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Returning to the U.S. with Pets

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Now Mandatory For Pets Returning to the United States from High-Risk Rabies Countries All Pet Documents Must be in English or Bilingual

Requirements.

For returning to the United States with pets, check the specific requirements that must be fulfilled by the Center for Disease Controls (CDC) .  Please note that valid, bilingual rabies vaccine certificates (in English or as a certified English translation) are required for dogs returning from rabies high risk countries.  Check the  list of affected countries on the CDC website .

Animals Entering the United States Booked as Manifest Cargo

A directive regarding transporting live animals into/through the United States by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) became effective February 1, 2009. The directive requires that all animals, including dogs, coming into the United States booked as manifest cargo must be tendered at their foreign origin airport by a “Regulated Agent” or “IATA-Approved Agent.” To find a TSA-approved pet shipper in your location. Visit the  International Pet and Animal Transportation Association (IPATA)   .

According to  U.S. Customs and Border Protection   :

Who is affected?

  • Breeders shipping pets as cargo overseas/across the US border
  • Animal show participants shipping pets as cargo overseas/across the US border
  • Individuals living overseas who want to send their pets back to the US as cargo

All of the above must now go through a Registered Agent. This could be particularly difficult for someone living in a more remote city/country where there might not be a freight forwarder or registered agent who is capable and/or willing to book pets as cargo.

Who is not affected?

  • People (Breeders, Pet Owners, etc.) shipping their pets as cargo within the US.
  • People traveling with their pets as excess luggage or in-cabin within the US.
  • People traveling with their pets as excess luggage or in-cabin into the US.

For more information, please contact the Transportation Security Administration at (866) 289-9673 or the US Customs and Border Protection at (877) 227-5511.

More Information: Customs and Border Protection for Pets Entering the U.S. as Cargo If a pet owner ships a pet to the U.S. as cargo using a pet shipper, and the pet owner plans on having the pet collected by a professional shipper, the pet owner should download  CBP Form 7501   . After completing the appropriate sections of this form, the owner should fax or scan this information along with a copy of the airway bill, the health certificate papers and a copy of the owners driver’s license or passport to the pet shipper. The shipper can deliver this form and accompanying papers to the Custom’s office at the airport prior to the pet’s arrival. In essence, this will mean that the owner is authorizing clearance—not the shipper. This avoids the need to hire a customs broker. A friend or family member may collect and clear the pet without this form because they are not being paid for this service.

Check with the Airline You Intend to Use

Recent changes in airline policies mean that returning pets will have to travel as cargo. Do not assume that if you have shipped your pet as accompanied baggage to post that you can ship your pet in the same way back into the United States. Individuals flying with animals into the United States should check with the airline you intend to fly to confirm its policies on live animals as excess baggage / cargo / and in-cabin.

Returning with Birds

The USDA website provides some information regarding the  importation of birds into the United States.  

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travelling to the us with a dog

Pets and International Travel

Transition Center

For information on how to bring your pet into the United States, please visit OBC’s  Returning to the United States with Pets  and  USDA-APHIS Bring your pet into the United States from a foreign country (Import)  webpages.

Shipping a Pet Overseas from the United States

The Overseas Briefing Center provides country-specific pet information for the foreign affairs community assigned to a U.S. embassy or consulate abroad. We encourage pet owners to review carefully their travel plans for upcoming international moves.

Whether moving overseas or returning to the United States on official U.S. government orders, pet owners need to determine an airline carrier’s pet policies on live animals as excess baggage, cargo, and in-cabin before booking your pet. Pet owners also need to determine which carrier has the contract for their travel route and what the expenses will be.

International Pet Travel on American Carriers

The information below pertains to cats and dogs. Airline policies regarding other pets may vary.  Contact the airlines directly for additional information. The travel policies of U.S. airlines with regard to shipping animals are subject to change at any time. If your pet must be shipped as cargo using a commercial shipper, ontact one early in the moving process, using  IPATA  . The information below provides only general guidelines. Review all considerations with the airline and, if necessary, the pet shipper you plan to use. OBC recommends that you request written confirmation of reservations you make for the shipment of your pet.

There are  three ways you can ship your pet  via the airlines:

  • Your pet can travel on the plane with you  (either in-cabin, as accompanied baggage, or as cargo). Your pet will be charged accordingly. Some airlines no longer offer this option and some countries do not allow pets to enter the country in-cabin.
  • You can book your pet on a separate flight.   You will be charged the cargo rate, which is considerably more than excess baggage. However, most airlines no longer allow pet owners to book their pets directly with the airline as cargo.
  • You can have your pet shipped through a licensed commercial shipper.  You will be charged the cargo rate plus the pet shipper’s fee. Many airlines now require this method unless your pet is small enough to fit in the cabin.

As a rule, animals 100 lbs. or larger ( including  the weight of the cage) will be charged as cargo even if they travel on the same plane as you. Check with the airline if your pet is close to that weight and to determine if the airline policy may vary from this general 100 lb. rule.

Traveling with a Service Animal

Check the following updated website as of Dec. 2, 2020:    U.S. Department of Transportation Announces Final Rule on Traveling by Air with Service Animals.  The rule indicates only trained service animals that assist owners with either physical or psychiatric disabilities will be allowed to travel in the cabin free of charge. Emotional support animals will no longer  receive the same entitlement. Please check out the  DOT form   for more details. Airlines may also require additional forms.

The following websites may have additional helpful information:   Service Dog Registration of America (SDRA)  |  VetDogs.org 

Worldwide Import and Quarantine Restrictions

For U.S. government employees and family members ONLY

  • Visit or e-mail the  Overseas Briefing Center  (OBC) to inquire about pet entry requirements for your post assignment.
  • Notify the post once you have your assignment that you will be bringing pet(s) and what kind.

For the general public traveling outside the United States with pets

  • Review the  International Animal Export Regulations  , provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture – Animal Plant and Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS).
  • Check the requirements to see how close to departure the required veterinarian examination, inoculations, and tests must be scheduled.
  • Call the  appropriate embassy  in Washington, DC to confirm the entry requirements for the country you are moving to. Some embassies will provide forms printed in English and in the host language for your veterinarian to complete. Some countries do not permit importation or have long quarantine requirements.
  • Arrange with your veterinarian for required shots and certificates within the specified time period.

U.S. Airline Pet Policies

Typically, airlines require pet health certificates that are no older than 10 days, even if the receiving country accepts an older one. Some countries, however, require a health certificate to be even less than 10 days. Check directly with the airline. U.S. government employees or family members may contact the  Overseas Briefing Center  for information on airline restrictions.

  • American Airlines
  • United Airlines (for in-cabin pets, check the following United Airlines (for in-cabin pets, check the following United Airlines  webpage ) webpage   )

The ISO Microchip

If assigned to an EU or non-EU country that requires an ISO microchip, determine if your veterinary clinic carries ISO-compliant microchips known as ISO microchip standards 11784 and 11785. EU transponders do NOT read non-ISO microchips. Microchips should always be implanted prior to administering the required rabies booster. The requirement for ISO microchips is becoming more prevalent worldwide.

If your veterinary clinic does not carry ISO microchips, you may purchase one from the  Pet Travel Store   and bring it to your vet for insertion. Check with your local pet store or any online retailer that offers specifically  ISO standard 11784 and 11785-compliant microchips .

Certification Requirements

Pet owners should first visit the  U.S. Department of Agriculture – Animal and Plant Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS)  website to review country requirements for pet arrival. Pet certification requirements vary from country to country. A few countries simply require the veterinarian who examines your pet to be licensed in the state of origin, and no USDA endorsement of the veterinarian’s examination statement is required. However, most countries require that your pet be checked by a federally-accredited veterinarian and that a United States Interstate and International Certificate for Health Examination for Small Animals ( 7001 USDA-APHIS Form ) be issued by that veterinarian  and  endorsed by the USDA. Check the airline you will be using for your pet. There have been cases where a country does not require a certification, but a particular airline does. There is a USDA endorsement fee per certificate for cats and dogs.

NOTE:   More than one dog or cat may be on a certificate. For other types of pets, check the USDA site below or email  [email protected] .

The timetable for examination statements and certifications can be very tight. Plan well in advance to be sure all paperwork is complete in time for your shipping date.

As of April 29, 2020: Endorsement of pet health forms is now a 100% electronic through the  Veterinary Export Health Certification System (VEHCS) .

How does the process work?  First, for your assigned country, check the  U.S. Department of Agriculture – Animal and Plant Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS)  site and look for a colored banner at the top of each country page. Banners will either be green or orange with explanations for how documents are processed (either fully digital or digitally endorsed with hard copy processes).

Note: A hard copy of the APHIS-endorsed veterinary export health certificate must travel with the animal during the export process.

Authentication of the USDA Certificate

Authentication of the USDA certificate forms may be required by the country to which you will be traveling with your pet. Check with the embassy before arrival.

The certificates are authenticated by the  Department of State’s Office of Authentications 600 19th Street, NW Washington, DC 20006 Tel: 202-485-8000 or 1-800-333-4636 and then press 5 Fax: (202) 663-3636

Note: The office suspended in-person counter service during the COVID-19 pandemic and is only offering mail-in service at this time. You should  expect delays  processing your request for authentication services. It may take 2-3 months to process your request from the date it was received. Please consider waiting to mail your request until normal operations are resumed.

You may view more information about form requirements on the  USDA-APHIS   website at and whether forms need to be authenticated. The most common form that will need authentication is  7001 USDA-APHIS Form  (Certification of Health for Small Animals).

European Union Pet Regulations

  • For a detailed explanation of the European Union (EU) Pet Regulations, check the  European Commission website for pet entry into a EU country .
  • For the United Kingdom, check the  UK’s Bring Your Pet to the UK:  Step by Step  website.
  • If  your pet is shipped as cargo  over five  days after your arrival in the EU, a commercial  EU Pet Animal Health Certificate Form  will be required. The form must be signed by your private veterinarian and endorsed by a USDA-APHIS veterinarian within 48 hours prior to the pet’s arrival in the EU. This form is attached to the pet’s paperwork during travel. If your pet is only transiting the EU, this regulation will not apply.
  • Rabies Titer Tests –  A rabies titer blood test (rabies antibody titration test) may be required for entry into certain EU countries (depending on the country from which the pet originates). Those shipping a pet to the EU from outside the United States can expect to have to pay for the cost of the blood test in addition to the shipment cost. Check the European Union website for a list of “ rabies controlled ” countries from which the rabies titer test is not required.

Emergency Planning for Your Pet

Pet owners should also consider the possibility of emergency situations while overseas that could require rapid departure or shipping of a pet.Take time to think about the resources your pet(s) might need and consider options for sheltering them in-country as well as making plans for departure on short notice. The Overseas Briefing Center offers U.S. government foreign affairs personnel helpful information in the case of evacuation from an embassy or consulate.  Email the OBC.

Returning Your Pet to the United States

Please visit OBC Returning to the United States with Pets and USDA-APHIS Bring your pet into the United States from a foreign country (Import) webpages.

Helpful Links

  • Plane Talk: Traveling with Animals and Pet Tips   from the Department of Transportation

Note: Information provided on this page is for informational purposes only and does not constitute an endorsement. The U.S. government can provide no guarantees and accepts no responsibility thereof for any action taken on the visitor’s part based on the information provided.

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TSA offers tips for traveling with small pets through the security checkpoint this holiday season

travelling to the us with a dog

DENVER - With the holiday travel period upon us, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is expecting to see a marked increase in the number of pets brought to the security checkpoint at Denver International Airport (DEN). Traveling through the security checkpoint with your pet can be easy when you know what to expect.

“TSA recognizes that for many pet owners, their animals are an extension of their family and they want to travel together,” said TSA Deputy Federal Security Director for Colorado Anne Cross “Becoming familiar with the screening procedures and how to clear security quickly and easily is the first step to embarking on a great trip with your pet.”

In the past few weeks, TSA has discovered two pets during the X-ray screening process. The first was a cat who had been placed in a piece of checked luggage at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York. The second incident involved a dog who was screened at the security checkpoint at Dane County Regional Airport in Madison, Wisconsin. In both cases, the pets were unharmed, but should not have been screened through an X-ray unit.

Small pets should travel in the cabin of the aircraft with their owners. TSA will screen pets via the security checkpoint. Below is what pet owners can expect:

  • All pets should be brought to the security checkpoint in a hand-held travel carrier. Remove the pet from the carrier just prior to the beginning of the screening process.
  • Place the empty travel carrier so it can be x-rayed.
  • Never place a pet in the x-ray tunnel. The x-ray at the security checkpoint is used to screen passengers’ personal property and carry-on luggage only.
  • If possible, carry the pet during the screening process. Alternately, a pet can walk through the screening process if the owner has the pet on a leash.
  • A TSA officer will give the pet owner’s hands an explosive trace detection swab to ensure there is no explosive residue on the owner’s hands.
  • Once the screening process is complete, owners should return the pet to the travel carrier at the re-composure area away from the security checkpoint. This location helps ensure the safety of the pet as well as other passengers.

Other helpful travel tips to make your trip thru security as easy as possible include:

  • Acclimate the pet to the process of traveling by familiarizing it with the travel carrier in the days leading up to the trip. This familiarization will help ensure the pet is more relaxed as it travels through the security process and the airport.
  •  Be on the lookout for “working” K9s and handlers at the airport. Areas where it is common to see a working K9 at airports may include a security checkpoint or in the terminal concourse. If you encounter a working canine, please be screened at an alternate checkpoint.
  • Know the temperament of your pet and ensure that you can maintain control of it in a busy and potentially crowded transportation environment.
  • Familiarize yourself with the pet relief areas at DEN. There are multiple locations available.
  • ✔ Jeppesen Terminal, Level 2 on the northwest side (pre-security)
  • ✔ A Gates, Level 2, near the U.S. Mail drop
  • ✔ B Gates, Level 2, near the U.S. Mail drop
  • ✔ C Gates, Level 2, near the U.S. Mail drop

Below are additional tips for traveling with pets provided by Foothills Animal Shelter in Golden, Colorado.

  • Ensure your pet is healthy and up to date on vaccinations before you travel. Check with your veterinarian for a health certificate. Make sure you have your pet’s vaccination records.
  • Book a direct flight when possible.
  • Ensure your pet is microchipped and wearing a collar and tag with current, accurate information.
  • Purchase a pet-friendly crate large enough for your pet to stand, sit, and turn around comfortably.
  • Make sure you have fresh food and water for your pet.
  • Take your dog for a walk and allow them to go to the bathroom before your flight.
  • When traveling with cats, provide a small elimination area in the carrier or be thoughtful with their feeding schedule, so they don’t need to go to the bathroom during the flight.
  • Help your pet acclimate to the carrier ahead of the flight. Leave the carrier in their living space and feed them in the carrier to ensure they are comfortable.
  • Ensure you let the airline personnel know you are traveling with a pet.

Pet travel restrictions vary by airline, so please check with your air carrier before traveling with your pet. For information on traveling with service animals or for other special circumstances, please reach out to the TSA Contact Center by calling 866-289-9673 or by emailing [email protected] .

Travelnuity

How to Bring a Dog to the USA: Vaccines & Paperwork

How difficult it is to import a dog to continental USA depends on what countries your dog has visited in the last six months. If your dog hasn’t visited any high-risk countries for rabies, the process is relatively simple, unless you are heading to Hawaii or Guam.

However, if your dog has visited any high-risk countries for rabies in the last six months, the process to import your dog is more complicated. So much so that many airlines flying out of these countries often refuse to fly dogs, in case there are issues with their paperwork.

These restrictions on the import of dogs from high-risk countries for rabies were put in place in July 2021 as a temporary suspension. However, there are still no signs of these restrictions being lifted, with the latest extension continuing until the end of July 2024, although the process has changed multiple times.

Here’s what you need to organise before taking your pet dog to the USA, whether you are visiting from abroad, relocating with your dog, or returning home after taking your dog out of the USA.

Travel with dog to USA

Overall Rules for Dogs Entering the USA

The regulations to import a dog to the USA are controlled by multiple departments as well as the state that you’re travelling to, meaning you need to check multiple sources of information.

There are two US government departments that control the regulations for dogs entering the USA are, so there are two main websites that you need to check for the latest rules. Make sure you check the website of both the US Department of Agriculture Animal and Planet Health Inspection Service (or USDA APHIS for short) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (or CDC for short).

Additional requirements may also apply for pets being imported for resale, including adoptions, and working dogs, and are outside the scope of this article.

Importing Dogs from Non High-Risk Countries For Rabies

If you are importing a dog to the USA from a country that isn’t listed as a high-risk country for rabies (see the list ), including Canada, Mexico and most European countries, the steps are quite simple.

This also covers where you have visited in the last six months with your dog. On arrival you must provide written or verbal statements that your dog has only lived in countries that are not high-risk for rabies in the last six months, or since birth.

Dog-friendly Paris

The main requirement for dogs being imported from these countries, as stipulated by the CDC, is that your dog is healthy. If a dog appears to be sick at entry, further inspection by a licensed veterinarian at your expense may be required.

Up until a few years ago, you were required to have a rabies vaccination certificate for your dog and present it if requested, unless you were travelling from a rabies-free country.

However, the CDC no longer requires a rabies certificate for dogs that are not travelling from high-risk countries. The CDC still recommends all dogs are vaccinated against rabies, plus some states may require a rabies certificate. Additionally, your airline might require a rabies certificate (for instance, United Airlines).

United Airlines Sign

If flying to the USA, double check that your airline is still flying pets to the USA. When the restrictions on the import of dogs from high-risk countries for rabies were initially put into place, many airlines stopped flying dogs to the USA. However, this generally now only applies when flying from countries on the high-risk list, not in other parts of the world.

Importing Dogs from High-Risk Rabies Countries

In July 2021, the CDC put in place a temporary suspension on the import of dogs to the USA from countries classified as high-risk for rabies , except for dogs that meet certain requirements. This suspension has been most recently extended to at least the end of July 2024, with no signs of being lifted.

It is best to always refer to the latest steps on the CDC website , as they have modified the process multiple times. The latest modification is that if dogs don’t have a US-issued rabies vaccination certificate, a CDC Rabies Vaccination and Microchip Record needs to be completed by the vaccinating veterinarian – not another certificate or a pet passport.

The easiest way to still import a dog from a high-risk rabies country is if your dog is originally from the USA and was vaccinated against rabies before leaving the USA, with the rabies certificate still valid, i.e. not expired.

Dog at vet about to have vaccinations

Your dog also needs to be over 6 months of age, have a microchip, appear healthy on arrival and arrive at one of 18 airports with a CDC quarantine station. For the requirements related to the rabies certificate, double check here .

If you don’t have a valid US-issued rabies certificate for your dog, you may be eligible to apply for a CDC Dog Import Permit . There is a long list of requirement for being granted a Dog Import Permit, including that your dog is at least 6 months old, has been microchipped, has a valid rabies vaccination certificate (specifically a CDC Rabies Vaccination and Microchip Record ), has had a rabies titre test performed at least 45 days before entry to the USA, and will be entering at an approved port of entry.

An additional option (“Option C”) is also in place, which is required for those with more than two dogs. Depending on whether your rabies titre test is valid, a quarantine period of 28 days may be required.

How to take your dog the USA

Importing Dogs from Countries with Screwworm

There are some additional requirements for dogs entering the USA from selected countries, as specified in the USDA APHIS Veterinary Services requirements .

Firstly, there is an additional step for dogs travelling from countries or regions where screwworm is present. To see the affected countries, view this list . Many countries in Asia, Africa and South America are affected.

Within five days of your dog’s departure to the USA, they need to visit a vet and be inspected for screwworm. If they are free of screwworm, a certificate needs to state this. Alternatively, if they are not free of screwworm, their certificate should state they have been held in quarantine and treated until free of screwworm.

Singapore Gardens by the Sea

Importing Dogs from Countries with Foot and Mouth Disease

Secondly, there are some simple requirements for dogs arriving from countries that are not free from Foot and Mouth Disease. These include that their fur and bedding is free of excessive dirt, hay or straw, they are bathed as soon as possible and kept away from livestock for at least five days.

To see the affected countries, view this list – the middle column lists the Food and Mouth Disease status of countries. Canada, Australia and most countries in Central America, the Caribbean, and Western and Central Europe are not affected.

State Requirements for Importing Dogs

It’s also necessary to check the requirements for the state that you are travelling to in the USA. To easily view these requirements, the USDA APHIS Veterinary Service has provided a simple dropdown menu on their page . Select the state and you’ll be re-directed to the relevant state website.

In my experience, some of these regulations only apply for the commercial transport of pets or pets permanently relocating, although always carefully check.

How to bring a dog to usa

For example, I flew into New York . Here’s the rules for New York State . In addition to requiring dogs to be vaccinated against rabies, they require a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection. At the time of my visit, it was stated this wasn’t required for stays of less than 30 days, but these days that exemption seems to only apply to interstate arrivals.

States and territories that require additional steps for all dog owners include Hawaii and Guam (due to their rabies-free status), and Alaska.

Read more about the preparation required to take your dog to Hawaii (and skip on a stay in quarantine)

Is a Health Certificate Required?

If you’re flying to the USA, in many cases a health certificate is required by the airline. Additionally, a health certificate is required by some states, depending on your circumstances.

However, there is no blanket requirement for a health certificate for dogs entering the USA, unlike for many countries. Naturally, though, your dog should be healthy, as required for entry, and often a combined health and rabies certificate is issued by vets.

Our Experience Entering the USA

We flew into JFK Airport in New York from Paris with our small dog in the cabin in October 2018. This was prior to the relaxation of the blanket requirement for a rabies vaccination certificate, but our arrival was still very simple. 

After picking up our baggage, we walked through the customs area with our dog in his carrier, not seeing any signs about “something to declare”. We actually nearly walked out the exit with no check of our dog – it would have been easy to do!

However, we instead turned around and spoke to the nearest officer, letting him know we had a dog. The officer simply asked for his rabies certificate, and checked it over in a matter of seconds, then we were good to go! We had also filled out a customs declaration on the plane, but no-one looked at it or took it.

Can You Bring Dog Food into the USA?

We had heard before arriving in the USA that it wasn’t possible to bring dog food into the country, unless it was labelled as manufactured in the USA or Canada. However, I had trouble finding definitive information on this, only when bringing pet food from Canada .

Due to this uncertainty, we only travelled with a small amount of food (we were nearly at the end of our bag of dog food anyway), with it packed into our hand luggage. That way it was easy to feed our dog on arrival (before passing through customs, in case it was taken off us) and it was easy to declare.

When we spoke to the customs officer about our dog, I also said we had dog food, holding it in my hand. However, he didn’t even glance at it. That being said, it’s probably best to not bring in too much (especially if entering by road) and there’s a chance it could be confiscated.

You May Also Like

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  • Taking a Dog to the USA from the UK
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About the Author

Photo of Shandos & Schnitzel

Shandos Cleaver is the founder of Travelnuity: Dog-Friendly Travel. She has travelled extensively with her Miniature Dachshund, Schnitzel, including to 33 countries across Europe, every state and territory of Australia except Tasmania, and 10 of the United States. She’s passionate about providing inspiration and information to others wanting to travel with their dogs, whether close to home or internationally.

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How to bring a dog to usa

14 thoughts on “How to Bring a Dog to the USA: Vaccines & Paperwork”

I am currently in London (originally from NZ) and am looking to move to Melbourne with my dachshund, I loved reading your story about your journey with Schnitzel! Can you tell me which airline you flew with to the USA that allowed Schnitzel in the cabin?

Thank you!!

Unfortunately I flew with XL Airways, a French airline that recently went out of business, so no longer an option! Some of the US Airlines don’t allow pets in the cabin on trans-Atlantic flights, but last time i checked Delta did. I recommend calling up and checking, particularly for flying out of London. I’ve also heard good reports about Air Canada, if you don’t mind the extra hop, and I’m pretty sure they fly out of London. Otherwise, if you’re happy to travel via Paris or Amsterdam, Air France and KLM can fly dogs in the cabin, but I found their one-way fares (for humans) very expensive.

Thank you for a well-researched and thorough article! – Margaret

Thanks Margaret!

I am a US resident and I’m planning on taking my tiny doggo on a European trip next year, with plans to fly in to Paris from NYC and taking the same route home, with her in the cabin both times. I’m curious: do I need to get a health certificate from a French vet in order to return from France to the United States?

You don’t need a health certificate for your pet to enter the United States, but your airline might require a certificate. In this case it doesn’t need to be from a French vet, although they generally want it within a certain number of days of the flight and they will possibly have language requirements (e.g. English or French).

Hi Shandos, I am flying to SFO in the US from the UK (via Frankfurt) with my small dog in cabin this summer. As we are coming from a non-rabies country, US customs does not require a rabies vaccination. I do know, however, that the state of CA requires a rabies vaccination for dogs entering the state.

My question is whether US customs, at SFO, will check whether my dog has a rabies vaccine given that it is not a federal requirement. Any idea? Thanks!

It’s a bit difficult to know for sure, I would have your dog vaccinated beforehand and travel with a rabies certificate.

Thanks so much for this, it has been really helpful. I’m making a similar move with my wirehaired dachshund. We’re moving UK to NYC. I’m still finding the paperwork stuff confusing. I was going to get her a rabies vaccine regardless but I assume that I don’t need the official ‘certificate’ for this? As for the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (Is this the same as a health certificate?), can I get this done at any vets and is there a time limit (e.g.30 days before flight?) I’m really nervous about getting this wrong and being separated from my girl.

Thanks so much, Izzy

I would still get a rabies vaccination certificate, you might need it in the future for another trip. The Certificate of Veterinary Inspection is a health certificate. For NY it needs to be done within 30 days, but also check with your airline if they have a shorter timeframe. There are more guidelines for NY here: https://agriculture.ny.gov/animals/companion-animals (click on Import & Export).

Hi Shandos Thank you for your helpful posts about travelling abroad with a dog… it’s so confusing! I also have a mini daschund..Lila, she’s gorgeous but very clingy with us so my husband has been despairing that we’ll ever be able to travel again! We are supposed to be going to Corfu for 3 weeks this summer but I dread leaving her, so it’s very encouraging to hear it’s possible to take her. I have a son who lives in San Francisco and I would like to take her with me (in the cabin)from the U.K. when I visit quite regularly. Do you have any idea of the best way to go about it? Many thanks Henri

It’s frustrating that it’s tricky to fly in and out of the UK with a dog in the cabin, especially compared to most countries in Europe. In order to fly to San Francisco from the UK, there are a few options.

None of the US airlines fly dogs leaving the UK, but I know Air Canada does for some airports. You could then take a 2nd flight from Canada to the USA. However, you couldn’t fly back with your non-service dog in the cabin to the UK.

Alternatively, you could get an EU pet health certificate and travel across to Dublin or Continental Europe. I believe Delta flies dogs in the cabin in and out of Dublin, plus other European cities, both ways.

Hope this helps! For shorter trips, it’s probably best to leave her with family or friends or a Dachshund-specific pet hotel. But you know what would suit her best.

Do I need a broker to fly my dog back to New York from Madrid Spain. He is large and goes through cargo. We flew here in June of this year for vacation. We payed $2000 to come here.

This depends on the individual airline. I recommend researching some possible airlines that fly large dogs in cargo, then look into their requirements. Sorry, but I don’t have as much information on flying large dogs.

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  • Special assistance

Carry on or transport your pet

Depending on animal breed and size, they can travel as a carry-on or be transported through American Airlines Cargo. Carry-on pets are limited to cats and dogs that meet the size, age and destination requirements.

We only accept checked pets at the ticket counter for active-duty U.S. Military and U.S. State Department Foreign Service personnel traveling on official orders. Fees and restrictions apply.

Fully-trained service dogs may fly in the cabin at no charge if they meet the requirements.

  • Service animals

Please contact Reservations before your trip so we can notify you of any requirements or travel changes that may affect you and your pet, like aircraft restrictions.

  • Reservations and ticket changes

Which destinations allow travel with pets?

You can travel with a pet on most flights up to 12 hours or flights to / from select locations:

  • Within the 48 contiguous United States
  • The U.S. and Canada*
  • Puerto Rico

*Additional special restrictions may apply when traveling with pets to / from these destinations.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a temporary suspension of dogs (carry-on or checked), including fully trained service dogs, traveling to the United States (U.S.) from a country considered high-risk for dog rabies.

Only service dogs traveling to the U.S. from high-risk countries with an approved CDC Dog Import Permit, or that meet CDC U.S. vaccination and microchip requirements may fly on American. Contact Special Assistance to request travel with a cat or dog in cabin from a high-risk country.

CDC notice of temporary suspension Opens another site in a new window that may not meet accessibility guidelines

Dogs traveling to the U.S. from countries affected by ‘screwworm’ must meet specific requirements from the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services (USDA APHIS VS), including fully trained service dogs.

USDA APHIS VS import requirements Opens another site in a new window that may not meet accessibility guidelines

The Australian Department of Agriculture and Water Resources does not accept applications to import assistance or service animals of any species other than dogs.

An assistance or service dog which is accredited by an Australian State or Territory Government will also qualify. In most cases these animals are returning to Australia.

Australian requirements for assistance and service dogs Opens another site in a new window that may not meet accessibility guidelines

You’ll be responsible for fulfilling all entry requirements and must notify the department of the dog’s intended arrival at least 3 working days before export.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has issued a suspension on the import of commercial dogs from countries at high-risk for dog rabies.

Commercial dogs will not be permitted to enter Canada from the identified high-risk countries.

CFIA notice of suspension Opens another site in a new window that may not meet accessibility guidelines

Carry-on pets

You cannot travel with a carry-on pet when traveling to Jamaica.

Additional restrictions

When traveling with a pet to Trinidad and Tobago (POS), you cannot arrive on a flight before 8 a.m. or after 4 p.m.

Continental U.S.

Within the u.s..

Pets traveling within the U.S. and Puerto Rico must be at least 8 weeks old.

To the U.S.

All dogs (carry-on and checked) traveling to the U.S. must meet government regulations on vaccinations.

Requirements Opens another site in a new window that may not meet accessibility guidelines.

You cannot travel with a carry-on pet when traveling to / from Hawaii.

Checked pets

You can travel with your pet to Hawaii as a checked pet if you:

  • Only connect via Honolulu (HNL)*
  • Follow Hawaii’s quarantine rules

Animal quarantine rules in Hawaii Opens another site in a new window that may not meet accessibility guidelines.

*No pets are accepted on departures out of Honolulu prior to 8 a.m. HT between March 5 and November 1.

You cannot travel with your pet to Hawaii:

  • On nonstop flights to Maui, the Big Island of Hawaii or Kauai
  • If your pet is pregnant and past 45 days gestation

All pets traveling to Mexico must meet government regulations on vaccinations.

Government regulations and vaccinations in Mexico Opens another site in a new window that may not meet accessibility guidelines.

South America

You cannot travel with a carry-on pet when traveling to / from:

Transatlantic

You cannot travel with a carry-on pet on transatlantic trips.

When traveling to the European Union (EU) with a checked pet, you’ll be responsible for completing all entry requirements. Your pet must have a tattoo or implanted microchip that matches the ID number on their vaccination card.

Apart from service animals, you can't travel with a checked pet to the U.K. or Ireland, but you can transport dogs and cats to London (LHR) and Manchester (MAN) with American Airlines Cargo.

Transport your pet with American Airlines Cargo Opens another site in a new window that may not meet accessibility guidelines.

Transpacific

You cannot travel with a carry-on pet on transpacific trips.

Japan exceptions

Although you can travel with a checked pet from Japan to Los Angeles (LAX) or Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW), pets are not allowed as checked bags to Japan. According to USDA restrictions, animals should be offered water every 12 hours, so for travel with a checked pet to LAX or DFW, you must book a flight 12 hours or less.

If you’re traveling with a checked pet for travel from Japan, you’ll need to:

  • Make sure your pet has a microchip and documents required by the country you are traveling to
  • Notify the Japanese Animal Quarantine Service at least 7 days prior to departure to arrange an inspection

Japanese animal quarantine service Opens another site in a new window that may not meet accessibility guidelines.

On flights with American you can bring 1 kennel as your carry-on bag if:

  • You pay the carry-on pet fee
  • Your pet stays in the kennel and under the seat in front of you the entire flight

You can travel with your pet carrier and 1 personal item, but you will not be permitted to bring a carry-on bag in addition to a pet carrier and personal item. Instead, the kennel will replace your carry-on bag.

If your pet is too large to fly in the cabin, it must travel with American Airlines Cargo. Keep in mind, we only accept checked pets for active-duty U.S. Military and U.S. State Department Foreign Service personnel traveling on official orders, and the pet carrier must meet all kennel guidelines for checked-pets. If you don’t meet these requirements, your pet may not travel. Fees and restrictions apply.

Kennel guidelines for checked pets

Pet strollers must be checked at the ticket counter, and all checked bag fees apply.

We assume no liability for the health or well-being of carry-on pets. These rules are enforced:

  • Pets must be small enough to fit comfortably inside the closed / zipped carrier.
  • Non-collapsible kennels can’t exceed the under-seat dimensions of any aircraft included in your journey. Please contact reservations to verify maximum dimensions.
  • Soft-sided collapsible kennels are recommended and can be slightly larger but still need to fit under the seat without having to excessively collapse the kennel. They must be secure, padded, made of water-repellant material and have nylon mesh ventilation on 3 or more sides.

Carry-on kennel dimensions

Hard-sided kennel.

  • Mainline flights on American: 19 x 13 x 9 inches / 48 x 33 x 22 centimeters (length + width + height)
  • Regional flights on American Eagle: 16 x 12 x 8 inches / 40 x 30 x 20 centimeters (length + width + height)

Soft-sided kennel (recommended)

18 x 11 x 11 inches / 46 x 28 x 28 centimeters (length + width + height)

Contact reservations to verify maximum dimensions.

Flying in First / Business on an A321T?

  • Pets must stay in their kennel during your flight and will need to be placed in a dedicated animal friendly compartment at the front of the plane during taxi, take-off, landing and turbulence
  • The combined weight of the carrier and your pet can’t exceed 20 lbs. / 9.07 kgs., weighed at check-in

We can only accept:

  • 7 kennels on American flights, excluding service animals
  • 5 kennels on American Eagle flights; 1 in First

Due to the lack of underseat storage space, carry-on pets are not permitted in First or Business on:

As recommended by the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), we don’t accept pets that have been sedated or tranquilized. Pets that have been given sedatives or tranquilizers are at a higher risk of respiratory and cardiovascular problems at high altitudes.

To add a carry-on pet to your trip, follow these steps:

  • Find your trip on aa.com or the American app
  • In the Special Services section, select ‘Add carry-on pets’
  • Review and agree to the carry-on pet requirements
  • Select the flights that you want your pet to travel on
  • Confirm your carry-on pet to complete the changes

Find your trip

At the airport, go to the American ticket counter to pay the fee and ensure your pet and kennel meet the requirements.

We only accept checked pets for active-duty U.S. military and U.S. State Department Foreign Service personnel traveling on official orders. Up to 2 pets may be checked and they must meet the minimum age and health requirements of the destination. Since capacity is limited, we accept checked pets on a first-come basis.

When checking a pet, you need to:

  • Contact Reservations at least 48 hours prior to travel
  • Check in at the ticket counter with your official orders
  • Allow extra check-in time (at least 2 hours and no more than 4 hours before your flight)
  • Complete a checklist with an agent
  • Provide a health certificate

To ensure the health and safety of your pet, the health certificate you provide must be issued by a vet within:

  • 10 days of your travel
  • 60 days of your return (travel on the same ticket)
  • 10 days of your return (travel on a separate ticket)

All USDA health requirements Opens another site in a new window that may not meet accessibility guidelines.

American PetEmbark™

American Airlines Cargo offers the American PetEmbark™ service for pets that don’t qualify to travel as carry-on or checked pets.

Ship your pet through American PetEmbark™ Opens another site in a new window that may not meet accessibility guidelines.

When checking in your pet, there are specific requirements for their kennel:

  • Large enough for your pet to stand, turn, sit and lie down in a natural position (without touching any side or the top of the container)
  • Must not exceed maximum size requirements of the aircraft you're traveling on
  • Must not exceed maximum weight (combined pet and kennel) of 100 lbs. / 45 kgs.
  • Be made of wood, metal, plastic or similar materials
  • Have a door made of welded or cast metal
  • Secured at the top and bottom with bolts or screws
  • Secured by yourself with release cable ties on all 4 corners (we’ll provide complimentary ties)
  • Be rigid and secure enough so the animal cannot escape through gaps or poke any body part through the container
  • Be leak and escape proof with a secure fastened door
  • Have ventilation on at least 3 sides for domestic U.S. travel and 4 sides for international travel
  • Have separate food and watering dishes attached securely inside the kennel
  • Have a small bag of food for a 24-hour period attached to the top
  • Be clean and have absorbent material (no straw, hay or wood shavings)

If you travel with 2 of your pets in the same kennel, they must be:

  • The same species (2 cats or 2 dogs)
  • A similar size and weigh less than 20 lbs. / 9.07 kgs. each
  • Between 8 weeks and 6 months old

Aircraft restrictions and acceptable kennels

Checked pets cannot travel on:

  • A321, A321H, A321neo, A321S

Cat restrictions

We don’t accept brachycephalic cats of any 'mix' as checked pets, such as:

  • Exotic Shorthair

Cats must be at least 8 weeks old when traveling within the U.S. and Puerto Rico.

Dog restrictions

We don’t accept brachycephalic or snub-nosed dogs of any 'mix' as checked pets, such as:

  • Affenpinscher
  • American Staffordshire Terrier
  • Boston Terrier
  • Boxer (all breeds)
  • Brussels Griffon
  • Bulldog (all breeds)
  • Dogue De Bordeaux
  • English Toy Spaniel
  • Japanese Chin
  • Mastiff (all breeds)
  • Presa Canario
  • Pug (all breeds)
  • Staffordshire Bull Terrier
  • Tibetan Spaniel

Dogs must be at least 8 weeks old when traveling within the U.S. and Puerto Rico. If you're traveling into the U.S., your dog's age and vaccine requirements depend on the risk of dog rabies where your trip starts. Dogs arriving from high-risk countries need to be at least 16 weeks old and have their rabies shots before traveling into the U.S.

Check if your trip starts in a high-risk country.

Flights with connections

If you’re traveling on a connecting flight, checked pets will only be able to connect through these cities:

  • Charlotte, NC (CLT)
  • Chicago O'Hare, IL (ORD)
  • Dallas / Fort Worth, TX (DFW)
  • Los Angeles, CA (LAX)
  • New York Kennedy, NY (JFK)
  • New York LaGuardia, NY (LGA)
  • Miami, FL (MIA)
  • Philadelphia, PA (PHL)
  • Phoenix, AZ (PHX)
  • Washington Reagan, DC (DCA)

Food and water

Due to Federal Regulations, you’ll need to provide written certification that:

  • Your pet has been fed and offered water within 4 hours (with the specific time noted) before you deliver them to the airplane
  • Is securely and visibly attached to the outside of the kennel
  • Has your signature with the date and time you signed it

You’ll also need to provide feeding and watering instructions for a 24-hour period. Unless specified by a vet, you cannot leave instructions saying 'no food or water.'

If you’re flying with American Airlines, you can pay your pet travel fee at the airport or at a travel center with a credit card or paper voucher (where accepted). We don’t accept cash or checks for payment.

We don’t collect pet fees for other operating airlines on your trip (even if it has an American flight number). You’ll need to check in with each airline and pay your fees at check-in. To find out if you're on a partner airline, look for the words, "Operated by" on your ticket.

What's a codeshare?

*Fees shown apply for each destination without a voluntary stopover / connection of 4 hours or more. If your trip includes a voluntary stopover / connection of more than 4 hours, fees apply for each connection segment. All pet fees are non-refundable and apply per kennel, each way. Fees for transporting your pet with American Airlines Cargo may vary depending on the trip details and size of the animal and kennel.

Temperature restrictions

We have temperature restrictions to make sure checked pets and pets traveling with American Airlines Cargo aren’t exposed to extreme heat or cold:

  • In the animal holding areas
  • At terminal facilities
  • When moving the animals between terminal and the plane
  • On a plane awaiting departure

You cannot travel with a pet if the current or forecasted temperature is above 85 degrees Fahrenheit (29.4 degrees C) at any location on the itinerary.

Pets not traveling in cabin cannot travel to / through / from Phoenix (PHX), Tucson (TUS), Las Vegas (LAS) or Palm Springs (PSP) May 1 – September 30.

You cannot travel with a pet if the ground temperature is below 45 degrees Fahrenheit (7.2 degrees C) at any location on the itinerary.

We may waive the cold temperature restrictions if you have a written letter from a licensed vet that includes:

  • Your name and address
  • Your pet’s name
  • Your vet’s name and signature
  • Your vet’s accreditation date and number
  • The temperature your pet is acclimated to

The letter must be dated:

  • Within 10 days of the first flight your pet will be on
  • Within 30 days of any other trips in the same itinerary

You may need an additional letter for lengthy trips. If the temperature is below 20 degrees Fahrenheit (-6.6 degrees C), your pet cannot be checked even with a letter from your vet.

Flying on a partner airline?

Find helpful information if your trip includes 1 or more flights with our partner airlines.

  • British Airways
  • Japan Airlines
  • Qatar Airways

Questions about transporting a pet?

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Home > Pet Passports > United States Pet Passport & Import Regulations

United States Pet Passport & Import Regulations (excluding Guam & Hawaii)

These regulations do NOT include the State of Hawaii or Guam. Regulations to import a dog or cat to Hawaii or import a dog or cat to Guam . Unless otherwise stated, the regulations below apply to domestic dogs, cats and ferrets. Owners of other pets should refer to item 13.

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) has additional requirements the import of dogs from the following high-rabies countries. Dogs who have resided in, visited or entered the following countries within 6 months of import are also affected by this suspension. All pet owners wishing to import their dog from these high rabies countries to the United States are not subject to these requirements if they meet the following qualifications: Has a rabies certificate* proving a current rabies vaccination administered by a licensed veterinarian in the United States. Has proof of a microchip listed on the rabies certificate. Is at least 6 months old. Is healthy upon arrival. Enters the United States at an approved point of entry (see below). UPDATE: *Effective March 1, 2023, all dogs entering the United States from high-rabies countries with a rabies vaccination that was administered in the origination country must have a completed Rabies Vaccination and Microchip Record. This legislation includes dogs who have resided in, visited, or cleared customs and entered such a country within 6 months of import. Dogs intending to enter the US from these countries that do not meet the above criteria can either apply for an import permit or enter the United States at an airport that has approved quarantine facilities (MIA, LAX, JFK, ATL, IAD). If a valid rabies titer test is available, then quarantine will not be imposed on healthy dogs. If the titer test is invalid or no titer test is available, then a 28 day quarantine will be imposed. These requirements have been extended to July 31, 2024. HIGH-RABIES COUNTRIES

How to get a pet passport to import your dog, cat or other animal to the united states in 7 steps.

Pet passports (except EU Pet Passports) are simply the collection of documents required to import your pet to a specific country.

Step #1 - Export Requirements

Research export requirements for your origination country. Ask your veterinarian or Ministry of Agriculture. You can also find export requirements for many countries here.

Step #2 - Proof of rabies vaccination

Determine if the United States will require a rabies certificate for your pet to clear customs. Proof of rabies vaccination are required to import your pet to the United States from many countries.

Step #3 - Screwworm Inspection

Determine if you are originating in a screwworm-infected country in which case a screwworm inspection is required.

Step #4 - Import Permit

Determine if an import permit is required to import your dog when unaccompanied.

Step #5 - Veterinary Health Certificate

Visit your veterinarian to issue a pet health certificate for the United States .

Step #6 - Requirements to Import a Puppy

Determine requirements for importing a puppy to the United States .

Step #7 - Requirements to Return Home

Determine requirements to re-import your pet to your originating country. Find Regulations to re-import your pet to over 220 countries.

Information on Importing a Pet to the United States

Pet microchip.

pet microchip

The United States does not require that your pet be identified with a pet microchip unless your pet is entering the United States under one of the following conditions:

  • Your pet is entering the United States from a high-rabies country.
  • Your dog is entering the United States for commercial reasons (resale, adoption, etc.).
  • Your dog is entering the United States from a country identified as having African Swine Fever (see step 5)

Crates, carriers, passports, microchips and more at PetTravelStore.com

Vaccination Certificates

pet rabies vaccination

If your dog is entering the United States from a country the US considers as a high risk of rabies ( Click here for high-rabies countries ), your dog will need valid rabies certificate* proving current rabies vaccination. Dogs that have never been vaccinated against rabies must be vaccinated at least 28 days prior to arrival.

*Effective March 1, 2023, a completed Rabies Vaccination and Microchip Record will be required for dogs with current rabies vaccinations administered in a high-rabies country who are entering the United States. Foreign-issued vaccination booklets or rabies certificates will not be accepted. The Rabies Vaccination and Microchip Record is not required for dogs returning to the United States from non-high-rabies countries; however, it is recommended.

If your dog is entering the United States from a country that does not require a rabies vaccination, you must provide proof that it has lived in the origin country at least 6 months or since birth.

If your dog is over 15 months of age and you can provide rabies history that your dog has been vaccinated on or after 3 months of age and all boosters were administered before the previous vaccination expired, your dog does not need to wait 28 days after their last rabies vaccination.

The United States does accept 3 year rabies vaccinations. If the expiration date of the vaccination is not shown on the health certificate, then the date of vaccination must be less than 12 months prior to entry to the United States.

All requests to import an unvaccinated dog must be approved at least 10 business days in advance. Permits will only be given only to US residents and visitors staying 30 days or more in the United States.

Dogs being imported for commercial resale or adoption must also be vaccinated for rabies and distemper, hepatitis, leptospirosis, parvovirus, and parainfluenza virus (DHLPP). See step 10 for more information.

Rabies vaccinations for cats are not required to enter the country, but requirements may be subject to State and local ordinances.

Pet Travel Transport can help get your pet there comfortably and safely.

Rabies Titer Test (FAVN)

rabies titer test

A rabies titer test is required to enter the United States from all high-rabies countries to avoid quarantine. If a valid rabies titer test administered at least 45 days before travel is not available, your pet will need to enter an Animal Quarantine Facility in an approved port of entry.

airine pet policies

Screwworm Inspection - Dogs Only

Before your dog can enter the United States from the following countries, it must be inspected for certain screwworms within five days prior to entering the United States. Your veterinarian must verify that your pet has been inspected for screwworm, and the results are negative.

Screwworm Countries: Angola, Argentina, Aruba, Bhrain, Bangladesh, Benin, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, China, Colombia, Congo (Democratic Republic of), Congo, Costa Rica, Democratic Republic, Dominican Republic, Easter Island, Ecuador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, French Guinea, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ivory Coast, Jamaica, Kenya, Kuwait, Laos, Lesotho, Liberia, Macau, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nigeria, Oman, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paracel Islands, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, South Africa, Spratly Islands, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Swaziland, Taiwan, Tanzania, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, Venezuela, Vietnam, Yemen, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

African Swine Flu - Dogs Only COMMERCIAL RESALE

Additional requirements will apply to dogs entering the US for commercial resale from the following countries identified for African Swine Fever:

Continent of Africa, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bhutan, Kingdom of Brazil, excluding the State of Santa Catarina, Burma (aka Myanmar), Cambodia China, People’s Republic of, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Georgia, Haiti, Hong Kong (Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China), India, Indonesia (Republic of), Korea, Democratic People's Republic of, Korea, Republic of, Kosovo, Laos, Malaysia, Mauritius, Moldova, Mongolia, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Russia, Serbia, Singapore, the Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste, Ukraine, and Vietnam.

Additionally, any restricted zone in the European Union (EU) established by the EU or any EU Member State because of detection of African swine fever in domestic or feral swine is affected by these requirements.

  • The dog and their crate must be free of dirt, wood shavings, hay, straw, or any other organic or natural bedding material.
  • All bedding that accompanies the dog during transit must be properly disposed of at the U.S. port of entry.
  • Each dog must have an ISO-compliant microchip implanted, and the individual microchip number must be verified immediately before each dog is bathed.
  • Each dog must be bathed at the U.S. port of entry within 2 calendar days of arrival in the United States. Bathing must be documented in the Veterinary Services Dog Import Record.

Tapeworm Treatment - Dogs Only

Collies, shepherds, and other dogs to be used in the handling of livestock and that are imported from any part of the world except Canada, Mexico, and regions of Central America and the West Indies must have a tapeworm treatment administered by a licensed veterinarian shortly prior to entry to the United States and are subject to inspection and quarantine.

Import Permit

Effective July, 2021, all DOGS entering the United States from countries classified as high-rabies without a current rabies vaccination administered by a US-based veterinarian must either apply for an import permit or enter the US at an airport with a government quarantine facility (see above). If an import permit is secured, your dog can enter the US without quarantine.

All dogs being imported to the United States for commercial resale or adoption must have an import permit issued by the United States Department of Agriculture. See step 10 for more information.

An import permit will be required for many live animals including birds entering Alaska from Canada via a land border port. Cats and dogs are not included in this requirement; however, they will need a health certificate with a traceable number. Forms downloaded from the Internet will not be accepted.

Pet Health Certificate

A licensed veterinarian must complete and sign a pet health certificate . This certificate should be in English or be accompanied by a version translated in English. It should identify the animal, the dates of vaccination, the manufacturer and the expiration date of the rabies vaccine.

For pets entering Alaska from the United States mainland: the APHIS 7001 form will only be accepted if it has a unique and trackable identification number. A certificate number must be printed on the form. This form cannot be downloaded from the Internet.

Countries that require a rabies vaccination for dogs

rabies vaccination

Dogs entering the United States from these high-rabies countries will require a rabies certificate and should be vaccinated for rabies no sooner than 3 months of age and wait for 28 days before entering the United States. To avoid quarantine or when applying for an import permit, dogs should also have a rabies titer test 30 days after their rabies vaccination and more than 45 days prior to import.

Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei, Burkina Faso, Burma (Myanmar), Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, China, Colombia, Comoros, Côte D'Ivoire (Ivory Coast), Croatia, Cuba, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, French Guiana, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan,Laos, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Moldova, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, North Korea, Oman, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Russia, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Tanzania (including Zanzibar), Thailand, Timor-Leste (East Timor), Togo, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Vietnam, Western Sahara, Yemen, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

Entering the United States by Air

airplane

Pets from countries that the United States recognize as rabies free can enter the United States at international airports in many cities including but not limited to New York, Chicago, Washington DC, Atlanta, Miami, Houston, Los Angeles, Portland Seattle and Chicago.

All domestic dogs and cats must be free of evidence of disease communicable to humans when examined at the port of entry. If the animal is not in apparent good health, further examination by a licensed veterinarian may be required at the owner's expense.

All pets entering the United States unaccompanied as air cargo must be claimed by someone with US legal resident status or a citizen of the US and must have a valid US address.

It is strongly advised that dog owners importing more than 5 dogs owned personally by them via air cargo contact the CDC to avoid having the import be classified as commercial.

All interstate transports where a health certificate is required should use a multi-copy health certificate with a tracking number or the veterinarian must file the certificate electronically. Currently, this requirement primarily applies to airline travel.

Puppies and Kittens

US puppy or kitten import

Kittens are not required to be vaccinated for rabies to enter the US, however, they should travel with a recent health certificate and can be subject to State requirements which is why rabies vaccination is recommended.

Non-Commercial Import of Puppies

Puppies entering the United States for non-commercial reasons from all countries not listed in step #7 must be vaccinated for rabies at 3 months of age and wait for 28 days before entering the country. In certain cases, pre-approval for home quarantine can be obtained from the Center for Disease Control for unvaccinated puppies entering from non-rabies-free countries. See step 2 for more information.

Proof of age should be available.

Commercial Import of Dogs and Puppies

Puppies and dogs entering the United States intended for resale* or adoption must be 6 months of age and may not enter the United States from any country until fully vaccinated (rabies and distemper, hepatitis, leptospirosis, parvovirus, and parainfluenza virus (DHLPP) and accompanied with an import permit.

This includes dogs being imported from Puerto Rico and all US territories. An exception would be dogs being imported for veterinary treatment that is unavailable in the originating country or dogs being imported for research purposes.

*The term “dogs imported for resale” includes dogs imported for sale in wholesale channels, at retail, and for adoption after arrival in the United States, as well as dogs imported for other purposes involving transfer of ownership or control of the dog to another person for more than de minimis consideration after the dog's arrival in the United States.

This rule does not apply when there is no transfer of ownership or control of a dog to another person for more than de minimis consideration after the dog's importation into the United States. Therefore, dogs imported by a person who will use the dog as a personal pet, for sport, for shows or competitions, or for breeding or semen collection are not subject to the 6-month age restriction or any other requirements of this rule.

Banned Breeds

Banned Dogs in the United States

The United States does not ban breeds, however, some cities do. Visitors to these cities will be responsible for their pet's behavior.

Exporting Pets from the United States

All resident pets leaving the United States must send relevant paperwork required for the destination country to the State USDA office for endorsement prior to leaving the country. Additionally, transiting pets whose permits or health certficiates have expired will be required to obtain these documents in the United States and have them endorsed prior to leaving the country.

Pets returning to the United States are subject to the same passport requirements as those entering for the first time. This means that pet owners returning to the United States should consider getting a new health certificate completed by a vet in the country you are visiting if you stay for more than 30 days as many States require a current health certificate.

Other Animals

rabbits turtles other animals

There are no rabies requirements for other species of rodents, rabbits, ornamental fish, intervebrates, amphibians and reptiles imported to the United States. These pets should travel with health certificates issued prior to travel.

Birds entering the United States from any country will require permits from the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The following regulations assume an import of 5 or less birds.

Birds entering the United States from Canada by air or seaport will require an import permit, health certificate and veterinary inspection.

In addition to these requirements, non-US-resident pet birds entering the US from all countries except Canada must enter the United States must travel directly to quarantine at the New York Animal Import Center in Newburgh, NY or the Miami Animal Import Center in Miami, FL. A 30-day quarantine is required for these pet birds and includes mandatory testing.

Birds entering the United States from Mexico or other HPAI-infected country** must undergo 21 days pretravel quarantine in Mexido and enter by air at international airports located in Miami or New York and be subject to 30 days of quarantine. An import permit, health certificate and veterinary inspection will apply.

Birds entering the United States from HPAI-free countries are subject to all requirements above except the 21 day pre-travel quarantine.

Pet birds weighing more than 100 grams, must be identified by one of three approved means (microchip, leg band or tattoo) in order to qualify for home quarantine, in lieu of Federal quarantine, upon returning to the United States from HPAI-FREE countries. The identification must be documented on the accompanying U.S. origin health certificate.

**HPAI-infected countries are: Afghanistan, Albania, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Botswana, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cambodia, Canada, China, Croatia, Djibouti, Egypt, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Ivory Coast, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Korea, Kuwait, Laos, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Macau, Malaysia, Mali, Moldova, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Palestine, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Taiwan, Thailand, Togo, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, Vietnam and Zimbabwe.

Live finfish of most species may be imported into the United States without import requirements. There are 8 species of fish that will require an import permit and health certificate completed by a licensed veterinarian in the originating country: common carp, including koi carp (Cyprinus carpio), goldfish (Carassius auratus), grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus), silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix), bighead carp (Aristichthys nobilis), Crucian carp (Carassius carassius), tench (Tinca tinca), and sheatfish (Silurus glanis).

CITES endangered turtle

If your pet is not a dog, cat or ferret, and especially if it is a turtle or parrot, you should verify that it is not protected under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).  You will need to apply for additional permits if this is the case. Over 180 countries participate and enforce CITES regulations.

  • Search CITES database .
  • Read More about CITES

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To the best of our ability, we ensure that recommendations given on PetTravel.com reflect the current regulations. We cannot predict how a given country may enforce these regulations. Noncompliance may result in the need to make arrangements to put your pet into quarantine at your expense, return your pet to the country of origin, or euthanize your pet. We suggest that you minimize the disruptions that may occur by following the rules of the country you are visiting.

Further detail on import permits, costs, tests and procedures are available at minimal cost at PetTravelStore.com under Pet Passports. We also stock all the equipment and accessories your pet will need for traveling domestically or internationally. Same day shipping Monday through Friday until 2:00 PM EST.

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Due to the high demand, we may be unable to respond to your  question quickly if posted below. If you need a fast response, you can post them directly to our Facebook page , blog , or forum . We will respond as soon as we can.

Please note that the accuracy of comments made from Facebook users other than Pet Travel have not been verified. We do not endorse any person or company that may offer transport services through posts to this webpage.

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Snowbird Guide to Bringing Your Pets to the U.S. and Beyond for the Winter

Tips for bringing pets to the U.S. from Canada

LAST UPDATED: December 7, 2022

Most Canadian snowbirds who own cats or dogs will of course want to bring them along when they go away for the winter each year. Whether you are travelling by air or by car, the rules for bringing a pet are essentially the same, but what’s involved is vastly different and requires a lot of planning and organization.  

Read on for tips and guidelines to help you prepare for either mode of transport.

Requirements to bring your pets to the U.S.

First of all, your pet must be healthy, look healthy and be well groomed or it can be turned away.

It is required that all dogs are up to date with rabies shots and other vaccinations and you should carry a document from your veterinarian certifying general good health and vaccination records. Although cats are not technically required to have rabies shots, many border guards will ask for proof. Vaccination records are also required for coming back to Canada.

Before you travel, be sure to look at the websites of the departments that oversee the importation of pets (even though you are not importing your pet, you are subject to the same health requirements).

In the United States, this is the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). You can find regulations for importing pets on the USDA website . The Centre for Disease Control (CDC) website also has requirements for importing pets, including rabies vaccinations .

Additionally, some States have their own requirements for bringing in pets, in particular, Hawaii, which imposes a quarantine period.

It is also highly recommended that your pet be micro-chipped for identification purposes should he or she escape during travel or during your stay in the United States.  

Cats are required to be removed from their cat carrier and this can be problematic.  Make sure you have gloves and the right clothing to deal with this.

Start well before your travel date to thoroughly investigate the requirements for your pet to travel.

Bringing your pets to countries other than the U.S. for the winter

Canadians who winter in countries other than the United States may still wish to bring their pets with them.

You can find information on the requirements for bringing pets from Canada to Mexico  here on the Government of Canada website.

Other Countries

If you are travelling to other countries, be sure to research the pet importation requirements for your destination before you go, as  each country has its own regulations regarding bringing in cats and dogs - and in some cases, it may not even be permitted.

Requirements to bring your pets back to Canada

It’s important to remember that you will be subject to inspection upon returning to Canada if you are bringing in a pet.  

The Canadian government agency that oversees the importation of animals is the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA).  You can find rules and regulations about importing a pet to Canada on the CFIA website as well as information on travelling with pets on the Government of Canada website .

If you have purchased your pet while in the U.S. or another country, different rules may apply so be sure to investigate the rules for importing an animal. 

Tips for travelling by air

Travelling by air is in many ways a simpler option than by car. However, it is extremely important to check with each airline as their policies for carrying pets varies. This might influence your choice of airline, as some are more pet friendly than others.  

Before planning your trip, be sure to investigate the feasibility of transporting your pet on the dates you would like to travel.

Larger pets have to be carried in the cargo hold area of the aircraft and in approved animal crates. However, most airlines have blackout periods when they will not carry any pets whatsoever in the hold and this usually includes much of the summer months.

In addition, since the COVID-19 pandemic, some airlines are restricting pets in the hold due to the likelihood of flight delays, etc.

If your pet is small enough, it may be allowed in the passenger cabin but must be kept under the seat, not all airlines allow this, and it can even vary by time of year. So be sure to ask all the right questions before you book your flights.

When you do book your flights, you must advise the airline at the same time that you will be travelling with a pet.

Airlines have strict rules about the type of carrier your pet can travel in, so be sure to ask about that too and make sure you have one that complies.  The carrier should be large enough for your pet to comfortably lie down and have adequate padding for comfort.  There are specific rules for carriers that are allowed in the cabin, so again, be sure to ask.

Many vets advise a mild tranquillizer for your pet before air travel. There are sprays for the carrier that relieve anxiety.  Be sure to ask your vet about this and any other tips he or she may have.

Travelling by car

Before you go:  Travelling by car with your pet requires significant preparation and planning.  First of all, you will want to source hotels or motels along your route that allow pets. You can find this out by checking the websites of the many chains that operate throughout the U.S. Make reservations well in advance so your pet is not in the car any longer than necessary when you arrive. Many hotels do apply a surcharge.  You can put the litter box on some newspapers next to the hotel toilet.

Make sure you have sufficient food and treats for your pet’s journey and also check that you can import the food and treats you normally use. If you don't do this, you will have to stop once in the U.S. and purchase food there. Carry plenty of water and bowls for food and water. And be sure to take any medications your pet needs.

Make sure you have a crate or carrier for the journey. It is wise to line the carrier with a number of puppy training pads, in case of any accidents or car sickness.  Other useful items are paper towels, rubber gloves, leashes, trash bags, plastic spoons for tinned food, and rug cleaner for the car or hotel room.  For cats, you will want a litter box for the hotel and litter tools.

En route: In the car, it is better if your pet remains restrained in a carrier or cage, this is for your safety and theirs. If you do open the carrier, do it with the car doors closed, as you don’t want to risk your pet escaping outside the car. 

Travelling through the southern U.S. even in the winter can still be very hot and if you are driving alone any rest stops should be kept to a minimum so your pet is not left in a hot car. Dogs can be taken out of the car on a leash for bathroom breaks and to eat and drink, however, cats are best kept in the car and fed and watered there, to prevent any chance of escape. 

Choose the fastest and most direct route using interstate highways. This is not the time to take scenic, mountain routes.  Many pets get carsick, especially on high and winding roads. The best thing for your pet is to get to your destination as soon as possible.

Disclaimer:  The material provided on the SnowbirdAdvisor.ca website is for informational purposes only and does NOT constitute legal, tax, accounting, financial, real estate, medical or other advice, and should not be relied on as such. If you require such advice, you should retain a qualified professional to advise you.

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  • Traveling With Your Pet to the U.S.
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Cats and dogs do not require a permit to enter the U.S., they do not require a rabies vaccination either, as the UK and Ireland are rabies free.

You should however, get a health certificate from your veterinary stating that your pet is fit and healthy to travel. You should also contact your airline and the respective State Department of Agriculture (in the U.S.), to check if they require further documents from you and for guidance on how to register your pet once you have arrived.

For further information, please visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention .

Bringing pets to the UK is regulated by the UK Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs (DEFRA).

Disclaimer – Footer This is the official website of the U.S. Embassy and Consulates in The United Kingdom. External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views or privacy policies contained therein.

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Pets Radar

How to travel with a dog by plane

H ow to travel with a dog by plane is a question asked by more canine owners than you may think. Our dogs are considered part of our families. When our lives give us opportunities to work and travel in different cities or countries, it often requires air travel to get there. As we prepare our visas and travel documents, advance preparation is also necessary to fly with a dog by plane. 

Dog owners may be feeling overwhelmed with all the details involved in the dog’s flight. There is the daunting thought of how your dog will react to being on a plane, especially if it’s a longhaul flight where some of the longest lasting dog chews won’t go a miss, and there are the logistics of it all such as the costs and travel requirements that owners will want to understand better.

It's helpful to heed the advice of an expert, so we spoke to Bellina Tan, a professional pet relocator who has successfully transported hundreds of pets, specializing in Australia, Asia, UK and the US travel. Tan from Pet Embassy, shares her expertise with Pets Radar, giving us valuable advice for flying with our beloved dog.

Whether you’re flying to another city or to a distant country, just keep reading to find out how to travel with a dog on a plane.

Can I fly with a dog on the plane?

“Some countries permit pets to arrive with passengers as checked baggage or in the cabin. This is largely dependent on the country and the airline’s regulation,” Tan points out.

The first thing to do is to check the airline regulations as well as the rules enforced by the country you are leaving and the country of destination. It is also important to consider the breed, size, and age of your dog.

There have been many concerns about brachycephalic breeds or snub-nosed dogs. There are often higher risks for these types of dogs than other breeds, and you will need to take special precautions when flying them. Many airlines will refuse to fly snub-nose breeds due to the risks involved. There are certain countries where certain breeds like the American Staffordshire Terrier, Bull Terrier, and Pit Bull Terrier are prohibited.

A pet can also travel without its owner as manifest cargo. “Manifest cargo is the best option for pets traveling without their owners, as they do not require their owner to be on the same flight,” says Tan. “This allows pet owners to travel ahead to their new destinations and make sure everything is prepared for their furry family’s arrival. Pets traveling as manifest cargo and excess baggage travel in the baggage compartment in a pressurized, temperature-controlled area reserved just for pets.”

Unlike pets traveling as excess baggage, pets traveling as manifest cargo can be tracked throughout their trip by an Air Waybill. Shipping pets as manifest cargo is more expensive than transporting them as in-cabin and excess baggage.

“When a pet travels as manifest cargo, the airline takes over the pet during the travel, not just for the container. Your pet will travel on an Air Waybill (AWB) and the airline may require the consignee at destination to acknowledge an ‘OK-to-Forward’ before we can even load the animal on the plane at departure,” emphasizes Tan.

Is it expensive?

As the cost of travel has increased for passengers, the cost of relocating a dogs is substantially expensive. “The cost varies depending on the size, breed of pet, flight routing, and destination,” Tan emphasizes.

When considering air travel for your dog, it's essential to be aware of the associated expenses. As Tan points out, the cost can vary depending on factors such as the airline's policies, whether your dog will travel in-cabin or in the cargo hold, health certificates and vaccinations, the price of an airline-approved travel crate, additional fees for pet handling and services, and the option of hiring a pet travel agent. Pet travel insurance is also worth considering to cover unexpected veterinary expenses. 

Plan ahead, book well in advance, and price up different airlines to secure the best rates. Always prioritize your dog's safety and comfort, and if necessary, explore alternative transportation methods if plane travel isn't suitable for your pet.

Can a dog sit in the cabin?

While many people dream of sitting in the cabin with their dogs, this is not possible for all dogs.

“Some countries permit pets to arrive with passengers in the cabin. This is largely dependent on country and airline regulations,” Tan explains.

Airlines set limitations on the size and weight of the pets allowed in the cabin. Small dogs must meet the measurements specified by the airlines and fit in the approved carriers in front of the passenger seat.

In addition, there are countries like Australia where animals cannot fly in the cabin. Animals must travel in the temperature and noise-controlled cargo to enter Australia and adhere to the rules, documentation, and quarantine required.

How to prepare a dog for the day of flying?

Making the dogs comfortable on their flight is the ultimate concern of dog owners. A seasoned pet relocator like Tan is experienced in putting them at ease, with a list of things dog owners should prepare before the big day of flying:

“Days before flying, it is important to work on the veterinary requirements. This varies and is dependent on the country’s regulation and the pet’s needs.”

“Exercise is crucial preparation for dogs before their trip. Tired pets make for better travelers and help to work off nervous energy.” Tan cannot emphasize this enough. A walk before boarding the plane helps them travel comfortably.

“Some pets may suffer from air sickness," says Tan. Therefore, you will want to consider how far in advance your dog will eat before boarding a flight and discuss it with your vet to make sure you aren't under or over feeding your dog before traveling.

Tan adds, “Water is always encouraged. Hydration is important and each crate is always fitted with a container with drinking water.”

“Start early with crate training. Get your pet used to the crate at least four weeks before departure.”

“A visit to the groomers before the flight is a good idea. Keeping the coat clean and short will prevent any matted furs should it get soiled. Keeping nails short will prevent potential injuries too.”

What about anxious dogs?

“We usually strongly advise against any sedatives. I only ever recommend using natural calming methods such as rescue remedies, calming collars, calming sprays etc. Using sedatives can actually be much more harmful for pets when travelling. These usually make them unable to control their heart rate which can cause health problems whilst traveling. 

"It is too dangerous as the medication goes into the animal’s blood system, slows down the heartbeat, animal has difficulties controlling body temperature and movement. Sedatives have a different impact when traveling in a pressurized airplane at high altitudes and can therefore be very dangerous to the pet's health," explains Tan.

With the many details and moving parts involved in a dog’s plane trip, many people opt to enlist the services of a pet travel specialist. Agents like Tan handle the entire relocation from vet checks, documents, right down to flight booking, and working with a destination agent who will handle the import clearance on arrival.

It is worth noting checking if the relocator is an IPATA member. IPATA members are registered with the applicable organizations within their own country and adhere to the rules and regulations of the Live Animals Regulations of the International Air Transport Association (IATA). A pet travel professional facilitates the travel process with their knowledge and expertise in flights, flight regulations, airways pet policy, flight container requirements, pickup and delivery arrangements, quarantine, boarding, import and export arrangements, and proper identification. As requirements, regulations and restrictions change, the pet travel professional stays abreast of these changes and makes the necessary adjustments to your pet's travel arrangements.

With advanced planning and preparation, dogs can comfortably fly on a plane. The ultimate reward is the joy of going for walks and adventures in the new city you are moving to.

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Traveling Between the United States and Canada When You Have a Pet

Traveling across the international border with your pet—either from the United States into Canada or from Canada into the United States—should prove largely hassle-free, although some basic regulations need to be kept in mind, including if you are using international flights instead of driving. All U.S. and Canadian citizens traveling for vacation between the United States and Canada are required to show a passport or other accepted secure document. For additional information about secure documents visit www.travel.state.gov or phone (877) 487-2778.

Traveling From the United States to Canada

U.S. citizens taking pet cats and dogs 3 months of age and older into Canada must carry a rabies vaccination certificate signed by a licensed veterinarian that describes the animal, provides proof of rabies vaccination and includes documentation of the product name, lot number and lot expiration date. Collar tags are not sufficient proof of immunization. The certificate also is needed to bring a pet dog back into the United States; make sure the vaccination doesn't expire while you're in Canada. Note: Pit bulls are not permitted to be taken into Ontario.

Vacation and International Flights with Service Animals or Young Animals

Service animals are exempt from import restrictions. Also exempt are puppies and kittens under 3 months old; obtain a certificate of health from your veterinarian indicating that the animal is too young to vaccinate. Note: For details on pet imports, including on international flights, contact the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA); phone (800) 442-2342 or visit the Web site at www.inspection.gc.ca. If you need assistance while in Canada, contact the Embassy of the United States of America, 490 Sussex Dr., Ottawa, ON, Canada K1N 1G8; phone (613) 688-5335.

Traveling From Canada to the United States

Canadian travelers who plan to vacation in the United States may take pet cats and dogs into the country with no restrictions, but U.S. Customs requires that dogs have proof of rabies vaccination no less than 30 days before arrival. For additional information on U.S. regulations, contact the USDA-APHIS National Center for Import & Export, (301) 734-8364.

Bringing an Animal into the United States

CDC is extending its temporary suspension of dog importation from high-risk dog rabies countries until July 31, 2024. This suspension includes dogs arriving from countries without high risk of rabies if the dogs have been in a high-risk country in the past 6 months. Learn about the current rules: What Your Dog Needs to Enter the United States

CDC regulations  govern the importation of animals and animal products capable of causing human disease. Pets taken out of the United States are subject upon return to the same regulations as those entering for the first time.

CDC does not require general certificates of health for pets for entry into the United States. However, health certificates may be required for entry into some states or may be required by airlines. Check with officials in the state of final destination and with the airline before your travel date.

CDC is aware that Internet scammers are falsely representing themselves as CDC employees in emails to US citizens. Learn more about internet pet adoption scams .

A CDC public health officer checks the rabies vaccination certificate of a dog in a kennel just arrived into the United States. Photo credit to Derek Sakris, CDC.

Photo credit: Derek Sakris, CDC

Animals Regulated by CDC

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How to see the northern lights in alaska in 2024.

If seeing the northern lights in Alaska is on your bucket list, this is the year to do it.

How to See the Northern Lights in Alaska

Northern lights over Alaska.

Chris McLennan | Courtesy of State of Alaska

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says solar activity is intensifying and will peak (at a higher level than previously thought) in 2024. This means travelers will have more opportunities to see the northern lights around the world .

If you're considering a trip to Alaska to witness this atmospheric phenomenon, read on to discover the best months to visit as well as a variety of viewing options.

The best time to see the northern lights in Alaska

Where to see the northern lights in alaska, northern lights alaska cruises.

  • Alaska northern lights tours

Northern lights over group of trees in water in Alaska.

Courtesy of Travel Alaska

According to the Alaska Travel Industry Association, the best time to see the northern lights is typically from Aug. 21 to April 21 , also known as the Aurora Season. While the aurora can appear at any time of night, 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. are the prime viewing hours.

The winter solstice – which is the shortest day of the year, typically falling between Dec. 20 and 23 – is a particularly good time to be in Alaska for the northern lights. This day affords less daylight and more time to spot the aurora. In parts of Alaska, the amount of daylight during the winter solstice can range from around six hours in Anchorage to less than four further north in Fairbanks. Up in remote Utqiagvik (formerly called Barrow), about 320 miles north of the Arctic Circle, there are roughly 67 days of darkness from Nov. 18 to Jan. 23, resulting in even more opportunities to spot the northern lights.

Of course, 2024 is expected to be a little different. Scientists say solar activity will reach its peak from January to October, expanding the typical time frame for spotting the aurora. Ahead of and during your visit, experts recommend utilizing these forecasting resources:

  • Aurora Tracker: Whether you're a beginner or an experienced aurora chaser, you'll appreciate Explore Fairbanks' real-time Aurora Tracker . This online reference shows up-to-the-minute information on the temperature, weather and likelihood of catching the northern lights in Fairbanks. Much of the data comes from one of the world's foremost aurora research centers, the Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska–Fairbanks . To further assist in your search, you can also download the My Aurora Forecast & Alerts app on your smartphone.
  • Aurora Forecast: For other parts of the state, the Geophysical Institute website's Aurora Forecast has daily forecasts of geomagnetic activity up to three days in advance and taken at three-hour intervals. There's also a summation on the webpage of whether the aurora will be active – or not – and where you'll find the best visibility in Alaska.

Northern lights above Aurora Villa in Alaska.

Courtesy of Aurora Villa

Below are the top destinations to consider when deciding where to see the northern lights in Alaska.

Fairbanks, known as the Golden Heart of Alaska, sits at 65 degrees north latitude, making it an excellent choice for aurora hunters, especially first-timers. It's easily accessible and offers plenty of accommodations , restaurants and other unique attractions . You can also be outside of Fairbanks within minutes to find excellent northern lights viewing locales.

Your chances of seeing the aurora display are excellent as the city sits where the activity of the polar lights is concentrated – under the ring-shaped zone known as the auroral oval. Local experts say that on clear evenings when the sky is very dark, you should be able to witness the skies light up on an average of four out of five nights in Fairbanks.

Where to stay:

  • Aurora Villa : Located on the outskirts of Fairbanks, Aurora Villa offers luxurious guest rooms with floor-to-ceiling windows for viewing the northern lights in a cozy private space. The modern wooden cabin sits on 10 acres surrounded by forested hills, yet it's close enough to the city (less than 15 miles northeast) to explore all that Fairbanks has to offer.
  • Pike's Waterfront Lodge : Located along the Chena River in Fairbanks, just minutes from Fairbanks International Airport, this property offers 180 rooms and 28 cabins for aurora-hunting adventurers. As a guest of the lodge, you can request that the front desk alert you when the northern lights appear – no matter the time of day or night. Pike's Waterfront Lodge also offers amenities to keep guests warm while viewing the light show outdoors.

Talkeetna sits about 115 miles north of Anchorage in south-central Alaska, at the base of Denali, the tallest mountain peak in North America. With its old clapboard buildings, log cabins and roadhouse dating back to 1917, this historic town offers a lot of outdoor fun beyond chasing the aurora. Main Street is filled with galleries, shops, restaurants and a brewery. The quirky village, once a former mining town, was the inspiration for the imaginary borough of Cicely in the TV show "Northern Exposure."

If you visit in December, check out the festivities at the monthlong Winterfest. This event features a parade of lights, a tree lighting ceremony and the Taste of Talkeetna food festival, plus entertaining events like the Bachelor Auction and the Wilderness Woman Competition.

When it's time to look up in the sky for the lights, local aurora hunters recommend heading out of town to Christiansen Lake or past the airport on Beaver Road. If you prefer to stay close by, look north into the sky toward Denali from Talkeetna Riverfront Park.

  • Talkeetna Alaskan Lodge : Book a Mountain View room for views of Denali and the Alaskan Range. The cozy lodge offers multiple dining venues, including the award-winning Foraker Restaurant.
  • Talkeetna Lakeside Cabins : These cabins provide peace and quiet on a private lake just 12 miles from Talkeetna.

Denali National Park

Denali National Park is another spectacular place to view the northern lights in Alaska – not to mention one of the top tourist attractions in the U.S. The National Park Service says almost everywhere within the park is free from city light pollution, so if the conditions are right (meaning that's it's clear and dark enough), you should be able to see the aurora borealis, especially when looking toward the northern horizon.

However, when wintertime rolls around – from September or October through April – it's more difficult to access parts of the park, even though it's open year-round. Keep in mind, too, that the lodges closest to the park are typically closed from mid-September to mid-May.

Where to stay: Located less than 15 miles from the Denali National Park entrance, the Aurora Denali Lodge offers year-round accommodations equipped with queen-sized beds, smart TVs and private bathrooms. Rates at the lodge include a continental breakfast, free Wi-Fi, free parking and complimentary hot drinks. What's more, the property says visitors can expect plenty of wildlife sightings, such as bears, moose, lynxes, owls and snowshoe hares, just outside your door.

Coldfoot Camp

Coldfoot Camp is situated above the Arctic Circle in the Brooks Mountain Range, near the Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The remote wilderness destination is ideal for aurora viewing since it sits directly under the auroral oval. It's also the perfect locale for backcountry snowshoeing, wildlife viewing and dog mushing.

Where to stay: The Inn at Coldfoot Camp offers rustic accommodations located in trailers that once housed Alaskan pipeline workers. The rooms include two twin beds and a private bathroom and shower. Guests can dine at the on-site Trucker's Cafe, which offers breakfast and dinner buffets in the summer months and all-day a la carte dining in the winter. When you're ready for a cold one at the end of the day, check out the Frozen Foot Saloon and order an Alaska-brewed beer.

If you prefer camping and have your own gear , you can camp free of charge on the property during the summer months. Coldfoot Camp also hosts a selection of year-round Arctic adventures and excursions, including a trip to the nearby village of Wiseman for aurora viewing.

This remote wilderness retreat has just 13 full-time residents. Wiseman is located in Alaska's Brooks Range, about 15 miles north of Coldfoot Camp, 60 miles north of the Arctic Circle and 270 miles from Fairbanks. The community sits directly under the auroral oval, making it one of the best places in Alaska to view the northern lights. You can expect to see the spectacle in the sky in Wiseman about 250 nights a year, especially between late August and mid-April.

  • Arctic Hive : Arctic Hive has the distinction of being the northernmost yoga studio in the U.S. A common fiberglass lodge allows guests to gather for cooking and meals, and meditation, educational gatherings and other activities are hosted in a geodesic dome. Arctic Hive also offers retreats that include northern lights viewing opportunities in February and March.
  • Arctic Getaway : This bed-and-breakfast sits between the middle fork of the Koyukuk River and Wiseman Creek, offering three cabins. While here, you can learn what it's like to homestead in Alaska above the Arctic Circle and enjoy outdoor activities like dog sled rides across the vast wilderness, cross-country skiing , pack rafting and flightseeing by bush plane.
  • Boreal Lodging : Reachable by vehicle, Boreal Lodging has several rental options, ranging from lodge rooms to larger cabins with living areas and kitchens.

Located in western Alaska overlooking the Norton Sound of the Bering Sea, Nome is the ending point for the more than 1,000-mile, 51-year-old Iditarod Trail Dog Sled Race in March. Once the most populated city in Alaska, Nome had almost 20,000 residents and an average of 1,000 new people arriving daily during the height of the gold rush in 1899. Nome is a little quieter now, with a population of less than 4,000 residents.

Where to stay: Some of the best spots for viewing the aurora are at the end of town, where the 52-room Aurora Inn & Suites is located. The hotel conveniently offers car rentals on-site.

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Situated on the banks of the Arctic Ocean, Utqiagvik is the northernmost city in the U.S. The town, formerly known as Barrow, changed its name in 2016 back to Utqiagvik, its traditional Inupiaq name. Utqiagvik is only accessible by plane: Alaska Airlines and other regional carriers offer service from both Anchorage and Fairbanks.

Where to stay: For accommodations, make reservations at a hotel named for its location – the Top of the World Hotel . The property's comfortable rooms offer views of the Arctic Ocean, and the on-site restaurant, Niggivikput (meaning "our place to eat"), serves traditional local dishes like reindeer soup. While you may be there for aurora hunting, don't miss the excellent wildlife-viewing opportunities: You may see polar bears, caribou, foxes, bearded seals, whales, walruses, migratory birds and the great snowy owl on the tundra.

Borealis Basecamp

One of the best glamping destinations in the U.S. , Borealis Basecamp is a remote 100-acre property that sits within a boreal forest 25 miles north of Fairbanks. The property features 20 individual igloos, resembling those you'd find at Arctic research stations and on polar expeditions, as well as five glass cubes. All accommodations allow guests to gaze up at the aurora and the starry night sky while snuggled up in bed. You'll also enjoy many amenities you'd find in a hotel, including full bathrooms with toiletries and a selection of coffee, hot cocoa and tea.

Choose from a variety of packages that include accommodations and activities like dog-sledding, UTV tours, helicopter sightseeing experiences and more.

Woman on an Alaska cruise ship uses binoculars as she look out over the ocean.

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One of the best times to cruise to Alaska is during the aurora season. Aurora season sailings to Alaska are available with the following cruise lines this year.

If you're interested in excursions for aurora viewing, look for a line that offers cruisetours, such as Holland America. These tours offer the best of both worlds, giving you time on land and at sea to view the dancing night sky. Holland America's cruisetours range from overnight stays just 2 miles from Denali National Park at the McKinley Chalet Resort to a domed luxury train ride through Alaska's backcountry on the McKinley Explorer. On a Tundra Wilderness Tour in Denali, look for Alaska's "Big Five": grizzly bears, moose, caribou, Dall sheep and wolves. Just keep in mind that none of the above cruise lines can guarantee you'll see the northern lights during your journey.

The best northern lights tours in Alaska

Northern light over statue in Fairbanks, Alaska.

Jody Overstreet | Courtesy of State of Alaska

If you want to experience the aurora borealis by joining a tour group, you'll find a variety of options led by expert guides and granting you easier access to many of the state's remote destinations, often with other activities included. (Just be aware that, on any tour or excursion, there's no way to guarantee that the aurora will be visible.) These are some of the best northern lights tours in Alaska:

Arctic Dog Adventure Co.: Aurora Overnight Tour

Dog-sledding is one of the top winter activities in Alaska, and you can choose to do it by day or night. If you want to experience an Alaska dog-sledding adventure while chasing the aurora, book a once-in-a-lifetime experience with Arctic Dog's Aurora Overnight Tour. Highlights of this two-day, one-night excursion – which starts in Fairbanks – are dog mushing your own sled team and glamping in a heated tent under an aurora-filled sky. Other features of the tour include cold weather gear, a photography lesson and Alaska-inspired meals.

Alaska Wildlife Guide: Northern Lights & Murphy Dome Tour

Located around 20 miles northwest of the city, Murphy Dome is regarded as one of the best places to watch the northern lights in Fairbanks at nearly 3,000 feet above sea level. This location, once home to Murphy Dome Air Force Station with as many as 250 personnel stationed at the base, now houses a long-range radar station that detects military air threats from overseas.

Alaska Wildlife Guide leads 5.5-hour northern lights tours to Murphy Dome, typically from late August to early April – you can check with the company for day-to-day tour availability. Excursion prices include round-trip transportation from Fairbanks, 360-degree views of the north-facing sky, hot beverages and bottled water – in addition to (hopefully) hours of memorable aurora viewing.

Alaska Wildlife Guide: Northern Lights & Arctic Circle Tour

This full-day (14-hour) excursion, also offered by Alaska Wildlife Guide, begins in Fairbanks and crosses the Arctic Circle into Alaska's vast and remote wilderness. The tour includes a drive along the more than 800-mile Trans-Alaskan Pipeline and a half-mile walk along the loop at Finger Mountain with views overlooking the Kanuti Flats (depending on the season). Your guide will also stop along the riverbank after crossing the Yukon River Bridge.

During the tour, you'll learn about the history of the pipeline and hear narratives around the other included stops. A snack and warm beverage are included; then, if conditions are just right, you'll have the chance to see the brilliant light show dance across the dark, clear skies before you arrive back in Fairbanks at dawn.

Alaska Journey Tours: Northern Lights (Aurora) Chasing Tour

Get picked up at your Fairbanks hotel (or meet at the Hyatt Place Fairbanks) for this three-hour northern lights tour in a heated SUV. Guides take photos of tourgoers as well as their own photos of the night sky, which are later shared with the group. Recent travelers praise this tour, and appreciate that the guides are always determined to give them the best northern lights viewing experience.

Alaska Tours: Bettles Lodge Winter Adventure

Hosted by Alaska Tours, the Bettles Lodge Winter Adventure is available January to March and August to December. This excursion includes two, three or four nights at this wilderness lodge about 35 miles north of the Arctic Circle. During the winter days, enjoy outdoor Arctic sports such as snowshoeing and cross-country skiing or stay warm indoors chatting with other guests at the Aurora Lodge. In the evenings, you can bundle up and head outside at one of the best places in Alaska to see the spectacle in the sky.

Prices include round-trip airfare between Fairbanks and Bettles, accommodations at the lodge, meals, a village tour and complimentary use of the Arctic gear (in season).

Alaska Photo Treks: Anchorage Aurora Quest

Alaska Photo Treks offers one of the best ways to see the northern lights in Anchorage – and you'll even learn how best to photograph the aurora, which can be a challenge to capture digitally or on film. This experience, the Anchorage Aurora Quest, is available nightly (when conditions are right), typically from mid-August to mid-April. The approximately six-hour guided tour with a professional photographer explains the science behind the northern lights and provides photo tips for budding aurora photographers in a small-group format. Tourgoers are picked up from their hotel by the guide at about 10 p.m. and return around 4 a.m., though that time can vary based on the aurora forecast.

On the Alaska Photo Treks website, you'll find a list of recommended camera equipment to bring. If you're using a smartphone, the tour group suggests downloading an aurora app and bringing a tripod. The company also advises that you'll be outdoors for about two hours, so you need to dress appropriately for the weather. For the best aurora viewing, the guides usually travel between one to three locations within a 70-mile radius of Anchorage. If you're in town for an extended stay, Alaska Photo Treks also offers a four-day pass for even more nocturnal viewing of the auroral activity.

Alaska Tours: Chena Hot Springs and Northern Lights

Chena Hot Springs Resort is known for its therapeutic waters and aurora-viewing opportunities. If you prefer to head out with a guide rather than on your own, book the Chena Hot Springs and Northern Lights tour with Alaska Tours. This package includes a four- to five-hour Aurora Expedition tour, four nights of accommodations, and access to resort amenities including cross-country skiing and snow machine tours.

Alaska Wildlife Guide: Northern Lights and Chena Hot Springs

Day trips are also an option for those who'd like to enjoy the resort amenities and a chance at seeing the northern lights from Chena Hot Springs. This tour offered by Alaska Wildlife Guide includes admission to the hot springs and Aurora Ice Museum as well as pickup from local hotels. Recent travelers say the tour guides are top-notch.

John Hall's Alaska: Alaska's Winter Wonders

For an extended land tour to chase the aurora – and experience Alaska's magical winter wonderland – book this bucket list eight-day adventure with John Hall's Alaska. The company's Alaska's Winter Wonders tour is offered in February and March; it features up to seven nights of northern lights viewing, as well as adventure-filled days with skiing, snowmobiling and snowshoeing. You'll also take an awe-inspiring flightseeing bush plane ride over Denali National Park, which includes a fly-by of the Foraker, Silverthorne, Hunter and Moose's Tooth peaks before landing on the Great Gorge of Ruth Glacier – the deepest in the world.

If that's not enough adventure, test your skills at dog mushing and curling or take an aerial tram ride. Travelers can also check out the local breweries or just sit back, relax and enjoy the spectacular views. Additional highlights include spending two evenings under the dancing night sky in one of the domed igloos at Borealis Basecamp, as well as aurora borealis photography lessons.

All-inclusive pricing covers accommodations, meals, luxury land and small plane transportation, fully guided service, gratuities, and baggage handling – plus a black subzero jacket to keep you warm during your Alaska adventure.

Why Trust U.S. News Travel

Gwen Pratesi is an avid travel adventurer who fell in love with Alaska on her first visit to the state many years ago. She's returned several times on land trips and by ship for year-round outdoor adventure and to chase the northern lights in one of the best places on the planet to view them. She writes about the travel and culinary industries for a variety of major publications.

You might also be interested in:

  • The Top Packable Jackets
  • The Top Things to Do in Alaska
  • How to See the Northern Lights in Iceland
  • The Best Travel Insurance Companies

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Garnpet 36 Inch Collapsible Soft Dog Crate for Large Dogs, 4-Door Foldable Travel Dog Kennel with Durable Mesh Windows for Indoor & Outdoor Portable Pet Crate, Soft Side Dog Crate, Beige

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Garnpet 36 Inch Collapsible Soft Dog Crate for Large Dogs, 4-Door Foldable Travel Dog Kennel with Durable Mesh Windows for Indoor & Outdoor Portable Pet Crate, Soft Side Dog Crate, Beige

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  • Space-saving Design: Garnpet collapsible dog crate is designed to save space when not in use, making it an ideal choice for pet owners who are looking for a pet crate that can be easily stored away.
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Nose wheel falls off Boeing 757 passenger jet awaiting takeoff

Delta Air Lines jet was due to depart from Atlanta airport and none of six crew or 184 passengers were hurt

A nose wheel fell off a Delta Air Lines Boeing 757 passenger jet and rolled away as the plane lined up for takeoff over the weekend from Atlanta’s international airport in the US, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

According to a preliminary FAA notice , none of the 184 passengers or six crew onboard were hurt in the incident, which took place on Saturday at Hartsfield-Jackson airport.

The report said the aircraft was lining up and waiting for takeoff when the “nose wheel came off and rolled down the hill”.

Boeing 757 planes have two rubber nose wheel tyres positioned side by side and are checked before flight.

The aircraft had been scheduled to fly to Bogotá, Colombia, and Delta said the passengers were put on a replacement flight, according to the New York Times.

A Delta Air Lines Boeing 757 aircraft

Boeing declined to comment and directed questions to the airline, the paper reported. The FAA said it was continuing its investigation of the incident.

There has been heightened scrutiny of the US-based aircraft manufacturer by federal regulators after a piece of fuselage fell off an Alaska Airlines flight midflight this month, leaving a gaping hole in a new Boeing 737 Max 9 jet.

The FAA has since recommended that airlines operating Boeing 737-900ER jets inspect door plugs to ensure they are properly secured. While the 900ER is not part of Boeing’s newer Max fleet, it has an identical mid-exit door plug design.

On Wednesday, Boeing CEO Dave Calhoun said the company would not let its aircraft fly unless its was sure of their safety. “We don’t put planes in the air that we don’t have 100% confidence in,” Calhoun told reporters in Washington DC, where he was meeting lawmakers.

With passenger concerns rising, Kayak, a leading online travel agent, has updated filters to allow customers to exclude flights that use Boeing’s troubled 737 Max planes.

Kayak introduced an aircraft filter in March 2019 but after the Alaska Airlines incident it reworked the setting, making it more prominent on the search page and adding the ability to distinguish between 737 Max 8 and Max 9 planes, since only the latter has been grounded by the FAA.

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U.S. Border Patrol canine sniffs out 38 pounds of deadly fentanyl hidden in spare tire

SAN CLEMENTE, Calif. — San Diego Sector Border Patrol agents seized more than 38 pounds of fentanyl during a vehicle stop on Interstate 5 Thursday afternoon.

San Diego Border patrol fentanyl pills inside a tire

On the afternoon of January 18, agents assigned to the San Clemente Border Patrol Station conducted a vehicle stop on a grey sedan heading northbound on Interstate 5 near the Vista Hermosa Highway exit. A Border Patrol canine team conducted an air sniff of the vehicle and the canine alerted to the probable presence of narcotics near the trunk. Agents searched the trunk and noticed the spare tire to be heavier than normal. Agents transported the vehicle and driver to the San Clemente Border Patrol Station for further inspection. At the station, 15 cellophane wrapped packages containing blue pills were discovered inside the spare tire.

Subsequent tests of the pills indicated the presence of fentanyl. The pills weighed more than 38 pounds with an estimated street value of $1,720,000.00. According to the Drug Enforcement Administration’s publication, Facts About Fentanyl , one kilogram of fentanyl has the potential to kill half a million people.

The driver and narcotics were turned over to the Drug Enforcement Administration for federal prosecution. The vehicle was seized by U.S. Border Patrol.

“Even in small amounts, this deadly drug can cause havoc on the people who fall victim,” said Chief Patrol Agent Patricia D. McGurk-Daniel. “The U.S. Border Patrol is committed to stopping these criminals and will continue to leverage all available resources to target and dismantle their organizations.”

San Diego Border patrol canine sniffs fentanyl pills inside a tire

This seizure is part of the recently announced Operation Apollo. Operation Apollo is a joint regional operation comprised of federal, state, and local agencies working to combat the threat from fentanyl and other illicit narcotics. More information about Operation Apollo can be found here .

During Fiscal Year 2023, San Diego Sector Border Patrol agents seized 1,802 pounds of methamphetamine, 2,100 pounds of cocaine, 111 pounds of heroin, and 1,285 pounds of fentanyl.

To prevent the illicit smuggling of humans, drugs, and other contraband, the U.S. Border Patrol maintains a high level of vigilance on corridors of egress away from our Nation’s borders.  To report suspicious activity to the U.S. Border Patrol, contact San Diego Sector at (619) 498-9900.

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  5. 50 Beautiful Travel Destinations To Visit With Your Dog

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COMMENTS

  1. Bringing a Dog into the United States

    NO: Dog is not allowed to enter the United States. The microchip number must be listed on the dog's rabies vaccination certificate. If you are unsure whether your dog has an ISO-compatible microchip, please contact your veterinarian for assistance. See What Your Dog Needs to Enter the United States.

  2. Returning to the U.S. with Pets

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has implemented a temporary suspension for dogs entering the United States, specifically those that do not have a current U.S. rabies vaccine and are returning from 113 high-risk rabies countries, as designated by the CDC. Check the summary of most recent changes.

  3. Pet Travel

    The CDC's temporary suspension for dogs entering the United States from high-risk countries for dog rabies implemented in July 2021 will be extended through July 31, 2024; all current requirements will remain in place. Learn more on CDC.gov.

  4. Traveling with Pets

    Traveling with Pets Print CDC is extending its temporary suspension of dog importation from high-risk dog rabies countries until July 31, 2024. This suspension includes dogs arriving from countries without high risk of rabies if the dogs have been in a high-risk country in the past 6 months.

  5. Returning to the U.S. with Pets

    People traveling with their pets as excess luggage or in-cabin into the US. For more information, please contact the Transportation Security Administration at (866) 289-9673 or the US Customs and Border Protection at (877) 227-5511. If a pet owner ships a pet to the U.S. as cargo using a pet shipper, and the pet owner plans on having the pet ...

  6. Travelling in the USA with a Dog: The Ultimate Guide

    The regulations for travelling to the USA with a dog are quite simple, as long as you don't currently reside in a high-risk rabies countries, and you're not heading to Hawaii or Guam. For most export countries, dogs are just required to be healthy, though no formal check is performed.

  7. The Complete Guide to Traveling With Your Dog

    Health and Safety for Dog Travel Bring your dog to the veterinarian for a checkup before going on an extended trip. Make sure all their vaccinations are up-to-date, and take their shot...

  8. Pets and International Travel

    Your pet can travel on the plane with you (either in-cabin, as accompanied baggage, or as cargo). Your pet will be charged accordingly. Some airlines no longer offer this option and some countries do not allow pets to enter the country in-cabin. You can book your pet on a separate flight.

  9. Best Airlines for Pet Travel and Dog Airline Policies

    safety travel airline travel As people around the world start to travel again, dog owners should be aware that many airlines have changed their rules on pet travel during the past year....

  10. Bringing Pets and Wildlife into the United States

    Last Modified: Jan 04, 2024. Importations of pets and/or wildlife may be subject to state/municipality veterinary health regulations, federal quarantine, agriculture, wildlife, and customs requirements and/or prohibitions. Pets taken out of the U.S. and returned, may be subject to similar requirements as those entering for the first time.

  11. TSA offers tips for traveling with small pets through the security

    Pet travel restrictions vary by airline, so please check with your air carrier before traveling with your pet. For information on traveling with service animals or for other special circumstances, please reach out to the TSA Contact Center by calling 866-289-9673 or by emailing [email protected]. ###

  12. How to Bring a Dog to the USA: Vaccines & Paperwork

    In July 2021, the CDC put in place a temporary suspension on the import of dogs to the USA from countries classified as high-risk for rabies, except for dogs that meet certain requirements. This suspension has been most recently extended to at least the end of July 2024, with no signs of being lifted.

  13. Pets − Travel information − American Airlines

    American Airlines Cargo offers the American PetEmbark™ service for pets that don't qualify to travel as carry-on or checked pets. Ship your pet through American PetEmbark™. Kennel guidelines for checked pets. Aircraft type. Maximum kennel height. A321T. 46 inches / 117 cm. B737-800. 28 inches / 71.12 cm.

  14. Taking a pet from one U.S. State/Territory to another U.S. State ...

    Last Modified: Aug 11, 2022 Print Taking a pet from one U.S. State/Territory to another U.S. State/Territory (Interstate) When travelling with your pet (s), there may be animal health requirements specific for that destination. As soon as you know your travel details, contact your local veterinarian to assist with the pet travel process.

  15. United States Pet Passport

    Pet Microchip The United States does not require that your pet be identified with a pet microchip unless your pet is entering the United States under one of the following conditions: . Your pet is entering the United States from a high-rabies country. Your dog is entering the United States for commercial reasons (resale, adoption, etc.).

  16. How to Bring Pets to the U.S. from Canada

    Requirements to bring your pets to the U.S. First of all, your pet must be healthy, look healthy and be well groomed or it can be turned away. It is required that all dogs are up to date with rabies shots and other vaccinations and you should carry a document from your veterinarian certifying general good health and vaccination records.

  17. Traveling With Your Pet to the U.S

    Traveling With Your Pet to the U.S. Useful Links Cats and dogs do not require a permit to enter the U.S., they do not require a rabies vaccination either, as the UK and Ireland are rabies free. You should however, get a health certificate from your veterinary stating that your pet is fit and healthy to travel.

  18. Traveling with pets

    All you have to do is select "Travel with a pet" as a traveler during booking on united.com. Or, you can go to My Trips to add a pet to an existing trip. You cannot add a pet to your trip on the United app. There is a $125 fee each way for traveling with your pet. There is also a $125 fee for each layover of more than four hours for flights ...

  19. Dog Travel: How to Prepare for Your Dog's Travel Abroad

    The United States doesn't determine the requirements for dog travel - each destination country has its own set of policies with respect to examinations and health tests, vaccinations, medical ...

  20. How to travel with a dog by plane

    H ow to travel with a dog by plane is a question asked by more canine owners than you may think. Our dogs are considered part of our families. When our lives give us opportunities to work and ...

  21. Traveling Between the United States and Canada When You Have a Pet

    Traveling across the international border with your pet—either from the United States into Canada or from Canada into the United States—should prove largely hassle-free, although some basic regulations need to be kept in mind, including if you are using international flights instead of driving.

  22. Bringing an Animal into U.S.

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