clutch cover Photo by Sam Bendall livemotofoto

I couldn’t believe it. I had made it the entire way up, miles of sitting on that torture rack of a seat only to have my off-road aspirations dashed before they could begin. I knew the 690 Enduro R would be more fun off-road than on, but I was willing to pound out the 170 miles of pavement for you, the reader, rather than trucking the bike to the trails. Three hours later, dejected and much less dirty than I had hoped to be at that point, I waited as Evans rolled up in his truck, we loaded the 690 into the back, and headed home.

2019 ktm 690 enduro r review, Always a sad sight Photo by Sam Bendall livemotofoto

Fast forward weeks later…

2019 ktm 690 enduro r review, Finally getting into the dirt Photo by Kiyoji Whitener

Here at MO, we don’t give up on bikes so easily. Within a week of KTM having the bike they fixed the issue and returned the motorcycle to us in working order. Turns out the center bolt holding the clutch assembly together had worked its way loose, and the entire clutch pack was spinning against the inside of the clutch cover. C’est la vie .

On with the testing!

After being assured the correct torque spec had been used and maybe even a dash of Loctite, I set a date to get the 690 off the beaten path as soon as possible, and as I had expected, I enjoyed it more off-road.

2019 ktm 690 enduro r review, Keeping the suspension settings in the middle of the road worked well for me with the ride ranging from loose and embedded rock to sand The adjustability is there though for riders of all skill levels across varying terrain Photo by Kiyoji Whitener

Once I was able to get the 690 in the dirt, some of the other changes for 2019 began to show just how capable and compliant the big Thumper could be. Fitted with WP’s XPLOR fork and shock, the Enduro R gains even more adjustability than before. The 48 mm fork delivers nearly 10 inches of travel and is adjustable for preload as well as compression and rebound with more than thirty clicks of adjustment available without tools for each. The shock – connected via linkage – also delivers almost 10 inches of travel and is adjustable for both high and low speed compression, rebound, and preload with a similar range of adjustment to the fork. This allows riders to really fine tune the suspension to their riding style or the terrain they most often find themselves on. I generally keep the adjustment in the mid-range since I often encounter rocky terrain and deep sand during the same ride. I’ve sung the praises of the WP XPLOR units before, and these are no different. The damping feels excellent and with the range of adjustment available, characteristics can easily be changed.

2019 ktm 690 enduro r review, The highly adjustable WP fork is held in place by a rigid forged triple clamp Also of note the steering stops can be adjusted to allow for more or less sweep from side to side Photo by Kiyoji Whitener

The 21-inch/18-inch spoked tube-type wheels are shod with Continental TKC 80s, a favorite in ADV circles for their balance of both on- and off-road performance. Brembo calipers provide great stopping power and modulation at the levers, though the rear took me a bit more time to get used to. Standard protective equipment on the 690 Enduro R includes flag-style handguards, and a plastic skid plate.

Ergonomics are unsurprisingly dirtbike-esque with a high wide handlebar giving more than enough leverage to man handle the big orange bike. Although the seat is hard – and high, at 35.8 inches – the seat cover does provide ample grip, and combined with the rear-mounted fuel tank, allows the rider plenty of room to scoot up to weight the front tire.

2019 ktm 690 enduro r review, In ride mode 2 traction control will keep things pretty conservatively reigned in Disable TC and the 690 s Single delivers torque that can be easily modulated to dial in wheel spin to ones wrist s content Photo by Kiyoji Whitener

Riding the 690 Enduro R through fast trails and fire roads is a blast. The big Single delivers wheel-spinning torque that translates into easily controlled power slides corner after corner even without the off-road TC engaged. If you do like to have that safety net, ride mode 2 will allow the rear to step out, just not as much as I would have liked. The 690 doesn’t have quite the hit that the 500 EXC-F delivers. It takes a little bit longer to spool up that power, but it’s no slouch by any means. Adjusting the electronics did come to be rather annoying off-road. Having to turn off TC and ABS every time the key is cycled off is one thing – although the 690’s routine is more finicky than others – but that can be bypassed by just using the kill switch. The problem is, that didn’t work all of the time. More often than not, if I just used the kill switch to stop briefly on the trail, it would retain TC and ABS off, but every once in a while, for reasons I couldn’t seem to consistently replicate, I’d fire the bike back up and start riding only to realize once I was relying on those systems being off that they had reset to on. Another odd occurrence was that the bike wouldn’t always stay in the same ride mode either. Sometimes the kill switch or key cycling would cause the bike to be in the other mode as indicated on the left side control by a backlit white one or green two. This became quite annoying during a full day of riding off-road with plenty of stops for photography or simply to chat.

2019 ktm 690 enduro r review, Photo by Kiyoji Whitener

The 690 Enduro R is a difficult model for me to wrap my head around. As a motorcycle, it’s damn good, albeit with a few flaws. It uses components that I really enjoy on other models, and that’s no different here. It has advantages over smaller dual-sports and larger adventure bikes alike. So, what’s the problem? For me, the problem is that it’s more of a jack of all trades, but master of none.

The 690 is relatively heavy (we’ve heard reports around 350 pounds) and big compared to a dual-sport like the 500 EXC-F. I’ve managed to do some surprisingly technical riding on the EXC-F that I would never want to attempt on the 690. Compared to an adventure bike, the electronics are crude, it’s uncomfortable and doesn’t provide the long-range touring capability of a bike like the 790, and with the capabilities of the 790 Adventure R, I’m not sure there’s a huge performance gap. A great motorcycle for what it is, but the 2019 KTM 690 Enduro R finds itself in an ever-narrowing niche. I’d rather have an adventure bike and a dual-sport than the 690 Enduro R, personally. And that’s exactly why those two types of motorcycles are sitting in my garage right now. I’ve rarely met a motorcyclist that flounders for a reason to buy “one more bike.”

  • The WP XPLOR suspension is the bees knees
  • One of the smoothest big Singles out there
  • Brembo brakes are strong and easy to dial in the right amount of brake pressure
  • The seat becomes painful quicker than I’d like for a “travel” bike
  • The rear-mounted gas tank makes tossing a tailbag on difficult
  • Electronics can be finicky

2019 ktm 690 enduro r review

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Ryan’s time in the motorcycle industry has revolved around sales and marketing prior to landing a gig at Motorcycle.com. An avid motorcyclist, interested in all shapes, sizes, and colors of motorized two-wheeled vehicles, Ryan brings a young, passionate enthusiasm to the digital pages of MO.

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Join the conversation

TonyCarlos

“Jack of all master of none” is pretty much the definition of any adventure bike, isn’t it?

Craig Hoffman

Revisited this article as I decided to buy a Husky 701 yesterday. My revised stable is '18 300 XC, '23 701 and '14 Super Tenere. My '06 FZ1 and '10 Berg 450 are going away. The 'Berg particularly hurts as it is such a cool and semi rare machine, but I never ride it due to having the 300, which is more fun to ride than man should be allowed to have...

The 690 and 701 are essentially identical as are their prices. I like the 690's looks better but the 701 comes with a 2 year 24K mile warranty vs. the 690, which only has a 1 year 12K mile warranty. It was another $800 to buy another year of warranty on the 690, so I took the 701 with it's "free" extra year of warranty. My friend's 690 has been very reliable, but whatever. No doubt I will come to love the 701's appearance and I will spice it up with a DeCal Works kit anyway.

The 690/701 is not a master of anything, but I kind of enjoy that. It is simply a dual sport with a big honkin' ridiculous engine in it, and that is a recipe for fun. Fortunately I am tall enough and experienced enough off road (short people and off road noobs have no reason to apply here) and that engine really is amazing.

I rode a friend's 690, which had a perfectly functioning quick shifter in off road mode with it's TC off and the ensuing multi gear lazy hanging wheelies were almost as good as "back in the day" on my '83 XL600. Good God, what an engine. Good suspension too.

Gotta get busy doing the usual mods - first things first, a Seat Concepts saddle. Then a Rottweiler fueling dongle (to remove the O2 sensor and richen up the very lean and hot running part throttle mixture), AXP skid plate with a tail on it to protect the linkage, and a rear disc fin. I like to buy bikes in the winter as it gives me time to go through them and set them up.

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KTM 690 Enduro R: Lean, mean, do-it-all machine

ktm 690 enduro travel

The world of dual sport motorcycles is always a compromise between street performance and off-road capability. The name of this category implies that, but it doesn’t stop motorcyclists from wanting more, a bike with no corners cut.

That’s an impossible dream, but the KTM 690 Enduro R ($13,499 MSRP) gets a lot closer than any Japanese bike—its only real competition comes from in-house, and it’s hardly a fair fight.

I had a KTM 690 Enduro R for a month this summer, with opportunity to take it on a wide range of terrain all over Atlantic Canada. Here’s what I found out about the bike:

ktm 690 enduro travel

I know, you’re probably tired of hearing me say this, but KTM’s liquid-cooled LC4 single-cylinder engine is truly the pinnacle of thumperdom.

With about 74 ponies on tap, it makes more power than any other production single, ever. It’s just a titch behind the legendary race-only Ducati Supermono racer, which made 75 hp. And while the Supermono was rated for 37.5 lb-ft of torque, the LC4 engine makes a massive 54 lb-ft of torque. Hoo-rah!

How does KTM get so much power out of the LC4, when the Japanese competition, makes roughly half that power out of its 650 thumpers?

The LC4 does have a displacement advantage, with 693cc displacement, but more importantly, it benefits from years of development. The first-gen LC4 engine came out in 1987, with 553cc capacity. Since then, it’s grown bigger and a lot more refined, with finger-follower intake valve actuation, a resonator chamber at the exhaust to smooth the engine out, and two counterbalancers–one in the head, the other at the crank. Of course, it’s fuel-injected, with ride-by-wire throttle and two engine modes (off-road and street).

Then, add a slip/assist clutch and a bi-directional quickshifter (allowing clutchless shifting either up or down through the gearbox), and you’ve got a machine that’s not just pleasantly enjoyable to ride on pavement or dirt—it’s an absolute rocket ship, begging to be flogged as soon as you get on board.

Clickers make the separate-function fork (rebound and compression damping are in separate fork legs) easy to adjust. Photo: Sebas Romero/KTM

The frame itself is a chromoly steel trellis arrangement, painted in a lovely orange hue. The fork and shock come from WP, which is itself a subsidiary of KTM. Unlike KTM’s pure trail bikes, which use linkgage-free shocks with progressive internal damping, the 690 Enduro uses a linkage arrangement. This theoretically limits ground clearance, but probably offers a smoother ride. There is a reason that most manufacturers use this arrangement, after all …

Really, there’s plenty of ground clearance anyway, at 270 mm; I never dragged the skid plate, even with the bike loaded down on some pretty rocky, hilly trails. Seat height is sky-high, at 910 mm, but that’s the price you pay for improved off-road capability. Speaking of that seat, it’s positioned “on top” of the motorcycle, with less coverage along the sides at the front of the bike, which is the Husqvarna 701’s configuration.

Floating Brembo brake calipers come standard, with two-piston setup in front, mated to a 300 mm disc. In back, there’s a single-piston caliper and a 240 mm disc. Both front and rear brakes are connected to ABS, which can be switched off. This bike has full ABS, no ABS, or Supermoto ABS (no rear ABS, but front ABS is on) modes.

Finally, like the 701, the 690 has its gas tank doing double duty—it’s also the rear subframe, and that means the fuel filler cap is behind the seat. This slightly complicates gas stops, if you’ve got luggage strapped on behind you, but it wasn’t too bad. The 690 has about a half-gallon more fuel on board than the 701, and generally has a more rear-heavy weight bias.

Is your ABS on or off? Traction control? Glowing buttons inform you. Photo: Sebas Romero/KTM

Other details

  • Henry Ford said you could buy the Model T (or was it the Model A?) in any colour you wanted, as long as that colour was black. With KTM, orange is the new black, and that’s the only paint option for this season. Some will like it (I do), others will hate it and go for the trendier paint and billet fittings of the Husqvarna 701.
  • I’ve said this before—considering the price tag of these machines, the gauges are extremely, uh, “non-expensive” looking. However, these are enduro bikes, not full adventure bikes, and they have no need of nor space for a giant TFT screen. The button interface for the electronics is fairly simple and switching the options on/off is not difficult.
  • My bike came with official factory accessory handguards, skid plate and soft saddlebags pre-installed. I was a big fan of the handguards, and didn’t really test the skid plate. The soft bags were OK, once I rigged up an exhaust guard. I added a Perun Moto rack and Adventure Spec mini-fairing , and would highly recommend both of these farkles, if you’re planning on doing long distances like I did.
  • The headlight was not really what I’d expect on a bike that costs this much money, especially when there are LED options on the aftermarket that could do a much better job. This is perhaps the first thing I’d recommend KTM change on the next-gen model. It would be a cheap upgrade to a proper setup, and riders would benefit greatly.

ktm 690 enduro travel

The riding experience

I loved riding the KTM 690 Enduro R. The rev-happy engine, with its gobs of torque always ready when needed, made this bike a thrilling mount for spirited backroad rides, especially when you’re zapping through the gearbox with the aid of the quickshifter. The suspension was perfectly planted on wide-open logging road runs, and when I was in tighter stuff, the bike’s low weight and balanced chassis made it much easier than a full-sized ADV—and yet, like a full-sized adventure bike, I was able to travel at a pretty decent clip on the 690. I took tighter two-laners when possible, but when forced out to the highway, the 690 is a much more competent machine than Japanese 650s with less muscle. The extra torque is most welcome.

As with the 701 Enduro last summer, I did spend a lot of time wishing I could get my hands on a version of this machine with a 19-inch front wheel, biased towards backroad riding. I do think this bike’s on-demand torque delivery combined with its electronic safety package (which can be all pretty much deactivated, if you wish) make it a perfect machine for ripping up those narrow, forgotten country roads that Canada is so full of. You’ve got great brakes, if you need ’em; ABS, traction control, and did I mention that addictive snap every time you open the throttle? It’s a bike that constantly begs to go faster, as you flog it.

SLightly more fuel capacity might be nice, but I wouldn’t make the rear tank any larger. In standard form with a full tank, I found the bike’s front end would get a little wiggly when ridden behind a tractor-trailer. The rear-bias to the weight was more evident when wind turbulence was battering the front fender about. When I added luggage, it was more unpleasant, but I can hardly blame KTM for that, as this bike was not designed with touring in mind.

ktm 690 enduro travel

I managed to get as high as 250 kilometers from the 13.5-liter tank anyway, as long as I was carefully watching my riding. I was actually pleasantly surprised by the economical fuel consumption, and although I generally ran premium gas, I noted that nowhere on the bike told me I needed to—and once or twice, stuck in a rural gas stop with no other choice, I filled up on regular with no apparent ill effects. Your mileage may vary on that one…

I will say that, as far as offroading goes, this machine is made to be ridden fast. If you’re like me, a dawdler in the dirt, then you may find the tight suspension actually makes it hard to slowly putt-putt your way through tough terrain. If I’d had more opportunity, I might have messed with the suspension clickers a bit, but generally, most of my riding was a mixture of smooth and rough forestry roads, and I felt the 690 was really at home here, especially with someone of my talent level behind the bars. Practice makes perfect, though—if you’re not comfortable flogging this thing off-road, invest in some training and add some protection to the bike, and you’ll get there.

ktm 690 enduro travel

Final thoughts

Years ago, I remember reading some moto-mag (probably Cycle World) reviewing one of the big-bore Honda dual sports (probably the XL600R). In that write-up, the authors (probably David Edwards and/or Jimmy Lewis) said that even though that machine wasn’t as fast as a big streetbike, and the brakes weren’t as good, the power-to-weight ratio made it an very fun ride on pavement.

Thirty-plus years later, that’s even more true of the 690 platform, which has twice the horsepower of those old thumpers, and brakes and onboard tech that were unimagineable back in the 1980s. As I said in the opening, the 690 Enduro is the ideal dual sport for someone who wants minimal compromise. There are still trade-offs, but if you want a machine that’s major fun on the street and still lightweight and competent off-pavement, the only competition is KTM’s in-house cousins, the Husqvarna 701 Enduro and the not-in-Canada-yet GasGas ES700.

Find more details at KTM.com .

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Related articles more from author, dakar rally 2024: ricky brabec wins the race, 2023 ktm 390 adventure: peak small bike, review: 2023 suzuki v-strom 800de.

Hello riders I owned a 2019 690r I ended ip putting $5000 in extras on it,I have to say out of the 35 motorcycles I’ve owned in my 50 plus years of riding and racing off/on road the 690 was the funnest all-round bike I’ve owned,it didn’t do any one thing really well but all-round it did the job,I found it too tall and rigid for single track riding as im only 5’9 30″ inseam and way too heavy picking it up after laying it down ,I tore my Achilles picking it up,I’ve since sold the 690 and went back to an excf350,this 690r is made for taller riders

Yes, but then it should be when it costs essentially 2x the price of a DR650. I don’t doubt your word that it’s great. I’m just not sure it would be twice the fun for me.

To be fair, the cost makes sense at double the power, double the torque, over a hundred pounds less weight, way better suspension, better rims, better tires, better frame, fuel injetion, electronics and the whole nine yards.

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KTM 690 Enduro R Road/Highway Manners? (KLR 650?..)

Discussion in ' Thumpers ' started by Low Drag , Aug 28, 2023 .

  • ktm 690 enduro r

Low Drag

Low Drag Been here awhile

Looking for people who have ridden/owned a Kawasaki KLR 650 and a KTM 690 Enduro R. Thinking of getting the KTM. How do the 2 compare on the highway/pavement? I've ridden the KLR all day and know what it feels like. Is the KTM 690 Enduro R similar after a day on the road? I'm aware, well at least expect/hope the KTM will be head and shoulders above the KLR on trails/gravel roads. I've always said if the KLR had more power I'd still have it. The bike just rolled. It looks like the KTM 690 Enduro R is a 21st Century version of a 650 thumper, it certainly has a ton of HP. Thanks in advance!

eakins

eakins Butler Maps

I have. The KLR is happier on paved, the 690 in dirt.
eakins said: ↑ I have. The KLR is happier on paved, the 690 in dirt. Click to expand...
Low Drag said: ↑ That makes sense.... Which one could leave you less fatigued after grinding out a day or two of pavement? The seat on the KTM looks like it has a lot to be desired, even an after market would be narrow. Click to expand...

docwyte

docwyte Long timer

I don't have an issue with slab riding my 690. However, a different seat is a MUST, the stock seat might as well be a piece of wood. Also some sort of fairing/windshield is really nice too.

Brmax

Brmax Been here awhile

Adding all the typical amenities to the 690 as is a normal consideration with the Kawi Results in a bit heavier bike for Dam Sure, yet I dont think it will ever top the weight. Its a tough fight in deciding to add baggage and rally dash and windshields, in one detune realization trip. Its a similar topic as friends here discuss the 200-400cc to the bigger ones. Its the trip or track or the rtw tour; pick your weekend or month, they never last that long But I’l be dam if im luggin a backpack while riding thinking its a pannier trade off Later

Shawnee Bill

Shawnee Bill Long timer Supporter

I've ridden both quite a bit, but it's been a while since I had a KLR and it was a 1999 model. There is no comparison, the 690 is far better both on and off road. You do need a better seat on the 690 if you're going very far on the highway. That and a small windscreen and the 690 is a good highway bike at any speed and for long miles. Having said that I do prefer a BMW, larger KTM over either 690 or KLR for a road trip. The KLR is a capable bike, the main reason to pick one over the other is cost, if you can not afford a 690 go for the KLR, there is no shame in that, both bikes are fun to ride in a dual sport or adventure bike fashion. Edit: To add, the Aprilla Tuareg is the modern incarnation of the 1980's (and newer) KLR. The 690 is a different class of bike.
Shawnee Bill said: ↑ I've ridden both quite a bit, but it's been a while since I had a KLR and it was a 1999 model. There is no comparison, the 690 is far better both on and off road. You do need a better seat on the 690 if you're going very far on the highway. That and a small windscreen and the 690 is a good highway bike at any speed and for long miles. Having said that I do prefer a BMW, larger KTM over either 690 or KLR for a road trip. The KLR is a capable bike, the main reason to pick one over the other is cost, if you can not afford a 690 go for the KLR, there is no shame in that, both bikes are fun to ride in a dual sport or adventure bike fashion. Edit: To add, the Aprilla Tuareg is the modern incarnation of the 1980's (and newer) KLR. The 690 is a different class of bike. Click to expand...
It really depends on your combination of slab vs dirt. Something like an Aprilia Toureg is a much better street bike and will handle dirt roads and two track fine. The 690 isn't as good on the street but is over 100lbs lighter than any of the twin cylinder bikes out there, so having to pick it up on a high Colorado pass is much, much easier. Which is what I need....

canadius_maximus

canadius_maximus Quaere verum

I'll echo what the others have said about tradeoffs, but frame a slightly different way. What tradeoff could you least live with? For me, a bike too big to comfortably manhandle over technical terrain is an unacceptable tradeoff, irrespective of how amazing it is on road. So I'd rather suffer on road a bit than off road a lot. But that's me. On my 690, I mitigated the travel downsides with a good rally fairing/fuel kit and I loved how close to a do-it-all bike it came. Did multi-day, road-only trips with ease and it was quite acceptable. Again, my tradeoffs aren't everyone's. I'm shortish and don't have decades of dirt bike riding in my youth like some have, and so this bike was superb as a 1-bike platform.
canadius_maximus said: ↑ I'll echo what the others have said about tradeoffs, but frame a slightly different way. What tradeoff could you least live with? For me, a bike too big to comfortably manhandle over technical terrain is an unacceptable tradeoff, irrespective of how amazing it is on road. So I'd rather suffer on road a bit than off road a lot. But that's me. On my 690, I mitigated the travel downsides with a good rally fairing/fuel kit and I loved how close to a do-it-all bike it came. Did multi-day, road-only trips with ease and it was quite acceptable. Again, my tradeoffs aren't everyone's. I'm shortish and don't have decades of dirt bike riding in my youth like some have, and so this bike was superb as a 1-bike platform. View attachment 5198655 Click to expand...
Low Drag said: ↑ I hear ya.... What I wanted was the opinion of someone who has ridden the KTM 690 on the pavement for extended periods, as in a day or two. Bonus if said comparison was directly to a KLR 650. I am thinking this bike may be my do-it-all bike, in particular hearing from you and your multi day road trips. I may add a windscreen just for cooler seasons, here in North Carolina I can't get enough air hitting me while wearing my mesh gear in the middle of the summer. Click to expand...
canadius_maximus said: ↑ I've switched bikes for an hour or so with a buddy who had a KLR. I found vibration levels to be comparable, with perhaps a mild advantage to the KLR, and other than his seat being lower and wider, I saw no clear advantage with the KLR as a roadgoing machine over my 690, once I had put the tank and fairing package on. My year (2009) had the earlier, unbalanced, single-spark motor; I hear (but have not ridden) newer 690s/701s are noticeably smoother on account of the engine enhancements. And insofar as suspension, well obviously there's no comparison. And yes, there's all sorts of fairing / windscreen options for the 690, from very basis to frame-mounted, etc. Ditto for seats. Another way to potentially "have your cake and eat it" - this is commonly done in the DRZ/KLX community - is an alternate set of wheels. I never considered this for either my DRZ, KTM690, or my current KLX400R since these days I'm spending more time off piste than on. But I know lots of folks with DRZs with a set of 17" sumo wheels and a set of 21/18" dirt wheels. So long as brake rotors are sized the same on both sets, it's as simple as swapping out both wheels and a quick setting change on their ODO. If you find you have a very even mix of dirt only vs road only rides, this might be an approach. I had a great time on my 690, once I chased down its common foibles - chiefly clutch slave and fuel pump. Once resolved, it was a bomb-proof and smile-producing bike. Click to expand...
Low Drag said: ↑ Thanks again for the info. I've heard the new 690s with additional counterbalance smooth it out a bit. I plan on getting basic protection and a windscreen, most likely a new seat but I'll see how it feels before I do that. If I get luck enough to do a huge pavement trip with a little gravel etc I'll get some 70/30 tires to take some of the knobby induced vibration away. I rarely try to break the sound barrier on a bike, I don't need to pay the large stupid tax/ticket. My 1290 SAR will certainly go a lot faster than I'll take it, BUT I do love its ability to pass 3 cars lined up on a 2 lane road with ease. I suspect I won't be able to do that on the 690.... Click to expand...

delta_lima_KTM20Trip20Day%202014_E72FEAF3-8046-4AF4-908C-48F377277517_zpssnmwn8du.jpg

b4thenite Long timer

690 can go anywhere KLR goes, but KLR can’t. 690 is the best performance thumper in the entire universe. The performance is unbelievable. No comparison from any other thumpers. 690 is a very needed gf. She wants this and that all the time, but you ride her you will not complain. KLR is just a nice girl. She tries to do everything you ask for but you won’t be too excited riding her. If you gonna do long distance, I recommend DR 650. At least she is sexier than KLR, even if most parts are fake ( after market ). I had great time doing freeway long distance with 690 with 50/50 tires and over priced rally fairing. Now I have Motoz tires minus heavy ass fairing and it a blast around town and on dirt. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

XDragRacer

XDragRacer Long timer Supporter

Got 'em both. KLR's Betty; KTM's Veronica. Each has its own merits and signature personalities. "Adventurized" each to some extent. KTM has a Seat Concepta low saddle, rear rack, fairing, Black Dog bash plate; could use additional capacity fuel tank. A tall bike; make sure you can flat-foot it before you buy. Mine has smaller (than stock) front and rear wheels. KLR has handlebar-wide windscreen, CycleRacks rear rack (outstanding), Happy Trails bash plate, Happy Trails adjustable-height center stand. CycleRacks fabric panniers and top case fit each. No, "Iron Butt;" however, have done some long rides on both. Don't think you can make a bad decision on either. All a matter of your own preference and budget.

Big Tall Bastard

Big Tall Bastard Voice of Reason

I'm a big fan of my GasGas 700. It can do 70 plus all day down the road but rides like a proper dirt bike off pavement
Low Drag said: ↑ My 1290 SAR will certainly go a lot faster than I'll take it, BUT I do love its ability to pass 3 cars lined up on a 2 lane road with ease. I suspect I won't be able to do that on the 690.... Click to expand...

Bitingdog

Bitingdog That's not my dog

Do 1000 miles trips on my 690 all the time, about to head out tomorrow on one. Mixed slab an dirt, does great on both. I've addressed all the shortcomings and it's about as good as you're gonna get and still be sub 400lbs.
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TravelAwaits

Our mission is to serve the 50+ traveler who's ready to cross a few items off their bucket list.

19 Unique And Fabulous Experiences In Moscow

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  • Destinations

Thinking of visiting Russia? When visiting such a famous city, one must, of course, visit the iconic landmarks first. Moscow has plenty of those, most of them in the center of the city, which is very well-planned for tourists. Once you’ve seen the sights that are on most travelers’ lists, it’s time to branch out and visit some of the lesser-known sites, and there are some fascinating places to see and things to do.

I know this list is long, but I just couldn’t help myself. You probably won’t have the time to see them all. But that’s okay. Just scroll through the list and choose what sounds the most interesting to you. Where possible, make sure to book in advance, as things can get crowded, especially during high season.

Saint Basil's Cathedral in Moscow, Russia

1. The Red Square, Kremlin, And Surroundings

Red Square (Krasnya Ploshad) is the heart and soul of Russia, and where much of the country’s history has unfolded. This is the most famous landmark in Moscow and indeed the whole country, it’s an absolute must-do! The square is always full of people and has a rather festive atmosphere!

Saint Basil’s Cathedral

This is the famous church with the rainbow-colored, onion-domed roof. The cathedral was commissioned in the 1500s by Ivan the Terrible and according to legend, the Tsar thought it was so beautiful, that he ordered that the architect’s eyes be cut out afterward, so he could never build anything more beautiful! He wasn’t called Ivan the Terrible for no reason!

Lenin’s Mausoleum

The “love-it-or-hate-it” of tourist attractions in Russia. A glass sarcophagus containing the embalmed body of Russian revolutionary, Vladimir Lenin. It may seem a bit bizarre to display the mummy of a person, but it has been there for almost half a century and the 2.5 million visitors who come each year, clearly feel the queuing and thorough body search are worth it, to be in Lenin’s presence.

Pro Tip: no photos and no loud talking are allowed inside the Mausoleum.

Eternal Flame

There is an Eternal Flame in honor of an unknown soldier on the left side of Red Square. The hourly changing of the guards is worth seeing.

The Kremlin is the official residence of the Russian president. You can see it from the outside, or you can take an excursion to one of the museums located inside. This is the biggest active fortress in Europe, and holds a week’s worth of attractions! Once behind the 7,332-feet of walls, there are five squares, four cathedrals, 20 towers, various museums, and the world’s largest bell and cannon to see. Worth a special mention is the Armory Chamber that houses a collection of the famous Faberge Eggs.

Pro Tip: You can only go inside the Kremlin if you are part of a tourist group.

Interior of the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscos

2. Bolshoi Theatre

Bolshoi Theatre translates to “The Big Theatre” in Russian, and the building is home to both the Bolshoi Ballet and Bolshoi Opera — among the oldest and most famous ballet and opera companies in the world.

Pro Tip: It’s hard to get an inexpensive ticket, so if you’re reading well in advance of going to Moscow then try buying tickets on the official website . Last-minute tickets cost around $250 per person. If this is out of your budget, about an hour before a performance, you can try buying a ticket at the entrance from a reseller. Most can speak enough English to negotiate the price.

Tour the Bolshoi Theatre: You can take a group guided tour of the Bolshoi Theatre which focuses on the history and architecture of the theatre and behind the scenes. There’s an English language tour that lasts 2 hours and costs around $300 for a group of up to six.

GUM, a popular department store in Moscow

3. Luxury Shopping At GUM And TSUM

Russia’s main department store, GUM, has a stunning interior that is home to over 100 high-end boutiques, selling a variety of brands: from luxurious Dior to the more affordable Zara. Even if shopping is not on your Moscow to-do list GUM is still worth a visit; the glass-roofed arcade faces Red Square and offers a variety of classy eateries. TSUM, one of the biggest luxury malls in town, is right behind the Bolshoi and GUM. It’s an imposing building with lots of history, and worth a visit just for its design and its glass roof.

Christ the Savior Cathedral in Moscow

4. Christ The Savior Cathedral

This is one of Russia’s most visited cathedrals and is a newer addition to the gorgeous array of Muscovite cathedrals, but don’t let its young age fool you. After perestroika, in the early 90s, the revived Russian Orthodox Church was given permission to build a cathedral on this site. It did the location honors and built the largest temple of the Christian Orthodox Church. The façade is as grand as you’d expect, but it’s the inside that will mesmerize you, with its domes, gold, gorgeous paintings, and decor!

The cathedral is located just a few hundred feet away from the Kremlin and was the site of the infamous Pussy Riot protest against Putin back in 2012.

Pro Tip: Bring a shawl to cover your hair as is the local custom.

Gates at Gorky Park in Moscow

5. Gorky Park

Moscow’s premier green space, Gorky Park (Park Gor’kogo) is the city’s biggest and most famous park. There is entertainment on offer here for every taste, from outdoor dancing sessions to yoga classes, volleyball, ping-pong, rollerblading, and bike and boat rental in summer. In winter, half the park turns into a huge ice skating rink. Gorky Park is also home to an open-air movie theater and the Garage Museum of Contemporary Art. There is also Muzeon Art Park, a dynamic contemporary space with a unique collection of 700 sculptures. It is located right in front of Gorky Park.

6. Sparrow Hills Park

If you take a walk from Gorky Park, along the Moscow River embankment, you’ll end up in the city’s other legendary park, Sparrow Hills. Although the park doesn’t offer as many activities as its hip neighbor, it has a great panoramic view of the city

Pro Tip: You can take a free walking tour to all of the above attractions with an English-speaking guide.

River cruise in Moscow

7. River Cruising

One of the best ways to experience Moscow, and see all the famous landmarks, but from a different angle, is from the Moscow River. Take a river cruise. Avoid the tourist crowds. There are little nameless old boats that do the cruise, but if you are looking for a more luxurious experience take the Radisson Blu cruise and enjoy the sights with some good food and a glass of wine.

Moscow Metro station

8. Metro Hopping

Inaugurated in the 1930s, the Moscow Metro system is one of the oldest and most beautiful in the world. Started in Stalinist times, each station is a work of art in its own right. I’d recommend touring the stations between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. This way, you’ll be able to properly see it without the crowds. Ideally, I’d recommend taking a tour with a knowledgeable guide with GuruWalk, who will tell you stories of forgotten stations and how the history of the country is interconnected with the metro development. If going by yourself, then I definitely recommend checking out: Mayakovskaya, Ploschad Revolutsii, Kievskaya, Kropotkinskaya, Kurskaya, and Novoslobodskaya stations.

Visit the free Moscow Metro Museum: For real train enthusiasts, located in the southern vestibule of Sportivnaya station is a small free museum. Here you can take a peek into the driver’s cabin, see a collection of metro tokens from different cities, and see different models of a turnstile, traffic lights, escalator, and more.

Moscow State University at dusk

9. Moscow State University View

In his effort to create a grander Moscow, Stalin had seven skyscrapers built in different parts of town; they’re called the Seven Sisters. The largest of these buildings and the one with the best view is the main building of the Moscow State University. Although this is a little outside the city center, the view is more than worth it.

Izmailovsky Market in Moscow, Russia

10. Izmailovsky Market

Mostly known for the city’s largest flea market, the district of Izmaylovo is home to a maze of shops where you can get just about anything, from artisan crafts to traditional fur hats, handcrafted jewelry, fascinating Soviet memorabilia, and antiquities. It’s also one of Moscow’s largest green spaces. There are often no price tags, so be prepared to haggle a bit. Head to one of the market cafes for a warming mulled wine before continuing your shopping spree.

The History of Vodka Museum is found here, and the museum’s restaurant is the perfect place to sample various brands of the national drink.

Once you’ve covered the more touristy spots, Moscow still has plenty to offer, and the places below will also be full of locals! So for some local vibes, I would strongly recommend the spots below!

The skyscrapers of Moscow City

11. Moscow City

With a completely different vibe, Moscow City (also referred to as Moscow International Business Center) is like a mini Dubai, with lots of impressive tall glass buildings. Here is where you’ll find the best rooftops in towns, like Ruski Restaurant, the highest restaurant both in Moscow City and in Europe. Moscow City is great for crowd-free shopping and the best panoramic views of the city.

Art in the Tretyakov Gallery in Moscow

12. Tretyakov Gallery

Tretyakov Gallery started as the private collection of the Tretyakov brothers, who were 19th-century philanthropists. They gave their private collection to the government after their deaths. If there is just one museum you visit in Moscow, I recommend this one!

Tsaritsyno Museum Reserve, former residence of Catherine the Great

13. Tsaritsyno Museum-Reserve

Tsaritsyno was a residence of Catherine the Great more than two centuries ago. It became derelict during the Soviet era but has now been fully renovated. With its opulently decorated buildings, gardens, meadows, and forests, Tsaritsyno Park is the perfect place for a green respite in Moscow.

Kolomenskoye Museum-Reserve in Moscow

14. Kolomenskoye

A 10-minute metro ride from the city center is Kolomenskoe Museum-Reserve, where you can get an idea of what Russia looked like 200 years ago. You’ll find ancient churches (one dating back to the 16th century), the oldest garden in Moscow, and the wonderful fairytale wooden palace of Tsar Alexey Mikhailovich, father of Peter the Great.

Ostankino TV Tower in Moscow at night

15. Ostankino TV Tower

Built in 1967, Ostankino TV Tower was the tallest free-standing construction in the world at the time, it’s still the 8th tallest building in the world and the highest in Europe. It’s also the best observation deck, with a glass floor and 360-degree views. The speedy elevators take you 1,105 feet in next to no time.

Pro Tip: You need to book in advance; entrance is based on specific ticket times and the capacity is limited and only a certain number of tourists are allowed per day. Don’t forget your passport, you’ll need it to get through security.

The floating bridge of Zaryadye Park in Moscow

16. Zaryadye Park

Zaryadye is a newly opened, landscaped urban park so new you won’t find it in a lot of tour guides. The park is near Red Square and is divided into four climatic zones: forest, steppe, tundra, and floodplains, depicting the variety of climatic zones in Russia.

These last three suggestions are a little quirky, but all are really worth checking out.

17. Museum Of Soviet Arcade Games

Release your inner child playing on 66 arcade machines from the Soviet era! What a great way to spend a couple of hours when tired of visiting museums and palaces. The staff speaks excellent English and are happy to explain how the games work.

The rooftops of Moscow, Russia

18. Moscow Rooftop Tour

Take a 1-hour private Moscow rooftop tour with an experienced roofer. I can just about guarantee none of your friends will be able to say they’ve done it! For your comfort, I recommend wearing comfortable shoes. Take your camera, there are some amazing photo opportunities out there!

A pool at Sanduny Banya in Moscow

19. Sanduny Banya

This classical Russian bathhouse opened its doors in 1808 and is famous for combining traditional Russian banya services with luxurious interiors and service. If you enjoy spas and saunas, then you should experience a Russian bathhouse at least once in your life! Go with an open mind and hire a specialist to steam you as it’s meant to be done — by being beaten repeatedly with a besom (a leafy branch)! This is said to improve circulation, but is best done by a professional!

So there you have my list of things to do in Moscow. I could have gone on and on and on, but I didn’t want to try your patience! There are so many things to do in this vibrant city that you’ll definitely need to allocate several days for exploring.

Here are some other reasons to visit Moscow and Russia:

  • 7 Reasons To Put Moscow On Your Travel Bucket List
  • Russia 30 Years (And 30 Pounds) Ago
  • Massive Mysterious Craters Appearing Again In Siberia

Image of Sarah Kingdom

Born and raised in Sydney, Australia, before moving to Africa at the age of 21, Sarah Kingdom is a mountain climber and guide, traveler, yoga teacher, trail runner, and mother of two. When she is not climbing or traveling she lives on a cattle ranch in central Zambia. She guides and runs trips regularly in India, Nepal, Tibet, Russia, and Ethiopia, taking climbers up Tanzania’s Mount Kilimanjaro numerous times a year.

2018 Primetime Emmy & James Beard Award Winner

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  1. 2019 KTM 690 Enduro R Guide • Total Motorcycle

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  2. 4 Sale / 2017 KTM 690 Enduro: A bike that can be built into anything

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  3. 2020 KTM 690 Enduro R Guide • Total Motorcycle

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  4. KTM 690 Enduro R Gets Serious Upgrades for 2019

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  5. 2018 KTM 690 Enduro R

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  6. KTM 690 ENDURO R

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  6. KTM 690 Enduro R (LC 4) 2015 Year, 14k. Km (MB Dopmoto)

COMMENTS

  1. 2024 Ktm 690 Enduro R

    By professionals for everyone: The KTM 690 ENDURO R's WP upside-down fork, with a whole 250 mm of suspension travel and 48 mm outer tubes, is adjustable in many ways and masters the balancing act between every day, road and offroad use with the greatest of ease. ... The KTM 690 ENDURO R's split fork design was originally developed by WP and KTM ...

  2. 2024 Ktm 690 Enduro R

    The KTM 690 ENDURO R features a specifically developed exhaust system made from the highest-quality stainless steel, which is not only compact and optimized for offroad use, it is EURO 5 compliant too. ... The KTM 690 ENDURO R's WP upside-down fork, with a whole 250 mm of suspension travel and 48 mm outer tubes, is adjustable in many ways and ...

  3. Building a KTM 690 Enduro R Travel Bike, Part 1: Powerparts

    Starting with KTM hard parts. I started bolting travel parts onto the KTM 690 Enduro R as soon as I had it in the driveway. Photo: Zac Kurylyk. In 2021, when I had a Husqvarna 701 Enduro on loan, I kept wishing I had a travel bike based on that platform. Alas, the Husqvarna 701 Enduro LR is no longer sold in North America, so I was out of luck.

  4. Building a KTM 690 Enduro R Travel Bike: Part 2 (Perun luggage rack

    Welcome back to our write-up on a quick-and-easy travel bike build from this summer, using a 2022 KTM 690 Enduro R as a base. Part 1 is here—Ed.. The last installment of this story talked about a few KTM-issued Powerparts that were installed on the 690 Enduro R that I rode this summer. That list included a set of saddlebags, but their combined capacity of 24 liters wasn't enough for my ...

  5. Building a KTM 690 Enduro R Travel Bike: Part 3 (Adventure Spec

    With the KTM Powerparts (including soft saddlebags) and a Perun luggage rack installed, my initial voyage on the KTM 690 Enduro R travel bike project went well, but I felt I needed to add one more piece: A windscreen. I planned to take the bike to Newfoundland in mid-August, and previous experience riding The Rock had taught me that protection from wind and weather would be welcome.

  6. KTM 690 ENDURO R DUAL-SPORT: FULL TEST

    The KTM 690 Enduro R is back, and it's mostly new for 2019. The 690 has been around for some time as kind of a transition bike between hard-core. Likes ; ... The 690 doesn't have the suspension travel to deal with that. It can be made to work better, though. A few years ago KTM had a factory Baja team that raced the 690. The riders all ...

  7. 2020 KTM 690 Enduro R Buyer's Guide: Specs, Photos, Price

    KTM's 690 Enduro R is a dual sport that's ready for any terrain with a 690cc engine, electronics, and large tires capable of eating it all up. ... Fully adjustable; 9.8-in. travel: Front Tire ...

  8. 2023 KTM 690 Enduro R Buyer's Guide [Specs, Price + Photos]

    Certainly, the 2023 KTM 690 Enduro R is dirt-capable. The WP Xplor suspension offers nearly ten inches of high-quality wheel travel at both ends, plus a pure-dirt 21-/18-inch wheelset with D.I.D ...

  9. 2024 KTM 690 Enduro R Guide • Total Motorcycle

    2024 KTM 690 Enduro R: THE LIGHTWEIGHT KING OF VERSATILITY. ... By professionals for everyone: The KTM 690 ENDURO R's WP upside-down fork, with a whole 250 mm of suspension travel and 48 mm outer tubes, is adjustable in many ways and masters the balancing act between every day, road and offroad use with the greatest of ease. ...

  10. 2023 KTM 690 Enduro R and 690 SMC R

    The 2023 KTM 690 SMC R has adjustable WP APEX suspension with separate damping circuits, 9.8 inches of travel, and Brembo brakes with 320mm front and 240 rear discs. From an aesthetics standpoint ...

  11. 2024 KTM 690 Enduro R

    2024 KTM 690 Enduro R pictures, prices, information, and specifications. Specs Photos & Videos Compare. Type. On-Off Road . Rating #1 of 11 KTM On-Off Road Motorcycles. Compare with the 2023 KTM XC 350 F ... Rear Travel (in/mm) 9.8 / 250 Wheels & tires. Wheels. Standard ...

  12. 2023 KTM 690 Enduro R First Look

    KTM's 690 Enduro R returns for 2023 with cosmetic revisions including gray hand guards and fork guards, and orange rear bodywork. KTM. The fuel-injected liquid-cooled SOHC four-stroke boasts ...

  13. 2019 KTM 690 Enduro R Review

    The 2019 KTM 690 Enduro R fills a niche within a niche.Ask riders of different disciplines where the 690 Enduro R falls among motorcycle segments and you're likely to get two different answers.To off-road riders, the 690 is an adventure bike. ... The 690 Enduro R is the only model in what KTM calls its Travel segment that doesn't come with ...

  14. KTM 690 Enduro R: Lean, mean, do-it-all machine

    The KTM 690 Enduro R combines streetbike hooliganism with a braaaaap-happy off-road attitude. Buying and Selling. List your bike for free; Search New and Used Motorcycles ... I was able to travel at a pretty decent clip on the 690. I took tighter two-laners when possible, but when forced out to the highway, the 690 is a much more competent ...

  15. KTM 690 Enduro R Road/Highway Manners? (KLR 650?..)

    The KLR is a capable bike, the main reason to pick one over the other is cost, if you can not afford a 690 go for the KLR, there is no shame in that, both bikes are fun to ride in a dual sport or adventure bike fashion. Edit: To add, the Aprilla Tuareg is the modern incarnation of the 1980's (and newer) KLR.

  16. 2024 Ktm 690 Enduro R

    La KTM 690 ENDURO R è dotata del sistema ride by wire, che analizza i movimenti della manopola dell'acceleratore con l'ausilio di sensori elettronici e attiva di conseguenza le valvole a farfalla. Ciò migliora notevolmente la risposta, fornendo al pilota un migliore controllo dell'accelerazione del potente monocilindrico e una guida più fluida.

  17. 19 Unique And Fabulous Experiences In Moscow

    5. Gorky Park. Moscow's premier green space, Gorky Park (Park Gor'kogo) is the city's biggest and most famous park. There is entertainment on offer here for every taste, from outdoor dancing sessions to yoga classes, volleyball, ping-pong, rollerblading, and bike and boat rental in summer.

  18. 9 BEST Photo Spots and Things to Do in Moscow, Russia

    8. Church of Nikolaya Chudotvortsa Tverskoy Old Believers' Community. This is a small, relatively unknown cathedral, but what makes this place special for me is its location. The small cathedral is located between business centers and skyscrapers, which creates the perfect contrast between the old and the new.

  19. 2024 Ktm 690 Enduro R

    Sedlo modelu KTM 690 ENDURO R zaujme hned třemi věcmi. Za prvé, díky svému ergonomickému tvaru a výšce 910 mm umožňuje jezdci zcela plynulý pohyb při jízdě v náročném terénu. Za druhé, nabízí skvělý komfort sezení při silničních přesunech mezi traily.

  20. Walking Tour: Central Moscow from the Arbat to the Kremlin

    There are green spaces and public parks, leafy neighborhoods, pedestrian zones, and calm bodies of water. And, of course, more history in one street corner than in many entire towns. This tour of Moscow's center takes you from one of Moscow's oldest streets to its newest park through both real and fictional history, hitting the Kremlin ...

  21. 2024 Ktm Rc 8c

    THE TRACK IS CALLING. The KTM RC 8C is a purpose-built, lightweight racing prototype built around a hyper-tuned 890 LC8c engine, featuring a bespoke frame and WP PRO COMPONENTS all around. In short - it is the ultimate, uncompromised track weapon. Boasting an exclusive line-up of race-focussed, top-shelf componentry, the KTM RC 8C uses a dedicated race-ready chassis and a near 1-to-1 power ...

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    Travel Sports Tourer Supermoto Naked Bike Supersport X-BOW BRABUS MX DISCOVER. 4-stroke. 2025 KTM 250 SX-F ADAMO EDITION ... 2024 KTM 690 ENDURO R