ART

Australian Regional Tourism

Inspiring development

regional tourism organisations australia

Creating market intelligence

regional tourism organisations australia

Empowering policy & programs

regional tourism organisations australia

Australian Regional Tourism (ART) is the peak national body representing regional tourism practitioners. ART acts as a hub for collaboration, cooperation, ideas generation, knowledge sharing, networking and so much more.

On behalf of its members, ART advocates for sustainable regional development and amplifies key messages to government, other industries and industry sectors, researchers, educators and the public.

regional tourism organisations australia

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Tourism industry associations

Starting out in the tourism industry can be a little daunting if you're not sure of who is who and how the industry works. Use our list of regional, state and national industry groups for essential networking and industry advice.

Regional tourism organisations

The state has a number of membership-based regional tourism organisations (RTOs), which together represent more than 4,000 regional tourism businesses. The RTO network is widely regarded as one of the most influential in Australia and will work with the government to facilitate investment in new tourism product. The 13 RTOs are:

  • Brisbane Economic Development Agency
  • Bundaberg Tourism
  • Capricorn Enterprise
  • Fraser Coast Tourism and Events
  • Gladstone region
  • Destination Gold Coast
  • Mackay region
  • Outback Queensland
  • Southern Queensland Country
  • Sunshine Coast
  • Tourism Tropical North Queensland
  • Townsville Enterprise
  • Tourism Whitsundays

State-based tourism organisations

Queensland tourism industry council (qtic).

QTIC is the state's peak body for tourism and a not-for-profit membership organisation representing members' interests and maintains strong industry representation in all relevant forums. The Council co-ordinates the Queensland Tourism Awards for excellence, trade shows, conferences and industry functions and offers membership services providing businesses with resources, networking opportunities and access to valuable workforce and industry programs. QTIC also manages the Quality Tourism Accredited Business program and Star Ratings program for the Queensland industry.

Adventure Queensland

Adventure Queensland is the peak backpacking and independent travel industry body for the state. It was formed to enhance the commercial viability of its members by providing marketing support and representation to all levels of government.

Association of Marine Park Tourism Operators (AMPTO)

AMPTO is the peak industry body for marine tourism within the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park.

Caravanning Queensland

Caravanning Queensland joins the peak industry bodies for Queensland caravan dealers, manufacturers, camping suppliers, service providers as well as caravan park operators through 2 related associations – the Caravan Parks Association of Queensland for owners and operators of caravan parks and the Caravan Trade and Industries Association for Queensland for the caravan, manufactured home and camping industry.

Queensland Hotels Association (QHA)

QHA is the peak industry body in Queensland for the hotel and hospitality industries, accommodation providers, resorts, theme parks, convention centres and casinos.

Queensland Information Centres Association (QICA)

QICA is the key industry body for visitor and tourist information centres in Queensland.

National tourism organisations

Accommodation association.

The Accommodation Association is a member-owned, not-for-profit organisation representing motels, hotels, apartment hotels, caravan/tourist parks, self-contained units, bed and breakfast and resorts.

Australian Chamber – Tourism

Australian Chamber – Tourism is the tourism arm of the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry and advocates to the Australian Government on issues of common interest for Australian tourism businesses.

Australian Federation of Travel Agents (AFTA)

AFTA represents travel agents in Australia.

Australian Resident Accommodation Managers Association (ARAMA)

ARAMA is a membership based, not for profit, peak industry body which represents the interests of people who are involved in 'management rights'. ARAMA members operate management rights or are associated with the management rights industry.

Australian Timeshare Holiday Ownership Council (ATHOC)

ATHOC is a not-for-profit industry body representing all interests involved in the Australian timeshare industry with membership categories covering resorts, timeshare owners, developers and promoters, marketers, exchange companies and organisations providing professional advice to the timeshare industry.

Australian Tourism Export Council (ATEC)

Australian Tourism Export Council's mission is to build better business relationships for members and to represent the inbound tourism industry to government and business leaders.

Ecotourism Australia (EA)

Ecotourism Australia is the peak national body for the ecotourism sub-sector. EAs head office is in Queensland. They manage certification programs, resources and membership services for the sustainable and nature tourism sectors.

Exhibition and Event Association of Australasia (EEAA)

EEAA is the peak industry association for the business event industry. This includes businesses organising trade and consumer expos and events, and venues such as convention and exhibition centres, as well as event organisers and suppliers.

Short Term Accomodation Assocation Australia (STAAA)

STAAA's purpose is to bring together stakeholders in the short term accommodation industry to address challenges and identify opportunities for growth. They provide a range of services to educate and support hosts and managers in the short term accommodation industry.

Tourism and Transport Forum (TTF)

TTF is the peak industry group for the Australian tourism, transport and aviation sectors.

Also consider...

  • Find out who's who in the tourism industry from the DestinationQ website.
  • Learn how to promote your tourism business on the Tourism and Events Queensland website.
  • Find out more about Queensland's tourism industry .
  • Last reviewed: 4 Dec 2020
  • Last updated: 14 Dec 2023

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Australia’s online library of regional research

[In]Sight: Economic diversification and the competitiveness of regional Australia

  • Author: Regional Australia Institute
  • Country: Australia

[In]Sight is an online index and interactive map tracking the competitiveness of Australia’s 560 Local Government Areas (LGA) and 55 Regional Development Australia (RDA) regions, unlocking thousands of insights into regional Australia.     [In]Sight’s economic diversification indicator (within the Business Sophistic ....

A community built on the pond: Social cohesion, sport tourism and the World Pond Hockey Championships

  • Author: Awde, Cory
  • Journal Name: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses
  • Publisher: University of Ottawa (Canada)
  • Published Location: Canada
  • ISBN: 9780494464649
  • Country: Canada
  • State/Region: New Brunswick

Neoliberalism and globalization have contributed to an environment of economic uncertainty in rural Canada, raising concern for the social well-being of its residents. Despite immense challenges, many rural communities possess positive elements of social cohesion that can be used by the community in the pursuit of their communal objecti ....

A longitudinal study of the use of the web by regional tourism organisations

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The information-intensive nature of the tourism and travel industry suggests an important role for Web technology in the promotion and marketing of tourist destinations. The rapid development of the Internet is also having profound impacts on the industry. In fact, travel and tourism has become the single largest category of products sold over th ....

A Profile of Cellar Door Personnel: An Exploratory Case Study Analysis of Two Australian Wine Regions

  • Author: Williams, Kim Marianne
  • Journal Name: Journal of Human Resources in Hospitality & Tourism
  • Journal Number: 12.1
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis Ltd.
  • Published Location: United Kingdom
  • ISBN: 15332845
  • State/Region: Victoria, South Australia

This exploratory study investigated the profile of cellar door personnel working in two wine districts in Australia, the Yarra Valley, Victoria, and the McLaren Vale, South Australia. The project examined the demographic profile, employment relationships, career mobility, and the perceived skills and knowledge essential for cellar door or tasting ....

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  • Journal Name: Australian Planner
  • Journal Number: 50.3
  • ISBN: 0729-3682
  • State/Region: Queensland

In coastal areas, extreme weather events, such as floods and cyclones, can have debilitating effects on the social and economic viability of marine-based industries. In March 2011, the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority implemented an Extreme Weather Response Program, following a period of intense flooding and cyclonic activity between Dece ....

ABS Tourism Statistics

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  • Author: Australian Bureau of Statistics
  • State/Region: All

Includes data over various years on accomodation, domestic tourism, employment by industry, visitor expenditure, and visitors. Report Locationhttp://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/[email protected]/ViewContent?readform&view=ProductsbyTopic&Action=Expand&Num=3.16 ....

Advancing North Queensland: Investing in the future of the north

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  • State/Region: North Queensland

Advancing North Queensland outlines the five priority areas that have been identified to accelerate the government's efforts to develop and diversify North Queensland's economy. These are road infrastructure, water security, research and innovation, tourism, trade and investment, and North Queensland stadium. Report LocationClick here to view ....

An analysis of amenity-led rural economic development in northeast region: A spatial simultaneous equations approach

  • Author: Kahsai, Mulugeta Saare
  • Publisher: West Virginia University
  • Published Location: United States -- West Virginia
  • ISBN: 9781109440652
  • Country: United States

In a matter of just a few decades, the economic landscape of rural America has changed in fundamental ways. Industries onceconsidered the backbone of rural economies have been  transformed by globalization and marketing. Others, such as tourism and amenity-based economies or the service sector, have emerged to replace the traditional na ....

Application of resiliency theory and adaptive cycles as a framework for evaluating change in amenity-transition communities

  • Author: Hoffmann, Scott L.
  • Publisher: Utah State University
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  • ISBN: 9780549797005

In recent decades, many rural, natural resource-dependent communities have experienced ubiquitous and oftentimes substantial economic decline due to downturns in their commodity-oriented industries. In spite of this, communities with access to varying forms of natural capital have experienced an upsurge in activities such as recreation, ....

Benefits and costs of tourism for remote communities: case study for the Carpentaria Shire in north-west Queensland

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  • Publisher: CSIRO Sustainable Ecosystems
  • ISBN: 192094902X

This report summarises the results of a research project that studied the relationship between tourism and Carpentaria Shire Qld, as a host region and a host community. Tourism has become a significant industry in Carpentaria Shire since sealed roads ensured easy access by travellers. The regional community is small and tourism has ....

Change through tourism: Resident perceptions of tourism development

  • Author: Doh, Minsun
  • Publisher: Texas A&M University
  • Published Location: United States -- Texas
  • ISBN: 9780549415374
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Many view tourism as a tool for community development. Especially in the rural areas experiencing economic hardships, tourism often is considered an instrument for revitalization of a local economy helping to improve quality of life and protect natural and cultural resources. However, many researchers have raised concerns about an over ....

Comparing resident attitudes toward tourism: Community-based cases from Arctic Canada

  • Author: Stewart, Emma J.
  • Publisher: University of Calgary (Canada)
  • ISBN: 9780494512142
  • State/Region: Arctic Canada

This research examines attitudes toward local tourism development held by a sample of stakeholders and residents in three Arctic Canadian communities: Churchill, Northern Manitoba, Cambridge Bay and Pond Inlet, both in Nunavut. This research is premised on the idea that complex phenomena such as tourism are best understood through the l ....

Consequences of tourism-based growth on rural communities' quality of life: A comparative study of Liberia and La Fortuna, Costa Rica

  • Author: Matarrita Cascante, David
  • Publisher: The Pennsylvania State University
  • Published Location: United States -- Pennsylvania
  • ISBN: 9780549906001
  • Country: Costa Rica

Tourism has become a source of income generation for many rural communities seeking ways to improve their livelihoods. This is particularly the case of amenity-rich areas which attract tourists because of their natural endowments. Often tourism-based growth is reflected in economic and infrastructural improvements. Nevertheless, such gr ....

Contribution of Indigenous Culture to Tourism Development – A Case in Central Australia

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  • Journal Name: International Journal of Culture and Tourism Research
  • Journal Number: Vol. 3, No. 1
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Tourism is a major contributor to Australia's economy.  Tourists and ther expenditure, from the provision of infrastructure, direct and indirect employment, and opportunities for cultual exchange impact upon many aspects of Australian life. Even a modest increase in the gorwth of tourism could see potentially significant benefits accrue in r ....

Creative destruction and rural tourism planning: The case of Creemore, Ontario

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This study assesses the relationship between planning and creative destruction in the village of Creemore, Ontario. The study has four objectives. The first is to describe the evolution of tourism in Creemore by tracking change in three variables: investment, visitor numbers and resident attitudes. Second, is to describe past and presen ....

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​At a regional level, we work closely with the five Regional Tourism Organisations, who play a key role in marketing their particular regions. Other bodies include the nine Regional Development Commissions.

Regional Tourism Organisations (RTOs)

Tourism regions

WA i s divided into five tourism regions, each with its own RTO, which is the peak marketing and management body for that particular region. We provide funding to the RTOs so they can deliver region-focused intrastate campaigns and support our interstate and international marketing. The RTOs are our eyes and ears on the ground and an important link between us and the local industry. They build strong relationships with local tourism organisations and local governments to achieve better tourism outcomes and make the most of marketing activities. In most cases, the RTOs take the lead in marketing activities with the support of these organisations.

How they can help

  • Provide marketing opportunities to tourism business to encourage direct bookings
  • Keep you informed of industry news and updates
  • Trade coaching and representation
  • Facilitate industry development opportunities

Find out more

Map of WA's five tourism regions

regional tourism organisations australia

Download the map of WA's five tourism regions boundaries (PDF 988KB) .

Contact your local RTO:

  • Australia’s South West
  • Australia’s North West
  • Australia’s Golden Outback
  • Australia’s Coral Coast
  • Destination Perth

Regional Development Commissions

Western Australia has nine Regional Development Commissions whose role is to promote the economic and social development of a particular part of the State.

  • Work with stakeholders to develop a tourism strategy for the region

View the list of Regional Development Commissions in WA .

Who's who in tourism

Last Reviewed: 2024-01-17

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CULTURE, HERITAGE AND ARTS REGIONAL TOURISM PROGRAM

27 Jan 2022

CULTURE, HERITAGE AND ARTS REGIONAL TOURISM PROGRAM

The Culture, Heritage and Arts Regional Tourism (CHART) Program is an Australian Government program administered by the Australian Museums and Galleries Association (AMaGA) in 2021–22aims to promote domestic tourism into regional and remote parts of Australia to assist community arts and cultural organisations—including museums, galleries and historical societies—to recover from the impacts of COVID-19.

Not-for-profit incorporated community arts and cultural organisations can apply for grants of up to $3,000 (plus GST where applicable) to support eligible activities, which includes, for example:

  • additional COVID-19 cleaning and hygiene measures
  • cleaning, conservation or development of collections or exhibits
  • purchasing computer hardware and/or software to facilitate the digitisation of the collection, including website modifications (website modifications may include improving online access)
  • purchasing other computer equipment to facilitate better collection management such as computers, printers and scanners
  • improving conditions for volunteers and collections through the purchase of furniture, display cabinets, better kitchen facilities or other related items
  • assisting with costs of reopening or restoration or holding a community event that promotes the collection, including guest speakers and/or performers for such events, or otherwise facilitating recovery from the impact of COVID-19.

Funding application period: Applications open on 5 November 2021 and will remain open until 29 April 2022 or until all funds are allocated, whichever is sooner. Applications will be assessed in batches of 50–100.

  • Regional Arts Network

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Industry partners

Creating and maintaining strong partnerships with industry to sustain a thriving visitor economy.

Who we work with

We work in close partnership with the tourism industry including:

  • individual operators
  • local government
  • the Australian Government
  • major accommodation chains
  • Traditional Owners Corporations
  • communities
  • the wider travel sector.

Industry entities

We provide governance and strategic support for major Victorian tourism entities. Our responsibility is to oversee and manage the government’s relationship with these entities.

We work with them to deliver strategic objectives so that they can contribute to Victoria’s visitor economy. These organisations play a role in positioning Victoria as a world-leading tourism destination.

Tourism and Events entities

  • Visit Victoria
  • Melbourne Convention Bureau
  • Australian Grand Prix Corporation 
  • Puffing Billy Railway Board
  • Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Trust

Victoria's regional tourism network

The Victorian regional tourism network is made up of regional tourism organisations.  Each coordinates local efforts to support tourism growth within their region.

We work closely with the network to gather insights direct from industry. This informs the development of policy, guides investment, and training and advice directly to operators.

The Regional Tourism Boards also work with us to help with crises preparedness and recovery.

Regional Tourism Boards

  • Daylesford Macedon Tourism
  • Destination Gippsland
  • Destination Phillip Island
  • Grampians Tourism
  • Great Ocean Road Regional Tourism
  • Mornington Peninsula Regional Tourism
  • Murray Regional Tourism
  • Tourism Greater Geelong and the Bellarine
  • Tourism North East
  • Yarra Ranges Tourism

From 2023, Regional Tourism boards will start the transition to form a network of Visitor Economy Partnerships (VEPs). These partnerships will be independent destination management organisations. They represent their region as official voices to government.

Visitor Economy Partnerships

  • Tourism Midwest Victoria

Other entities

  • Bendigo Regional Tourism

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To what extent are regional tourism organisations (RTOs) in Australia leveraging the benefits of web technology for destination marketing and eCommerce?

  • Published: 29 March 2011
  • Volume 11 , pages 341–355, ( 2011 )

Cite this article

  • Lois Burgess 1 ,
  • Belinda Parish 1 &
  • Carole Alcock 1  

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The information-intensive nature of the tourism and travel industry suggests an important role for Web technology in the promotion and marketing of tourist destinations. The rapid development of the Internet and WWW is having profound impacts on the industry. In fact, according to Tourism Australia, travel and tourism has become the single largest category of products sold over the Internet (Tourism White Paper, Destinations online: approaches for regional tourism organisations, Centre for Regional Tourism Research, Southern Cross University, 2007 ). With reports of travel purchases being one of the fastest growing segments of the Internet community it is no surprise that the number of tourism operators on the Web has increased considerably over the past few years. This paper presents the results of a longitudinal study that seeks to determine if and to what extent, Regional Tourism Organisations (RTOs) in Australia are leveraging the benefits of Web technology for destination marketing and eCommerce. The study was undertaken over an eight year period from 2000 to 2008, using the Extended Model of Internet Commerce Adoption (eMICA) (Burgess and Cooper, International conference on telecommunications and electronic commerce, Dallas, November, 2000 ). A significant finding of this study is that despite assertions that the Tourism industry is leading the field in terms of eCommerce adoption (Buhalis and Law, Information and communication technologies in tourism, Ljubljana, Springer, Berlin, 2007 ), and this may hold true with some providers in the sector (for example, hotels and airlines) it does not appear to be the case with Australian RTOs who have been slow to embrace eCommerce. The results of the study also add support to the premise of eMICA, that is, in developing commercial websites, businesses (particularly, SMEs) in this industry sector typically start simply by establishing a presence on the Web and build on functionality over time, as their experience with and expertise in the use of Internet and Web technologies increases and they become more aware of the benefits the Web has to offer.

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Burgess, L., Parish, B. & Alcock, C. To what extent are regional tourism organisations (RTOs) in Australia leveraging the benefits of web technology for destination marketing and eCommerce?. Electron Commer Res 11 , 341–355 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10660-011-9077-1

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Australian Regional Tourism (ART) and Tourism Tribe Partnership

Australian Regional Tourism (ART), the peak national body representing regional tourism practitioners, is pleased to announce its affiliation with Tourism Tribe, a renowned global digital learning platform dedicated to the tourism industry. This partnership marks a significant step in expanding digital support and learning opportunities for ART’s members.

As a respected hub for collaboration, cooperation, ideas generation, knowledge sharing, and networking within the regional tourism sector, ART recognises the importance of providing its members with access to cutting-edge resources and expertise. Through its affiliation with Tourism Tribe, ART aims to empower its community with discounted access to Tourism Tribe’s esteemed Digital Academy.

This partnership follows closely on the heels of Tourism Tribe’s innovative collaboration with Australia’s Coral Coast Regional Tourism Organisation, which set a precedent for destination marketing organisations (DMOs) worldwide to offer world-class digital support and learning to their members. Tourism Tribe’s Digital Academy offers a range of benefits, including fortnightly support calls with digital marketing experts, access to a comprehensive library of digital marketing resources, updates on the latest industry trends and technologies, and exclusive discounts on additional services.

“We are thrilled to welcome Australian Regional Tourism (ART) as our affiliate partner,” said Liz Ward, CEO of Tourism Tribe. “Our mission is to democratise access to top-quality digital learning and support for tourism businesses, regardless of their size or location. With ART joining our affiliate program, regional tourism professionals and tourism operators across Australia will now have the opportunity to harness the power of digital marketing and business development.”

Through this affiliate partnership, ART aims to enhance its value proposition and contribute to the strength and resilience of the regional tourism industry. This collaboration aligns with efforts to expedite the industry’s recovery, particularly in the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Coralie Bell, Chair of Australian Regional Tourism, expressed her enthusiasm for the partnership, saying,

“ART is proud to join forces in an affiliate partnership with Tourism Tribe, giving our members discounted access to additional digital support and learning opportunities to better their business and strengthen their regions.”.

Australian Regional Tourism (ART) invites its members to seize this transformative opportunity and join the Tourism Tribe Digital Academy. To sign up or learn more about the digital resources and support available, click here .

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South Australia has 12 tourism regions.

They include famous wine destinations such as the Barossa and Clare Valley to the most accessible outback in Australia, the Flinders Ranges. Each tourism region operates independently of the SATC.

Imager.20200423T1428017418

The Adelaide metropolitan area is not covered by a regional tourism organisation. Key local councils have their own tourism staff and the SATC liaises with them. The State Government’s Vibrant City initiative includes a strong tourism focus and brings together key agencies and the City of Adelaide.

Cuddle A Koala

Adelaide Hills

Adelaide Hills Tourism is the regional tourism organisation for the area. Its board includes representatives of its two funding councils, Adelaide Hills Council and the Mount Barker District Council, as well as tourism operators and industry bodies.

Barossa Teaser Image

Barossa Australia is a membership-based organisation responsible for tourism in the region. Its board draws on representation from the regional tourism, wine and food industries and local government.

Clare Teaser

Clare Valley

Regional Development Australia (RDA) Yorke and Mid North coordinates industry based tourism initiatives for the region. With funding support from local councils it employs a regional tourism manager.

Eyre Peninsula Teaser Image

Eyre Peninsula

Regional Development Australia (RDA) Eyre Peninsula drives tourism for the region. It employs a tourism development manager with funding support from 10 local councils.

Fleurieu Peninsula Teaser

Fleurieu Peninsula

Fleurieu Peninsula Tourism is a regional tourism organisation. Its board comprises representatives of the tourism industry and the local councils which provide key funding support.

Flinders Ranges Carousel Image 2

Flinders Ranges and Outback

Flinders Ranges and Outback South Australia Tourism (FROSAT) is a regional tourism organisation. FROSAT works closely with RDA Far North which employs the region’s Tourism Development Manager.

Stokes Bay

Kangaroo Island

The Kangaroo Island Tourism Food Wine and Beverage Association is a membership-based regional tourism organisation. It employs the Island’s Regional Tourism Manager.

Limestone Coast Taser Image

Limestone Coast

The Limestone Coast Local Government Association (LCLGA) hosts a regional tourism development program. As a regional subsidiary, the LCLGA represents its seven constituent councils. It employs the region’s tourism development manager.

Murray River Teaser Image 2

Murray River, Lakes & Coorong

Tourism for the Murray River, Lakes & Coorong is overseen by the Murray River, Lakes and Coorong Tourism Alliance regional tourism organisation. Its committee brings together tourism operators and representatives of the local councils which fund it.

Murray River Teaser Image 2

Yorke Peninsula

Yorke Peninsula Tourism is a regional tourism organisation. The region’s local councils provide funding support, and the Yorke Peninsula Tourism board is comprised of tourism industry and local government representatives.

Murray River Teaser Image 2

Destination Riverland is a regional tourism organisation. The region’s local councils provide the main funding support. Its board comprises members with tourism and other relevant experience and skills.

Visitor Information Centres

South australian visitor economy.

IMAGES

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  2. ART

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  3. Tourism Australia

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  5. 1 Regional Tourism Organisations within Western Australia

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  6. Unlocking regional tourism potential and driving jobs

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COMMENTS

  1. ART

    Australian Regional Tourism (ART) is the peak national body representing regional tourism practitioners. ART acts as a hub for collaboration, cooperation, ideas generation, knowledge sharing, networking and so much more.

  2. Who's Who In The Tourism Industry

    The role of the State Tourism Organisations (STOs) is to support the development and marketing of sustainable tourism destinations and experiences within their state, to increase awareness and attract visitors. Destination NSW South Australian Tourism Commission Tourism and Events Queensland Tourism NT Tourism Tasmania Visit Victoria VisitCanberra

  3. Tourism in Australia's regions

    Tourism plays a significant part in Australia's regional economies, often accounting for a greater share of GDP and employment than in capital cities.

  4. Tourism regions maps

    tourism regions - defined in consultation with the relevant national and state/territory tourism organisations. Each tourism region is constructed from allocations of whole Statistical Area Level 2s (SA2s), which are small spatial units of the ASGS.

  5. Tourism industry associations

    The state has a number of membership-based regional tourism organisations (RTOs), which together represent more than 4,000 regional tourism businesses. The RTO network is widely regarded as one of the most influential in Australia and will work with the government to facilitate investment in new tourism product. The 13 RTOs are:

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    Regional Tourism Board contacts The State's primary tourism, business and major events company, working in partnership with the tourism industry to market Victoria and Melbourne. Learn More

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    ISBN: 9780494464649 Country: Canada State/Region: New Brunswick Neoliberalism and globalization have contributed to an environment of economic uncertainty in rural Canada, raising concern for the social well-being of its residents.

  8. Regional Tourism Organisation contacts

    Bundaberg Tourism is the regional tourism organisation responsible for implementing marketing strategies and destination development strategies, as well as operating two Visitor Information Centres in promoting Bundaberg, North Burnett and the Southern Great Barrier Reef. Website : www.bundabergregion.org Phone: 1300 722 099 Bundaberg Tourism

  9. Regional Visitor Strategy

    Initiated by regional tourism organisations through the Regional Tourism Chairs Forum and led by Helen Edwards as Chair of the Regional Visitor Strategy steering committee, the strategy is a collaboration involving stakeholders from tourism operators to Local Government Association of South Australia, Regional Development Australia South Austral...

  10. PDF To what extent are regional tourism organisations (RTOs) in Australia

    To what extent are regional tourism organisations (RTOs) in Australia 345 Tourism plays a key role in the development of regional and rural Australia, ac-counting for around 85,000 jobs or 7% of rural and regional employment [2, 33]. More than 70% of domestic and 23% of international tourist visitor nights are spent

  11. Regional

    Regional Tourism Organisations (RTOs) Tourism regions WA is divided into five tourism regions, each with its own RTO, which is the peak marketing and management body for that particular region. We provide funding to the RTOs so they can deliver region-focused intrastate campaigns and support our interstate and international marketing.

  12. The Dynamics of Regional Tourism Organisations in New South Wales

    The establishment of regional tourist organisations (RTOs) has been a popular reaction from many governments worldwide as an attempt, among other things, to coordinate tourism planning ...

  13. The Dynamics of Regional Tourism Organisations in New South Wales

    The establishment of regional tourist organisations (RTOs) has been a popular reaction from many governments worldwide as an attempt, among other things, to coordinate tourism planning, development, marketing and promotion among and within local areas. However, there is much confusion and conjecture over the structures and operations of such organisations and subsequently, their relationships ...

  14. Culture, Heritage and Arts Regional Tourism Program

    27 Jan 2022. The Culture, Heritage and Arts Regional Tourism (CHART) Program is an Australian Government program administered by the Australian Museums and Galleries Association (AMaGA) in 2021-22aims to promote domestic tourism into regional and remote parts of Australia to assist community arts and cultural organisations—including museums ...

  15. Industry partners

    The Victorian regional tourism network is made up of regional tourism organisations. Each coordinates local efforts to support tourism growth within their region. We work closely with the network to gather insights direct from industry. This informs the development of policy, guides investment, and training and advice directly to operators.

  16. PDF The Dynamics of Regional Tourism Organisations in New South Wales

    In Australia, tourism organisations exist at every level of government ... The Dynamics of Regional Tourism Organisations in New South Wales 177. for 53% of total public sector outlays (excluding ...

  17. Our Organisation

    Tourism Australia (TA) is the Australian Government agency responsible for growing demand for Australia as a tourism destination, both in Australia and overseas. Our corporate purpose, as laid down in the Tourism Australia Act 2004, is to grow demand and foster a competitive and sustainable tourism industry.

  18. To what extent are regional tourism organisations (RTOs) in Australia

    This paper presents the results of a longitudinal study that seeks to determine if and to what extent, Regional Tourism Organisations (RTOs) in Australia are leveraging the benefits of Web technology for destination marketing and eCommerce.

  19. Australian Regional Tourism Network (ARTN)

    Nearly half of the nation's tourism expenditure $107.1 Billion* occurs in regional Australia. As well, tourism employs 534,000* people directly in tourism related industries, which is more ...

  20. Tourism Research Australia

    View the latest report on Australian tourism's economic value. Tourism Research Australia (TRA) is Australia's leading provider of quality tourism intelligence across both international and domestic markets, providing statistics and research to assist the government, the visitor economy and Australian businesses.

  21. Australian Regional Tourism (ART) and Tourism Tribe Partnership

    This partnership follows closely on the heels of Tourism Tribe's innovative collaboration with Australia's Coral Coast Regional Tourism Organisation, which set a precedent for destination marketing organisations (DMOs) worldwide to offer world-class digital support and learning to their members. Tourism Tribe's Digital Academy offers a ...

  22. What THRIVE 2030 means for regional tourism destinations

    The impact of tourism on regional communities. The strategy identifies that . 30% of Australia's tourism businesses are in the regions. 63 cents in every tourism dollar is spent in regional destinations (as of September 2021, up from 44 cents in 2018-19, likely due to COVID's impact on domestic travel)

  23. Regions

    Flinders Ranges and Outback South Australia Tourism (FROSAT) is a regional tourism organisation. FROSAT works closely with RDA Far North which employs the region's Tourism Development Manager. Kangaroo Island The Kangaroo Island Tourism Food Wine and Beverage Association is a membership-based regional tourism organisation.