The Intrepid Guide

28 Beautiful Travel Words that Describe Wanderlust Perfectly

Travel words and wanderlust synonyms

Describe your travels with these unique and beautiful travel words from different languages around the world.

I love travelling and I love languages, so imagine my excitement when I came across a treasure trove of travel words and wanderlust synonyms that describe how we feel before, during, and after we travel. 

Just like a photo can’t fully capture what it feels like to stand on the edge of a fjord , neither can ‘wanderlust’ fully express how we feel when we crave our next adventure. These travel words are literary gems which have been gathered from languages around the world. From Japanese to Swedish , Latin to Greek , travel brochures of the future will be peppered with travel words like of resfeber , livsnjutare, and coddiwomple .

Wanderlust meaning

As you’ll see in the list below, every language has its own variation of how it explains and defines what wanderlust is. In English, wanderlust means to have a strong desire for or impulse to travel, wander and explore the world.

Learn a language from home

During these times it can be bittersweet to think about travelling when we have to stay at home and practice social distancing, let this list of wanderlust-filled words inspire you to a learn a language from home and prepare yourself for your next trip. Being travel fluent is the best way to enrich your travel experiences.

Without further ado, here are 28 beautiful travel words you should slip into your vocabulary. When you’re done, take and look at this collection of inspirational travel quotes . I’d love to hear which ones are your favourites in the comment section below.

1. Resfeber  (n.)

Origin: Swedish

Definition: The meaning of resfeber refers to the restless race of the traveller’s heart before the journey begins when anxiety and anticipation are tangled together.

It’s that moment just after you buy your plane tickets and excitement and fear floods in all at once, creating a mixture of emotions that make you feel anxious or physically ill.

Resfeber Tote Bag

For more inspiration, don’t miss my guide to cool gifts for language learners and the best travel accessories and travel gadgets here.

2. Sonder (v.)

Origin: Unknown

Definition: The realisation that each passerby is living a life as complex as your own.

The full definition, taken from The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows reads:

[Sonder is] the realization that each random passerby is living a life as vivid and complex as your own—populated with their own ambitions, friends, routines, worries, and inherited craziness—an epic story that continues invisibly around you like an anthill sprawling deep underground, with elaborate passageways to thousands of other lives that you’ll never know existed, in which you might appear only once, as an extra sipping coffee in the background, as a blur of traffic passing on the highway, as a lighted window at dusk.

I often feel this way when I pass groups of strangers, speaking a language that is completely foreign to me, and realise just how incredibly big the world is. We all have a life that is full of different connections, memories and possibilities. That’s sonder.

The internet suggests this may not be a real word, either way, the concept is beautiful.

3. Solivagant (adj.)

Origin: Latin

Definition: Wandering alone. A solitary adventurer who travels or wanders the globe.

Not all those who wander are lost, but all those who wander alone are definitely solivagants . From the Latin word solivagus , meaning lonely or solitary, solivagant describes anyone who enjoys meandering around new countries, alone, in order to take it all in.

4. Fernweh (n.)

Origin: German

Definition: This German word,means an ache to get away and travel to a distant place, a feeling  even stronger than wanderlust. If wanderlust wasn’t poetic enough for you, allow me to present fernweh , a German word that literally translates to “distance-sickness.”

While someone with wanderlust might sit at home and happily fantasise about all the places they might visit, someone with fernweh would feel a deeper sense of longing, a sort of homesickness but for foreign lands.  For me, it’s wanting to be back in Rome . Fernweh is one of most those beautiful untranslatable words I’ve ever come across.

Carry this beautiful word with you with my Fernweh T-Shirt available in men’s and ladies styles and black or white. Buy it here.

Gifts for language learners and travellers - Fernweh T-Shirt

5. Sehnsucht (n.)

Definition: A wistful longing and yearning in the heart for travels past and future.

One author translated it as the “ inconsolable longing in the human heart for we know not what .” Another compared it to “ a longing for a far-off country, but not one which we could identify.”

When you return from travelling and wish you could do it all over again and experience every moment like it was the first.

Travel-Words-Sehnsucht

6. Eleutheromania (n.)

Origin: Greek

Definition: An intense and irresistible desire for freedom.

We all want to be free, and travelling shows us how the freedom in the lives of others that is different from our own. Eleutheromania describes a person who has a strong desire and obsession for freedom.

7. Cockaigne (n.)

Origin: French , Middle French

Definition: An imaginary land of luxury and idleness.

Every destination seem like a wonderland or cockaigne before you set foot there and see it for yourself.

The term c ockaigne ” comes from the Middle French phrase pais de cocaigne, which literally means “the land of plenty.” The word was first popularised in a 13th-century French poem that is known in English as “The Land of Cockaigne.”

8. Quaquaversal (adj.)

Definition: Moving or happening in every direction instantaneously.

This perfectly describes my state when I’m in a new place and want to see and do everything at once.

9. Dérive (n)

Origin: French

Definition: A spontaneous and unplanned journey where the traveller leaves their life behind allows themselves to be guided by the landscape and architecture.

Literally translated as “drift”,  dérive is the idea that even if you drift you will end up on the right path. This could describe life in general, but it also describes small journeys. When you’re wandering through a new city and you just happen to wander on a path that takes you to great discoveries.

Travel-Words-Derive

10. Ecophobia (n.)

Origin: English

Definition: This word came into English word via Greek and means a fear or dislike of one’s home.

I don’t dislike my home, but recently I can’t stop thinking about going back to Lofoten, Norway.

11. Numinous (adj.)

Definition: A powerful feeling of both fear and fascination, of being in awe and overwhelmed by what is before you.

Originally, this word refers to having a strong religious or spiritual quality; but it can also be used to describe how you feel when you see things that are so beautiful that you realise how wonderful the world is and the small part you play in it.   Hiking Trolltunga was a numinous moment for me.

12. Schwellenangst (n.)

Definition: Fear of crossing a threshold to begin a new chapter.

From s chwelle (“threshold”) and a ngst (“anxiety”), this word explains that feeling you get before deciding to set out on a new journey. Argh! Did I make the right decision?

13. Strikhedonia (n.)

Definition: The pleasure of being able to say “to hell with it”.

Another personal favourite word on this list. Not only is it the joy I feel, but the freedom to be able to say “to hell with it” and book that next trip and embark on your next adventure.

14. Vagary (v.)

Definition: A whimsical or roaming journey.

From Latin, vagārī meaning “ to roam”, is an unpredictable idea, desire or action to travelling without knowing the destination, and not caring.

15. Livsnjutare (n)

Definition: Literally meaning, “enjoyer of life”, this describes a person who loves life deeply and lives it to the extreme.

If you’re reading this, that’s probably you!  Need more inspiration?

16. Commuovere (v.)

Origin: Italian

Definition: To stir, to touch, to move to tears.

Just like the euphoric emotions I felt whilst whale watching.

17. Sturmfrei (adj.)

Definition: The freedom of being alone and being able to do what you want.

Literally translating to “stormfree”, this describes the freedom of not being watched by others and being alone in a place where you have the freedom and ability to do what you want.

Another great German word. Travelling solo can be especially rewarding because you have complete control. No compromises, no one else to please. Just you and the big wide world.

18. Saudade (n.)

Origin: Portuguese

Definition: This Portuguese word describes the emotional state of nostalgia and longing for someone or something distant. S audade  was once described as “the love that remains” after someone is gone.

Saudade  is the recollection of feelings, experiences, places, or events that brought excitement and happiness but now triggers the senses and makes one live again.

19. Yūgen (n.)

Origin: Japanese

Definition: A profound and mysterious sense of the beauty of the universe.

An awareness of the Universe that triggers emotional responses too deep and powerful for words.

20. Acatalepsy (n.)

Definition: The impossibility of comprehending the universe.

Henry Miller said “ One’s destination is never a place, but a new way of seeing things. ” Do we ever really understand the world and what we see on our  travels,  and how they mould us? Sometimes, if at all, it takes time to discover how these things change our lives.

21. Trouvaille (n.)

Definition: A chance encounter with something wonderful.

Whether it’s stumbling across a hidden back street, a quaint cafe, or connecting with a local, trouvaille describes those magical moments we experience in our journeys. 

22. Hygge (n.)

Origin: Danish

Definition: Pronounced hue-guh , hygge describes the warm feeling you get while enjoying the company of great friends and all life has to offer.

Hygge is the conscious appreciation of recognising everything you have and enjoying to the present moment.

23. Onism (n.)

Definition: The world is a big place as not everyone will get to see it. Onism describes understanding that we’ll never get to see it all. It’s the frustration of being stuck in just one body that can only inhabit one place at a time. I felt this way before going to Copenhagen !

Similar to the Swedish word ‘resfeber’, onism describes the feeling of knowing that you’ll never be able to see it all. They say that the more you travel, the harder it gets to stay in one place.

24. Novaturient (adj.)

Definition: A desire to change and alter your life.

This was exactly how I felt when I quit my job and moved to Rome . There was this strong urge that pulled me towards my dream of pursuing a life of speaking Italian and travelling. I knew I  wouldn’t be living my life if I didn’t go.

25. Yoko meshi (n.)

Definition: This untranslatable gem describes the stress of speaking a foreign language .

The Japanese word ‘meshi’ literally means ‘boiled rice’ and ‘yoko’ means ‘horizontal,’ together it means ‘a meal eaten sideways.’ The Japanese have created a beautiful way of describing the unique kind of stress you experience when speaking a foreign language. Furthermore, ‘yoko’ also references the fact that Japanese is normally written vertically, whereas most foreign languages are written horizontally. Clever, right?

Related: 69 Wonderful Japanese Expressions That Will Brighten Your Day

26. Selcouth (adj.)

Origin: Old English

Definition: When everything you see and experience is unfamiliar and strange, yet you find it marvellous anyway.

It’s that feeling you get when you travel to a foreign land and food, culture, customs, or language, is strange and different to everything you’ve experienced before, yet you love it and find it fascinating.

27. Eudaimonia (n.)

Definition: A state of being happy whilst travelling and everything feels great.

That intense excitement and appreciation when you travel and everything feels great. Seeing the Northern Lights was one of the best experiences of my life, a feeling I won’t forget.

28. Coddiwomple (v.)

Origin: English slang

Definition: To travel purposefully towards an unknown destination.

A brilliant word, coddiwomple is when you have a vague idea of your destination within a care for how long it takes to arrive. A great example is when you go hiking, you know you’ll eventually reach the summit, but every part of the trail along the way is just as beautiful.    Like the time I hiked Norway’s Trolltunga.

Travel Words Coddiwomple

If you enjoyed these words, then let wordsmiths Stephen King, Mark Twain and the Dalai Lama transport you around the world with these inspirational travel quotes or start using some of the beautiful untranslatable words from other languages.

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Over to you!

Which one of these travel words do you identify with the most? What others would you add? Let me know using the comments section below or join me on social media to start a conversation.

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tourism description words

Michele creates language learning guides and courses for travel. What separates her from other instructors is her ability to explain complex grammar in a no-nonsense, straightforward manner using her unique 80/20 method. Get her free guide 9 reasons you’re not fluent…YET & how to fix it! Planning a trip? Learn the local language with her 80/20 method for less than the cost of eating at a tourist trap restaurant Start learning today!

Italian Cognates & Loanwords: 17 Rules to Italianizing English Words You Already Know

124 inspirational travel quotes that’ll make you want to travel in 2022, 12 comments.

tourism description words

Amazing list! One word I’d add is the Dutch word “gezellig” or “gezelligheid” – similarly to hygge, it describes a feeling of warmth/comfort/coziness/quaintness in certain settings or around certain people.

Thank you so much for sharing this Heba. So interesting to learn that Dutch has a similar word :)

tourism description words

This is such a fun article! Love these words and phrases!

Glad to hear it! Thank you so much, Eric :)

tourism description words

So many of these describe me or my feelings about seeing the world. But, if I had to pick one, the one that best describes how I choose my destinations would be “selcouth”. I so want to be a stranger in a strange land. To have my belief that there is no such thing as “normal” affirmed again and again and over again.

What a beautiful word. Thanks for sharing, Janet :)

tourism description words

Thanks Michele what a wonderful list of inspirational words. It nearly made me cry as I realised that I suffer from acute eleutheromania! ha

Thanks Juliana :) I’m so glad you enjoyed this list. Eleutheromania? I know how you feel hehe

tourism description words

Unique list i must say – If you want to add one more word than check this !

In Hindi language (India) traveler called as “Musafir”

thanks Niraj :)

tourism description words

Thanks for sharing this! Really enjoyed it a lot ❤

Thanks Donah, I’m so glad you enjoyed it ;)

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UN Tourism | Bringing the world closer

Glossary of tourism terms

UN standards for measuring tourism

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Glossary of tourism terms

Tourism is a social, cultural and economic phenomenon which entails the movement of people to countries or places outside their usual environment for personal or business/professional purposes. These people are called visitors (which may be either tourists or excursionists; residents or non-residents) and tourism has to do with their activities, some of which involve tourism expenditure.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

Activity/activities : In tourism statistics, the term activities represent the actions and behaviors of people in preparation for and during a trip in their capacity as consumers ( IRTS 2008, 1.2 ).

Activity (principal): The principal activity of a producer unit is the activity whose value added exceeds that of any other activity carried out within the same unit ( SNA 2008, 5.8 ).

Activity (productive): The (productive) activity carried out by a statistical unit is the type of production in which it engages. It has to be understood as a process, i.e. the combination of actions that result in a certain set of products. The classification of productive activities is determined by their principal output.

Administrative data : Administrative data is the set of units and data derived from an administrative source. This is a data holding information collected and maintained for the purpose of implementing one or more administrative regulations.

Adventure tourism : Adventure tourism is a type of tourism which usually takes place in destinations with specific geographic features and landscape and tends to be associated with a physical activity, cultural exchange, interaction and engagement with nature. This experience may involve some kind of real or perceived risk and may require significant physical and/or mental effort. Adventure tourism generally includes outdoor activities such as mountaineering, trekking, bungee jumping, rock climbing, rafting, canoeing, kayaking, canyoning, mountain biking, bush walking, scuba diving. Likewise, some indoor adventure tourism activities may also be practiced.

Aggregated data : The result of transforming unit level data into quantitative measures for a set of characteristics of a population.

Aggregation : A process that transforms microdata into aggregate-level information by using an aggregation function such as count, sum average, standard deviation, etc.

Analytical unit : Entity created by statisticians, by splitting or combining observation units with the help of estimations and imputations.

Balance of payments : The balance of payments is a statistical statement that summarizes transactions between residents and non-residents during a period. It consists of the goods and services account, the primary income account, the secondary income account, the capital account, and the financial account ( BPM6, 2.12 ).

Bias : An effect which deprives a statistical result of representativeness by systematically distorting it, as distinct from a random error which may distort on any one occasion but balances out on the average.

Business and professional purpose (of a tourism trip): The business and professional purpose of a tourism trip includes the activities of the self-employed and employees, as long as they do not correspond to an implicit or explicit employer-employee relationship with a resident producer in the country or place visited, those of investors, businessmen, etc. ( IRTS 2008, 3.17.2 ).

Business tourism : Business tourism is a type of tourism activity in which visitors travel for a specific professional and/or business purpose to a place outside their workplace and residence with the aim of attending a meeting, an activity or an event. The key components of business tourism are meetings, incentives, conventions and exhibitions. The term "meetings industry" within the context of business tourism recognizes the industrial nature of such activities. Business tourism can be combined with any other tourism type during the same trip.

Business visitor : A business visitor is a visitor whose main purpose for a tourism trip corresponds to the business and professional category of purpose ( IRTS 2008, 3.17.2 ).

Central Product Classification : The Central Product Classification (CPC) constitutes a complete product classification covering goods and services. It is intended to serve as an international standard for assembling and tabulating all kinds of data requiring product detail, including industrial production, national accounts, service industries, domestic and foreign commodity trade, international trade in services, balance of payments, consumption and price statistics. Other basic aims are to provide a framework for international comparison and promote harmonization of various types of statistics dealing with goods and services.

Census : A census is the complete enumeration of a population or groups at a point in time with respect to well defined characteristics: for example, Population, Production, Traffic on particular roads.

Coastal, maritime and inland water tourism : Coastal tourism refers to land-based tourism activities such as swimming, surfing, sunbathing and other coastal leisure, recreation and sports activities which take place on the shore of a sea, lake or river. Proximity to the coast is also a condition for services and facilities that support coastal tourism. Maritime tourism refers to sea-based activities such as cruising, yachting, boating and nautical sports and includes their respective land-based services and infrastructure. Inland water tourism refers to tourism activities such as cruising, yachting, boating and nautical sports which take place in aquatic- influenced environments located within land boundaries and include lakes, rivers, ponds, streams, groundwater, springs, cave waters and others traditionally grouped as inland wetlands.

Coherence : Adequacy of statistics to be combined in different ways and for various uses.

Competitiveness of a tourism destination : The competitiveness of a tourism destination is the ability of the destination to use its natural, cultural, human, man-made and capital resources efficiently to develop and deliver quality, innovative, ethical and attractive tourism products and services in order to achieve a sustainable growth within its overall vision and strategic goals, increase the added value of the tourism sector, improve and diversify its market components and optimize its attractiveness and benefits both for visitors and the local community in a sustainable perspective.

Consistency : Logical and numerical coherence.

Country of reference : The country of reference refers to the country for which the measurement is done. ( IRTS 2008, 2.15 ).

Country of residence : The country of residence of a household is determined according to the centre of predominant economic interest of its members. If a person resides (or intends to reside) for more than one year in a given country and has there his/her centre of economic interest (for example, where the predominant amount of time is spent), he/she is considered as a resident of this country.

Country-specific tourism characteristic products and activities : To be determined by each country by applying the criteria of IRTS 2008, 5.10 in their own context; for these products, the activities producing them will be considered as tourism characteristic, and the industries in which the principal activity is tourism-characteristic will be called tourism industries ( IRTS 2008, 5.16 ).

Cultural tourism : Cultural tourism is a type of tourism activity in which the visitor's essential motivation is to learn, discover, experience and consume the tangible and intangible cultural attractions/products in a tourism destination. These attractions/products relate to a set of distinctive material, intellectual, spiritual and emotional features of a society that encompasses arts and architecture, historical and cultural heritage, culinary heritage, literature, music, creative industries and the living cultures with their lifestyles, value systems, beliefs and traditions.

Data checking : Activity whereby the correctness conditions of the data are verified. It also includes the specification of the type of error or of the condition not met, and the qualification of the data and their division into "error-free data" and "erroneous data".

Data collection : Systematic process of gathering data for official statistics.

Data compilation : Operations performed on data to derive new information according to a given set of rules.

Data confrontation : The process of comparing data that has generally been derived from different surveys or other sources, especially those of different frequencies, in order to assess and possibly improve their coherency, and identify the reasons for any differences.

Data processing : Data processing is the operation performed on data by the organization, institute, agency, etc., responsible for undertaking the collection, tabulation, manipulation and preparation of data and metadata output.

Data reconciliation : The process of adjusting data derived from two different sources to remove, or at least reduce, the impact of differences identified.

Destination (main destination of a trip): The main destination of a tourism trip is defined as the place visited that is central to the decision to take the trip. See also purpose of a tourism trip ( IRTS 2008, 2.31 ).

Destination management / marketing organization (DMO) : A destination management/marketing organization (DMO) is the leading organizational entity which may encompass the various authorities, stakeholders and professionals and facilitates tourism sector partnerships towards a collective destination vision. The governance structures of DMOs vary from a single public authority to a public/ private partnership model with the key role of initiating, coordinating and managing certain activities such as implementation of tourism policies, strategic planning, product development, promotion and marketing and convention bureau activities. The functions of the DMOs may vary from national to regional and local levels depending on the current and potential needs as well as on the decentralization level of public administration. Not every tourism destination has a DMO.

Documentation: Processes and procedures for imputation,  weighting,  confidentiality  and suppression rules, outlier treatment and data capture should be fully documented by the  survey provider.  Such documentation should be made available to at least  the body financing the survey.

Domestic tourism : Domestic tourism comprises the activities of a resident visitor within the country of reference, either as part of a domestic tourism trip or part of an outbound tourism trip ( IRTS 2008, 2.39 ).

Domestic tourism consumption : Domestic tourism consumption is the tourism consumption of a resident visitor within the economy of reference ( TSA:RMF 2008, figure 2.1 ).

Domestic tourism expenditure : Domestic tourism expenditure is the tourism expenditure of a resident visitor within the economy of reference, (IRTS 2008, 4.15(a)).

Domestic tourism trip : A domestic tourism trip is one with a main destination within the country of residence of the visitor (IRTS 2008, 2.32).

Domestic visitor : As a visitor travels within his/her country of residence, he/she is a domestic visitor and his/her activities are part of domestic tourism.

Durable consumer goods : Durable consumer goods are goods that may be used repeatedly or continuously over a period of a year or more, assuming a normal or average rate of physical usage. When acquired by producers, these are considered to be capital goods used for production processes, as is the case of vehicles, computers, etc. When acquired by households, they are considered to be consumer durable goods ( TSA:RMF 2008, 2.39 ). This definition is identical to the definition of SNA 2008, 9.42 : A consumer durable is a goodthat may be used for purposes of consumption repeatedly or continuously over a period of a year or more.

Dwellings : Each household has a principal dwelling (sometimes also designated as main or primary home), usually defined with reference to time spent there, whose location defines the country of residence and place of usual residence of this household and of all its members. All other dwellings (owned or leased by the household) are considered secondary dwellings ( IRTS 2008, 2.26 ).

Ecotourism : Ecotourism is a type of nature-based tourism activity in which the visitor's essential motivation is to observe, learn, discover, experience and appreciate biological and cultural diversity with a responsible attitude to protect the integrity of the ecosystem and enhance the well-being of the local community. Ecotourism increases awareness towards the conservation of biodiversity, natural environment and cultural assets both among locals and the visitors and requires special management processes to minimize the negative impact on the ecosystem.

Economic analysis : Tourism generates directly and indirectly an increase in economic activity in the places visited (and beyond), mainly due to demand for goods and services thatneed to be produced and provided. In the economic analysis of tourism, one may distinguish between tourism's 'economic contribution' which refers to the direct effect of tourism and is measurable by means of the TSA, and tourism's 'economic impact' which is a much broader concept encapsulating the direct, indirect and induced effects of tourism and which must be estimated by applying models. Economic impact studies aim to quantify economic benefits, that is, the net increase in the wealth of residents resulting from tourism, measured in monetary terms, over and above the levels that would prevail in its absence.

Economic territory : The term "economic territory" is a geographical reference and points to the country for which the measurement is done (country of reference) ( IRTS 2008, 2.15 ).

Economically active population : The economically active population or labour force comprises all persons of either sex who furnish the supply of labour for the production of goods and services as defined by the system of national accounts during a specified time-reference period (ILO, Thirteenth ICLS, 6.18).

Economy (of reference): "Economy" (or "economy of reference") is an economic reference defined in the same way as in the balance of payments and in the system of national accounts: it refers to the economic agents that are resident in the country of reference ( IRTS 2008, 2.15 ).

Education tourism : Education tourism covers those types of tourism which have as a primary motivation the tourist's engagement and experience in learning, self-improvement, intellectual growth and skills development. Education Tourism represents a broad range of products and services related to academic studies, skill enhancement holidays, school trips, sports training, career development courses and language courses, among others.

Employees : Employees are all those workers who hold the type of job defined as "paid employment" (ILO, Fifteenth ICLS, pp. 20-22).

Employer-employee relationship : An employer-employee relationship exists when there is an agreement, which may be formal or informal, between an entity and an individual, normally entered into voluntarily by both parties, whereby the individual works for the entity in return for remuneration in cash or in kind ( BPM6, 11.11 ).

Employers : Employers are those workers who, working on their own account with one or more partners, hold the type of job defined as a "self-employment job" and, in this capacity, on a continuous basis (including the reference period) have engaged one or more persons to work for them in their business as "employee(s)" (ILO, Fifteenth ICLS, pp. 20-22).

Employment : Persons in employment are all persons above a specified age who, during a specified brief period, either one week or one day, were in paid employment or self-employment (OECD GST, p. 170).

Employment in tourism industries : Employment in tourism industries may be measured as a count of the persons employed in tourism industries in any of their jobs, as a count of the persons employed in tourism industries in their main job, or as a count of the jobs in tourism industries ( IRTS 2008, 7.9 ).

Enterprise : An enterprise is an institutional unit engaged in production of goods and/or services. It may be a corporation, a non-profit institution, or an unincorporated enterprise. Corporate enterprises and non-profit institutions are complete institutional units. An unincorporated enterprise, however, refers to an institutional unit —a household or government unit —only in its capacity as a producer of goods and services (OECD BD4, p. 232)

Establishment : An establishment is an enterprise, or part of an enterprise, that is situated in a single location and in which only a single productive activity is carried out or in which the principal productive activity accounts for most of the value added ( SNA 2008, 5.14 ).

Estimation : Estimation is concerned with inference about the numerical value of unknown population values from incomplete data such as a sample. If a single figure is calculated for each unknown parameter the process is called "point estimation". If an interval is calculated within which the parameter is likely, in some sense, to lie, the process is called "interval estimation".

Exports of goods and services : Exports of goods and services consist of sales, barter, or gifts or grants, of goods and services from residents to non-residents (OECD GST, p. 194)

Frame : A list, map or other specification of the units which define a population to be completely enumerated or sampled.

Forms of tourism : There are three basic forms of tourism: domestic tourism, inbound tourism, and outbound tourism. These can be combined in various ways to derive the following additional forms of tourism: internal tourism, national tourism and international tourism.

Gastronomy tourism :  Gastronomy tourism is a type of tourism activity which is characterized by the visitor's experience linked with food and related products and activities while travelling. Along with authentic, traditional, and/or innovative culinary experiences, Gastronomy Tourism may also involve other related activities such as visiting the local producers, participating in food festivals and attending cooking classes. Eno-tourism (wine tourism), as a sub-type of gastronomy tourism, refers to tourism whose purpose is visiting vineyards, wineries, tasting, consuming and/or purchasing wine, often at or near the source.

Goods : Goods are physical, produced objects for which a demand exists, over which ownership rights can be established and whose ownership can be transferred from one institutional unit to another by engaging in transactions on markets ( SNA 2008, p. 623 ).

Gross fixed capital formation : Gross fixed capital formation is defined as the value of institutional units' acquisitions less disposals of fixed assets. Fixed assets are produced assets (such as machinery, equipment, buildings or other structures) that are used repeatedly or continuously in production over several accounting periods (more than one year) ( SNA 2008, 1.52 ).

Gross margin : The gross margin of a provider of reservation services is the difference between the value at which the intermediated service is sold and the value accrued to the provider of reservation services for this intermediated service.

Gross value added : Gross value added is the value of output less the value of intermediate consumption ( TSA:RMF 2008, 3.32 ).

Gross value added of tourism industries : Gross value added of tourism industries (GVATI) is the total gross value added of all establishments belonging to tourism industries, regardless of whether all their output is provided to visitors and the degree of specialization of their production process ( TSA:RMF 2008, 4.86 ).

Grossing up : Activity aimed at transforming, based on statistical methodology, micro-data from samples into aggregate-level information representative of the target population.

Health tourism : Health tourism covers those types of tourism which have as a primary motivation, the contribution to physical, mental and/or spiritual health through medical and wellness-based activities which increase the capacity of individuals to satisfy their own needs and function better as individuals in their environment and society. Health tourism is the umbrella term for the subtypes wellness tourism and medical tourism.

Imputation : Procedure for entering a value for a specific data item where the response is missing or unusable.

Inbound tourism : Inbound tourism comprises the activities of a non-resident visitor within the country of reference on an inbound tourism trip ( IRTS 2008, 2.39 ).

Inbound tourism consumption : Inbound tourism consumption is the tourism consumption of a non-resident visitor within the economy of reference ( TSA:RMF 2008, figure 2.1 ).

Inbound tourism expenditure : Inbound tourism expenditure is the tourism expenditure of a non-resident visitor within the economy of reference ( IRTS 2008, 4.15(b) ).

Innovation in tourism : Innovation in tourism is the introduction of a new or improved component which intends to bring tangible and intangible benefits to tourism stakeholders and the local community, improve the value of the tourism experience and the core competencies of the tourism sector and hence enhance tourism competitiveness and /or sustainability. Innovation in tourism may cover potential areas, such as tourism destinations, tourism products, technology, processes, organizations and business models, skills, architecture, services, tools and/or practices for management, marketing, communication, operation, quality assurance and pricing.

Institutional sector : An aggregation of institutional units on the basis of the type of producer and depending on their principal activity and function, which are considered to be indicative of their economic behaviour.

Institutional unit : The elementary economic decision-making centre characterised by uniformity of behaviour and decision-making autonomy in the exercise of its principal function.

Intermediate consumption : Intermediate consumption consists of the value of the goods and services consumed as inputs by a process of production, excluding fixed assets whose consumption is recorded as consumption of fixed capital ( SNA 2008, 6.213 ).

Internal tourism : Internal tourism comprises domestic tourism and inbound tourism, that is to say, the activities of resident and non-resident visitors within the country of reference as part of domestic or international tourism trips ( IRTS 2008, 2.40(a) ).

Internal tourism consumption : Internal tourism consumption is the tourism consumption of both resident and non-resident visitors within the economy of reference. It is the sum of domestic tourism consumption and inbound tourism consumption ( TSA:RMF 2008, figure 2.1 ).

Internal tourism expenditure : Internal tourism expenditure comprises all tourism expenditure of visitors, both resident and non-resident, within the economy of reference. It is the sum of domestic tourism expenditure and inbound tourism expenditure. It includes acquisition of goods and services imported into the country of reference and sold to visitors. This indicator provides the most comprehensive measurement of tourism expenditure in the economy of reference ( IRTS 2008, 4.20(a) ).

International Standard Industrial Classification of All Economic Activities : The International Standard Industrial Classification of All Economic Activities (ISIC) consists of a coherent and consistent classification structure of economic activities based on a set of internationally agreed concepts, definitions, principles and classification rules. It provides a comprehensive framework within which economic data can be collected and reported in a format that is designed for purposes of economic analysis, decision-taking and policymaking. The classification structure represents a standard format to organize detailed information about the state of an economy according to economic principles and perceptions (ISIC, Rev.4, 1).

International tourism : International tourism comprises inbound tourism and outbound tourism, that is to say, the activities of resident visitors outside the country of reference, either as part of domestic or outbound tourism trips and the activities of non-resident visitors within the country of reference on inbound tourism trips ( IRTS 2008, 2.40(c) ).

International visitor : An international traveller qualifies as an international visitor with respect to the country of reference if: (a) he/she is on a tourism trip and (b) he/she is a non-resident travelling in the country of reference or a resident travelling outside of it ( IRTS 2008, 2.42 ).

Job : The agreement between an employee and the employer defines a job and each self-employed person has a job ( SNA 2008, 19.30 ).

Measurement error : Error in reading, calculating or recording numerical value.

Medical tourism : Medical tourism is a type of tourism activity which involves the use of evidence-based medical healing resources and services (both invasive and non-invasive). This may include diagnosis, treatment, cure, prevention and rehabilitation.

Meetings industry : To highlight purposes relevant to the meetings industry, if a trip's main purpose is business/professional, it can be further subdivided into "attending meetings, conferences or congresses, trade fairs and exhibitions" and "other business and professional purposes". The term meetings industry is preferred by the International Congress and Convention Association (ICCA), Meeting Professionals International (MPI) and Reed Travel over the acronym MICE (Meetings, Incentives, Conferences and Exhibitions) which does not recognize the industrial nature of such activities.

Metadata : Data that defines and describes other data and processes.

MICE : See meetings industry.

Microdata : Non-aggregated observations, or measurements of characteristics of individual units.

Mirror statistics : Mirror statistics are used to conduct bilateral comparisons of two basic measures of a trade flow and are a traditional tool for detecting the causes of asymmetries in statistics (OECD GST, p. 335).

Mountain tourism : Mountain tourism is a type of tourism activity which takes place in a defined and limited geographical space such as hills or mountains with distinctive characteristics and attributes that are inherent to a specific landscape, topography, climate, biodiversity (flora and fauna) and local community. It encompasses a broad range of outdoor leisure and sports activities.

National tourism : National tourism comprises domestic tourism and outbound tourism, that is to say, the activities of resident visitors within and outside the country of reference, either as part of domestic or outbound tourism trips ( IRTS 2008, 2.40(b) ).

National tourism consumption : National tourism consumption is the tourism consumption of resident visitors, within and outside the economy of reference. It is the sum of domestic tourism consumption and outbound tourism consumption ( TSA:RMF 2008, figure 2.1 ).

National tourism expenditure : National tourism expenditure comprises all tourism expenditure of resident visitors within and outside the economy of reference. It is the sum of domestic tourism expenditure and outbound tourism expenditure ( IRTS 2008, 4.20(b) ).

Nationality : The concept of "country of residence" of a traveller is different from that of his/her nationality or citizenship ( IRTS 2008, 2.19 ).

Non-monetary indicators : Data measured in physical or other non-monetary units should not be considered a secondary part of a satellite account. They are essential components, both for the information they provide directly and in order to analyse the monetary data adequately ( SNA 2008, 29.84 ).

Observation unit : entity on which information is received and statistics are compiled.

Outbound tourism : Outbound tourism comprises the activities of a resident visitor outside the country of reference, either as part of an outbound tourism trip or as part of a domestic tourism trip ( IRTS 2008, 2.39(c) ).

Outbound tourism consumption : Outbound tourism consumption is the tourism consumption of a resident visitor outside the economy of reference ( TSA:RMF 2008, figure 2.1 ).

Outbound tourism expenditure : Outbound tourism expenditure is the tourism expenditure of a resident visitor outside the economy of reference ( IRTS 2008, 4.15(c) ).

Output : Output is defined as the goods and services produced by an establishment, a) excluding the value of any goods and services used in an activity for which the establishment does not assume the risk of using the products in production, and b) excluding the value of goods and services consumed by the same establishment except for goods and services used for capital formation (fixed capital or changes in inventories) or own final consumption ( SNA 2008, 6.89 ).

Output (main): The main output of a (productive) activity should be determined by reference to the value added of the goods sold or services rendered (ISIC rev.4, 114).

Pilot survey : The aim of a pilot survey is to test the questionnaire (pertinence of the questions, understanding of questions by those being interviewed, duration of the interview) and to check various potential sources for sampling and non-sampling errors: for instance, the place in which the surveys are carried out and the method used, the identification of any omitted answers and the reason for the omission, problems of communicating in various languages, translation, the mechanics of data collection, the organization of field work, etc.

Place of usual residence : The place of usual residence is the geographical place where the enumerated person usually resides, and is defined by the location of his/her principal dwelling (Principles and recommendations for population and housing censuses of the United Nations, 2.20 to 2.24).

Probability sample : A sample selected by a method based on the theory of probability (random process), that is, by a method involving knowledge of the likelihood of any unit being selected.

Production account : The production account records the activity of producing goods and services as defined within the SNA. Its balancing item, gross value added, is defined as the value of output less the value of intermediate consumption and is a measure of the contribution to GDP made by an individual producer, industry or sector. Gross value added is the source from which the primary incomes of the SNA are generated and is therefore carried forward into the primary distribution of income account. Value added and GDP may also be measured net by deducting consumption of fixed capital, a figure representing the decline in value during the period of the fixed capital used in a production process ( SNA 2008, 1.17 ).

Production : Economic production may be defined as an activity carried out under the control and responsibility of an institutional unit that uses inputs of labour, capital, and goods and services to produce outputs of goods or services ( SNA 2008, 6.24. ).

Purpose of a tourism trip (main): The main purpose of a tourism trip is defined as the purpose in the absence of which the trip would not have taken place ( IRTS 2008, 3.10. ). Classification of tourism trips according to the main purpose refers to nine categories: this typology allows the identification of different subsets of visitors (business visitors, transit visitors, etc.) See also destination of a tourism trip ( IRTS 2008, 3.14 ).

Quality of a tourism destination : Quality of a tourism destination is the result of a process which implies the satisfaction of all tourism product and service needs, requirements and expectations of the consumer at an acceptable price, in conformity with mutually accepted contractual conditions and the implicit underlying factors such as safety and security, hygiene, accessibility, communication, infrastructure and public amenities and services. It also involves aspects of ethics, transparency and respect towards the human, natural and cultural environment. Quality, as one of the key drivers of tourism competitiveness, is also a professional tool for organizational, operational and perception purposes for tourism suppliers.

Questionnaire and Questionnaire design : Questionnaire is a group or sequence of questions designed to elicit information on a subject, or sequence of subjects, from a reporting unit or from another producer of official statistics. Questionnaire design is the design (text, order, and conditions for skipping) of the questions used to obtain the data needed for the survey.

Reference period : The period of time or point in time to which the measured observation is intended to refer.

Relevance : The degree to which statistics meet current and potential users' needs.

Reliability : Closeness of the initial estimated value to the subsequent estimated value.

Reporting unit : Unit that supplies the data for a given survey instance, like a questionnaire or interview. Reporting units may, or may not, be the same as the observation unit.

Residents/non-residents : The residents of a country are individuals whose centre of predominant economic interest is located in its economic territory. For a country, the non-residents are individuals whose centre of predominant economic interest is located outside its economic territory.

Response and non-response : Response and non-response to various elements of a survey entail potential errors.

Response error : Response errors may be defined as those arising from the interviewing process. Such errors may be due to a number of circumstances, such as inadequate concepts or questions; inadequate training; interviewer failures; respondent failures.

Rural tourism : Rural tourism is a type of tourism activity in which the visitor's experience is related to a wide range of products generally linked to nature-based activities, agriculture, rural lifestyle / culture, angling and sightseeing. Rural tourism activities take place in non-urban (rural) areas with the following characteristics:

  • Low population density;
  • Landscape and land-use dominated by agriculture and forestry; and
  • Traditional social structure and lifestyle

Same-day visitor (or excursionist): A visitor (domestic, inbound or outbound) is classified as a tourist (or overnight visitor), if his/her trip includes an overnight stay, or as a same-day visitor (or excursionist) otherwise ( IRTS 2008, 2.13 ).

Sample : A subset of a frame where elements are selected based on a process with a known probability of selection.

Sample survey : A survey which is carried out using a sampling method.

Sampling error : That part of the difference between a population value and an estimate thereof, derived from a random sample, which is due to the fact that only a subset of the population is enumerated.

Satellite accounts : There are two types of satellite accounts, serving two different functions. The first type, sometimes called an internal satellite, takes the full set of accounting rules and conventions of the SNA but focuses on a particular aspect of interest by moving away from the standard classifications and hierarchies. Examples are tourism, coffee production and environmental protection expenditure. The second type, called an external satellite, may add non-economic data or vary some of the accounting conventions or both. It is a particularly suitable way to explore new areas in a research context. An example may be the role of volunteer labour in the economy ( SNA 2008, 29.85 ).

SDMX, Statistical Data and Metadata Exchange : Set of technical standards and content-oriented guidelines, together with an IT architecture and tools, to be used for the efficient exchange and sharing of statistical data and metadata (SDMX).

Seasonal adjustment : Seasonal adjustment is a statistical technique to remove the effects of seasonal calendar influences on a series. Seasonal effects usually reflect the influence of the seasons themselves, either directly or through production series related to them, or social conventions. Other types of calendar variation occur as a result of influences such as number of days in the calendar period, the accounting or recording practices adopted or the incidence of moving holidays.

Self-employment job : Self-employment jobs are those jobs where remuneration is directly dependent upon the profits (or the potential of profits) derived from the goods or services produced.

Self-employed with paid employees : Self-employed with paid employees are classified as employers.

Self-employed without employees : Self-employed without employees are classified as own-account workers.

Services : Services are the result of a production activity that changes the conditions of the consuming units, or facilitates the exchange of products or financial assets. They cannot be traded separately from their production. By the time their production is completed, they must have been provided to the consumers ( SNA 2008, 6.17 ).

Social transfers in kind : A special case of transfers in kind is that of social transfers in kind. These consist of goods and services provided by general government and non-profit institutions serving households (NPISHs) that are delivered to individual households. Health and education services are the prime examples. Rather than provide a specified amount of money to be used to purchase medical and educational services, the services are often provided in kind to make sure that the need for the services is met. (Sometimes the recipient purchases the service and is reimbursed by the insurance or assistance scheme. Such a transaction is still treated as being in kind because the recipient is merely acting as the agent of the insurance scheme) (SNA 2008, 3.83).

Sports tourism : Sports tourism is a type of tourism activity which refers to the travel experience of the tourist who either observes as a spectator or actively participates in a sporting event generally involving commercial and non-commercial activities of a competitive nature.

Standard classification : Classifications that follow prescribed rules and are generally recommended and accepted.

Statistical error : The unknown difference between the retained value and the true value.

Statistical indicator : A data element that represents statistical data for a specified time, place, and other characteristics, and is corrected for at least one dimension (usually size) to allow for meaningful comparisons.

Statistical metadata : Data about statistical data.

Statistical unit : Entity about which information is sought and about which statistics are compiled. Statistical units may be identifiable legal or physical entities or statistical constructs.

Survey : An investigation about the characteristics of a given population by means of collecting data from a sample of that population and estimating their characteristics through the systematic use of statistical methodology.

System of National Accounts : The System of National Accounts (SNA) is the internationally agreed standard set of recommendations on how to compile measures of economic activity in accordance with strict accounting conventions based on economic principles. The recommendations are expressed in terms of a set of concepts, definitions, classifications and accounting rules that comprise the internationally agreed standard for measuring indicators of economic performance. The accounting framework of the SNA allows economic data to be compiled and presented in a format that is designed for purposes of economic analysis, decision-taking and policymaking ( SNA 2008, 1.1 ).

Total tourism internal demand : Total tourism internal demand, is the sum of internal tourism consumption, tourism gross fixed capital formation and tourism collective consumption ( TSA:RMF 2008, 4.114 ). It does not include outbound tourism consumption.

Tourism : Tourism refers to the activity of visitors ( IRTS 2008, 2.9 ).

Tourism characteristic activities : Tourism characteristic activities are the activities that typically produce tourism characteristic products. As the industrial origin of a product (the ISIC industry that produces it) is not a criterion for the aggregation of products within a similar CPC category, there is no strict one-to-one relationship between products and the industries producing them as their principal outputs ( IRTS 2008, 5.11 ).

Tourism characteristic products : Tourism characteristic products are those that satisfy one or both of the following criteria: a) Tourism expenditure on the product should represent a significant share total tourism expenditure (share-of-expenditure/demand condition); b) Tourism expenditure on the product should represent a significant share of the supply of the product in the economy (share-of-supply condition). This criterion implies that the supply of a tourism characteristic product would cease to exist in meaningful quantity in the absence of visitors ( IRTS 2008, 5.10 ).

Tourism connected products : Their significance within tourism analysis for the economy of reference is recognized although their link to tourism is very limited worldwide. Consequently, lists of such products will be country-specific ( IRTS 2008, 5.12 ).

Tourism consumption : Tourism consumption has the same formal definition as tourism expenditure. Nevertheless, the concept of tourism consumption used in the Tourism Satellite Account goes beyond that of tourism expenditure. Besides the amount paid for the acquisition of consumption goods and services, as well as valuables for own use or to give away, for and during tourism trips, which corresponds to monetary transactions (the focus of tourism expenditure), it also includes services associated with vacation accommodation on own account, tourism social transfers in kind and other imputed consumption. These transactions need to be estimated using sources different from information collected directly from the visitors, such as reports on home exchanges, estimations of rents associated with vacation homes, calculations of financial intermediation services indirectly measured (FISIM), etc. ( TSA:RMF 2008, 2.25 ).

Tourism destination : A tourism destination is a physical space with or without administrative and/or analytical boundaries in which a visitor can spend an overnight. It is the cluster (co-location) of products and services, and of activities and experiences along the tourism value chain and a basic unit of analysis of tourism. A destination incorporates various stakeholders and can network to form larger destinations. It is also intangible with its image and identity which may influence its market competitiveness.

Tourism direct gross domestic product : Tourism direct gross domestic product (TDGDP) is the sum of the part of gross value added (at basic prices) generated by all industries in response to internal tourism consumption plus the amount of net taxes on products and imports included within the value of this expenditure at purchasers' prices ( TSA:RMF 2008, 4.96 ).

Tourism direct gross value added : Tourism direct gross value added (TDGVA) is the part of gross value added generated by tourism industries and other industries of the economy that directly serve visitors in response to internal tourism consumption ( TSA:RMF 2008, 4.88 ).

Tourism expenditure : Tourism expenditure refers to the amount paid for the acquisition of consumption goods and services, as well as valuables, for own use or to give away, for and during tourism trips. It includes expenditures by visitors themselves, as well as expenses that are paid for or reimbursed by others ( IRTS 2008, 4.2 ).

Tourism industries : The tourism industries comprise all establishments for which the principal activity is a tourism characteristic activity. Tourism industries (also referred to as tourism activities) are the activities that typically producetourism characteristic products. The term tourism industries is equivalent to tourism characteristic activities and the two terms are sometimes used synonymously in the IRTS 2008, 5.10, 5.11 and figure 5.1 .

Tourism product : A tourism product is a combination of tangible and intangible elements, such as natural, cultural and man-made resources, attractions, facilities, services and activities around a specific center of interest which represents the core of the destination marketing mix and creates an overall visitor experience including emotional aspects for the potential customers. A tourism product is priced and sold through distribution channels and it has a life-cycle.

Tourism ratio : For each variable of supply in the Tourism Satellite Account, the tourism ratiois the ratio between the total value of tourism share and total value of the corresponding variable in the Tourism Satellite Account expressed in percentage form ( TSA:RMF 2008, 4.56 ). (See also Tourism share).

Tourism Satellite Account : The Tourism Satellite Account is the second international standard on tourism statistics (Tourism Satellite Account: Recommended Methodological Framework 2008 –TSA:RMF 2008) that has been developed in order to present economic data relative to tourism within a framework of internal and external consistency with the rest of the statistical system through its link to the System of National Accounts. It is the basic reconciliation framework of tourism statistics. As a statistical tool for the economic accounting of tourism, the TSA can be seen as a set of 10 summary tables, each with their underlying data and representing a different aspect of the economic data relative to tourism: inbound, domestic tourism and outbound tourism expenditure, internal tourism expenditure, production accounts of tourism industries, the Gross Value Added (GVA) and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) attributable to tourism demand, employment, investment, government consumption, and non-monetary indicators.

Tourism Satellite Account aggregates : The compilation of the following aggregates, which represent a set of relevant indicators of the size of tourism in an economy is recommended ( TSA:RMF 2008, 4.81 ):

  • Internal tourism expenditure;
  • Internal tourism consumption;
  • Gross value added of tourism industries (GVATI);
  • Tourism direct gross value added (TDGVA);
  • Tourism direct gross domestic product (TDGDP).

Tourism sector : The tourism sector, as contemplated in the TSA, is the cluster of production units in different industries that provide consumption goods and services demanded by visitors. Such industries are called tourism industries because visitor acquisition represents such a significant share of their supply that, in the absence of visitors, their production of these would cease to exist in meaningful quantity.

Tourism share : Tourism share is the share of the corresponding fraction of internal tourism consumption in each component of supply ( TSA:RMF 2008, 4.51 ). For each industry, the tourism share of output (in value), is the sum of the tourism share corresponding to each product component of its output ( TSA:RMF 2008, 4.55 ). (See also Tourism ratio ).

Tourism single-purpose consumer durable goods : Tourism single-purpose consumer durables is a specific category of consumer durable goods that include durable goods that are used exclusively, or almost exclusively, by individuals while on tourism trips ( TSA:RMF 2008 , 2.41 and Annex 5 ).

Tourism trip : Trips taken by visitors are tourism trips ( IRTS 2008, 2.29 ).

Tourist (or overnight visitor): A visitor (domestic, inbound or outbound) is classified as a tourist (or overnight visitor), if his/her trip includes an overnight stay, or as a same-day visitor (or excursionist) otherwise ( IRTS 2008, 2.13 ).

Tourism value chain : The tourism value chain is the sequence of primary and support activities which are strategically fundamental for the performance of the tourism sector. Linked processes such as policy making and integrated planning, product development and packaging, promotion and marketing, distribution and sales and destination operations and services are the key primary activities of the tourism value chain. Support activities involve transport and infrastructure, human resource development, technology and systems development and other complementary goods and services which may not be related to core tourism businesses but have a high impact on the value of tourism.

Travel / traveller : Travel refers to the activity of travellers. A traveller is someone who moves between different geographic locations, for any purpose and any duration ( IRTS 2008, 2.4 ). The visitor is a particular type of traveller and consequently tourism is a subset of travel.

Travel group : A travel group is made up of individuals or travel parties travelling together: examples are people travelling on the same package tour or youngsters attending a summer camp ( IRTS 2008, 3.5 ).

Travel item (in balance of payments): Travel is an item of the goods and services account of the balance of payments: travel credits cover goods and services for own use or to give away acquired from an economy by non-residents during visits to that economy. Travel debits cover goods and services for own use or to give away acquired from other economies by residents during visits to other economies ( BPM6, 10.86 ).

Travel party : A travel party is defined as visitors travelling together on a trip and whose expenditures are pooled ( IRTS 2008, 3.2 ).

Trip : A trip refers to the travel by a person from the time of departure from his/her usual residence until he/she returns: it thus refers to a round trip. Trips taken by visitors are tourism trips.

Urban/city tourism : Urban/city tourism is a type of tourism activity which takes place in an urban space with its inherent attributes characterized by non-agricultural based economy such as administration, manufacturing, trade and services and by being nodal points of transport. Urban/city destinations offer a broad and heterogeneous range of cultural, architectural, technological, social and natural experiences and products for leisure and business.

Usual environment: The usual environment of an individual, a key concept in tourism, is defined as the geographical area (though not necessarily a contiguous one) within which an individual conducts his/her regular life routines ( IRTS 2008, 2.21 ).

Usual residence : The place of usual residence is the geographical place where the enumerated person usually resides (Principles and recommendations for population and housing censuses of the United Nations, 2.16 to 2.18).

Vacation home : A vacation home (sometimes also designated as a holiday home) is a secondary dwelling that is visited by the members of the household mostly for purposes of recreation, vacation or any other form of leisure ( IRTS 2008, 2.27 ).

Valuables : Valuables are produced goods of considerable value that are not used primarily for purposes of production or consumption but are held as stores of value over time ( SNA 2008, 10.13 ).

Visit : A trip is made up of visits to different places.The term "tourism visit" refers to a stay in a place visited during a tourism trip ( IRTS 2008, 2.7 and 2.33 ).

Visitor : A visitor is a traveller taking a trip to a main destination outside his/her usual environment, for less than a year, for any main purpose (business, leisure or other personal purpose) other than to be employed by a resident entity in the country or place visited ( IRTS 2008, 2.9 ). A visitor (domestic, inbound or outbound) is classified as a tourist (or overnight visitor), if his/her trip includes an overnight stay, or as a same-day visitor (or excursionist) otherwise ( IRTS 2008, 2.13 ).

Wellness tourism : Wellness tourism is a type of tourism activity which aims to improve and balance all of the main domains of human life including physical, mental, emotional, occupational, intellectual and spiritual. The primary motivation for the wellness tourist is to engage in preventive, proactive, lifestyle-enhancing activities such as fitness, healthy eating, relaxation, pampering and healing treatments.

EnglishBix

Travel and Tourism Vocabulary Words List – A to Z

Travel is something everyone loves to do. People like to explore new places, try out new cuisines, connect with people from the different geographic backgrounds. It helps them to understand how people live and also experience new things. 

tourism description words

We have prepared a list of common English words one would encounter while travelling from one place to another.

Travel Vocabulary Words for ESL Beginners

Englishbix has put together an entire list of words that contains relatable key terms and it’s significance in the tourism industry. Let’s have a look at tourism words and their meaning. To make it easy for you we have sorted the list from A to Z.

Tourism Vocabulary Words List

We hope that this guide will help you to get acquainted with words which are commonly used whenever you travel.

Keep Learning with EnglishBix!

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English Tourism Vocabulary and Exercises for Any Traveler

People who work in the travel industry around the world generally use English as a common language to communicate with international tourists.

Because there are so many jobs in tourism, there are many different types of tourism English . 

In this guide, I’ll show you some of the most useful vocabulary you’ll need to know for the tourism industry, so that you’ll be prepared for a range of situations!

Basic Vocabulary to Get You Started

Phrases to check for understanding, to double-check what you heard, to ask for clarification, to invite your guests to ask questions, common scenarios in tourism english, giving recommendations, providing directions and describing places, using simple “ice breakers” to make friendly small talk, exercises to improve your tourism vocabulary, and one more thing....

Download: This blog post is available as a convenient and portable PDF that you can take anywhere. Click here to get a copy. (Download)

Here’s a list of common tourism-related English words. You might be asked questions with these words, or you might need to use them yourself. Make sure you’re familiar with them and can use them in full sentences.

  • Attractions — places for tourists to see
  • Business district — also called the financial district, this is the center of the city where most offices are located
  • Entertainment district  — an area that has lots of clubs, bars, theaters, etc.
  • Dining district  — an area with a lot of restaurants
  • Custom — something that people do as part of their culture
  • Highlight — best part (of something) or an important part of an event or period of time
  • Scenery  — the setting for a place, natural beauty that you see around a place
  • Surroundings  — all of the things around you
  • Depart  — leave, take off
  • Arrive  — come to a place, reach a destination
  • Recommend  — give advice, suggest
  • Sit back and relax  — a common phrase to tell people to have a good time

If you work in the tourism industry, you probably have experience with miscommunication.

As a guide, host or receptionist, it’s your job to make sure that you’re double-checking for understanding. These phrases are simple and quick ways to make sure you and your guest are on the same page.

  • I heard you ask (about flights). Is that correct?
  • So, you said (you wanted to visit the ruins), right?
  • Okay, I understand that (your flight leaves at 3 PM). Is that correct?

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Even though you’re both speaking English, your guest may use vocabulary that you’re unfamiliar with. Likewise, they might have an accent that’s difficult for you to understand. Here are some polite ways to ask them to repeat or clarify what they said.

  • I’m sorry, I didn’t quite understand that. Can you say that again?
  • Pardon my English, but I didn’t quite understand that. Can you say that again?
  • I’m sorry, but I didn’t catch that. Can you describe what you mean?

Some cultures encourage people to be outspoken, while those from other parts of the world prefer people to act in a more reserved manner. Make all of your guests feel welcome by encouraging them to ask questions.

  • Does anyone have any questions?
  • Yes, sir / ma’am? Do you have a question?
  • Please feel free to raise your hand any time if you have a question.
  • So, any questions?

Depending on your job, you’ll probably be required to give directions to tourists, provide them with recommendations for a good restaurant or attraction and in general make friendly conversation that makes them feel welcome.

In these scenarios, you’ll play the part of the “guide,” but it could really be anyone a tourist might come in contact with. Practice these dialogues so that you feel confident using these words and phrases in your interactions.

  • For (authentic cuisine, family activities, etc), I recommend…
  • My favorite place is…
  • Personally, I suggest…

Tourist: Excuse me, do you know a good place for ice cream?

Guide: Oh, yes. For really good ice cream, I recommend “Maria’s.” It’s located about six blocks from here, and it’s my favorite place. Personally, I suggest the chocolate cherry flavor, but they’re famous for their award-winning lemon flavor. I think your family will like it.

Tourist: Great, thanks!

  • Go straight
  • Stop at the…
  • Continue until…
  • Take the (subway, bus, etc.)
  • Follow the signs for…

Points of reference

  • At the traffic light
  • At the next (street, light, block, etc.)
  • In (five) blocks
  • Near the (hotel, beach, station, etc.)
  • On the main plaza

Tourist: Can you tell me how to get to the theater?

Guide: Sure! The theater is near the train station. You need to go straight down this street for one block. At the next street, turn left. Continue until you see a sign for the theater, in about five blocks. If you’re lost, you can follow the signs for the train station. Does that make sense?

Tourist: Yes, thank you!

Here’s a helpful video  to practice basic phrases for giving directions.

Here are some phrases that you can use when you want to get to know the tourists a little bit better.

  • So, are you enjoying your time in (Paris) so far?
  • Tell me, what is your favorite part of the city so far?
  • I’m curious, do you think this city seems friendly?
  • Tell me, what do you think of the (architecture, food, beach, festival, etc.)?

Each chapter is filled with  different tourism-related scenarios that you’re likely to encounter . The series is designed like a language course to steadily grow your skills. Try to find half an hour every day to read a chapter and complete the associated exercises.

  • Follow English Speakers on X (Twitter). More specifically, follow English speakers who work in the travel industry. This will help you naturally absorb English tourism vocabulary, plus today’s big topics in the world of travel.

@TravelEditor :  Full of great travel advice and destination information. She also likes to tweet travel questions and talk with her followers.

@Just1WayTicket :  Want some ideas of where to go next? Check out beautiful pictures and helpful information posted on this account.

@GettingStamped :  Great profile for learning about popular tourist destinations, as well as what tourists like to do while traveling abroad.

And remember, if you really want to  use Twitter to sharpen your English skills , you need to do more than just read tweets.  Engage in discussions as well!  Not only will that make using Twitter more fun, but it’ll also require you to learn and use new words during your chats back and forth with others.

/r/Travel :  Reddit has always been a great place for English language learners to  practice their written English with people all over the world . The travel  sub (Reddit slang for “forum”) is a great place to talk about everything related to tourism. Think of it as more like chatting about tourism rather than answering specific questions.

If you’re a hospitality professional, you’ll want to check out Oxford University Press’  free   online workbook series,  English for Careers . There, you’ll see English for Tourism exercises divided up into three different skill levels, along with various other careers.

Try spending as little as 30 minutes a day using Memrise to brush up on your tourism vocabulary—you’ll notice a difference!

Soon you’ll be able to communicate with any tourist who crosses your path!

If you like learning English through movies and online media, you should also check out FluentU. FluentU lets you learn English from popular talk shows, catchy music videos and funny commercials , as you can see here:

learn-english-with-videos

If you want to watch it, the FluentU app has probably got it.

The FluentU app and website makes it really easy to watch English videos. There are captions that are interactive. That means you can tap on any word to see an image, definition, and useful examples.

learn-english-with-subtitled-television-show-clips

FluentU lets you learn engaging content with world famous celebrities.

For example, when you tap on the word "searching," you see this:

learn-conversational-english-with-interactive-captioned-dialogue

FluentU lets you tap to look up any word.

Learn all the vocabulary in any video with quizzes. Swipe left or right to see more examples for the word you’re learning.

practice-english-with-adaptive-quizzes

FluentU helps you learn fast with useful questions and multiple examples. Learn more.

The best part? FluentU remembers the vocabulary that you’re learning. It gives you extra practice with difficult words—and reminds you when it’s time to review what you’ve learned. You have a truly personalized experience.

Start using the FluentU website on your computer or tablet or, better yet, download the FluentU app from the iTunes or Google Play store. Click here to take advantage of our current sale! (Expires at the end of this month.)

Enter your e-mail address to get your free PDF!

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tourism description words

Describing Words Logo

Describing Words

tourism description words

This tool helps you find adjectives for things that you're trying to describe. Also check out ReverseDictionary.org and RelatedWords.org . Here are some adjectives for tourism : . You can get the definitions of these tourism adjectives by clicking on them. You might also like some words related to tourism (and find more here ).

Sort By Usage Frequency

Click words for definitions.

Loading you some adjectives... Won't be much longer! :)

Words to Describe tourism

Below is a list of describing words for tourism . You can sort the descriptive words by uniqueness or commonness using the button above. Sorry if there's a few unusual suggestions! The algorithm isn't perfect, but it does a pretty good job for most common nouns. Here's the list of words that can be used to describe tourism :

  • consequently physical
  • british and turkish
  • religious and cultural
  • small-scale
  • self-referential
  • twenty-first-century
  • interstellar
  • international
  • substantial
  • transparent

Popular Searches

As you've probably noticed, adjectives for " tourism " are listed above. Hopefully the above generated list of words to describe tourism suits your needs.

If you're getting strange results, it may be that your query isn't quite in the right format. The search box should be a simple word or phrase, like "tiger" or "blue eyes". A search for words to describe "people who have blue eyes" will likely return zero results. So if you're not getting ideal results, check that your search term, " tourism " isn't confusing the engine in this manner.

Note also that if there aren't many tourism adjectives, or if there are none at all, it could be that your search term has an abiguous part-of-speech. For example, the word "blue" can be an noun and an adjective. This confuses the engine and so you might not get many adjectives describing it. I may look into fixing this in the future. You might also be wondering: What type of word is tourism ?

The idea for the Describing Words engine came when I was building the engine for Related Words (it's like a thesaurus, but gives you a much broader set of related words, rather than just synonyms). While playing around with word vectors and the " HasProperty " API of conceptnet, I had a bit of fun trying to get the adjectives which commonly describe a word. Eventually I realised that there's a much better way of doing this: parse books!

Project Gutenberg was the initial corpus, but the parser got greedier and greedier and I ended up feeding it somewhere around 100 gigabytes of text files - mostly fiction, including many contemporary works. The parser simply looks through each book and pulls out the various descriptions of nouns.

Hopefully it's more than just a novelty and some people will actually find it useful for their writing and brainstorming, but one neat little thing to try is to compare two nouns which are similar, but different in some significant way - for example, gender is interesting: " woman " versus " man " and " boy " versus " girl ". On an inital quick analysis it seems that authors of fiction are at least 4x more likely to describe women (as opposed to men) with beauty-related terms (regarding their weight, features and general attractiveness). In fact, "beautiful" is possibly the most widely used adjective for women in all of the world's literature, which is quite in line with the general unidimensional representation of women in many other media forms . If anyone wants to do further research into this, let me know and I can give you a lot more data (for example, there are about 25000 different entries for "woman" - too many to show here).

The blueness of the results represents their relative frequency. You can hover over an item for a second and the frequency score should pop up. The "uniqueness" sorting is default, and thanks to my Complicated Algorithm™, it orders them by the adjectives' uniqueness to that particular noun relative to other nouns (it's actually pretty simple). As you'd expect, you can click the "Sort By Usage Frequency" button to adjectives by their usage frequency for that noun.

Special thanks to the contributors of the open-source mongodb which was used in this project.

Please note that Describing Words uses third party scripts (such as Google Analytics and advertisements) which use cookies. To learn more, see the privacy policy .

Recent Queries

tourism description words

29 travel words that describe travel better than you ever thought possible

Travellers in Bolivia

We love travelling and we love words, so imagine our surprise when we came across a massive treasure trove of travel words that describe how we feel before, during and after we travel better than anything we’ve ever seen, ever. In the history of everything.

These literary gems make ‘wanderlust’ look like an overrated show pony. Which it is. Travel brochures of the future will be littered with the likes of resfeber, eudaimonia and fernweh. At least, they will if we have anything to do with it.

TAKE IT AWAY, WORDS!

1. Trouvaille (n.)

Origin: French

Something lovely discovered by chance, like stumbling on a waterfall in Costa Rica .

2. Dérive (n.)

Origin: Latin/French

Lit. “drift”; a spontaneous journey where the traveller leaves their life behind for a time to let the spirit of the landscape and architecture attract and move them.

Girl on the Quarry Trail in Peru

Dériving along the Quarry Trail. Photo by Stephen Parry.

DÉRIVE YOUR WAY AROUND SOUTH AMERICA ON A SMALL GROUP ADVENTURE NOW 

3. Numinous (adj.)

Origin: Latin

Describing an experience that makes you fearful yet fascinated, awed yet attracted; the powerful, personal feeling of being overwhelmed and inspired. For example, you may have a numinous experience at Yosemite National Park , gazing up in wonder at El Capitan, or at a towering black bear.

4. Cockaigne (n.)

Origin: French, medieval trope

An imaginary land of luxury and idleness. Think House Tyrell of Highgarden, minus the poisoning.

5. Schwellenangst (n.)

Origin: German

Fear of embarking on something new; fear of crossing a threshold. But you know what? You should totally just go with it, and cross that threshold.

A man backflips off a sand dune

Getting all Strikhedonia in Jordan. Photo by tegan & nathan.

6. Strikhedonia (n.)

Origin: Greek

The pleasure of being able to say “to hell with it”. Try it now. Head to our North America page  and shriek ‘Strikhedonia’ immediately before booking a trip.

7. Resfeber (n.)

Origin: Swedish

The restless race of the traveller’s heart before the journey begins when anxiety and anticipation are tangled together; a ‘travel fever’ that can manifest as an illness. The only cure is another grand adventure.

8. Vagary (n.)

An unpredictable instance, a wandering journey; a whimsical, wild or unusual idea, desire, or action.

ESCAPE THE VAGARIES OF LIFE ON, SAY, A SMALL GROUP ADVENTURE IN AFRICA

Girl walks through shrine in Japan.

Embracing eudaimonia in Japan. Photo by Stephen Parry.

9. Eudaimonia (n.)

Lit. “human flourishing”; a contented state of being happy, healthy and prosperous. For example, you are pretty much guaranteed to experience eudaimonia as you watch the sun rise above the ocean in Playa del Carmen .

10. Quaquaversal (adj.)

Moving or happening in every direction instantaneously. It’s a little like when you think your passport’s in your sock drawer but it’s not and your flight’s leaving in three hours.

11. Novaturient (adj.)

Desiring or seeking powerful change in one’s life, behaviour, or situation.

Young travellers in the jungle.

Happily quaquaversal in Guatemala. Photo by Nathan Landers.

12. Sehnsucht (n.)

“The inconsolable longing in the human heart for we know now what”; a yearning for a far, familiar, non-earthly land one can identify as one’s home.

13. Ecophobia (n.)

Origin: English

A fear or dislike of one’s home.

14. Eleutheromania (n.)

An intense and irresistible desire for freedom. Pretty much describes every picture of the Greek Islands  we’ve ever seen.

Trevi Fountain

Livsnjutare in Italy. Photo by The Common Wanderer

15. Livsnjutare (n.)

One who loves life deeply and lives it to the extreme.

16. Solivagant (adj.)

Wandering alone. Although we think it’s better when you’re solivagant with a small group of other solivagant types.

17. Saudade (n.)

Origin: Portuguese

A nostalgic longing to be near again to something or someone that is distant or that has been loved and then lost; “the love that remains”. For example, I have a nostalgic longing for Turkish Delight right now.

Girl at night market

Having eunoia in Vietnam. Photo by Damien Raggatt.

18. Eunoia (n.)

Beautiful thinking; a good mind. My love of Turkish Delight proves I have eunoia (or does it?).

19. Sturmfrei (adj.)

Origin: Germany

Lit. “stormfree”; the freedom of not being watched by a parent or superior; being alone at a place and having the ability to do what you want. Like eating 18 waffles in a day in Belgium .

20. Yoko meshi (n.)

Origin: Japan

The peculiar stress of speaking a foreign language (literally means ‘a meal eaten sideways’). If you’ve ever tried to order ramen in one of Tokyo’s  laneway bars, you’ll know exactly what this means.

Two people in bright clothes

Selcouth outfits in the Sacred Valley. Photo by Stephen Parry.

21. Selcouth (adj.)

Unfamiliar, rare, strange, and yet marvellous, like adding cheese to your coffee in Colombia .

22. Fernweh (n.)

An ache for distance places; the craving for travel; the opposite of homesickness. Also one of Instagram’s most popular hashtags.

23. Yūgen (n.)

An awareness of the universe that triggers emotional responses too deep and mysterious for words.

Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe

It’s hard not to feel yūgen in a place like this. Photo by Damien Raggatt.

24. Commuovere (v.)

Origin: Italy

Only in Italy  would you find such a sensual word meaning to stir, to touch, to move to tears. Possibly while eating a giant slice of thin-crust pizza.

SUBSCRIBE TO INTREPID’S NEWSLETTER FOR TRAVEL TIPS, COMPETITIONS, GIVEAWAYS & MORE

25. Peregrinate (v.)

To wander from place to place. AKA travel. It’s the very definition. Think of a falcon and BE THE FALCON by embracing its love of flying immediately.

26. Nemophilist (n.)

One who is fond of forests; a haunter of the woods. Not like a spooky ghost; more like a guy with a top-knot who enjoys spending his weekends writing poetry under an old oak tree and drinking black coffee from a vintage thermos.

Girl standing on a rock

Peripatetic over a rock. photo by Phoebe Escott-Kenny.

27. Peripatetic (n.)

A person who spends his or her time wandering. There’s nothing pathetic about being peripatetic – we embrace the wanderers wholeheartedly.

GET PERIPATETIC IN THE MIDDLE EAST. EXPLORE OUR RANGE OF ADVENTURES NOW

28. Hireath (n.)

Origin: Welsh

A homesickness for a home that you can’t return to, a home that perhaps never was. Which is kind of a downer, but a good excuse to keep travelling.

29. Gadabout (n.)

A person who travels often, and for pleasure. Something we should all aspire to, right? Be professional gadabouters? Update your LinkedIn profiles now, gang.

Now you’ve got the lingo, USE IT! Impress your friends with your newfound vocabulary on a small group adventure with Intrepid .

Feeling inspired?

tourism description words

Intrepid Travel

Intrepid has been leading small group adventures for over 30 years. We’re the world’s biggest travel B Corp. That means we want to be the best travel company not just in the world, but for the world. To create positive change through the joy of travel. You can read our latest adventures right here.

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Tale of 2 Backpackers

Unusual & Creative Travel Words that you must know in 2019

Blogging Tips & SEO

Creative travel words

Last Updated on: Oct 10, 2023  

About this blog: This contains 38 unique and creative travel words that you can use in your travel vocabulary. Use them in your travel captions or use them for naming your blog . 

Oh, yes! We love to travel. And we love to get amazed at new experiences. We love to look over in awe at the jaw-dropping scenery before us. At times, words fail. The feeling, the emotions that we encounter after scaling a summit, or after having a scuba diving experience cannot often be described with words. I am sure all of us have these moments when we fall short of words. But there are some beautiful and creative travel words that describe these various feelings very well. Some of these words might not have English equivalents.

As a traveller and writer, I often keep looking for words to describe my feelings. The more I look into these words, the more I fall in love with them. These words have such powerful emotions and feelings! So we decided to share some of our favourite unusual and creative travel words with you.

UNUSUAL AND CREATIVE TRAVEL WORDS

Peregrinate (v.).

Origin: Latin

Definition: To travel or wander around from place to place

travel words with beautiful meanings-peregrinate

The feeling we have whenever we are visiting any new place. We love to wander around and discover the hidden and not so hidden gems. And Darjeeling happens to be one of our favourite places to wander around. What’s yours?

Nemophilist (n.)

Origin: English

Definition: One who is fond of the forest

travel words with beautiful meanings-nemophilist

Serendipity (n.)

Definition: The fact of finding interesting or valuable by chance

travel words with beautiful meaning-serendipity

Trouvaille (n.)

Origin: French

Definition: Something lovely discovered by chance

travel word with beautiful meaning - trouvaille - blog name ideas

These two words are so close to our hearts. That we would be together was destiny, but our meeting was definitely serendipity! We had been travelling together for a long time, but it was only after our Amarnath Yatra , that we truly realized what travel means to us and what we actually want of our life.

Eudaimonia (n.)

Origin: Greek

Definition: The contented happy state when you travel

unusual-travel-words-eudaimonia

Eleutheromania (n.)

Definition: The intense desire for freedom

unusual-travel-words-eleutheromania

These two Greek words so wonderfully summarize our feeling when we travel. Travelling makes us contented and happy.

Sonder (n.)

Origin: Unknown

Definition: The realization that each random passerby is living a life as vivid and complex as your own

unusual-travel-words-sonder

Resfeber (n.)

Origin: Swedish

Definition: The tangled feelings of fear and excitement before a journey

unusual-travel-words-resfeber - blog name ideas

This always happens before a journey. There is a perpetual state of excitement as well as nervousness before I start any journey. And I enjoy both the state.

Before our trip to Uzbekistan, I had a bad case of travel anxiety after I read about Airbnb scams. It was only after I found out methods to detect Airbnb scam , I caught a break.

Fernweh (n.)

Origin: German

Definition: An urge to travel even stronger than wanderlust ; farsickness

unusual-travel-words-fernweh-domain-name-ideas

Dérive (n.)

Definition: To drift unplanned, only led by the landscape and architect around you.

unusual-travel-words-dérive

Have you done this? Have you travelled without any fixed plan? Often it is the unexpectedness of a journey that makes it even better. When we went to Majuli , we did not know where we would visit next. It was an impromptu decision to next visit Meghalaya . And this time we decided to give Shillong and Cherrapunji a miss and visit the offbeat places in Meghalaya . It was surely a memorable trip!

Solivagant (adj.)

Definition: Wandering alone. A solitary adventurer who travels and wanders the globe.

unusual-travel-words-solivagant

Strikhedonia (n.)

Definition: The joy of being able to say “to hell with it”

unusual-travel-words-strikhedonia

The feeling we had when we visited Ladakh !

Numinous (n.)

Definition: The powerful, personal feeling of being overwhelmed and inspired

unusual-travel-words-numinous

I had this feeling when I trekked the Rupin Pass summit . It was an overwhelming experience to stand there and look at the Kinner-Kailash range before me.

Forelsket (n.)

Origin: Norwegian

Definition: The euphoria you experience when you are first falling in love

unusual-travel-words-forelsket

This is such a beautiful and creative travel word. The first time we fell in love with each other, it was confusing. But the tangled emotion that I was feeling at that time was probably known as “forelsket”! And I think it is the same feeling when we fall in love with each other after completing every trek or doing something that we never thought we would do.

Hireath (n.)

Origin: Welsh

Definition: A homesickness for a home which you cannot return, a home which maybe never was.

unusual-travel-words-hireath

Sehnsucht (n.)

Definition: A wistful longing and yearning in the heart for travels that have been and travels to come.

unusual-travel-words-sehnsucht

Livsnjutare (n.)

Definition: Someone who loves life deeply and enjoys life

unusual-travel-words-livsnjutare

Sturmfrei (n.)

Definition: The freedom of being alone and having the ability to do whatever you want.

unusual-travel-words-sturmfrei

Sometimes, being alone is the best thing that we can gift ourselves.

Coddiwomple (v.)

Definition: To travel in a purposeful manner towards a vague destination

unusual-travel-words-coddiwomple

Nefelibata (n.)

Origin: Portugese

Definition: One who lives in the cloud of their own imagination; an unconventional person

unusual-travel-words-nefelibata

This word so describes me. I love to live in my own imagination.

Hodophile (adj.)

Definition: A lover of roads. One who loves to travel.

unusual-travel-words-hodophile

Schwellenangst (n.)

Definition: Fear of crossing a threshold to embark on something new.

unusual-travel-words-schwellenangst

Don’t we all have the fear while starting anything new? It might be a new job, or a new life at a different city, or even changing our lifestyle. I was always very complacent with my life with a high paying job. But there was a void somewhere. Even after I knew that I have to take the leap, the fear hold me back. The fear of uncertainty was keeping me back from doing what I loved.

Today, I have crossed that threshold. And let me tell you the joy that it brings is totally worth all the difficulties and problems and hard work that went. What is the fear that is holding you back?

Vagary (v.)

Definition: A wandering or roaming journey

unusual-travel-words-vagary

Saudade (n.)

Definition: A nostalgic longing to be near something or someone who is distant.

unusual-travel-words-saudade

Origin: Danish

Definition: The cosy feeling you get when you are enjoying the good things in life with friends

unusual-travel-words-hygge

Commuovere (v.)

Origin: Italian

Definition: To stir, to touch, to move to tears

unusual-travel-words-commuovere

The feeling we had after completing the Chadar Frozen River Trek .

Origin: Japanese

Definition: A profound and mysterious sense of the beauty of the universe

creative travel words-yūgen

Definition: Awareness of how little of the world you will experience

Travel words with beautiful meaning-onism

These two words sum it all. The universe, the world is so mysteriously beautiful. We can feel and experience only a part of this beauty!

Petrichor (n.)

Definition: The smell of earth after rain

travel words with beautiful meaning -petrichor-domain-name-ideas

Flâuner (n.)

Definition: A person of leisure, deliberately aimless, simply wandering the streets, soaking in the city

travel words with beautiful meaning-flâuner

Whenever we visit any city, we love to walk around. It is the best way to discover the charm of a city. We loved to roam around Yangon and explore the city on foot discovering its gems, hidden or otherwise!

Sometimes Kolkata , our hometown does this to us. We simply wander around, soaking in the little delights, wandering around the lanes and bye lanes and falling in love over and over again with the city. And so does Delhi !

Jijivisha (n.)

Origin: Sanskrit

Definition: The strong eternal desire to live and continue living

creative-travel-words-jijivisha

Rasasvada (n.)

Definition: The taste of bliss in the absence of all thoughts

creative-travel-words-rasasvada

Exactly what we felt after seeing the Everest and Kanchenjunga ranges in front of us from the Phalut. The Sandakphu-Phalut Trek is a great experience.

Smultronställe(n.)

Definition: Lit. “ Place of wild strawberries ”; a special place discovered, treasured, returned to for solace and relaxation; a personal idyll free from stress and sadness.

creative-travel-words-smultronställe

Darjeeling and Sikkim is our “place of wild strawberries”. What is yours?

Querencia (adj.)

Origin: Spanish

Definition: A place where one feels safe, A place where one feels at home

creative-travel-words-querencia

Musafir (n.)

Origin: Urdu

Definition: Traveller

creative-travel-words-musafir

Vuslat (n.)

Origin: Turkish

Definition: A union or reunion after being apart for a long time with one’s beloved

This is one of my favourite creative travel words.

creative-travel-words-vuslat

Thalassophile (n.)

Definition: A lover of ocean

creative-travel-words-thalassophile

Waldeinsamkeit (n.)

Definition: The feeling of being alone in the woods

creative-travel-words-waldeinsamkeit

So did you find your travel inspiration from these beautiful and unusual travel words? What is your favourite? Let us know in comments.

Pin this post for a later dose of inspiration!

unusual travel words with beautiful meanings

Agni Amrita

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26 comments.

Amazing list! This should keep me busy for a while. I would like to add French noun Flânerie – Aimless strolling or sauntering without a set plan or defined destination; walking at a leisurely pace, simply observing as you’re being taken along. Sometimes I write about similar topics. Here is an example post I wrote in case you or any of your readers find it interesting. Our content complements each other nicely, perhaps we can collab in some way in the future. Keep up the good work. Can’t wait to see something new from you! Cheers!

Thank you so much for the comment and another beautiful word. You blog is amazing too. Maybe we can connect over for a collab in some way. Looking forward.

Excellent post..very informative!!

Always admire your writting skills and this time thanks for introducing new words in my dictionary. Great way to increase ones vocabulary with pictures origin and all.

Thank you Pallavi. So glad that you liked the post.

Thanks for enhancing my vocabulary.. none them was familiar to me so far.

Thank you Sapna! I did not know a few before writing this.

Wow that made for an interesting read. Adding them to my dictionary right away!

Thanks so much.

Woow so many beautiful, unique travel words i am unaware off. Love it

Thank you Gurjeet!

Such words , very useful must say. I love to read and learn new things. These will definitely help me to increase my vocab.

Thank you Pamela!

That is a very unique topic for a blog. Though I would want to identify myself with all the term, but I find myself closest to be a Nemophilist and Trouvaille. I also identify with Resfeber. No matter how much I have travelled, I still get a little nervous (and excited) before a foreign trip.

Thanks Abhinav. I can understand that nervous and excited feeling before a foreign trip!

Thanks for sharing this, great to know these word and their meaning. And yes I can say now I am Nemophilist. 🙂

Thank you Sundeep!

I am not just inspired but so well educated too now. Y next travel will now be so well-informed.

Thank you Sanjay!

This post was such a treat! I love travel and I love words, and it was nice to recognise a few that I knew, and learn new ones that I didn’t!

Thank you so much! So glad that you liked the post.

These are indeed words that provide full expression to the meaning of travel. Thanks for adding to my vocabulary. this is indeed the serendipity of reading travel blogs.

Thank you Sandy and Vyjay!

Brilliant post, some of these descriptive words I read for the first time. Bookmarked for future reference. Thanks for Sharing.

Thank you Anahita. Glad that you liked the post.

If you love to travel and excited to know different places in world then pack your bag and travel to India. India the birth place of yoga. Good for peace your mind and relaxing body.

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tourism description words

Advanced Adjectives To Describe Travel Experiences

  • Post author: Harry
  • Post last modified: 10/02/2024
  • Post category: English Vocabulary
  • Reading time: 8 mins read

Learn English adjectives to describe travel or travel experience. I will also give you the nouns that collocate with these adjectives.

Learning these adjectives will help you improve your vocabulary in English.

Listen to the podcast Speak Better English with Harry or watch it on YouTube at Learn English with Harry . englishclass101

List of adjective to talk about travel

Adjectives to describe travel experiences.

Harry

In this lesson, I have 10 adjectives for you that will help you describe your travel experience.

And because these adjectives are connected with travel or travel experiences, a lot of them will collocate with very similar words.

But at least they’ll give you a choice of words with which you can use them. I’ll try and give you some of those popular collocations.

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Meaning: leaves an impression, something lasting in your memory

  • impressive hotel
  • impressive reception area
  • impressive setting
  • impressive entrance

The main architecture is very, very old, but it is really clean and well maintained. The whole look of the hotel is impressive.

When you walk into the reception area, it is impressive. Everything about the entrance, and the setting is very impressive. 

Meaning: something that gives you a lot of information, something that you didn’t know about

  • remarkable gallery
  • remarkable exhibition
  • remarkable museum
  • remarkable information

A remarkable gallery! I really didn’t know anything about him before I visited this gallery.

The information I got was really remarkable. I can use it in my lessons for my students in the history classes.

English adjectives to describe travel experiences. Advanced English lessons on Zoom and Skype. #learnenglish

Meaning: quality, better than average, amazing

  • superb food
  • superb menu
  • superb weather
  • superb facilities

It was superb food every night, there was always the chef’s choice on the menu.

If I wanted one word to describe the holiday, it was superb.

  • astonishing

Meaning: something that shocks us or surprises us in a positive way

  • astonishing experience
  • astonishing details
  • astonishing transformation

Breakfast was excellent. It’s astonishing how much food you can eat when you’re on holiday.

The amount of food I ate was astonishing.

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Meaning: really, really beautiful

  • stunning view
  • stunning hotel
  • stunning museum

When we visited this place for the first time, we were completely taken aback. The views were stunning.

The museum was stunning. Last year it won an award for its architecture.

Meaning: impressive, exciting

  • dramatic view
  • dramatic journey
  • dramatic events

When you look down, it’s quite dramatic. The water falls down several hundred metres, and then the spray comes back up again.

The plane journey turned out to be dramatic. There was a lot of turbulence.

Meaning: unusual and interesting

  • exotic fruit
  • exotic location
  • exotic tree
  • exotic animal

I’m not sure about their honeymoon. I think they picked some exotic location in the Caribbean.

Meaning: unusual or different, something you haven’t done before

  • unique experience
  • unique tradition
  • unique exhibition

For me, going on a cruise ship would be a unique experience because I haven’t done it before.

The tea ceremony in Japan is a unique tradition only known to the Japanese.

English adjectives to describe travel experiences. Advanced English lessons on Zoom and Skype. #learnenglish

  • breathtaking

Meaning: really beautiful, very impressive

  • breathtaking view
  • breathtaking drive
  • breathtaking interior
  • breathtaking scenery

When I got off the cable car at the top of the mountain, the views were breathtaking.

When walking around Niagara Falls, the scenery is simply breathtaking.

Meaning: something that you are going to remember in the future

  • memorable holiday
  • memorable honeymoon
  • memorable dinner
  • memorable occasion

We had a really memorable honeymoon. We spent a lot of money, but it was wonderful, really memorable.

The hiking trip was really memorable. We climbed over a mountain and visited places that we hadn’t expected to see.

Our dinner on Friday night was memorable. It was a clear night, and we could see different places.

Here are the advanced English adjectives to describe travel experiences. Let me give them to you one more time:

I hope, you enjoyed this lesson. Try to use them in your conversational English. If you need help, come back to me and I’ll give you more examples.

You can book advanced English lessons on Zoom or Skype at englishlessonviaskype.com

Thanks for listening. Join me again soon.

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Chapter 1. History and Overview

1.1 What is Tourism?

Before engaging in a study of tourism , let’s have a closer look at what this term means.

Definition of Tourism

There are a number of ways tourism can be defined, and for this reason, the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) embarked on a project from 2005 to 2007 to create a common glossary of terms for tourism. It defines tourism as follows:

Tourism is a social, cultural and economic phenomenon which entails the movement of people to countries or places outside their usual environment for personal or business/professional purposes. These people are called visitors (which may be either tourists or excursionists; residents or non-residents) and tourism has to do with their activities, some of which imply tourism expenditure (United Nations World Tourism Organization, 2008).

Using this definition, we can see that tourism is not just the movement of people for a number of purposes (whether business or pleasure), but the overall agglomeration of activities, services, and involved sectors that make up the unique tourist experience.

Tourism, Travel, and Hospitality: What are the Differences?

It is common to confuse the terms tourism , travel , and hospitality or to define them as the same thing. While tourism is the all-encompassing umbrella term for the activities and industry that create the tourist experience, the UNWTO (2020) defines travel as the activity of moving between different locations often for any purpose but more so for leisure and recreation (Hall & Page, 2006). On the other hand, hospitality can be defined as “the business of helping people to feel welcome and relaxed and to enjoy themselves” (Discover Hospitality, 2015, p. 3). Simply put, the hospitality industry is the combination of the accommodation and food and beverage groupings, collectively making up the largest segment of the industry (Go2HR, 2020). You’ll learn more about accommodations and F & B in Chapter 3 and Chapter 4 , respectively.

Definition of Tourist and Excursionist

Building on the definition of tourism, a commonly accepted description of a tourist is “someone who travels at least 80 km from his or her home for at least 24 hours, for business or leisure or other reasons” (LinkBC, 2008, p.8). The United Nations World Tourism Organization (1995) helps us break down this definition further by stating tourists can be:

  • Domestic (residents of a given country travelling only within that country)
  • Inbound (non-residents travelling in a given country)
  • Outbound (residents of one country travelling in another country)

Excursionists  on the other hand are considered same-day visitors (UNWTO, 2020). Sometimes referred to as “day trippers.” Understandably, not every visitor stays in a destination overnight. It is common for travellers to spend a few hours or less to do sightseeing, visit attractions, dine at a local restaurant, then leave at the end of the day.

The scope of tourism, therefore, is broad and encompasses a number of activities and sectors.

Spotlight On: United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO)

UNWTO is the United Nations agency responsible “for the promotion of responsible, sustainable and universally accessible tourism” (UNWTO, 2014b). Its membership includes 159 countries and over 500 affiliates such as private companies, research and educational institutions, and non-governmental organizations. It promotes tourism as a way of developing communities while encouraging ethical behaviour to mitigate negative impacts. For more information, visit the UNWTO website .

NAICS: The North American Industry Classification System

Given the sheer size of the tourism industry, it can be helpful to break it down into broad industry groups using a common classification system. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) was jointly created by the Canadian, US, and Mexican governments to ensure common analysis across all three countries (British Columbia Ministry of Jobs, Tourism and Skills Training, 2013a). The tourism-related groupings created using NAICS are (in alphabetical order):

  • Accommodation
  • Food and beverage services (commonly known as “F & B”)
  • Recreation and entertainment
  • Transportation
  • Travel services

These industry groups (also commonly known as sectors) are based on the similarity of the “labour processes and inputs” used for each (Government of Canada, 2013). For instance, the types of employees and resources required to run an accommodation business whether it be a hotel, motel, or even a campground are quite similar. All these businesses need staff to check in guests, provide housekeeping, employ maintenance workers, and provide a place for people to sleep. As such, they can be grouped together under the heading of accommodation. The same is true of the other four groupings, and the rest of this text explores these industry groups, and other aspects of tourism, in more detail.

Two female front desk employees speak to a male guest in a hotel lobby.

It is typical for the entire tourist experience to involve more than one sector. The combination of sectors that supply and distribute the needed tourism products, services, and activities within the tourism system is called the Tourism Supply Chain. Often, these chains of sectors and activities are dependent upon each other’s delivery of products and services. Let’s look at a simple example below that describes the involved and sometimes overlapping sectoral chains in the tourism experience:

Tourism supply chain. Long description available.

Before we seek to understand the five tourism sectors in more detail, it’s important to have an overview of the history and impacts of tourism to date.

Long Descriptions

Figure 1.2 long description: Diagram showing the tourism supply chain. This includes the phases of travel and the sectors and activities involved during each phase.

There are three travel phases: pre-departure, during travel, and post-departure.

Pre-departure, tourists use the travel services and transportation sectors.

During travel, tourists use the travel services, accommodations, food and beverage, recreation and entertainment, and transportation sectors.

Post-departure, tourists use the transportation sector.

[Return to Figure 1.2]

Media Attributions

  • Front Desk by Staying LEVEL is licensed under a CC BY-NC 4.0 Licence .

Tourism according the the UNWTO is a social, cultural and economic phenomenon which entails the movement of people to countries or places outside their usual environment for personal or business/professional purposes.

UN agency responsible for promoting responsible, sustainable, and universally accessible tourism worldwide.

Moving between different locations for leisure and recreation.

The accommodations and food and beverage industry groupings.

someone who travels at least 80 km from his or her home for at least 24 hours, for business or leisure or other reasons

A same-day visitor to a destination. Their trip typically ends on the same day when they leave the destination.

A way to group tourism activities based on similarities in business practices, primarily used for statistical analysis.

Introduction to Tourism and Hospitality in BC - 2nd Edition by Morgan Westcott and Wendy Anderson, Eds is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

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tourism description words

9 tips for writing the perfect tour description for your travel business

How to write description for tours and travels

By Rezdy — 26 Aug 2018

copywriting   tour description

Updated December 2021 – While surfing the web, travelers are often bombarded with information about any given destination. A quick Google search of “things to do in Sydney” or “things to do in New York” for example,  will yield thousands of results, and it can quickly become overwhelming. In your tour business, your goal is to attract potential customers to your website and subsequently convert them into paying guests who attend your experience. By typing up the perfect description of tours and travels your business offers, it will help in helping customers during their decision-making process 

By writing a compelling and engaging tour description within your business, you’ll be able to increase your bookings in no time. All while creating a personal connection with your customers. In this article, we’ve detailed out 9 key tips to remember when writing a tour description. By following these tips, you’ll be able to convey your message even clearer and convince customers to book through you.

9 tips for writing the perfect description for tours and travels

So, let’s find out what the 9 key tips are for writing the perfect tour description.

1. Find your Unique Selling Proposition (USP)

Finding your USP is essential in writing the perfect tour description

Competition is only natural within the experiences industry. With so many other businesses providing similar tours and activities, it’s sometimes hard to stand out from your competitors. On the other hand, having so many similar options available at once may be overwhelming for many customers. Most of the time, customers want to quickly understand what makes one service different from the others. Having a clear differentiation, allows them to make a swift and efficient booking.

You can help your customers by promoting your business’s unique selling proposition. 

Unique selling proposition (USP) is a term used in marketing that indicates specialties your business offers that make you stand out from your competition. By having a unique selling proposition, you’re able to leverage your business by giving customers an experience they won’t be able to find elsewhere.

Your USP should showcase your strengths and advantages effectively, however, your USP should be uniquely valuable for your customers. By simply being “unique” won’t add that valuable element your customers seek. You have to differentiate around some aspect your target audience cares about, otherwise your messaging won’t be nearly as effective.

A compelling USP is:

  • Flaunted with evidence: Simply stating that your tours are “heaps of fun” may work for a few people, but proving and showing evidence that your activities are heaps more fun than your competitors will most likely capture bookings. You can achieve this by showcasing your reviews, adding quality photos and videos, and writing an engaging tour description.
  • Customer-focused: Promoting your USP won’t be effective if it doesn’t align with your customer’s value. Try to perform surveys and research your target audience to find out what their values are. Whether that be price-focused, social issues, or flexibility, finding out what your customers value, will help you find your USP.
  • Featured in the fine print: While taglines may be one way to communicate your USP, your USP should also be reflected in all areas of our business. Feature it within your policies, your “About Us” page, your descriptions, and more.

2. Find a persona for your tour description

Target a specific persona before you begin writing. For example, if you are a company that provides kayak tours to experienced adventurers, then develop a persona that addresses your target audience. It might be an open-minded person who has the necessary skills to kayak and enjoys the thrill of a new experience. You need to think about who will most likely book your tour business, think about your ideal customers, and break up the details of your tour description for a persona that identifies with that audience.

3. Make an easy to read description for tours and travels

Make sure your tour description is easy to read by:

  • Avoiding long, wordy sentences that can be cumbersome; 
  • Making every word count, and choosing powerful action verbs to describe the experience;
  • Instead of writing a paragraph about each tour that you offer, create several bullet points. Bullet points are easier to scan through and will allow you to keep your reader’s attention.

4. Tone of Voice

Choose a tone of voice, and remain consistent throughout your website. Some tour operators want to maintain a corporate presence, and therefore should adopt a professional tone of voice . A smaller, local business might be more interested in connecting with their customers on a personal level. They may choose to use description styles with a tone of voice that is light-hearted with a dash of humor. Either way, a consistent tone of voice is key to telling your story.

Discover your tone of voice when writing description for tours and travels

5. Be persuasive yet straight to the point

Be sure to outline the benefits of booking with your activity experience. If your business focuses on winery tours in the local wine-growing region, then be sure to explain what each unique offering is about. Avoid vague descriptions such as “Our day-long wine tour takes you to several wineries in the area.” Instead, provide additional details and throw in the benefits of booking this tour: “Our 8-hour wine tour takes you to 5 different local wineries, where you will sample delectable wines and snack on delicious cheese.”

6. Don’t share too many straight away

Being bombarded by the endless options of tours and activities your business offers may be too overwhelming for many customers. Not only that, it distracts your customers from the experiences they’re really after and as a result, may lead them not to follow through with the booking.

Likewise, strategically designing your website so that customers aren’t bombarded with options would be the best move. An effective method is to segregate the different tours and activities into categories. For example, if you’re a water sports operator that offers an array of different water activities for singles, couples, groups, and families, it’s best to select the top 4 to 6 activities for each audience and expand on it. By categorizing your activities, people will find it easier to navigate through your website and will be able to read a detailed description of each activity. Don’t forget to add photos and videos to complement the description.

7. Optimize your content

Optimize your content with relevant keywords, but do so in a natural way. Keywords might include the activity you offer, the name of your city, and any phrases your customers might use while searching for activities. If you can place your keywords naturally in the copy, not only will it capture your highlights but it will quickly optimize your site for search engines too. You also can add keywords into subheadings and image file names to include additional keywords for SEO and therefore increase your rankings in the search results.

For more tips and tricks on how to optimize your website and content, click here .

8. Add photos and visuals to complement your tour description

It’s no secret that photos and visuals are an effective way to draw people’s attention. People love to view photos of tours they’re about to experience as it helps them visualize the tours and activities. Featuring quality photos and videos to your description for tours and travels will only help people visualize and envision the description they just read.

9. Check your grammar and spelling

Clear grammar and spelling don’t only help people read and understand your descriptions easier, but it also adds an element of professionalism to your brand. Poor grammar and spelling on your website may come across as unprofessional and sloppy. As a result, it may decrease your brand’s value within your customer’s eyes. This could lead to a loss of potential bookings. Having clear grammar and spelling allows people to put their trust in your business. It shows that you pay attention to detail, especially when your tours and activities require a high level of safety.

When writing your description for tours and travels , it’s recommended that you type it out with the help of an online grammar checker. Apps like Grammarly are a great tool to help you stay on top of your grammar and spelling.

Once you have mastered the art of writing a compelling tour description, you’ll see that you’ll have fewer inquiries. Clear descriptions reduce the chances of your customers asking for more details of a particular tour and activity. Ultimately, capturing more bookings.

Once you start capturing more bookings, the best thing you can do is invest in an online booking software . A software like Rezdy is specifically built for tour operators like you. It helps you easily manage bookings by showcasing real-time availability, automatically updating manifests, and allowing customers to make secure payments. At the same time, Rezdy also offers a one-click website builder that makes it easier for tour operators to edit and update their photos and descriptions.

Curious to see whether Rezdy is right for you? Start a FREE 21-day trial or book a free demo today.

If you enjoyed this article then make sure to follow the Rezdy blog . There are a lot of marketing tools and tour operator tips designed with businesses like yours in mind.

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tourism description words

To Travel is To Live: A Comprehensive Guide Through English Vocabulary for Tourism

Comprehensive Guide Through English Vocabulary for Tourism

Teaching English as a foreign language is an international concept peculiar to many countries worldwide. And the good news is that you can use it in any tourist destination, from the United States to Australia or Japan. Knowing at least basic words and phrases is essential to feel confident when communicating with English speakers. Today’s article will accompany you through the most important stops on your trip abroad. So buckle up as we are ready to start our journey!

English for Tourism: General Vocabulary and Phrases

Today, over  13% of the world’s population speaks English. Therefore, numerous phrases and expressions can be useful for locals and tourists. But before diving into more specific vocabulary, let’s learn some general  terms for your travel adventures . Here are some of them:

  • Tourist – a person who travels for pleasure.
  • Attractions – places of interest visited by tourists, including landmarks, museums, theme parks, etc.
  • Guide – someone who provides information and assistance to tourists during their journeys.
  • Souvenir – a memento or  keepsake people buy to remember their trip.
  • Itinerary – a planned route or schedule for activities .
  • Accommodation – a place where people stay overnight, including hotels, hostels, or vacation rentals.
  • Landmark – a well-known and easily recognizable feature or monument significant to a specific location. 
  • Guidebook – a book that provides information, recommendations, and maps for tourists.
  • Transportation – the ways of getting from one place to another, including buses, trains, or taxis.
  • Passport – an official government document that identifies a person and allows them to travel. 
  • Visa – an endorsement or a stamp in a passport that grants permission for entry into a specific country.
  • Currency – the particular type of money used in a country or region. 

These are just a few examples of English tourist vocabulary. However, many more terms and phrases can become useful depending on the context or specific travel destinations. Let’s learn the most common ones by entering every stage of a typical trip abroad. 

Air Travel and Transportation

Every journey starts with choosing the destination. And after finding out where you want to go, you immediately book the tickets and enter your adventures. Then, you arrive at the airport and investigate how to transport to your accommodation. Every step of this journey is accompanied by different words and new English phrases.

  • Booking and tickets.

Can I ask you to help me book a ticket from London to Paris, please?

What is the departure time for the next flight to New York?

Can I choose my seat, or is it assigned automatically?

May I see your boarding pass again, please?

  • Modes of transportation. 

Is there direct transport from Venice to Florence?

Where is the nearest bus station?

Could you help me, please? I need to call a  taxi .

I’m looking for a car for a week trip. Where can I rent it?

  • Public transport. 

Which bus should I take to reach the city center?

What time does the next train to Edinburgh depart?

How much is the fare for a subway ride?

Is this the right subway line for the museum?

Checking in the Hotel

We all want to relax and lay down after a long flight or ride. And the best place to do so when traveling abroad is the hotel. But before entering your room, you need to communicate with the person at the reception desk. After saying “hello,” use some of the following phrases.

  • Providing information.

I have a reservation for /the number of nights/ from /the check-in date/ to /the check-out/ date.

I booked a /room type/ for my stay.

I requested a non-smoking room. 

I have a special request.

  • Identification and payment.

Here is my passport for identification.

Could you please provide me with the registration form to fill out?

What is the total cost of my stay?

Could I pay with cash/credit card?

  • Clarifying policies and services.

What time is the check-in/check-out?

Is breakfast included in my reservation?

What are the hotel’s facilities and services available for guests?

Could someone please help me with my luggage?

Ordering Food and Exploring Restaurants

Finally, when you’ve relaxed a little, it is time to find something to eat. One option is to order food from the hotel’s restaurant. But you can also use your knowledge after years of English learning for foreigners and look for some exciting restaurants. To make the process smoother, memorize some of these phrases.

  • Asking for recommendations. 

What can you recommend from the menu?

Could you suggest any popular dishes?

Are there any vegetarian/vegan options available?

Do you have any local or seasonal dishes?

  • Placing an order. 

I would like to order the /dish name/, please.

Can I have this /menu item/ with /specific customization/?

May I request /a specific dietary requirement/ for my meal?

Could you bring me a glass of sparkling water, please?

  • Special requests or modifications.

Does this dish contain any /specific allergen/?

Could I have the dressing/sauce on the side, please?

Can you make it a little less spicy?

Is it possible to substitute the /ingredient/ with an /alternative ingredient/?

English for International Tourism: Communicating with Locals

When you have covered your basic travel needs, it is time to explore the local attractions and landmarks. And, of course, it would be impossible without communicating with locals, so let’s find out how to do it in different circumstances. The best way is to memorize some of these English for tourist guides phrases.

Asking for Directions and Getting Recommendations

It is usually difficult for tourists to find the destination without asking any questions (unless you are a topographical genius). In that case, local strangers come to the rescue. They can also help you with unique places to visit and other helpful recommendations. But before asking them, remember that English for international tourism person is different than for native speakers. Hence, keep in mind some of these phrases. 

  •  Asking for directions.

Excuse me, can you tell me the shortest way to the /destination/?

I’m a bit lost. Could you please help me reach this place?

Which way is the nearest landmark?

I’m trying to find the /street name/. Could you please give me directions?

  • Getting recommendations.

I’m looking for a good restaurant nearby. What can you recommend?

What are some popular attractions or places to visit in this area?

Do you know any nice cafés or coffee shops nearby?

Could you suggest a local dish that I must try?

  • Seeking specific places or services.

Is there a pharmacy/bank/hospital near here?

Where can I find a grocery store/souvenir shop?

I’m interested in exploring the art scene. Are there any galleries in this area?

Are there any hidden gems or off-the-beaten-path places nearby?

Language for Shopping (and Bargaining)

We can’t speak for you, but one of our favorite things, after teaching English as a foreign language, is visiting local markets and small family shops when traveling abroad. These are the best places to communicate with people, practice speaking, learn more about the culture, and, of course, buy some nice souvenirs. If you like these things as much as we do, don’t forget to learn some of these phrases.

  • Inquiring about the products.

Could you tell me more about this item?

What are the features/specifications of this product?

Is this item available in a different size/color?

Is there a warranty/guarantee for this item?

  • Asking for the price.

How much does this cost?

What is the price of this item?

Could you give me a discount on this product?

Is there any discount available for this?

  • Bargaining and negotiating.

Is there any room for negotiation on the price?

Could you offer a lower price for this item?

I’m interested in buying multiple items. Can we work out a deal?

Would you consider a discount if I purchase this along with /another item/?

Nail English Speaking with Promova

At Promova, we believe that  learning a language  is the key to immersing yourself in the cultures you encounter while traveling. And we are here to empower you with different essential skills that will transform your tourism experience. With all the options available, you can definitely find the perfect solution for yourself.

Our team of professional tutors offers both one-on-one and group lessons tailored to your specific needs. They always ensure that you progress at your own pace while receiving personalized guidance. And the best thing is that we invite you to examine our free trial lesson. You can explore our teaching methods before making your final decision. Another amazing option is our  online language courses that bring the classroom to your screen. 

But we know that learning a language is not just about the lessons – it’s about practicing and engaging with others. That’s why we offer you to join our free  Conversation Club . Thereyou can meet fellow English learners, share experiences, and enhance your speaking skills in a supportive environment. Join Promova today and let your adventures truly come alive with the power of language proficiency.

To sum up, language is the ultimate key that opens doors to rich cultural experiences and amazing travel adventures. Whether you’re going on a solo expedition or joining a group of fellow wanderers, even basic tourism vocabulary can bridge the gaps and improve your communications. We believe this article will help you in your next journey. By the way, what is your favorite travel destination? Tell us in the comments!

Is it necessary to learn English for successful tourism?

While it’s not an absolute requirement, learning English can significantly improve your travel experience. Since it is a common language, it can help you communicate with locals, navigate unfamiliar environments, and access a broader range of services and information. You will easily interact with people from different countries, making your adventures more enjoyable and rewarding.

What are the best resources for studying English tourism vocabulary?

Since most travel words and phrases are very straightforward, you can start by expanding your general vocabulary. You can do it by practicing with professional tutors or reading books. For more specific terms, you can watch TV shows or movies dedicated to the travel topic, like Rick Steven’s Europe or  Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives . 

What should I do if I don’t understand a native speaker?

Language barriers can sometimes pose challenges during your travels. If you can’t understand a native person, relax and don’t panic. Just kindly ask your interlocutor to repeat their line or, maybe, speak slowly. Don’t forget to mention that English is not your mother tongue – most locals will understand your situation and use more simple phrases and words.

Can my English fluency level negatively affect my travel experiences?

Although a lower level of English fluency may present certain challenges, it should not necessarily negatively impact your travel experiences. Traveling is about embracing new cultures, connecting with people, and exploring the world. Even with limited English skills, you can still navigate your way, interact with locals, and enjoy your adventures.

  • Categories of tourism
  • Adjectives and useful expressions

Descriptive adjectives for brochures and leaflets.

  The setting, the destination.

breathtaking, stunning (views, scenery) sensationnel, à couper le souffle

exotic (beauty, charm, location)

picturesque, quaint (streets, villages, cottages) pittoresque

Outstanding, gorgeous, magnificent, splendid (architectural legacy)

Impressive / awe-inspiring impressionant

Striking (beauty) saisissant

Vibrant / bustling (city, market) / lively (city) iconic (city, destination)

ideal, idyllic, earthly paradise, heavenly, divine divin, paradisiaque

compelling (destination) fascinant

scenic (route) panoramique, pittoresque, touristique ( scenic train )

spectacular (Chilean fjords), dramatic (alpine lake) spectaculaire

majestic (mountains and national parks) majestueux

crystal clear (sea) colourful (coral) turquoise (waters)

adventurous (destination)

off-the-beaten track: en dehors des sentiers battus

sumptuous (surroundings, suites)

unspoilt=untouched (rainforest) préservé, intact , pristine (beach) immaculé

tranquil (waters) peaceful (atmosphere)

intimate (ambience), charming (resort)

jagged (coastline) déchiqueté, découpé, rugged (landscape, coast) accidenté, découpé

mighty (river, cathedral, oak) puissant

snow-capped, snow-covered ( mountain, volcano)

Hotel / restaurant / museum

World-class (museum, cuisine, accommodation) supérieur, de classe international

quality (service)

Award-winning (restaurant)

Renowned / famous / well-known / world famous

State-of-the-art (cruise ship) = à la pointe du progrès

Upmarket / upscale / high-end haut de gamme

Top notch (service) de premier ordre, excellent

Luxury (hotel) = de luxe   luxurious = luxueux

gourmet (food, cuisine) gastronomique

specialty (restaurant)

authentic, genuine ( cuisine )

stupendous (national cuisine) prodigieux

Mouthwatering (cookery = cuisine)

a perfect blend of stylish luxury, informality and excellent local cuisine

waterfront (hotel, campsite)

opulent (palace)

The experience

Exhilarating : exaltant, euphorisant, enivrant intoxicating : grisant, enivrant

glamorous  : séduisant, ensorcelant

A dream (holiday)

Once-in-a-lifetime (experience) / the trip or cruise of a lifetime

amazing, incredible, unforgettable, memorable

cultural (immersion)

Unparalleled, unrivalled (service) : incomparable

unequalled (spendour) inégalé = unsurpassed

Magical, Dazzling (tropical fish) éblouissant

Timeless: éternel

hidden (asset) / best-kept (secret)

overwhelming ( boulversant) fascinating

historical (monuments), historic (interest)

natural (beauty, habitat) authentique, véritable

medieva l (legend, area)

stately (homes ) imposant, majestueux

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Tourism Words

Words related to tourism.

Below is a massive list of tourism words - that is, words related to tourism. The top 4 are: travel , tourist , economic and leisure . You can get the definition(s) of a word in the list below by tapping the question-mark icon next to it. The words at the top of the list are the ones most associated with tourism, and as you go down the relatedness becomes more slight. By default, the words are sorted by relevance/relatedness, but you can also get the most common tourism terms by using the menu below, and there's also the option to sort the words alphabetically so you can get tourism words starting with a particular letter. You can also filter the word list so it only shows words that are also related to another word of your choosing. So for example, you could enter "travel" and click "filter", and it'd give you words that are related to tourism and travel.

You can highlight the terms by the frequency with which they occur in the written English language using the menu below. The frequency data is extracted from the English Wikipedia corpus, and updated regularly. If you just care about the words' direct semantic similarity to tourism, then there's probably no need for this.

There are already a bunch of websites on the net that help you find synonyms for various words, but only a handful that help you find related , or even loosely associated words. So although you might see some synonyms of tourism in the list below, many of the words below will have other relationships with tourism - you could see a word with the exact opposite meaning in the word list, for example. So it's the sort of list that would be useful for helping you build a tourism vocabulary list, or just a general tourism word list for whatever purpose, but it's not necessarily going to be useful if you're looking for words that mean the same thing as tourism (though it still might be handy for that).

If you're looking for names related to tourism (e.g. business names, or pet names), this page might help you come up with ideas. The results below obviously aren't all going to be applicable for the actual name of your pet/blog/startup/etc., but hopefully they get your mind working and help you see the links between various concepts. If your pet/blog/etc. has something to do with tourism, then it's obviously a good idea to use concepts or words to do with tourism.

If you don't find what you're looking for in the list below, or if there's some sort of bug and it's not displaying tourism related words, please send me feedback using this page. Thanks for using the site - I hope it is useful to you! 🐪

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  • hospitality
  • world tourism organization
  • agriculture
  • cruise ship
  • sightseeing
  • tourist destination
  • destination
  • attractions
  • late-2000s recession
  • united states
  • agricultural
  • visitor bureau
  • tourist arrivals
  • continental europe
  • tourist destinations
  • tourist attractions
  • tour operators
  • eco tourism
  • entertainment
  • destinations
  • cultural heritage
  • tourist board
  • beach resorts
  • immigration
  • tourist attraction
  • travel agents
  • exploration
  • agritourism
  • downtown revitalization
  • development
  • popular tourist destination
  • switzerland
  • visitors bureau
  • enterprises
  • book holiday
  • classical antiquity
  • tourist resorts
  • balance of payments
  • scenic beauty
  • visitor arrivals
  • 2009 flu pandemic
  • leisure travelers
  • visitbritain
  • transportation
  • economic development
  • export oriented
  • recreational boating
  • visitscotland
  • united nations
  • arabian travel
  • handicrafts
  • beautiful scenery
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  • middle class
  • trafficking
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  • the new york times
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  • hypertravel
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  • environment
  • opportunities
  • real versus nominal value
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  • emerging markets
  • sustainable
  • investments
  • protestantism
  • cooperation
  • greek language
  • goods and services
  • entrepreneurs
  • tertiary sector of the economy
  • renaissance
  • hospitality service
  • business enterprise
  • commercial enterprise
  • amusement park
  • vacationers
  • shopping mall
  • music venue
  • seaside resort
  • league of nations
  • buy souvenir
  • floriculture
  • permanent residency
  • go back home
  • round trip ticket
  • see new place
  • lose something
  • travel behavior
  • holidaymakers
  • cosmopolitan
  • experience different culture
  • loughborough
  • euromonitor international
  • aquaculture
  • motion sickness
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  • visit other country
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  • honeymooners
  • roman republic
  • horticulture
  • ancient china
  • choose destination
  • five sacred mountains
  • middle ages
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  • intercontinental
  • go to airport
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  • revitalization
  • hand luggage
  • canterbury tales
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  • entrepreneurship
  • circumnavigate
  • journey to the west
  • progression
  • english literature
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  • travel literature
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  • business trip
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  • paragliding
  • businesspeople
  • beautification
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  • medieval italy
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  • get on plane
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  • fly in airplane
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  • save your money
  • northern europe
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  • go somewhere
  • go someplace
  • thomas cook & son
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  • western culture
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  • aquiculture
  • conventioneers
  • board plane
  • industrial revolution
  • united kingdom
  • toll highway
  • train ticket
  • cox & kings
  • recreational
  • advertising

That's about all the tourism related words we've got! I hope this list of tourism terms was useful to you in some way or another. The words down here at the bottom of the list will be in some way associated with tourism, but perhaps tenuously (if you've currenly got it sorted by relevance, that is). If you have any feedback for the site, please share it here , but please note this is only a hobby project, so I may not be able to make regular updates to the site. Have a nice day! 🐨

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Do you have a glossary of travel, tourism & hospitality terms?

Every industry has its own jargon and lingo. tourism is no different. here's a great list of tourism terms that you should know..

The list has been compiled by the world-class team of strategists, consultants, educators and established tourism experts at the nonprofit Tourism Academy . Our team offers relationship powered professional development, trade marketing, tourism development and consulting solutions. 

Glossary of Tourism Terms

tourism glossary

adventure travel:  a type of niche tourism, involving exploration or travel with a certain degree of risk (real or perceived), and which may require special skills and physical exertion 

affinity group : a group of people linked by a common interest or purpose. See also pre- formed group. 

agent : one who acts or has the power to act as the representative of another. A person whose job it is to arrange travel for end clients (individuals, groups, corporations), confirming travel components and simplifying the planning process for customers, providing consultation services and travel packages. 

American Bus Association (ABA) : A trade organization consisting of member bus lines throughout the country. www.buses.org 

American National Standards Institute (ANSI): A private non-profit organization that oversees the development of voluntary consensus standards for products, services, processes, systems, and personnel in the United States. www.ansi.org

American Society of Travel Agents (ASTA):  The oldest and largest travel agent organization in the world with travel agents being the primary members. Other companies providing travel industry products and services can be associate members. www.astanet.com 

Application Programming Interface  ( API) : a code that allows two software programs to communicate with each other. 

attrition : Shortfall of sleeping room block pick-up or food-and-beverage projections from numbers agreed to in a contract. Penalties for attrition may be outlined in a contract’s attrition clause. 

Average Daily Rate (ADR) : a statistical unit that represents the average rental income per paid occupied room in a given time period. 

back of house : a business term that refers to parts of a business operation that customers do not see. This may refer to mechanical rooms, accounting offices, kitchens, and those persons who are engaged in those areas. 

block : a group of rooms, tickets, seats or space reserved for a specific customer - usually for a set period of time. Room blocks are commonly reserved for conventions, meetings or groups in general. Room blocks may also be allocated to high volume buyers (wholesale, receptive, tour) who intend to sell them as tour components on an ongoing basis. A room block is usually under a firm agreement and is for a set period of time. 

Brand USA : A public/private partnership to promote inbound tourism to the United States and communicate US entry/exit policies. Also known as the Corporation for Travel Promotion. www.thebrandusa.com 

bulk pricing : the practice of offering exceptionally low, typically non-commissionable rates to high volume buyers who purchase a specified number of units to resell at a mark up. 

campaign : A specific, defined series of activities used in marketing a new or changed product or service, or in using new marketing channels and methods. 

Certified Tour Professional (CTP) : A designation administered by the National Tour Foundation and conferred upon tour professionals who complete prescribed evaluation requirements. 

certificate:  an official document attesting to a fact such as a level of achievement in a course of study or training.

certification: the action or process of providing someone or something with an official document attesting to a status or level of achievement. See also: American National Standards Institute

certified: officially recognized as possessing certain qualifications or meeting certain standards. 

Certified Travel Counselor (CTC) : A designation conferred upon travel professionals who have completed a travel management program offered by the Institute of Certified Travel Agents. 

Certified Meeting Planner (CMP) : A designation conferred upon convention and meeting management professionals who have completed an application and written exam offered by the Events Industry Council. 

channel manager : a system or platform that coordinates the distribution of product details, inventory and pricing in real time across multiple sales “channels” 

charter : to hire for exclusive use any aircraft, motorcoach, cruise ship or other vehicle 

class of service : a parameter used to differentiate the types of accommodation offered by travel suppliers, often denoted by fare code on air tickets. Classes may reflect differences in space, comfort, amenities and cabin service. Ex: First Class, Business Class, Coach Class or please hold this chicken until we land. 

commercial rate : A special rate given by a hotel or rental car, motor coach, bus or passenger transport company to an organization based on either the volume of business done or the type of accommodation or rental car. Also referred to as a corporate rate. 

commission : The varying amount paid by suppliers to travel agents for the sale of travel products and services. 

commissioned tours : A tour available for sale through retail and wholesale travel agencies, which provides for a payment of an agreed upon sales commission either to the retail or wholesale seller.

complementary : goods or services that add to the value of another good or service. Ex: peanut butter complements jelly

complimentary (comp) : Service, space or item given at no charge.

complimentary (comp) ratio : The number of rooms, tickets, meals or service items provided at no cost based on the number of occupied rooms.

  • The industry standard is one complimentary room per 20-50 rooms occupied per day. 
  • The industry standard for ticketed attractions and restaurants is one complimentary admission/meal per 10-20 paid. 

complimentary registration : Waiver of registration fees. 

concierge : a hotel employee whose job is to assist guests by arranging tours, local transportation, making reservations for theater or restaurants, etc. 

Convention & Visitors Bureau (CVB) : A nonprofit organization supported by bed taxes, government budget allocations, private memberships or a combination of these. A CVB promotes tourism, encourages groups to hold meetings and trade shows in its city, and assists groups before and during meetings. 

consolidator : a person or company which forms groups to travel using group rates on to increase sales, earn override commissions or reduce the possibility of tour cancellations. 

consortium : a loosely knit group of independently owned and managed companies such as travel agencies, tour operators, hotels, or other suppliers, with a joint marketing distribution process 

convention and visitors bureau (CVB) : a nonprofit local organizations charged with representing (and promoting) a specific destination. CVBs are funded by transient room taxes, government budget allocations, private membership dues, sponsorship sales and program participation fees, or a combination of these mechanisms.  See also: destination marketing organization 

co-op marketing: outreach activities that help multiple suppliers reach the target audience by sharing costs, resources and tactics. 

course: a series of lessons or modules to teach the skills and knowledge for a particular job or activity. 

destination : a place where travelers might visit. This may be any neighborhood, city, region or country that can be marketing as a single entity for tourists. 

destination management company (DMC) : Company or professional individual engaged in organizing tours, meetings of all types and their related activities. Also referred to as a ground operator. 

destination marketing organization (DMO) : A nonprofit marketing organization for a city, state, province, region or area whose primary purpose is the promotion of the destination.  See also: convention & visitors bureau 

direct spend : the value of goods and services purchased by tourists (e.g., attraction ticket, hotel room rate and meals) 

double double : refers to a room containing two separate double beds, capable of sleeping up to four guests comfortably, sometimes referred to as a “quad” 

double occupancy rate : the price per person for a room that will be shared between two people 

dynamic pricing : the practice of varying the price for a product or service to reflect changing market conditions, in particular the charging of a higher price during times of greater demand. This is the opposite of static pricing. 

educational travel : a type of niche tourism, built around learning objectives, often to the benefit of students and/or those who share a common interest, hobby or profession 

emerging market : A group of customers who do not provide as much business as the target markets, but show interest in the destination. 

escort : a person employed or contracted by a seller of packaged travel product who accompanies tour participants from point to point often acting as a the tour operator liaison and onsite problem solver. 

escorted tour : a packaged, pre-planned itinerary that includes the services of a tour manager or tour escort who accompanies participants for the full duration of the tour 

escrow : a legal concept and financial instrument whereby assets are held by a third party on behalf of two other parties that are in the process of completing a transaction. In many places, agents and tour operators are required by law to maintain customer deposits and pre-payments in escrow until the time of service. 

excursion : a trip made for leisure, education or physical purposes. It is often an adjunct to a longer journey, cruise or visit to a place. 

familiarization tour (FAM) : A program designed to acquaint participants with specific destinations or services. Offered in groups and on an individual basis. 

folio : an itemized record of guest charges and credits, often referred to as a guest bill or statement. 

frequent independent travel (FIT) : A custom-designed, pre-paid travel package with many individualized arrangements. An FIT operator specializes in preparing FITs documents at the request of retail travel agents. FITs usually receive travel vouchers to present to onsite services as verification or pre-payment. Also known as foreign individual/independent travel or frequent individual travel. 

front office : a business term that refers to a company’s departments that come in direct contact with customers. 

gateway : a city, airport, port or area where visitors arrive. International gateway refers to places where foreign visitors may first enter a country. 

ground operator : a company or individual providing local accommodations, transfers, ticketing and related services.  See also: receptive operator 

group booking : Reservation for a block of rooms for a single group. 

group tour : A prearranged, prepaid travel program for a group usually including transportation, accommodations, attraction admissions and meals. Also referred to as a package tour. 

guaranteed departure : a tour that will definitely operate on the day it is scheduled and will not be cancelled. 

Horizontal Market : audiences for products or services that are not easily distinguished by consumer characteristics. Examples of horizontal markets include those for computer security, legal or accounting services. 

Hospitality Sales and Marketing Association International (HSMAI):  A trade association for hotel sales, marketing and revenue management professionals. 

hotel classifications : Classification of a hotel by its amenities, facilities, service and cost. Qualifications and terms may vary by country. 

  • limited service or economy  is generally a reasonably priced, generally providing a bed, telephone, TV, shower and free parking. They often do not have room service or a restaurant. 
  • full service  may refer to a property of any price category that offers some meeting space and features a restaurant onsite 
  • moderate  medium-priced property with services and amenities such as a restaurant and possibly conference rooms. 
  • upper moderate  is a property that offers special services such as a first-rate restaurant, banquet and conference rooms, valet service, room service, cable TV, and a host of other amenities. 
  • luxury or deluxe  is a top-grade hotel or resort offering the highest service and the maximum variety of amenities. All rooms have a private bath, and all the usual public rooms and services are provided. 
  • boutique  is loosely used to describe properties that have typically between 10 and 100 rooms and often contain luxury facilities in unique or intimate settings with full service accommodations. 

hub and spoke : a style of tour that has guests staying in a single location with excursions to nearby destinations 

incentive tour : travel experience offered to stimulate employee productivity or as a reward for sales agents 

incidentals : items not included in the package price 

inclusive : referring to a package or product price that includes all of the varying components, taxes and gratuities for a flat rate. An inclusive tour may include transportation, lodging, transfers, etc. for a set price. An inclusive meal might include food, drink, tax and gratuity. 

independent tour : a style of travel packaging that allows visitors to move about without the accompaniment of a tour manager or escort 

indirect spend : the value of all goods and services used to produce tourism output. (e.g., toiletries for hotel guests, ingredients for meals and plastic used in souvenirs) 

International Inbound Travel Association (IITA) : A trade association of inbound receptive tour operators and suppliers from the US. Formerly RSAA Receptive Services Association of America. 

incentive travel : A travel reward given by companies to employees to stimulate productivity. Also known as an incentive trip. 

inclusive tour : A specific package in which all components of the package are part of the price. Generally, an inclusive package includes transportation, lodging, meals, gratuities and taxes, and some form of sightseeing or rental car. The terms and conditions of a tour contract should specify exactly what is covered. Also referred to as an all-expense tour and an all-inclusive tour. 

inclusive rate : The rate charged to an operator that includes all service, tax, gratuities and additional fees. 

IPW : A computerized scheduled appointment show for international tour operators always held in the United States and sponsored by U.S. Travel Association. Formerly known as Pow Wow. 

itinerary : a schedule of travel components put together by an agent or operator. 

leg : a portion of a journey between two scheduled stops.

lesson: an amount of teaching given at one time; a period of learning or teaching.  

market segment : a group of consumers or buyer types that share one or more common characteristics, lumped together for sales or marketing purposes. 

markup : the difference between the cost of a good or service and its selling price. 

meet and greet : Pre-purchased service for meeting and greeting a client upon arrival in a city, usually at the airport, and assisting the client with entrance formalities, baggage and transportation. 

microlearning : a tool for training, teaching and development that delivers content in small, very specific bursts. 

module: each of a set of standardized parts or independent units that can be used to construct a more complex structure such as an item of furniture or a building. multiple lessons may be combined to create a module.  

motor coach : A large, comfortable, well-powered bus that can transport groups and their luggage over long distances. Motor coaches are normally able to accommodate 46 to 54 passengers. 

motor coach tour operator : A company that creates tours in which group members are transported via motor coach to their destination, itinerary activities and back. 

mystery tour : a short journey, usually in a bus, that people make for pleasure without knowing where they are going. 

NAJ : Producers of the RTO (receptive tour operator) summit and similar small trade show formats with a regional focus. Also referred to as North American Journeys 

net rate : A wholesale rate for groups (usually 10-15 people) which an operator may add a mark up. 

NTA (formerly National Tour Association) : A trade association of North American motor coach tour operators. www.ntaonline.com 

occupancy : the percentage of available rooms in use during a given period. 

online travel agent (OTA) : a travel website that specialized in the sale of travel products to consumers 

outbound operator (or outbound tour) : A company or tour that takes groups from a given city or country to another city or country. 

Ontario Motor Coach Association (OMCA) : A trade association of motorcoach operators based in and around Ontario province. 

package : Travel arrangements with two or more components offered for one price, inclusive of all taxes. Also refers to a single-fee booth package offered by show management. 

packager : An individual or organization that coordinates and promotes the development of a package tour and establishes operating procedures and guidelines for that tour. 

performance tour operator : A tour operator company that focuses on planning trips for groups that must perform while traveling like school bands, choral groups, etc. 

plus plus : a term used to describe a product price that does not include taxes, gratuities and/or service charges. Ex: The meal is $15 plus tax and gratuity OR $15++. 

pre- and post-trip tours : Optional extension or side trip package offered before or after a meeting, gathering or convention. 

pre-formed group : a group that contacts the tour operator to plan travel exclusively for the group members. 

rack rate : the normal rate of a product or service, before any discounts, commissions or net price arrangements 

receptive operator : A tour operator who provides local services, transfers, sightseeing, guides, etc. Many large receptive operators develop packages and sell them through wholesale tour operators in foreign countries. Also referred to as a ground operator, an inbound tour operator, a land operator, an RTO and a receiving agent. 

retail tour : A tour put together by a tour operator and sold to individuals.

request for proposal (RFP) : A document that stipulates what services the organization wants from an outside contractor and requests a bid to perform such services.

retailer : one who sells directly to the consumer.  See also: travel agent 

return on investment (ROI) : Net profit divided by net worth. A financial ratio indicating the degree of profitability. 

revenue per available room (RevPAR) : A measure used by hotels that divides revenue for a given time period by the number of available rooms for the same time period. 

sales mission : Intense selling effort in a particular locality; calling upon qualify leads. Usually performed by a group of people who may or may not all be in a sales capacity but have an interest in meeting with the same buyers. 

Seasons  (from a buyer/operator perspective): 

  • looking The time of year when tour operators are looking at for new activities & vendors to include in future trips. Also known as product or catalog development season. 
  • selling The time of year when tour operators are focused on reaching out to their customers, promoting future trips and selling packaged travel programs. 
  • booking The time of year when tour operators are booking and confirming tour components they plan to utilize. 
  • travel The time of year when the majority of the tour operators’ customers are traveling. 

Seasons  (from a supplier perspective): 

  • off-season The time of year when tourist traffic, and often rates, are at their lowest because of decreased demand. Also referred to as low season, off-peak or value season. 
  • peak season The time of year when demand and price is at a premium. Also known as high season. 
  • shoulder season The season between peak season and off-season when demand is average and the travel product will not produce the highest price but does not need a deep discount to generate traffic.

series : describing a piece of business or scheduled itinerary that takes place on a regular frequency 

site inspection : Personal, careful survey of property, facility or area.

Skål  is a professional, fraternal organization of tourism leaders around the world, promoting global tourism and friendship. 

SMERF : Meetings acronym for a category of meeting market segments including social, military, educational, religious and fraternal type groups. These organizations often are looking for value when selecting a meeting destination. 

supplier : The actual provider of a travel product such as the hotel, attraction, restaurant, airline or car rental agency; not the travel agent or tour operator selling the product. 

STAR (STR) Report : a tool used to measure hotel performance against competitive aggregates and within local markets. Data is collected and distributed by strglobal 

static pricing : the practice of maintaining the same price for a product or service at all times regardless of changing market conditions, trends and demand. This is the opposite of dynamic pricing. 

Student Youth Travel Association (SYTA) : a trade association representing tour operator companies that specialize in student travel. www.syta.com 

tariff : a schedule of rates for a good or services provided by a supplier 

tiered pricing : A pricing structure that offers a variety of price points for different customer types. For more or suggested rates by buyer type. 

tour operator : A person or company that negotiates discount rates, packages travel products, prints brochures, and markets these travel products through travel agents or to the general public. 

tour vouchers : Documents issued by tour operators to be exchanged for accommodations, meals, sightseeing, admission tickets and other services. Also referred to as coupons and tour orders. 

tourism : travel for business or pleasure; also the theory and practice of touring, the business of attracting, accommodating, and entertaining tourists, and the business of operating tours. Tourism may be international, or within the traveler’s country. 

tourism ambassador: an individual possessing the knowledge, skill and training to represent a destination, assist tourists and create better visitor experiences. 

Tourism Cares : A charitable organization that focuses on helping preserve the travel experience for future travelers. www.tourismcares.org 

trade association : Group of persons employed in a particular trade.

trade publication : A magazine or newsletter that targets a specific industry. 

trade show : Exhibit of products and services that is targeted to a specific clientele and not open to the public. 

travel agent (or travel agency) : Person or firm qualified to advise and arrange for travel needs such as hotel rooms, meals, transportation, tours and other travel elements. Represents all travel suppliers worldwide. Also referred to as a retailer. 

Travel Alliance Partners (TAP) : A member-owned organization of tour operators that work together to develop unique itineraries within their respective regions, cross-promote products offered by other members and leverage their collective buying power. www.tapintotravel.com 

travel receipt : purchase of travel and tourism related goods and services by visitors. These goods and services include food, lodging, recreation, gifts, entertainment, local transportation and other items incidental to travel. 

United Motor Coach Association (UMA) : North America's largest association for operators of motorcoach companies providing charter, tour and regular route services. www.uma.org 

United States Tour Operators Association (USTOA) : A nationwide organization of tour operators offering protection for travelers purchasing member travel products by way of a multi-million-dollar bond. www.ustoa.com 

Upsell : sales technique where a seller induces the customer to purchase more expensive items, upgrades or other add-ons in an attempt to make a more profitable sale 

U.S. Travel Association : The national, nonprofit association representing all components of the U.S. travel industry. (formerly known as TIA - Travel Industry Association of America) www.ustravel.org 

Vertical Market : used to identify areas where vendors offer goods & services specific to a group of customers with specialized needs. Examples may include customers identified by their areas of origin, age range(s) or interest types. 

Visa : a conditional authorization granted by a country to a foreigner, allowing them to enter, remain within, or to leave that country. 

voluntourism : the act or practice of doing volunteer or charitable work as needed in the communities where one is vacationing 

voucher : documents or digital codes issued to consumers by tour operators that may be exchanged for tour components 

walk-through : Review of meeting details, or inspection of function room or trade show floor prior to event. 

webinar : Short for web-based seminar, a presentation, lecture, workshop or seminar that is transmitted over the web. A key feature of the webinar is its interactive elements – the ability to give, receive and discuss information. Contrast with webcast in which the data transmission is one way and does not allow interaction between the presenter and the audience. 

wholesaler : A company that creates and markets inclusive tours and FITs for sale through travel agents. Often used interchangeably with “tour operator,” but several distinctions should be drawn: a wholesaler presumably sells nothing at retail, a tour operator does both; a wholesaler does not always create his or her own products, a tour operator virtually always does; and a wholesaler is less inclined than a tour operator to perform local services. 

World Tourism Organization (WTO) : An organization created to promote and develop tourism in the interest of the economic, social and cultural progress of all nations. www.world-tourism.org

About the Author

Stephen Ekstrom is the Chief Strategist at The Tourism Academy | tourismacademy.org, featured speaker at numerous tourism industry conferences, travel writer and host of the Business Class podcast.

tourism description words

How to Write a Tour Description For Your Website (With Examples)

Are you not able to sell your tour packages despite having the best stops and ideal route?

A poor tour description might be a reason.

Writing a perfect tour description is a lot of work. Looking just at your tour description (without even reading it), a visitor decides whether to stay on your website or bounce back to explore other options. So, while describing your tour, you must find a way to be engaging and persuasive.

But that is still not enough. Your tour description must be loved by Google too!

So, how do we do that?

Don’t you worry! This article is specially crafted to solve your tour description nightmare. We have come up with the best techniques and a step-by-step guide along with examples to help you with a tour description that sells like never before.

With the help of this guide, you will be able to attract unique visitors to your site and effortlessly turn them into customers.

Let’s dive right into it.

Table of Contents

What is a Tour Description?

A tour description is a piece of copy that summarizes the entire tour, highlighting the benefits and encouraging the visitors to book the trip.

As the name suggests, a tour description provides all the necessary details of your tour. But it’s not just “details.” It is also a marketing tool to help you convert visitors into customers.

How Important is it to Write a Persuasive Tour Description for Your Tour Packages?

When someone goes to the internet in search of a tour package, Google shows them a list of tours that matches the search intent. Certainly, you’re not the only one organizing the exact same trip. But your tour provides a unique experience that sets you apart from the rest.

But how does the searcher know that? Through your tour description.

Considering the short attention span of internet users, they scan through the lists and settle down the most compelling ones. They will only book your trip if they find your tour description promising enough to spend their holiday. That is why a compelling tour description is a must in order to ensure maximum sales.

Techniques to Follow While Writing Tour Description

Before getting down to writing, you must consider a few techniques that help you create a copy that is loved by the visitors and by Google.

1. Write for the Audience

Remember, you’re writing for the potential customer and not for yourself. They are here with the sole purpose of finding a great tour for themselves. Address that! Find out your target audience. Think out what they are looking for in a tour package and meld your offerings according to their requirements.

For example, if you are writing a tour description for a bungee jumping trip, it should be directed towards an adrenaline junkie who speaks a language of adventure.

Use of audience-centric pronouns like “you” and “your” instead of “we” and “our” makes the audience feel valued. It also makes your tour description more conversational and helps to build a personal connection with your potential customers.

2. Set a Tone and Stick to it

Choose a particular tone of voice and maintain it throughout your tour description. The voice tone may vary according to your brand personality and the kind of tour package you’re trying to sell.

For example, relatively larger tour companies tend to adopt a professional tone. Whereas, a smaller company that operates locally may use a casual tone in the attempt of building a personal connection with their customers.

As mentioned in the previous example, the tone of your writing might as well depend upon the audience you’re targeting.

3. Treat it as a Sales Copy

Make your tour description persuasive. We know you want to be as descriptive as possible to let the visitors know what your amazing tour package offers. But while piling up your tour description with unique features, don’t forget you are convincing someone to buy the tickets to the tour you’re organizing.

Instead of focusing on the unique features, focus on the benefits they serve to the customers. Sell while describing.

For example , if you allow pets on the trip, don’t write, “ This is a pet-friendly trip. ” Instead, write, “ Bring along your pets because they deserve a vacation too. ” While doing so, you’re offering them an emotional value and not just an attractive selling point. After reading that, it’s less likely they won’t book your trip.

4. Write Tour Descriptions That Google Loves

Making your tour description SEO-friendly (Search Engine Optimization) is extremely important. Suppose you wrote an exceptional tour description that everybody would love, but it never reached your target audience. It is of no use.

Incorporating relatable keywords helps Google scan your description and show it to those searching for those specific keywords.

You honestly don’t have to be an SEO expert in using keywords effectively. Use a seed keyword that defines your tour on your title and repeat those keywords a few times in the description. Make sure not to over-concentrate your description with keywords. It impacts your reach negatively.

Here are a few free SEO tools that might come in handy while writing a tour description:

  • Google Keyword Planner
  • Google Trends
  • Ubersuggest

5. Make it Skimmable

Research conducted by Microsoft says that the average human attention span has drastically reduced from 12 seconds to just 8 seconds between 2000 and 2013. While your visitors are surfing through your website, they might be doing a bunch of other tasks or scrolling through other similar websites.

So, it’s important for you to make your tour description skimmable.

  • Structure your tour description prior to writing
  • Break it down into smaller sections
  • Use Bullet points to highlight the unique selling points
  • Write in smaller paragraphs.

You can take inspiration from the below pattern to design the flow for your tour description.

Introduction > Additional Details > Photos/Videos > Showcase Your Expertise > Testimonials > FAQs > CTA Button

Now that you’ve figured everything about writing a conversion-focused tour description, let’s move on to the actual part, the writing.

How To Write an Impactful Tour Description? Step-to-Step Guide with Examples

1. great title.

Oftentimes while concentrating too much on creating an exceptional tour description, we tend to neglect the importance of a great title. It is your title that a visitor sees before even clicking on your tour package. So make sure that your title explains your tour precisely within a few words.

Come up with a title that is short, specific and keyword-heavy. There’s no place for abstract and generic titles anymore.

For example , instead of writing “ Ghorepani Poon Hill Trek ,” write “ 7 Days Moderate Trek To Ghorepani Poon Hill ”. It includes the keywords “Ghorepani Poon Hill” and “Trek” and is specific about the trek’s time duration and difficulty level.

How to write tour Title

2. Start with a Hook

This is your time to show off your copywriting skills. Layout your first sentence in a way that grabs visitors’ attention and makes them wanna read more.

While reading the first few sentences, the visitor already starts making their decision if they seriously consider taking this trip or bounce back. So, shoot your best shot.

Emotions trigger humans. So, put an emotional value into it while giving them the gist of what they can expect during the trip.

Another effective way to do that is by turning recent reviews into a hook . But, while doing so, don’t take the most common ones like “very good trip” or “enjoyed so much.”

Look at the ones that are a little more descriptive and also reflect your overall trip experience. In this way, you’re not just telling the prospective customer what value you serve, but you’re sharing the experience of a customer, which seems more relatable and trustworthy.

For example , the recent trend of reviews on your wine-tasting trip is somewhere around the lines, “ still remember the taste of that Italian wine on my tongue after a month ” or “ tastiest wine I have ever tasted .” You can use those reviews in your opening line as “ Just like our visitors before you; you are going home with the taste of the tastiest Italian wine that is gonna stick on your taste buds for months .”

How to write tour description

3. Tell a Story

Don’t just explain what your trip is about. You’re not only trying to sell a product. Rather it’s your customers who are buying an experience from you.

Create a scene. They might have already had an imagination about the destination. Bring that imagination into life with your words. But keep it short. Use sensory words and vivid imagery. While reading your description, make them feel they are already traveling with you.

For example , for a city tour of Mumbai, don’t write, “ Our Mumbai city tour takes you to Gateway of India, Taj Hotel, Marine Drive, Antillia, Worli Sealink, Bandra Fort, Mannat, and Juhu Beach. Eat Local Cuisine at best spots .”

Instead, you can write, “ Explore the beautiful coastal city of Mumbai, hopping around all the tourist attractions with experienced and friendly guides. We will pick you up from Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminal and drive to the historical monument, Gateway of India. Alongside, witness the grand five-star hotel “Taj Hotel” that has survived a terrorist attack in 2008. Then you pass through Marine Lanes viewing Antilia, the most expensive house in the world. The next stop is Bandra, where you Bollywood fans get to see where Shahrukh khan lives, but reaching there is even more exciting as we drive you through the iconic Worli Sea Link, a 5.6 km long bridge suspended in the sea. Finally, it’s time to enjoy some vada pav while enjoying the lavish sunset at Juhu beach .”

Note : Use present tense to trick the readers into thinking it is actually happening.

How to write tour description with story telling

4. Bulleted List of Additional Details

After you have impressed the visitors with a clear picture of the trip, move into details. Be specific and direct. Put down all the necessary details. Preferably, list them in bullet points.

Break down the additional details into subheadings like:

  • Highlights of the Trip
  • Extra Services
  • Inclusions (Meals, Transportation)
  • Exclusions (Alcoholic Beverages, Souvenirs, Personal Expenses)
  • What to Pack/Carry (Gears and Safety Tools for Adventure Activities or Identity Proof)
  • How to Reach the Pickup Location
  • Cancellation Policy

Add additional tour details

5. Trip Facts/Overview

Don’t miss out on minute details. While planning a huge trip, we might not feel the necessity of listing down small things. But these tiny little details answer a lot of the traveler’s doubts.

You can put out a bunch of straightforward facts of your tour in a noticeable way so that the visitor would easily get an overview of the trip. Trip Facts might include the following details:

  • Way of Transport
  • Maximum Altitude
  • Accommodation
  • Fitness Level
  • Departure From
  • Best Season to Travel
  • Guiding Method

Tour Facts

6. Show, Don’t Tell

It’s Showtime! After you have provided the overview, unique features, selling points, and all the necessary details, it is the right time to bring their imagination into reality. Create a gallery of the best of the best photos of the tour and display them in the most appealing way.

Remember, it’s not a photography competition. It is alright to exhibit a few high-quality DSLR photos of just the destination. But prioritize capturing the moments. Take pictures and videos of travelers indulging in the activities, capture the beautiful smiles, the laughter, the joy.

It would be a cherry on top if you could collect pictures or videos from the travelers themselves and display them. It would add that raw and fresh feel to your tour description.

Your potential customers would find it more relatable and trustworthy if they saw the previous visitors actually enjoying the tour instead of listening to you describing your tour and telling them how to feel.

7. FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions)

No matter how deliberate and self-explanatory your tour description might be, there are always some questions running in the visitors’ minds. Make their job easier by answering them even before they question you.

Make a list of previously asked questions about the tour and write down a short and sweet answer to those questions.

This way, you can save a lot of time for your potential customers and yourself.

how to write tour faqs

8. Huge Visible CTA for Booking Reservation

Your job is still not done yet. The purpose of creating an epic tour description is to convert the visitors into customers. After going through the whole description, there is still a chance that the visitor would bounce back if they do not find a clear CTA (Call-To-Action) button for booking the tour.

So make sure to add an appealing, clearly visible CTA button asking them to book the trip. You can also use schemes like ‘an early bird discount’ for booking the trip a month/week prior.

Note : In addition to tour description, it is also beneficial to provide an itinerary to your visitors so that they can be prepared for everything before booking the trip. Itineraries are helpful, mostly for longer tours. You do not necessarily have to explain every single detail of the events. Just give them the outline of day-to-day activities.

DON’Ts While Writing a Tour Description

1. don’t boast.

The visitors are not here to know how many awards you own or what inspired you to conduct this tour. This might sound brutal, but they don’t care about you. They are here to see what is in it for them. So, shift the focus from yourself to the visitors and show them what you can do for them.

2. Avoid Using “Cliche” Adjectives

The overly-used adjectives like hidden-gem, mouth-watering food, crystal-clear river, snow-capped mountain, etc., are too generic and can be seen in every other tour description.

With excessive and irrelevant use, these adjectives have lost their meaning. It might be inevitable sometimes, but try to stay away from them as much as possible. You can, instead, use sensory words and verbs as they have a stronger impact.

3. Don’t Expose Trade Secrets

We know you want to give as many details as possible to impress your potential customers. But while doing so, don’t overshare. Some of the visitors go online to find the local spots or cafes to go by themselves. So, don’t give away your trade secrets for free. A few things are best kept as secret. Instead of being specific, use words like “the most popular winery in town,” “a century-old food joint,” etc.

4. Don’t Provide Unrealistic Expectations

It is normal to get carried away sometimes. We tend to write things that are too good to be true when we are trying to sell. It actually has more negative impact than positive.

First, the readers might find it hard to believe and bounce back. Second, even if they fall into the trap and come on board, they would be really disappointed and leave bad reviews on your booking site.

It is found that nearly 9 out of 10 consumers read reviews before making a purchase. So, those bad reviews affect your future sales.

5. Grammatical Errors

This might sound obvious, but oftentimes we come across minor grammatical errors or misspelled words. Seeing such basic mistakes, the visitor might question your authenticity. So, proofread before publishing any changes. There are a few tools available in the market, like Grammarly, that can help you with it.

Sample Tour Description

Now let’s bind all the above steps together and create a tour description that sells.

Ghorepani Poon Hill Trek (Moderate) – 7 days

Give your wanderlust soul a little break from routined cubicle life, and come with us to experience a firsthand Himalayan life. With a maximum elevation of 3210m, Ghorepani Poon Hill Trek is a perfect blend to give you that adrenaline rush without being too harsh on your knees.

Our former travelers say that the orange rays of light reflecting back from the Annapurna Range right onto their face during the sunrise at Poon Hill is the sight they rejoice for a lifetime.

Beginning the trip from the cultural hub of Kathmandu, we move forward on a scenic road trip to the tourism heaven of Nepal, Pokhara. The next morning, we drive you to Nayapul, from where the actual adventure begins. The steady burble of running water as you hike takes all your worries away. Passing by vibrant villages, hanging bridges, and pristine waterfalls, staying overnight at the warmest homes, crossing forests full of Rhododendron, you will finally reach Ghorepani.

The next morning is the highlight of the trip as you wake up early in the morning, hike up to Poon Hill to view the panoramic sunrise casting its magic all over the Annapurna Range. Wait, it’s not over yet. The way back is even more exciting as you would descend on a different route through a luscious forest with a view of the mountains all along. A beautiful Gurung village, Ghandruk marks the endpoint of the trek, and you will get to soak in the rich culture of locals as you bid bye to the Himalayas.

Additional Details

What to Carry

  • Warm woolen clothes
  • Reusable water bottle as we don’t consume single-use plastic bottles
  • Trekking shoes, backpack
  • Trekking stick (optional)
  • Protein bars/snacks (optional)

What’s Included

  • Domestic transfers (bus + flight)
  • Accommodation (three-star hotel + homestay during the trek)
  • Three standard meals per day (breakfast + lunch + dinner)
  • Licensed English speaking guides
  • First aid kit

What’s Not Included

  • International transfers
  • Alcoholic beverage
  • Personal expenses
  • Porter (if required)
  • Group Size – Max 20
  • Maximum Altitude – 3210 m
  • Transportation – Tourist Bus + Flight
  • Accommodation – Hotel + Homestay
  • Fitness Level – Anyone with Sound Health
  • Best Season to Travel – Spring
  • Tour Type – Adventure
  • Language – English + Nepali

Day 1 – Departure from Kathmandu. Road trip to Pokhara (6-7 hours). Overnight stay.

Day 2 – Drive to Nayapul (2 hours). Hike to Ulleri (4-5 hours).

Day 3 – Hike to Ghorepani (5-6 hours).

Day 4 – Sunrise trek to Poon Hill – 3210m (1-1.5 hours). Hike to Tadapani (5-6 hours).

Day 5 – Downhill hike to Ghandruk (3-4 hours). Overnight stay at Gurung Homestay.

Day 6 – Drive back to Pokhara (4-5 hours). Enjoy the evening on the lakeside.

Day 7 – Drive/Fly back to Kathmandu.

FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions)

  • Is it necessary to acclimatize during this trek?
  • How to prevent Altitude Sickness?
  • Do the guides speak English?
  • How safe is the drinking water on the Ghorepani Poon Hill trek?
  • Is this trek children-friendly?

Next time you write a tour description for your trip, keep these things in mind and implement them in your writing to send your message across. The changes might look small on the website, but they are gonna bring a drastic positive change to your business.

We have said it before, and we are gonna say it again. Your tour description is not just a description of your tour; it is a sales copy. Failing to write an imposing copy loses a prospective customer.

So, take your time, follow the above steps, Dos and Don’ts, and win your visitor’s heart.

If you have any confusion, question, or inquiry regarding this specific topic or if you want to add a few more tips to write an even better tour description, feel free to drop them in the comment section below.

Travel Safe.

Also, check out this article, How to Write a Travel Itinerary For Your Website .

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Tourism Teacher

150 fascinating types of tourism you didn’t know existed

Disclaimer: Some posts on Tourism Teacher may contain affiliate links. If you appreciate this content, you can show your support by making a purchase through these links or by buying me a coffee . Thank you for your support!

There are many different types of tourism that make up the tourism industry and I have created the most comprehensive list of the different types of tourism on the internet especially for you. Read on to learn all about the most common through to the most unusual and fascinating types of tourism…

Adventure tourism

Alternative tourism, backpacking, business tourism, cruise tourism, dark tourism, domestic tourism, enclave tourism, beach tourism, honeymoon tourism, inbound tourism, international tourism, marine tourism, mass tourism, mountain tourism, outbound tourism, package tourism, recreational tourism, regional tourism, sex tourism, sports tourism, urban tourism, visiting friends and relatives (vfr), winter tourism, agritourism, couchsurfing, culinary tourism, danger tourism, dental tourism, disaster tourism, doom tourism, flashpacking, genealogy tourism, health tourism, insta tourism, lgbt tourism, literary tourism, medical tourism, minimoon tourism, niche tourism, overlanding, overtourism, pilgrimage tourism, rural tourism, smart tourism, space tourism, special interest tourism, vegan tourism, village tourism, vinitourism, virtual tourism, volunteer tourism, accessible tourism, community based tourism, cultural tourism, educational tourism, ethical tourism, ethnic tourism, experiential tourism, food tourism, homestay tourism, nature tourism, orphanage tourism, philanthropic tourism, pro-poor tourism, responsible tourism, slow tourism, sustainable tourism, benefit tourism, aid tourism, ancestry tourism, astro tourism, atomic tourism, cemetery tourism, communism tourism, birth tourism, cold war tourism, extreme tourism, fashion tourism, fertility tourism, ghetto tourism, grave tourism, industrial tourism, iron curtain tourism, jihadi tourism, justice tourism, libel tourism, narco tourism, nuclear tourism, red tourism, reproductive tourism, suicide tourism, tefl tourism, tolkien tourism, animal tourism, celebrity tourism, babymoon tourism, black tourism, booze tourism, charity tourism, christian tourism, conference tourism, drug tourism, film tourism, garden tourism, gay tourism, genocide tourism, grief tourism, halal tourism, hen party tourism, historical tourism, holocaust tourism, jungle tourism, kosher tourism, last-chance tourism, lighthouse tourism, linguistic tourism, nautical tourism, nightlife tourism, oenotourism, photographic tourism, pink tourism, pleasure tourism, pokemon-go tourism, polar tourism, postmodern tourism, religious tourism, romance tourism, roots tourism, safari tourism, screen tourism, self-guided tourism, shark tourism, shock tourism, shopping tourism, slum tourism, stag party tourism, thanatourism, tombstone tourism, township tourism, war tourism, water tourism, wellness tourism, wildlife tourism, wine tourism, types of tourism: to conclude, most common types of tourism.

Lets start off by looking at the most common types of tourism that you are likely to come across.

Adventure tourism is one of the most exciting types of tourism. Adventure tourism is tourism which involves a degree of risk. It typically requires specialist skills or physical exertion. According to the Adventure Travel Trade Association, adventure travel includes activities involving physical activity, a cultural exchange, and a connection with nature. Some examples of adventure tourism activities include rock climbing, skydiving, white water rafting, mountain climbing, zip-lining and paragliding.

types of tourism

Alternative tourism is the umbrella term for a number of niche tourism forms, therefore it actually encompasses several different types of tourism. It is seen as the paradox of mass tourism. It typically involves travel that is seen as being personal and authentic and encourages interaction with the local environment, people and communities. Many types of tourism are classified ‘alternative’, such as; volunteer tourism , sustainable tourism , community tourism and medical tourism.

Backpacking is essentially the act of travelling with a backpack. It is typically associated with budget, long-term, independent travel and is common undertaken by travellers in their twenties. However, the nature of backpacking has, in recent years, changed. Whilst some tourists do fit the typically description of young, budget tourists on a gap year, there has been an emergence of older backpackers, backpacking families and wealthy backpackers (see-flashpacker).

Business tourism , or business travel, is one of the most important types of tourism there is, because it is so big! Business tourism is essentially a form of travel which involves undertaking business activities that are based away from home. The United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) defines tourists as people ‘traveling to and staying in places outside their usual environment for not more than one consecutive year for leisure, business and other purposes’, thus making business an important and integral sector of the tourism economy. Business tourism activities includes attending meetings, congresses, exhibitions, incentive travel and corporate hospitality.

beach beach chair blur casual

Cruise tourism refers to holidays which are entirely or partly based on a cruise ship. It enables tourists to experience a multi-centre holiday, whereby they spend time at various destinations throughout their trip. Types of cruise vary from small yachts to mega ships and can take place on the ocean, river or fjords. Cruise tourism is popular in the Caribbean, Mediterranean and Arctic amongst other destinations.

Dark tourism , also known as black tourism, thanatourism or grief tourism, is tourism that is associated with death or tragedy. The act of dark tourism is somewhat controversial, with some viewing it as an act of respect and others as unethical practice. Popular dark tourism attractions include Auschwitz, Chernobyl and Ground Zero. Lesser known dark tourism attractions might include cemeteries, zombie-themed events or historical museums.

Domestic tourism is one of the biggest types of tourism worldwide. Domestic tourism is the act of travelling for business or leisure within one’s home country. According to the UNWTO, a person must be away from their usual place of residence for at least one night to qualify as a domestic tourist. Popular destinations for domestic tourism include the USA, India and China.

Enclave tourism is tourism which occurs in a confined geographical space. Typically facilitated by tour operators, enclave tourism enables the tourist to have an all-inclusive experience within their holiday resort or holiday area. This will typically include food, drink and pre-organised activities and tours. Enclave tourism is one of the major types of tourism that is criticised for its lack of economic contribution to host communities and is often associated with package holidays and cruises.

Beach tourism is one of the most popular types of tourism. Beach tourism is when which the physical beach landscape is a prominent element of the holiday. This will often encompass the traditional seaside and package holidays that are popular in Europe. Beach tourism can involve a range of activities and hospitality services including water sports, boating and fishing.

A honeymoon is the holiday taken soon after a marriage has taken place. Newly-wed couples tend to spend significantly more money on a honeymoon than on an ordinary holiday, often choosing destinations renowned for their romantic natures. Popular honeymoon destinations include the Maldives, Hawaii and Bali.

man and woman walks on dock

Inbound tourism is the act of a person travelling to a destination within which they would not usually reside. They are essentially coming ‘in’ the country. Many destinations rely heavily on inbound tourism, for example Spain, the Caribbean or the Maldives . Inbound tourism is one of the most important types of tourism.

International tourism is the act of travellers crossing international boarders for the purpose of business or leisure. International tourism has grown considerably in recent years due to rises in disposable income and cheap airfares. International tourism is more popular in Europe, where countries are relatively close together, than it is in larger countries such as the United States of America, China or India. International tourism is one of the most important types of tourism around the world.

Marine tourism is one of the types of tourism which involves the use of boats as part of a holiday experience. It includes holiday whereby the tourist resides on a boat, such as a cruise or sailing trip. It can also include holidays which feature boating events or activities, such as regattas, boat tours or deep sea fishing. Also known as nautical tourism.

Mass tourism is the movement of large numbers of people who choose to undertake their leisure pursuits in a given area. Commonly associated with package tourism, mass tourism destinations tend to be associated with reduced cost or budget holidays and have extreme peaks and troughs depending on the season. Mass tourism is typically associated with negative connotations of environmental degradation, cultural erosion and overpopulation. Mass tourism is closely associated with overtourism . Mass tourism is another example of one of the types of tourism that is somewhat controversial.

Mountain tourism is tourism which takes place in a mountain region. It will typically involve mountain-oriented activities such as climbing, hiking, mountain bike riding or skiing. Popular mountain ranges that host tourism activities include the Alps, the Himalayas and the Andes .

Outbound tourism refers to the act of leaving one’s home country to visit a holiday destination abroad. Countries that are small or that do not have a variety of tourist provision tend to experience high levels of outbound tourism. Outbound tourism is also popular amongst countries that are within close proximity of desirable overseas holiday destinations. Outbound tourism is one of the biggest and most important types of tourism around the world.

Package tourism refers to organised holidays whereby individual components are combined and sold as a packaged product. Traditionally such holidays are organised by a tour operator and include accommodation, transport and transfers. Nowadays, however, there has been a rise in post-modern packages, which include a variety of components packaged together to suit the needs of niche tourism forms, for example a volunteer tourism package . There is also an increasing number of people opting to organise their own holidays through the use of dynamic packaging . Traditional package tourism is one of the few types of tourism that has been in decline in recent years, as consumers seek more alternative and niche experiences.

Recreational tourism is tourism whereby the ultimate aim is recreation. This broad term can be applied to most tourism forms which have leisure pursuits and enjoyment at their core. Recreational tourism covers a wide spectrum of activities, ranging from being a spectator at a sports event to taking cooking classes to hiking. Recreation is at the heart of most types of tourism!

Regional tourism is the act of travelling to a particular region for business or leisure for more than one night. A region is defined by geographical area designated by a governmental organisation or tourism bureau as having common cultural or environmental characteristics.

Sex tourism involves travel to a particular destination to pursue sexual services. Sex tourism is usually associated with prostitution, although the sex tourism industry also encompasses the search for ‘mail brides’, sex shows and sex slavery. Sex tourism is illegal in many countries. Popular sex tourism destinations include Amsterdam, Thailand and The Gambia. Sex tourism is one of the most controversial types of tourism.

Sports tourism can be categorised into four segments. Sports event tourism is the act of attending or watching major sporting events such as the Olympics or the Football World Cup. Nostalgia sports tourism is the act of visiting attractions of particular sporting significance such as the Calgary Olympic Park. Active sports tourism is when a tourist travels for a particular physical activity such as yoga, golf or surfing. Passive sports tourism is when a tourist travels with the intentions of spectating, for example to watch a tennis match at at Wimbledon Championships or to watch a Manchester United football match. Sports tourism is one of the biggest types of tourism in the world.

Urban tourism refers to the notion of undertaking tourist activities in a built up, or urban, area. Popular urban tourism activities include visiting monuments, observing architecture and making use of cultural amenities such as museums, local hospitality and entertainment. Urban tourism is the paradox of rural tourism . Urban tourism is one of the most popular types of tourism.

Visiting friends and relatives , commonly referred to as VFR, is a popular form of tourism worldwide. VFR constitutes the act of travelling to home or friends and family or to a place of mutual convenience. VFR is particularly popular in areas that have been subjected to high immigration such as Pakistan, Mexico and Poland .

Winter tourism involves leisure activities that take place in cold climates. Winter tourism takes place at different times of the year, depending on where in the world it is located. Typical winter activities include skiing and snowboarding, sledging, wildlife spotting and ice fishing.

New and emerging types of tourism

There are many types of tourism that are either new or are gaining in popularity. Lets take a look at what these are.

Agritourism , also referred to as agricultural tourism, argotourism or farm tourism is a subset of the rural tourism industry. It focusses on agricultural operations and involves tourist activities based in or around farms. This includes activities such as wine tours, horseback riding, clay bird shooting, animal petting and historical agricultural exhibits. Agritourism is more common than many people realise and is one of the types of tourism that often goes unnoticed.

Couchsurfing is based on the concept of hospitality, whereby tourists will stay on a couch, bed or other sleeping area in a person’s house, free of charge. Couchsurfing is more than just a means of finding accommodation; it is a hospitality and social networking service which facilitates cultural exchange worldwide. There are a range of apps that facilitate that facilitate couchsurfing .

Culinary tourism , one of the types of tourism also known as food tourism, is the act of pursuing unique and memorable eating and drinking experiences. Seen as a sub-sector of cultural tourism , it enables the tourist to try local authentic delicacies and partake in traditional food and drink activities. Such experiences are varied and can range from drinking vodka shots with your meal whilst travelling Russia to taking a cooking class in Northern Thailand.

Danger tourism, also commonly referred to as extreme tourism or shock tourism, is the act of travelling to a destination to undertake extreme activities. An extension of adventure tourism, this type of travel is often considered dangerous. Extreme tourist activities include cliff BASE jumping in Norway, volcano bungee jumping in Chille and climbing Mount Hua in China .

Dental tourism , also known as dental vacations or dental holidays, is the act of travelling to a destination to have dental work undertaken. It is a subset of the medical tourism industry. Tourists will typically visit destinations where the treatment is available at a lower cost than in their home country. Popular dental tourism destinations include India , Thailand, Bulgaria, Turkey and Vietnam. Dental tourism is another one of the types of tourism that has grown considerably in recent years.

Disaster tourism is the act of visiting locations that have been subjected to man-made or natural environmental disasters. It is considered a sub-sector of dark tourism . Disaster tourism destinations can be permanently popular with tourists, such as Chenobyl, or they can be popular only in the aftermath of the disaster, such as Kathmandu after the 2015 earthquake or New Orleans after the 2005 hurricane.

Doom tourism, also sometimes referred to as ‘last chance tourism’, involves travelling to destinations which have been depicted as being ‘doomed’ to near extinction as a result of man-made or natural causes. Doom tourism destinations include the Maldives, which are at threat from rising sea levels, the Dead Sea , which is rapidly reducing in size and Mount Kilimanjaro , where the glaciers have reduced by more than 80% over the last century.

Flashpacking is a play on the term backpacking. Flashpacking refers to travelling with a backpack for a prolonged period of time, just as is typically associated with backpacking. However a flash packer does not adhere to a budget in the way that a backpacker commonly would. Instead, they are generally regarded as wealthy or with a significant disposable income that they are willing to spend during their travels. This is one of the lesser known types of tourism.

Geneology tourism, also known as ancestry tourism or roots tourism, is tourism which involves travel to destinations that the tourist is connected to through ancestral means. In parallel to the emergence of a number of organisations aimed at tracing a person’s family tree, this tourism form has grown in recent years. Destinations such as Scotland, The USA and Canada are popular ancestral tourism destinations given the extent of past immigration in these countries.

Glamping is an abbreviation of the term ‘glamourous camping’. It refers rot the act of camping with additional amenities and resort-style products and services that are not associated with ordinary camping. Glamping has become popular in recent years and often includes the use of specialised equipments such as yurts or pods. Popular clamping destinations include the United Kingdom, Norway, Spain and the United States of America.

Health tourism, also known as medical tourism , refers to the act of travelling to another destination for the purpose of medical treatment. Motivations of medical tourists may include reduced costs for treatments or higher quality of provision. Medical tourists may seek life-saving treatments unavailable to them at home, cosmetic surgery or dental procedures amongst a range of other medical needs. Popular destinations include India, Turkey and Panama.

Insta tourism is a new form of tourism that has emerged in response to the use of the social media platform Instagram . Over one billion people use Instagram every month, sharing images from all over the world with their followers. Whilst some Instagram users are sharing content predominantly with their friends and family, others are paid ‘Influencers’ with thousands of loyal followers. Users are often inspired by photographs that they are exposed to through the social network, which has seen a rise in tourism to places that have been featured in said images, particularly those that are shared by large-scale Influencers.

LGBT tourism, also sometimes referred to as gay tourism or pink tourism, is a form of tourism marketed towards those who identify themselves as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender. It encompasses LGBT only tours, events and festivals aimed at an LGBT audience and ‘LGBT friendly’ holiday packages. Whilst remaining a niche tourism form, the notion of LGBT tourism is becoming increasingly recognised by the mass market, with operators such as Thomas Cook retailing holidays to this market segment.

Literary tourism involves travelling to places connected to fictional texts or places that are associated with their authors. A form of cultural tourism , literary tourists enjoy visiting destinations that are featured in books, author’s former or current homes and author’s gravestones. Popular literary tourism destinations include Stratford Upon Avon, the home of Shakespear and Edinburgh, the home of J.K Rowling.

Medical tourism , also known as health tourism, refers to the act of travelling to another destination for the purpose of medical treatment. Motivations of medical tourists may include reduced costs for treatments or higher quality of provision. Medical tourists may seek life-saving treatments unavailable to them at home, cosmetic surgery or dental procedures amongst a range of other medical needs. Popular destinations include India, Turkey and Panama.

A minimoon is a short break taken soon after a wedding. A minimoon will typically be taken in advance of a longer holiday or honeymoon, providing couples with the opportunity to save money and to spend time planning their trip. Typically for 2-4 days, a minimoon tends to be taken close to home and is considerably less expensive than a honeymoon.

Niche tourism is the opposite of mass tourism. It is tailored to meet the specific needs of consumers according to a particular niche interest. Generally small scale, niche tourism sectors are diverse and many. Most tourism types outlined in this post are niche types of tourism.

Overlanding is a form of tourism which involves long distance journeys with the use of off-road vehicles. It is generally associated with travelling ‘the road less travelled’ and places emphasis on the journey, rather than the destination. Overlanding is popular amongst adventurous travellers and popular overloading destinations include many parts of Africa, Australia and North America.

As defined by the World Tourism Organisation, overtourism is ‘the impact of tourism on a destination, or parts thereof, that excessively influences perceived quality of life of citizens and/or quality of visitor experiences in a negative way’. Overtourism is the result of growing tourist numbers in a given area. Destinations that have suffered at the hands of overtourism include Maya Bay in Thailand, Barcelona, Maccu Picchu and Mount Everest. In some cases efforts have been made to reverse or mitigate damages caused from tourism by restricting tourist numbers, raising taxes or closing attractions all together. Overtourism is one of the most criticised types of tourism around the globe.

Pilgrimage tourism is a branch of religious tourism. It involves the undertaking of a pilgrimage which may be the sole purpose of a person’s trip or a part of a wider holiday experience. Popular religious pilgrimages include Mecca in Saudi Arabia, the Vatican City in Rome and the Western Wall in Israel. Pilgrimage tourism is one of the few types of tourism that focus on religion.

According to the World Tourism Organisation,  rural tourism  is ‘a type of tourism activity in which the visitor’s experience is related to a wide range of products generally linked to nature-based activities, agriculture, rural lifestyle / culture, angling and sightseeing’. Rural tourism takes place in non-urban areas such as national parks, forests or mountain areas. Popular rural tourism activities include cycling, walking or hiking. Rural tourism is one of the few types of tourism that rebounded fast during the COVID-19 pandemic and its popularity is to to continue.

Smart tourism is one of the fastest growing types of tourism. Smart tourism is defined according to the technological capabilities of a particular destination, attraction or the tourist themselves. Many destinations are now modernising to include increased use of smart technology in their operations ranging from payment methods to interactive activities. One destination that is leading the way with their smart tourism industry is China, whereby tourists can use their phones to do simple tasks such as pay for taxis, order meals, check queue times and read information on the attraction that they are visiting through a supplied QR code.

Space tourism is a type of tourism that involves an interest in space. Space tourism (as in trips to space) is one of the most innovative types of tourism and many wonder whether it will actually come to fruition. Space tourism can also include visiting space-focussed museums, watching rocket launches or travelling to destinations popular for stargazing. Most recently, there has been a lot of commercial attention centred around the concept of travelling to space as a tourist; this is something that several companies are working to achieve in the near future, including Virgin Galactic and SpaceX.

Special interest tourism is another one of the types of tourism that is becoming increasingly popular. Special interest tourism is the provision of tourist activities focussed on a particular interest. Most forms of special interest tourism are also niche tourism forms. A paradox to mass tourism , special interest markets cater for a wide range of pursuits from art to golf to dancing.

Vegan tourism is tourism that is designed to meet the needs of vegans. Growing in popularity, there are a number of tourism providers to have begun to emerge designed specifically to suit the needs of vegan tourists. This includes hotels, tour operators and event organisers.

Village tourism involves travelling to a village on an organised tour or as part of independent travel. It is often encompassed within a rural tourism holiday, given that most villages are located in rural areas. This type of tourism is popular in Asia, where many tour groups will visit local villages to learn about their cultures and traditional way of life.

Vinitourism, enotourism, oenotourismn or wine tourism is tourism which centres around wine. It includes wine appreciation, wine tasting, vineyard tours and the buying and selling of wine. Popular vinitourism destinations include France, California, South Africa and Italy, which are all known for producing good standards of wine.

Virtual tourism is the act of using technology to simulate a travel destination and its features. While it is unlikely that virtual tourism will ever replace physical visits to a destination, it has been used as a powerful marketing tool. It is also used to enhance the user experience in various attractions. Virtual tourism most commonly consists of sequences of film and images although can also include 3D and sensory experiences.

Volunteer tourism is a type of tourism whereby an individual will travel abroad to a destination that is predominantly considered ‘undeveloped’ or ‘developing’ to offer their support to those in need. According to Steven Wearing, the founder of the concept, a volunteer tourist undertakes holidays that might involve aiding or alleviating the material poverty of some groups in society, the restoration of certain environments or research into aspects of society or environment.

Sustainability-focussed types of tourism

Sustainability is key in tourism management and is a big focus now and will continue to b e in the future. As a result, there are many tourism forms that are based on sustainability principles. Lets take a look at what these are.

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Accessible tourism is one of the most important types of tourism there is! This is because it is all about making the industry accessible for all. The United Nations World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO)states that accessibility for all to tourist facilities, products, and services should be a central part of any responsible and sustainable tourism policy. This includes making efforts for tourism to be inclusive for people regardless of any physical limitations, disabilities or age.

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Community based tourism is one of the types of tourism that has grown the most in recent years. Charity tourism is a term used to describe holidays that benefit both the traveller and the destination. Community based tourism is based on the premise of collective responsibility, allowing the local community to have an active involvement in the development and management of tourism in the area. It often involves rural, poor and economically marginalised populations, where individuals are given the opportunity to raise money through work as land managers, entrepreneurs, produce and service providers and employees.

Cultural tourism is the act of travellers visiting particular destinations in order to experience and learn about a particular culture. This can include many activities such as; attending events and festivals, visiting museums and tasting the local food and drinks. Cultural tourism can also be an unintentional part of the tourism experience, whereby cultural immersion (with the local people, their language, customs, cuisine etc) is an inevitable part of a person’s holiday.

Ecotourism is a form of tourism directed at preserving fragile environments and eco-systems. Ecotourism commonly occurs in threatened natural environments, where the intention is to provide conservation. Ecotourism efforts include building tourist facilities that have minimal impact on the natural environment, adopting the use of products such as compost toilets or solar-powered electricity. Ecotourism has become somewhat of a ‘buzz word’ in recent years and is closely related to the concept of sustainable tourism .

Educational tourism is tourism which involves a significant amount of learning. Richie et al, the academics who coined the term, define an educational tourist as a person who is away from their home town or country overnight, where education and learning are either the main reason for their trip or where education and learning are secondary reasons but are perceived as an important way of using leisure time. Educational tourism cab involve organised learning, such as a TEFL course or gaining a diving certification. It can also involve consequential learning, where tourists are educated through their travel experiences and the activities that they choose to undertake.

Ethical tourism refers to tourism that benefits the people and the environment involved. It is closely aligned with concepts of sustainable tourism and responsible tourism and is strongly advocated by a number of pressure groups and NGOs such as Tourism Concern. Ethical tourism is one of the types of tourism that is found within a range of tourism types.

Ethnic tourism is tourism which focusses on learning about and experiencing a particular ethnicity. Ethnic tourism is a form of cultural tourism . Ethnic tourism may involve a deep cultural experience, for example through volunteer work or staying in a homestay. It may also include a lighter cultural experience, for example by watching plays or visiting museums.

Experiential tourism is derived from the concept of experiential learning, whereby a person learns and creates meaning through their experiences. This tourism type focuses on immersion with a particular destination, its culture, people, customs and histories. Experiential learning if often associated with cultural tourism and educational tourism and is popular amongst backpackers, students and tourists looking for an authentic and deep travel experience.

Food tourism , also known as culinary tourism, is the act of pursuing unique and memorable eating and drinking experiences. Seen as a sub-sector of cultural tourism , it enables the tourist to try local authentic delicacies and partake in traditional food and drink activities. Such experiences are varied and can range from drinking vodka shots with your meal whilst travelling Russia to taking a cooking class in Northern Thailand .

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Geotourism is tourism that sustains or enhances the geographical features of a destination. Geotourism is one of the many types of tourism that adopt the principles of sustainable tourism at its core, with a focus on the synergy of the destination- it aims to bring together all of the elements of geographical character to create a fulfilling and rewarding tourism product. Examples of geo tourism may be holiday homes that are run locally and built with local products (e.g. stones) or local produce being sold to tourists.

Homestay tourism is a branch of community based tourism. A homestay is a form of lodging and hospitality, whereby a tourist will stay with in a local person’s residence. This tourism form is more than just an accommodation option; enabling the tourist to experience an authentic, rich cultural experience by being immersed in the lives of the hosts. Homestay tourism is popular with budget tourists, volunteer tourists , student exchange programmes and those looking for a cultural experience.

Nature tourism is a form of responsible tourism which focuses on natural areas, environmental conservation and leisure activities that involve nature. Popular nature tourism activities include bird watching, hiking, camping and wildlife spotting. Nature tourism is one of the most popular types of tourism, especially in rural areas.

Orphanage tourism is the act of tourists helping to assist in the running of orphanages. Tourists can volunteer their time or they can provide physical and financial resources to the orphanage. Orphanage tourism is most prominent in developing countries and there has been some recent negative publicity regarding the suitability of volunteers. Orphanage tourism is one of the more controversial types of tourism.

Philanthropic tourism refers to the act of doing good through tourism. Most commonly seen through large corporations, the concept of travel philanthropy has now become popular amongst individuals also. Travel philanthropy enables business or individuals to undertake or promote charitable causes that are either connected too or during their travel endeavours. Philanthropic tourism is one of the types of tourism that has been increasing in popularity in recent years.

Pro-poor tourism is not a sector of the tourism industry per se, rather it is an approach to the industry. Pro-poor tourism, often shortened to PPT, intends to provide net benefits to the poor. These can be economic, social or environmental benefits and can be achieved through a range of means such as taking part in charity tourism or purchasing a holiday package through a charitable operator. Pro-poor tourism is one of the types of tourism associated with sustainability.

Responsible tourism is one of the most important types of tourism! Responsible tourism which is undertaken in a responsible way. It has close ties with sustainable tourism and takes into consideration any environmental, social and economic impacts, minimising these where possible.

Slow tourism is based on the concept of speed. It involves travelling for a prolonged period of time at a slow pace, allowing the tourist a deep, authentic and cultural experience. An alternative tourism form, slow travel is typically associated with sustainable practices, taking into consideration the impacts of travel on the environment, society and economy. Slow travel can be undertaken in any destination, but is particularly popular amongst traditional backpacking routes in destinations such as South East Asia, Central America or Australia. Slow tourism is one of the types of tourism that has been steadily growing in popularity in recent years.

Sustainable tourism , similarly to responsible tourism , relies on the premise of taking care of the environment, society and economy. Sustainable tourism principles intend to minimise the negative impacts of tourism, whilst maximising the positive impacts. As defined in the Bruntland Report , sustainable tourism is ‘development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs’. Sustainable tourism is one of the most important types of tourism, if not THE most important type of tourism that there is.

WWOOFING stands for world wide opportunities on organic farms. It is a form of homestay tourism, whereby the tourist works on the farm in exchange for free board. WWOOFING has grown as an industry in recent years and is particularly popular in Australia, where many international tourists undertake agricultural work in order to extend the duration of their working holiday visa

Unusual types of tourism

There are also many different types of tourism that you probably haven’t heard of! Lets take a deeper look.

Benefit tourism is the term given to people who travel to a destination with the intentions of claiming social benefits. It is one of the most controversial types of tourism. Particularly prominent in the United Kingdom with the large number of migrants from the European Union and further afield, benefit tourism has become a hot topic in the media and in the average household. It was also a major part of the Brexit campaign.

Aid tourism, also referred to as charity tourism, is a form of travel which centres around charitable activity. It can involve helping those in need directly by joining a volunteer tourism programme, for example. It can also involve booking tours and travels or providing financial donations through organisations and tour operators which promote charitable tourism, such as Tourism Concern, Barefoot or the Travel Foundation .

Ancestry tourism, also known as genealogy tourism or roots tourism, is tourism which involves travel to destinations that the tourist is connected to through ancestral means. In parallel to the emergence of a number of organisations aimed at tracing a person’s family tree, this tourism form has grown in recent years. Destinations such as Scotland, The USA and Canada are popular ancestral tourism destinations given the extent of past immigration in these countries.

A branch of space tourism , astro tourism refers to the tourism which focusses around astrology. Astro tourism includes visiting facilities related to astronomy like observatories, astrology museums or astrology tours and events.

Atomic tourism is a new form of tourism that involves visiting sites that have been subjected to atomic activity. This includes museums, bunkers and power stations. Also referred to as nuclear tourism, popular destinations include Chernobyl, Nevada test site and Hiroshima.

Cemetery tourism, also known as grave tourism or tombstone tourism, is the act of visiting graves for enjoyment. Another one of the types of tourism classified as dark tourism , many tourists will choose to visit the gravestones of famous people or cemeteries which are known for their unusual appearance or for the grandeur of the tombstones housed there. A taphophile, or tombstone tourist, may be undertaking a pilgrimage or looking to observe the stone and epitaphs. They may also enjoy gravestone rubbing. Popular cemeteries amongst tourists include the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem, Recoleta Cemetery in Buenos Aires and Arlington National Cemetery in Washington.

Communism tourism is a form of tourism which involves visiting sites or areas that are associated with past and present communist regimes. A subset of dark tourism , popular communism attractions includes the Killing Fields in Cambodia, the Mao Mausoleum in Beijing and the Museum of Communism in Prague.

Birth tourism is another one of the types of tourism that is somewhat controversial in nature. Birth tourism is the act of travelling to another country to give birth. The intended outcome is that the child will receive citizenship of the country in which they are born. Birth tourism is typically focussed on developing countries such as the United Kingdom or the USA, as people from less developed countries travel here in the belief that they can offer their child a better quality of life here than in their home country.

Begpacking is a combination of both begging and backpacking. This term in the travel and tourism literature is a relatively new phenomenon and is predominantly defined as a type of traveller who travels to a less developed country with no means of financially supporting themselves. Said tourists therefore turn to begging in the hope that locals and other travellers will contribute to their travel funds.

Cold War tourism involves travelling to sites that had significance during the Cold War or which educate tourists about the Cold War. This could include attractions such as bunkers, boarder crossings, prisons or museums.

Extreme tourism, also commonly referred to as danger tourism or shock tourism, is the act of travelling to a destination to undertake extreme activities. An extension of adventure tourism, this type of travel is often considered dangerous. Extreme tourist activities include cliff BASE jumping in Norway, volcano bungee jumping in Chille and climbing Mount Hua in China.

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Fashion tourism is tourism which revolves around the concept of fashion. The most popular type of fashion tourism involves fashion events, such as Berlin fashion week or Pitti Immagine Uomo. Fashion tourism is also a branch of shopping tourism. In a wider sense, Insta tourism can also encompass notions of fashion tourism, particularly when influencers are working to promote particular clothing or accessories .

Fertility tourism is a branch of medical tourism, whereby a person travels to a destination for the purpose of fertility treatments. Fertility tourism most commonly occurs when treatment can be found in an alternative location to a person’s home at a cheaper price or higher quality. Fertility tourism is one of the types of tourism that has grown in popularity since the reduction of IVF treatments on the NHS and rise in private healthcare costs.

Ghetto tourism, also known as slum tourism, is one of the several types of tourism that involves travel to impoverished areas. During their visit, tourists will typical spectate or donate their time to help people less fortunate than themselves. Ghetto tourism has been criticised by many as being an unethical practice. It is common in many parts of the world including the townships of South Africa, the favelas of Brazil and the slums of India.

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Grave tourism, also known as cemetery tourism or tombstone tourism, is the act of visiting graves for enjoyment. One of the types of tourism that fall under the category of dark tourism , many tourists will choose to visit the gravestones of famous people or cemeteries which are known for their unusual appearance or for the grandeur of the tombstones housed there. A taphophile, or tombstone tourist, may be undertaking a pilgrimage or looking to observe the stone and epitaphs. They may also enjoy gravestone rubbing. Popular cemeteries amongst tourists include the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem, Recoleta Cemetery in Buenos Aires and Arlington National Cemetery in Washington.

Industrial tourism is tourism is one of the more unusual types of tourism, despite being very common! Industrial tourism is tourism which involves visiting a site of past or present industrial action. Popular industrial sites visited by tourists include the tea plantations in Sri Lanka, copper mines in Canada and the Airbus factory in France . Sites that many people may consider to be ugly and polluting are now being transformed or used as duel purpose for tourism.

Iron curtain tourism involves travelling to sites that had significance during the Cold War or which educate tourists about the Cold War. The ‘iron curtain’ was a term used by Winston Churchill to describe the notional barrier separating the former Soviet bloc and the West prior to the decline of communism, which followed the political events in eastern Europe in 1989. Iron curtain tourism includes visiting attractions such as bunkers, boarder crossings, prisons or museums.

Jihadi tourism, also referred to as jihad tourism or jihadist tourism is the act of travelling to destinations to seek contact and collaboration with Jihadi groups. This form of tourism has emerged in response to the growth of Jihadi communities in Syria. There have cases reported of young girls travelling to Syria to become ‘Jihadi brides’ and of men travelling to seek terrorist training or to fight for terrorist groups.

Justice tourism is the act of travelling with the intentions of improving the economic conditions of those who live in the destination. Justice tourism centres around positive cultural exchange between guest and host through one-on-one interaction, the protection of the environment, and political/historical education. Justice tourism has been heavily promoted in Palestine and Bosnia.

Libel tourism is the act of travelling to a destination which has favourable libel laws. First coined by Geoffrey Robertson, to describe forum shopping for libel suits, libel tourism is usually associated with the United Kingdom, where the laws for suing a writer for alleged defamation in a foreign jurisdiction are weaker than in other destinations, such as the United States. Libel tourism is an example of one of the more controversial types of tourism.

Narco tourism is a small sector of the dark tourism industry. It refers to tourists who want to visit places of significance in central and South America that are/have been of particular significance to the narcotics industry. Narco tourism has increased as a result of the American Crime drama starring Pablo Escobar which first aired on Netflix in 2015. This is one of the more unusual types of tourism.

Nuclear tourism is a new form of tourism that involves visiting sites that have been subjected to nuclear activity. This includes museums, bunkers and power stations. Also referred to as atomic tourism, popular destinations include Chernobyl, Nevada test site and Hiroshima. As people learn more about the nuclear industry, this is one of the types of tourism that has become more popular.

Red tourism is an important part of the Chinese tourism industry which centres around locations with historical significance to Chinese Communism. According to the Chinese government’s records, more than 800 million red tourism trips are made on average every year. popular red tourism destinations include Yan’an, Shaoshan, Nanchang, Jinggang Mountain and Zunyi. Red tourism is one of the best examples of types of tourism that have been steadily growing in recent years.\

Reproductive tourism, also known as fertility tourism, is one of the types of tourism that is a branch of medical tourism , whereby a person travels to a destination for the purpose of fertility treatments. Fertility tourism most commonly occurs when treatment can be found in an alternative location to a person’s home at a cheaper price or higher quality. Fertility tourism has grown in popularity since the reduction of IVF treatments on the NHS and rise in private healthcare costs.

Suicide tourism is the act of travelling to a destination to commit suicide. Also known as euthanasia tourism, there are several suicide tourism destinations which have become popular due to a lack of legalisation in this area including Mexico, the Netherlands, Switzerland and Cambodia. In these destinations it is common for a person to have an assisted suicide. Suicide tourism also extends to those choose to kill themselves in less official capacities. Hotspots include the Aokigahara Forest in Japan, the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco and Beachy Head in England. Suicide tourism is one of the most controversial types of tourism there is.

TEFL tourism is the act of travelling for the purposes of teaching English as a foreign language as part of a wider tourism experience. As defined in my PhD thesis  a TEFL tourist can be defined as ‘a person who travels outside of their usual environment to teach English as a foreign language, whose role shifts between tourist, educator and educatee at various points in their trip’. Popular TEFL Tourism destinations include China, Thailand, Costa Rica and Mexico. TEFL tourism is one of the types of tourism that many people are unfamiliar with, but it is definitely a sizeable industry!

Tolkien tourism is a branch of film tourism and literary tourism which focusses on the fictional stories of The Lord of the Rings. Especially prominent in New Zealand, tolkien tourism involves travelling to areas that were either featured in or are of particular significance to the films/books. Tolkien tourism is one of the lesser known types of tourism.

Other types of tourism

And lastly, lets take a look at some other types of tourism that did not fit into any of the above categories.

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Animal tourism , or wildlife tourism, is tourism that is centred around observation and interaction with animals. This includes watching animals in their natural habitat, such as bird watching or going on a safari. More controversially, it includes animals which are kept in enclosures such as zoos or petting farms. Many forms of animal tourism such as swimming with dolphins or riding elephants have been heavily criticised in recent years due to growing awareness around these issues.

Celebrity tourism is tourism whereby celebrities are the main attraction. Tourists may seek to visit a celebrity tourism destination or attraction because a celebrity is currently there or has previously been there. Many destination management organisations (DMOs) will use celebrity tourism to promote a destination or attraction. Tourists may also seek to visit places that are centred around a celebrity, even though the celebrity may have never actually been there themselves. Popular celebrity tourism destinations/activities include Hollywood, the Cannes film festival, Harry Potter studio and Madam Tussauds.

A babymoon is a holiday that is taken shortly before the birth of a child, usually in the second trimester. A babymoon is seen as a last chance to relax and take a break before the arrival of the baby. Babymoons have become very popular over the last decade and are popular amongst those living in the United Kingdom, Australia and the United States of America. Popular babymoon destinations include destinations that are not too hot and that do not have mosquito borne viruses Zika and Malaria.

Black tourism, also known as dark tourism or grief tourism, is tourism that is associated with death or tragedy. The act of dark tourism is somewhat controversial, with some viewing it as an act of respect and others as unethical practice. Popular dark tourism attractions include Auschwitz, Chernobyl and Ground Zero. Lesser known dark tourism attractions might include cemeteries, zombie-themed events or historical museums.

Booze tourism is tourism which focusses around the act of consuming alcohol. Whilst this may encompass activities such as wine tasting or brewery tours, it is most commonly associated with booze cruise excursions. A booze cruise is a boat ride that involves significant levels of alcoholic consumption whilst onboard. It may also include stops at bars, parties and drinking games. Booze cruises are popular in 18-30 party destinations such as the Greek islands and parts of Spain such as Magaluf or Ibiza.

Charity tourism, also referred to as aid tourism, is a form of travel which centres around charitable activity. It can involve helping those in need directly by joining a volunteer tourism programme, for example. It can also involve booking tours and travels or providing financial donations through organisations and tour operators which promote charitable tourism, such as Tourism Concern, Barefoot or the Travel Foundation .

Christian tourism is a sub-sector of religious tourism . It is is the largest segment of the religious tourism sector, which focusses on tourism involving religious practices or pilgrimages. Christian tourism activities include visiting destinations with significance according to Christian beliefs, such as Bethlehem or Jerusalem. It can also include visits to monasteries, staying in Christian camps, undertaking fellowship vacations, missionary travel, crusades, rallies and retreats.

Conference tourism is when a person travels for the purpose of taking part in a conference. Conference tourism is usually associated with business travel and constitutes part of the MICE tourism sector.

Drug tourism is the act of travelling to a particular destination due to its ease of access to illegal drugs that might be difficult to obtain or unavailable at home. Popular drug tourism destinations include Amsterdam, where Cannabis is legally sold, South East Asia for recreational and party drugs and many parts of South and central America for cocaine.

Enotourism, oenotourism, wine tourism, or vinitourism is tourism which centres around wine. It includes wine appreciation, wine tasting, vineyard tours and the buying and selling of wine. Popular enotourism destinations include France, California , South Africa and Italy, which are all known for producing good standards of wine.

Film tourism , also referred to as screen tourism is a sub-sector of the cultural tourism industry. It is focussed on the concept of film-making and producing, whereby tourists seek to visit locations which are either featured in films, or where recording of film takes place. Popular film-induced tourism destinations include The Beach in Thailand , Dubrovnik and Northern Island as featured in the Game of Thrones and Petra which is famously known for its use in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. Film set examples include the Harry Potter Studios in Hertfordshire, Universal Studios in California and Pinewood Studios in London.

Garden tourism is the act of visiting places with gardening significance. It can include famous gardens, botanical gardens and lesser-known gardens. It can also include gardening events, such as the Chelsea Flower Show or Kew Orchid Festival a well as gardening museums.

Gay tourism, also sometimes referred to as LGBT tourism or pink tourism, is a form of tourism marketed towards those who identify themselves as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender. It encompasses LGBT only tours, events and festivals aimed at an LGBT audience and ‘LGBT friendly’ holiday packages. Whilst remaining a niche tourism form, the notion of LGBT tourism is becoming increasingly recognised by the mass market, with operators such as Thomas Cook retailing holidays to this market segment.

Genocide tourism is a sub sector of dark tourism . It is tourism which is focussed on death and killing. Popular genocide tourism locations include Cambodia, due to the Khmer Rouge regime, Vietnam, where tourists can learn about the Vietnam War and Auschwitz, a famous German concentration camp.

Grief tourism, also known as black tourism, thanatourism or dark tourism , is tourism that is associated with death or tragedy. The act of dark tourism is somewhat controversial, with some viewing it as an act of respect and others as unethical practice. Popular dark tourism attractions include Auschwitz, Chernobyl and Ground Zero. Lesser known dark tourism attractions might include cemeteries, zombie-themed events or historical museums.

Halal tourism is tourism which is designed according to the needs of Islam. Popular with strict Muslims, Halal tourist resorts, hotels and attractions will only serve meat that has been suitably handled, will not serve alcohol and have separate swimming and spa facilities for men and women. Halal tourism is popular in Indonesia, Turkey and Croatia and is growing in a number of destinations across the world. This is one of the few types of tourism that is designed around a particular religion.

smiling tourist with passport near airplane on road

Hen party tourism is one of the types of tourism connected to marriage. Hen party tourism that takes place for the purpose of being involved in a hen or bachelorette party. Traditionally organised by the Maid of Honour, the event will involve at least one night away from the participant’s usual place of residence. Hen party destinations are typically areas that have a strong nightlife scene such as Las Vegas , Ibiza or London.

Historical tourism involves visiting places of historical significance. Tourists generally travel to such places with the intentions of education and enjoyment. Visiting historical areas or attractions may constitute just one part of a larger tourism experience.

Holocaust tourism is a sub-sector of the dark tourism industry. It involves travel to destinations which were subject to macabre activities involving the Jewish population during World War Two. Popular Holocaust tourism destinations include Jewish concentration camps, such as Auschwitz, Anne Frank’s house in Amsterdam and a range of associated museums throughout central and Western Europe.

Jungle tourism is essentially tourism that occurs in the jungle. It can encompass a range of eco and sustainable travel forms and there are many such resorts that have opened up in recent years in the Amazon Rainforest , Rwanda, India and Costa Rica to name a few. Tourists will also often engage in adventure activities during their jungle stay. Popular activities include zip lining, jungle safaris, canoeing and canopy walks.

Kosher tourism is tourism which is designed to meet the needs of Orthodox Jews. Meals are designed according to religious requirements and accommodations are within walking distance of Jewish Synagogs.

Last-chance tourism, better known as doom tourism, involves travelling to destinations which have been depicted as being ‘doomed’ to near extinction as a result of man-made or natural causes. Doom tourism destinations include the Maldives, which are at threat from rising sea levels, the Dead Sea, which is rapidly reducing in size and Mount Kilimanjaro, where the glaciers have reduced by more than 80% over the last century.

Lighthouse tourism is tourism which includes visiting lighthouses. This may be to appreciate the panoramic vistas in the area or as a result of lighthouse tourism development whereby the lighthouse may have been redeveloped to serve a range of tourism purposes such as accommodation or museums.

Linguistic tourism is tourism which involves learning a language. This could be part of a formal course or it could be part of wider cultural experience. Popular destinations for language learning include much of Spain and South America to learn Spanish, France for French and Italy for Italian.

Nautical tourism is a form of tourism which involves the use of boats as part of a holiday experience. It includes holiday whereby the tourist resides on a boat, such as a cruise or sailing trip. It can also include holidays which feature boating events or activities, such as regattas, boat tours or deep sea fishing. Also known as marine tourism.

Nightlife tourism is one of the types of tourism that involves nighttime activities. Nightlife tourism usually centres around nightclubs or parties but can also include evening shows, concerts, gigs etc. Nightlife tourists are renowned for their large consumption of alcohol and drugs. Some tour operators specialise in this type of holidays, such as Thomas Cook’s 18-30 holidays. Popular nightlife destinations include Ibiza, Las Vegas and Kuta, Bali .

Oenotourism, ecotourism, wine tourism, or vinitourism is tourism which centres around wine. It includes wine appreciation, wine tasting, vineyard tours and the buying and selling of wine. Popular Oenotourism destinations include France, California, South Africa and Italy, which are all known for producing good standards of wine.

Photographic tourism is the act of visiting a particular destination with the intention of capturing it on camera. This branch of special interest tourism is often associated with picturesque destinations that tourists wish to photograph for their unique appearance, unusual imagery or personal interests. The scope of photography ranges from landscapes, artworks, cultural imagery, wildlife, food and architectures. Photographic tourism is one of the most fun types of tourism to take part in and helps to capture all of those wonderful memories!

Pink tourism is one of the types of tourism that is not known on a large scale. Pink tourism, also referred to as gay tourism or LGBT tourism, is a form of tourism marketed towards those who identify themselves as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender. It encompasses LGBT only tours, events and festivals aimed at an LGBT audience and ‘LGBT friendly’ holiday packages. Whilst remaining a niche tourism form, the notion of LGBT tourism is becoming increasingly recognised by the mass market, with operators such as Thomas Cook retailing holidays to this market segment.

Pleasure tourism refers to the sense of pleasure. It is one of the types of tourism which centres around the pursuit of happiness, satisfaction and enjoyment, which is achieved through travel and tourism-based endeavours. Pleasure tourism can encompass most types of tourism.

Pokemon-Go tourism arose in response to the release of the augmented reality game in 2016. Through a partnership with the UNWTO, Niantic (the developer) helped to promote global travel, whereby gamers would search for characters in a range of localities around the world. Whilst 2016 saw the explosion of this gaming phenomenon, its popularity has since declined, meaning that it is one of the few types of tourism to experience a significant decline in recent years.

Polar tourism refers to tourism that takes place in the Arctic and Antarctic regions. It is generally focussed around the concept of preservation and sustainability. This is one of the most controversial types of tourism because visiting the area generally has a significant environmental impact .

Postmodern tourism is one of the types of tourism which represents tourism activities and behaviours that are new or emerging as opposed to traditional. Postmodern tourism is commonly associated with emerging destinations and developing types of tourism.

Religious tourism , also known as faith tourism, refers to the act of travelling for the purposes of religious pilgrimage, missionary, or interest. A branch of cultural tourism , religious tourism constituted some of the earliest tourism forms. Not all religious tourists conform to beliefs of or religious practices of the attractions/destinations that they are visiting which can cause conflict between visitors and worshippers. Popular religious tourism destinations include Israel, Mecca and Varanassi.

Romance tourism is associated with holidays that facilitate the cultivation of emotional and physical relationships between tourists and members of the host community. This can be incorporated into a range of types of tourism too, such as honeymoon tourism or a babymoon. However, romance tourism is often associated with notions such as ‘Mail bride’ or ‘Thai bride’ and various degrees of sex tourism . Popular destinations for romance tourism include Thailand and The Gambia.

Roots tourism, also known as genealogy tourism or ancestry tourism, is tourism which involves travel to destinations that the tourist is connected to through ancestral means. In parallel to the emergence of a number of organisations aimed at tracing a person’s family tree, this tourism form has grown in recent years. Destinations such as Scotland, The USA and Canada are popular ancestral tourism destinations given the extent of past immigration in these countries. This is one of the types of tourism that has been growing in demand in recent years.

A safari is a type of wildlife expedition. Traditionally, tourists would seek to hunt wildlife, but nowadays it is centred around observation and photography. Safaris are most commonly found in Africa, although they can be found worldwide. Safari holidays are typically high priced attracting those with a moderate to high disposable income. This is one of the types of tourism that is particularly popular with wealthy travellers as trips often (although not always) come with high price tags.

Screen tourism, also referred to as film tourism is a sub-sector of the cultural tourism industry. It is focussed on the concept of film-making and producing, whereby tourists seek to visit locations which are either featured in films, or where recording of film takes place. Popular film-induced tourism destinations include The Beach in Thailand, Dubrovnik and Northern Island as featured in the Game of Thrones and Petra which is famously known for its use in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. Film set examples include the Harry Potter Studios in Hertfordshire, Universal Studios in California and Pinewood Studios in London. This is another example of one of the types of tourism that has been increasing in popularity in recent years.

Self-guided tourism is tourism which os organised and facilitated by the tourist. Through their own research and the use of self-guided maps, tours and instructions, the tourist is in sole control of their travel itinerary.

Shark tourism is a form of tourism which involves sharks. It tends to centre around the conservation of sharks and is often considered a form of ecotourism . Popular activities include taking boat trips to areas where sharks can be observed, either from the deck, or from inside a cage that is lowered under the water, known as shark cage diving. Shark tourism may also constitute part of a volunteer tourism project.

red and black temple surrounded by trees photo

Shock tourism, also commonly referred to as danger tourism or extreme tourism, is the act of travelling to a destination to undertake extreme activities. An extension of adventure tourism , this type of travel is often considered dangerous. Extreme tourist activities include cliff BASE jumping in Norway, volcano bungee jumping in Chille and climbing Mount Hua in China.

Shopping tourism is the art of shopping during a person’s travels or leisure time whilst on holiday. It can range from shopping at duty-free in the airport, to visiting street markets to shopping in large shopping malls. Shopping tourism may be the sole purpose of a person’s trip or it may be just one component. In some parts of the world it may include haggling for the best price, whilst in others the prize may be awarded only to the highest bidder, for example in an auction. This is an example of one of the types of tourism that is popular in destinations with low prices or specific goods for sale, such as custom-made dresses in Hoi An or fake goods at the markets in Shanghai.

Slum tourism, also known as ghetto tourism, involves travel to impoverished areas. During their visit, tourists will typical spectate or donate their time to help people less fortunate than themselves. Slum tourism has been criticised by many as being an unethical practice. It is common in many parts of the world including the townships of South Africa, the favelas of Brazil and the slums of India. Slum tourism is another one of the types of tourism that is often viewed as being controversial.

Stag party tourism is another example of one of the types of tourism associated with marriage. Stag party tourism is tourism that takes place for the purpose of being involved in a stag or bachelor party. Traditionally organised by the Best Man, the event will involve at least one night away from the participant’s usual place of residence. Stag party destinations are typically areas that have a strong nightlife scene such as Las Vegas , Ibiza or London.

Thanatourism, also known as black tourism, dark tourism or grief tourism, is tourism that is associated with death or tragedy. The act of dark tourism is somewhat controversial, with some viewing it as an act of respect and others as unethical practice. Popular dark tourism attractions include Auschwitz, Chernobyl and Ground Zero. Lesser known dark tourism attractions might include cemeteries, zombie-themed events or historical museums.

Tombstone tourism, also known as cemetery tourism or grave tourism, is the act of visiting graves for enjoyment. One of the several types of tourism that is a branch of dark tourism , many tourists will choose to visit the gravestones of famous people or cemeteries which are known for their unusual appearance or for the grandeur of the tombstones housed there. A taphophile, or tombstone tourist, may be undertaking a pilgrimage or looking to observe the stone and epitaphs. They may also enjoy gravestone rubbing. Popular cemeteries amongst tourists include the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem, Recoleta Cemetery in Buenos Aires and Arlington National Cemetery in Washington.

Township tourism is a type of slum tourism in South Africa. Townships (suburban areas designated for black occupation by apartheid legislation) are visited on tours organised by local tour operators. They can also be the base for volunteer tourism projects which provide a form of pro-poor tourism to the area. Township tourism is another one of the types of tourism that is pretty controversial.

War tourism involves travel for recreational purposes to former or current areas of war. The recent trend of visiting conflict zones has influenced the rise of several travel companies specialising in sending tourists on packaged trips to destinations such as Syria, Somalia, Iraq and Israel. Some describe this type of tourism as a form of dar, danger or extreme tourism.

Water tourism is tourism which involves the use of natural or man-made water areas. It is associated with leisure activities that involve water such as fishing, swimming or water sports.

Wellness tourism , a branch of health tourism, is the act of travelling for the purpose of physical or psychological wellbeing. The wellness travel sector has seen exponential growth in recent years, with a significant rise in holidays which incorporate an element of recuperation. Popular wellness tourism destinations include Iceland for spa breaks, India for Ayurveda treatments and Bali for yoga retreats.

Wine tourism , enotourism, oenotourism or vinitourism is tourism which centres around wine. It includes wine appreciation, wine tasting, vineyard tours and the buying and selling of wine. Popular wine tourism destinations include France, California, South Africa and Italy, which are all known for producing good standards of wine.

As you can see, the tourism industry is broad and diverse. There are many different forms of tourism, some have been around for decades, whereas others are only just emerging.

Whilst I have tried to make this post as comprehensive as possible, I appreciate that there may be a type of tourism that I have missed! If you enjoyed this article, I am sure you will love these too:

  • 21 Fascinating Types of Tourists Around The World
  • 50 Best Beaches in Europe Everyone Must Visit
  • The 13 Best Rivers of Europe
  • Which countries are using the Euro? + 8 Interesting facts about the Euro!
  • Which countries are in the European Union? + interesting facts!

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20+ Best Words to Describe Travel, Adjectives for Travel

Travel, the exhilarating journey of exploration and adventure, beckons wanderlust souls from every corner of the globe. It is the art of embarking on expeditions to discover new places, cultures, and experiences. Words to describe travel encompass a vibrant spectrum, ranging from “wanderlust,” the insatiable desire to wander, to “serendipity,” the joy of stumbling upon unexpected treasures. These words not only encapsulate the essence of travel but also ignite the flames of curiosity, inspiring travelers to set forth on new escapades and create cherished memories along the way.

Table of Contents

Adjectives for Travel

Here are the 20 Most Popular adjectives for travel:

  • Unpredictable
  • Mesmerizing
  • Exhilarating
  • Enlightening
  • Wanderlust-filled
  • Serendipitous
  • Unforgettable
  • Transformative
  • Adventurous

Adjectives for Travel Destination:

  • Picturesque
  • Captivating
  • Breathtaking

Adjectives for Travel Writing:

  • Descriptive
  • Informative
  • Entertaining
  • Enthralling

Adjectives for Travel Experience:

  • Heartwarming
  • Eye-opening
  • Life-changing

Adjectives for Travel Lover:

  • Enthusiastic
  • Open-minded
  • Free-spirited

Words to Describe Travel with Meanings

  • Exciting : Full of thrilling or stimulating experiences.
  • Unpredictable : Not easily foreseen or determined.
  • Mesmerizing : Captivating and enchanting, holding one’s attention.
  • Exhilarating : Thrilling and invigorating, creating excitement.
  • Enlightening : Providing insight and knowledge; informative.
  • Enriching : Enhancing personal growth and understanding.
  • Unexplored : Not yet discovered or fully investigated.
  • Wanderlust-filled : Filled with a strong desire to travel.
  • Epic : Grand in scale and significance; remarkable.
  • Diverse : Varied and showing a range of differences.
  • Serendipitous : Occurring by chance in a delightful way.
  • Thrilling : Exciting and causing a sense of adventure.
  • Unforgettable : Leaving a lasting impression or memory.
  • Transformative : Bringing about profound and positive change.
  • Inspiring : Fostering motivation and creative thoughts.
  • Cultural : Relating to the customs and traditions of a society.
  • Adventurous : Inclined to seek and embrace new experiences.
  • Curious : Eager to explore and learn new things.
  • Uncharted : Not yet mapped or explored; unknown territory.
  • Intrepid : Fearless and adventurous; brave in facing challenges.

Example Sentences for Travel Adjectives

  • The exciting roller coaster left us breathless.
  • Unpredictable weather delayed our flight plans.
  • The mesmerizing sunset painted the sky orange.
  • The bungee jump was truly exhilarating and thrilling.
  • The documentary provided an enlightening glimpse into history.
  • The study abroad program was an enriching experience.
  • He set out to explore the unexplored regions of the world.
  • Their wanderlust-filled hearts led them on new adventures.
  • The hike through the mountains was an epic adventure.
  • The city’s population is incredibly diverse and multicultural.
  • It was a serendipitous encounter that changed their lives.
  • The amusement park ride was fast and thrilling .
  • Our vacation was full of unforgettable memories.
  • The meditation retreat was a transformative journey.
  • Her story was inspiring and touched many hearts.
  • The museum showcased various cultural artifacts.
  • They embarked on an adventurous backpacking trip.
  • The curious child asked many questions about stars.
  • The expedition aimed to explore uncharted territory.
  • The intrepid explorer ventured into the unknown jungle.

Explore More Words:

Words to Describe Luxury

Words to Describe Bike

Words to Describe Transportation

How to describe travel in writing?

Describe travel through vivid imagery, capturing the sights, sounds, and emotions of your journey, immersing readers in the world you’ve explored.

Why travel is important in life?

Travel broadens horizons, fosters personal growth, and provides invaluable experiences, creating memories that last a lifetime.

What travel teaches you?

Travel teaches adaptability, cultural understanding, and a sense of wonder, unveiling diverse perspectives and enriching your outlook on life.

Adjectives for Travel

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About the author.

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Hi, I'm USMI, engdic.org's Author & Lifestyle Linguist. My decade-long journey in language and lifestyle curation fuels my passion for weaving words into everyday life. Join me in exploring the dynamic interplay between English and our diverse lifestyles. Dive into my latest insights, where language enriches every aspect of living.

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Inspirassion

67 adjectives to describe tourist.

The intrusive tourist .

Asiago was hardly known before the war to foreign tourists , but many Italians used to visit it , especially for winter sports .

Eight days later a tall , bronzed young man with yellow hair and quick blue eyes , in what an observant British tourist noted in his journal as " the not unpicturesque garb of a border - ruffian , " helped a dazed but very pretty young woman on to the rear platform of the Pullman car attached to the east - bound overland express at Ogden .

Niagara has suffered far more from the sentimental tourist and the landscape artist than from all the power - houses , and one has to make a strenuous effort of detachment from its excursionist associations to appreciate its sublimity .

Going right among the people , as you will , you can find out more in a week than the average tourist ever discovers .

There have been very few of those melancholy accidents that we so often hear of from Switzerland , because , probably , considerably fewer tourists attempt these mountains than attempt the Alps .

In thinking of the Yosemite , Angela had , half - unconsciously , pictured herself and Nick Hilliard alone in the valley together , separated from " mere tourists " by a kind of magic wall .

I have said that the life of the hotel was upon the veranda , and so it was at meal - time and for the casual tourist staying a day with a steamship to or from New Zealand or the United States ; but to the resident of Tahiti , the American , Britisher , or non - Latin European , the place of interest in Papeete other than the clubs was a small porch approached from the street by a few steps .

Weld , a more humble tourist , put into his book , that in Norfolk , Virginia , he found half the town ready to fight the other half on the French question .

He increased his resources in a gentlemanly fashion by genealogical research , directed mostly toward the rehabilitation of ambiguous pedigrees ; and for the rest , no other man could have fulfilled more gracefully the main duty of the Librarian , which was to exhibit the Association 's collection of relics to hurried tourists " doing " Lichfield .

To cross the Andes on mule - back along the regular routes is a feat comparable to the feats of the energetic tourists who by thousands traverse the mule trails in out - of - the - way nooks of Switzerland .

Being so favorably situated for the stream of Yosemite travel , the more adventurous tourists cross over through this glorious gateway to the volcanic region around Mono Lake .

In the old Papal Palace of Avignon , Dickens , seventy years ago , saw essentially the same things that a keen - eyed American tourist of today would see .

In regard to a number of the finest of the photographic illustrations in the volume the author gratefully acknowledges his obligations to the Canada Pacific Railway Company , without whose assistance it would have been impossible to reach many of the sublime and romantic places here portrayed ; until very recently known only to the adventurous red Indian hunter , but now brought within the reach of any enterprising tourist .

An intelligent home tourist in 1813 , says , " It concerned me to observe that this park presents at this time a neglected appearance , unworthy of a metropolitan royal park , adjoining to the constant residence of the court . "

She postures shamelessly before the delighted tourists with woven skeins of homeward - flying pelicans , fringes of wild duck , black spotted on crimson , and cheap jewellery of opal clouds .

The gradients are discouraging to any but determined tourists .

Notwithstanding all the arguments that may be advanced in favor of games at chess and back - gammon , as exercises in mental gymnastics , and of playing cards as affording pleasant diversion for mixed parties , the diligent tourist , like the industrious student , should not squander much of his time at it .

And here let us note a favourable contrast between our dramatic tourist , bold in conception , free in execution , and those compatriots of our own , authors and authoresses , who write travels merely because they are artists in ink , yet without any adequate notion of the duties and privileges of such an artist .

One especially enthusiastic lady tourist had kept up her Gattling fire of questions until she had thoroughly mastered the geography of the country .

" I now rejoice that a mad freak brought me here to these woods and fields , for otherwise I should probably never have learned to know the region ; for it has very little reputation abroad , and there is , in fact , nothing here to attract exhausted and surfeited tourists .

The following is the postscript to a letter by his father , S. T. C. , addressed to Sir Humphry Davy , Keswick , July 25 , 1800 : " Hartley is a spirit that dances on an aspen leaf ; the air that yonder sallow - faced and yawning tourist is breathing , is to my babe a perpetual nitrous oxide .

The whole was a fiction , ( no new trick for a fireside tourist , ) for Mrs. Radcliffe had never seen Haddon Hall .

24 After the struggling tides of fugitive tourists , and overlapping the waves of Belgian refugees , there came new streams of panic - stricken people , and this time they were French .

You and this funny tourist !

67 adjectives to describe  tourist

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tourism general

Promotion Academy Publishes Updated Globetrotting Glossary

tourism glossary

The tourism glossary now includes over 200 terms, phrases and popular acronyms that are unusual to the view and travel industry. Available online or as adenine PDF download, the tourism industry terms and lexicon are free to to public. 

MORE: Find A Tourism Expert To Speak At Your Next Occurrence

Benefits of to tourism glossary...

Having a frequently updated business and tourism our glossary is a necessity in today’s complex environment. It guaranteed consistent communication between everyone in an organization. It and makes sure that everyone is viewing and using and data in an same way. She creates a necessary standard over an industry. And, as it’s becoming increasingly harder in organizations to make sense out off details additionally govern it properly, a well-managed glossary of tourism technical is one of the best ways in ensure that everyone is what with and same information.  tourism: the business starting providing and marketing services and facilities for leisure travelers. Thus, the concept of tourism is of direct concern to governments ...

Why be a tourism industry glossary important?

A business or trade lexicon can  avoid poor communication real unify the departments in your organization. To tourism select english offers transparency and ensures this data and business terms have precise and tacit company and industry-wide. It's also a useful tool used training new employees. Best practices for how to define terms and how they are classified builds trust and findability in owner data press clear for users.

The glossary of tourism terms has past created and is maintained by the educational staff at the 501(c)(3) nonprofit Tourism Technical | tourismacademy.org the adenine service to the industry, new professionals, and those eager at advance theirs careers and share traveling experiences with others. 

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Related articles, unlocking cost-effective training: 6 reasons into choose online promotion ambassador programs with tourismacademy.org, power of collaboration: tourism sell associations and the tourism academy, convert caribbean tourism: insights from stephen ekstrom, ceo to the tourism graduate.

tourism description words

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What Is Tourism in Your Own Words?

By Anna Duncan

Tourism is a vast industry that encompasses various activities, including traveling, sightseeing, and exploring new cultures. In simple words, tourism can be defined as the act of visiting a place for the purpose of leisure or business.

The Importance of Tourism:

Tourism plays a vital role in the economy of many countries worldwide. It creates job opportunities, generates revenue for local businesses and governments, and helps to preserve cultural heritage. Additionally, tourism provides a platform for people to learn about different customs and traditions.

The Different Types of Tourism:

There are various types of tourism based on the purpose of travel. Some of them are:

  • Adventure Tourism
  • Eco-Tourism
  • Cultural Tourism
  • Medical Tourism
  • Sports Tourism
  • Business Tourism

Adventure Tourism:

Adventure tourism involves physical activities such as hiking, trekking, bungee jumping, rock climbing, etc. This type of tourism is popular among thrill-seekers who want to experience something exciting and challenging.

Eco-Tourism:

Eco-tourism involves traveling to natural areas that are not heavily populated or commercialized. The aim is to learn about the environment while promoting conservation and sustainability.

Cultural Tourism:

Cultural tourism involves traveling to places with significant cultural value such as museums, historical sites, and festivals. It provides an opportunity for people to learn about different cultures and traditions.

Medical Tourism:

Medical tourism involves traveling abroad for medical treatment or procedures that may be unavailable or expensive in their home country.

Sports Tourism:

Sports tourism involves traveling to attend or participate in sports events such as football games, tennis tournaments, or the Olympics.

Business Tourism:

Business tourism involves traveling for business purposes such as attending conferences, meetings, or exhibitions.

The Benefits of Tourism:

Tourism brings many benefits to both tourists and locals. Some of them are:

  • Creation of job opportunities
  • Generate revenue for local businesses and governments
  • Promotion of cultural heritage and traditions
  • Preservation of natural resources
  • Strengthening of international relations and understanding

The Conclusion:

9 Related Question Answers Found

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Are you really in love? How expanding your love lexicon can change your relationships and how you see yourself

tourism description words

Associate Professor of Philosophy and Fellow of the University of Tennessee Humanities Center (UTHC), University of Tennessee

Disclosure statement

Georgi Gardiner receives funding from the University of Tennessee. She has previously received funding from the American Council for Learned Societies (ACLS) and the Institute for Humane Studies (IHS).

University of Tennessee provides funding as a member of The Conversation US.

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Illustration of heart composed of multicolored, overlapping speech bubbles

What is love? Could those feelings you label as love be something else?

What about infatuation? Obsession? A passing fancy? Being smitten? Enthrallment? Beguilement? Lust? A crush? A squish ? Platonic admiration? Why do people categorize some attachments as romantic love but not others?

Suppose Holly meets someone on vacation. They quickly become romantically and sexually intimate and seem deeply compatible. Holly is from the U.K., where the term “ holiday romance ” is commonly used and part of her vocabulary. Because she knows this term, she can apply its social scaffolding to this relationship. She understands that the rapid emotional intimacy and apparent compatibility she experienced likely sprang from fleeting circumstances that aren’t meant to last.

Someone from the U.S., however, where this term is rarely used , might more easily interpret this rapid intimacy as a sign of deep, significant lifelong compatibility.

Judging that you are in love can be powerful . It can affect your feelings, relationships and even your sexuality. But how do people judge whether they are in love?

This, I argue, depends on your linguistic community . That is, how the people around you talk about romance, relationships and attraction.

I am a philosopher who studies categorization schemas – how, when and why people label things such as emotions, sexuality and health. I examine the effects of those labels on how people understand themselves and on their well-being, and how alternative taxonomies and labels can make people understand and shape the world differently.

What happens when a culture instills a broader, more encompassing definition of love, or a narrower, more restrictive definition? How does having a richer vocabulary of words in the neighborhood of love change how we understand it?

The social scaffolding of words

Self-ascriptions of love depend on two things . The first are introspective judgments about your feelings: Are you attracted to the person? Energized by them? Nervous around them? And the second is what you think love is: Does love require caring about the person? Thinking about them a lot? Sexual attraction? When how you feel about a person and what you think love is match up, you self-ascribe love. That is, you judge that you are in love.

Words provide social scaffolding. That is, they create expectations and norms that steer how you behave and react to other people. And vocabularies vary by culture and era.

Categorizing an attachment as a “holiday romance” doesn’t just describe it but can also change its course. The label affects what Holly notices and values about the time she spends together with another person and whether she is inclined to pursue a long-term relationship.

Silhouette of two people sitting on a swing in the mouth of a heart-shaped cave, watching the sun set over the ocean

Vocabulary is empowering . Having an even more expansive vocabulary would allow Holly to experiment with different labels, and these could shape her relationships in different ways.

For example, the term “ eintagsliebe ,” based on the German word for “mayfly” and translating to “one day’s love,” refers to an intense and brief relationship. “ Comet lovers ” have a deep romantic bond but see each other only intermittently, living far apart the rest of the time without much contact. A “ holibae ” is a perennial date that happens only when you’re visiting home for the holidays. See also “ zipcoding ” – dating someone only when you’re both in the same ZIP code.

The dictionary of polyamory

Words create possibilities, and the recent surge of interest in polyamory , or having more than one romantic relationship at a time, has introduced substantial amounts of new vocabulary .

An “anchor partner” is a central figure in your romantic life. A “nesting partner” is a partner you live with. And a “satellite partner” has emotional and physical distance from your home. Vocabularies sculpted by traditional monogamous relationships might not distinguish between these types of attachments because they see non-cohabitating partnerships only as temporary transition phases that end by breaking up or become serious by moving in.

By rejecting the mainstream social scaffolding about relationships, polyamory creates the need for more terms to describe innovative relationship structures. And those words in turn create more possibilities for how polyamorous people interpret and structure their attachments.

Backs of group of people with their arms links around each other, backlit by the sun

“ New relationship energy ” is the buzzing excitement of a new relationship. “ Established relationship energy ” is the comfort of a stable, long-term relationship. These emotions are especially salient within polyamorous relationships, where the excitement of a new relationship can arise alongside the comfort of preexisting relationships.

But monogamous relationships also benefit from these linguistic innovations. Monogamous relationships might also involve new relationship energy, established relationship energy, and nesting, anchor and satellite partnerships, even if they aren’t labeled as such. Such self-understandings affect the values, emotions, commitments and beliefs people use to forge relationships.

Conceptual tourism

Conceptual schemas, or the words and concepts we have for understanding ourselves and the world around us, have permissive flexibility : People can disagree about what words like “love,” “crush” and “bi-curious” mean. Disagreement doesn’t mean that someone is wrong. Rather, flexibility allows us to explore different ways to understand the world and ourselves. We can be conceptual tourists.

Suppose Nell develops an ambiguous attachment to a new classmate. She finds her charming, witty and pretty, but it isn’t a clear-cut case of romantic attraction. Nell can adopt a broad or narrow definition of the word “crush,” depending on whether her feelings meet how she defines a “crush.” Altering what she means by a “crush” would change whether she labels herself as having a crush. This, in turn, could affect whether Nell sees herself as queer or straight.

If she knows other terms to describe her feelings, Nell might interpret them as “ alterous attraction ,” which is the desire for emotional intimacy in a way that is neither platonic nor romantic. She might seek a “ queerplatonic relationship ,” which resembles a conventional romantic relationship but without sex or conventional romance. Or, if her feelings are intense, Nell might self-ascribe “ limerence ,” which is obsessive infatuation.

Two people sitting back to back on grass, hands loosely intertwined

Self-ascribing labels affects what people notice about themselves, how they interpret their feelings and what they appreciate about their attachments. What she pays attention to fuels particular emotions and can bolster certain attitudes, like profound gratitude, that might distinguish love from crushes.

For example, if Nell interprets herself as having a crush, she may become more attuned to the excitement she feels around her classmate, which can fuel those emotions in a feedback loop. If she labels her feelings as platonic admiration, she might instead interpret herself as being nervous about impressing her new classmate.

Nell can experimentally adopt different labels – alterous attraction, queer, crush, limerence, straight and more – to see which fit best. Some labels might better match her emotions. And those labels might also change her emotions and become self-fulfilling prophecies .

Conceptual tourism can be a valuable cognitive skill. It requires the mental dexterity to inhabit rival conceptual schemas and try on new interpretative terms. Doing so can increase your self-understanding, cultivate self-determination and even help steer your heart.

Culture unavoidably provides a lexicon of attachment that shapes how you relate to other people. A culture that is more deliberate about the words it uses for different kinds of attraction can help people bond in new and more open-minded ways.

It’s also a great motivator for education: Learning new words can help you improve your love life.

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Sebastian Stan Pushes Back After Reporter Uses the Word ‘Beast’ to Describe ‘A Different Man’ Character With Facial Disfigurement: ‘I Have to Call You Out’

By Ellise Shafer

Ellise Shafer

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A Different Man

Sebastian Stan corrected a journalist at the Berlin Film Festival press conference for his new film, the psychological thriller “ A Different Man ,” when they used insensitive language to describe a character with facial disfigurement.

The film follows Edward (Stan), who, after undergoing facial surgery, becomes fixated on another man playing him in a stage production based on his former life. In the first act of the movie, Stan wears heavy makeup to portray a character with a facial disfigurement, and after the surgery, his face returns to its typical look.

“I have to call you out a little bit on the choice of words there, because I think part of why the film is important is because we often don’t have the right vocabulary,” Stan responded. “I think it’s a little bit more complex than that, and obviously there are language barriers, but you know, ‘beast’ isn’t the word. And I think, ultimately, it’s just interesting to hear this word because I think that’s one of the things the film is saying — we have these preconceived ideas and we’re not really educated on how to understand this experience in particular.”

“That’s one of the things I love about the movie,” he continued. “He’s offering you a way to look at it, and hopefully, if you can have the same objective point of view while you’re experiencing the film, maybe you can kind of pick apart the initial instincts that you have, and maybe those aren’t always the right ones.”

Following its Sundance premiere, “A Different Man” is set to debut in competition at Berlin Film Festival on Friday night. Directed by Aaron Schimberg, the film also stars Renate Reinsve and Adam Pearson.

The film was well-received at Sundance , where the audience was left laughing and gasping at the film’s twists and turns. Variety ‘s Peter Debruge wrote in his review that the film “asks what it means to be ‘normal,’ and whether, if we could wave a magic wand and ‘correct’ those same aberrant qualities which set us apart, that’s really something we’d want.”

Pearson, who has neurofibromatosis, spoke at the Sundance premiere about how he was able to find common ground with Stan while discussing their characters.

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