RemoveandReplace.com - Appliance Repair

Breaker Trips When I Turn The Light On – How To Troubleshoot

Breaker trips from light switch. I turn the kitchen ceiling light switch ON and the circuit breaker trips . I am assuming the light switch or the light fixture is the cause. What can cause the breaker to trip when the light switch is turned on?

Breaker Trips When I Turn The Light On

There are different reasons why a breaker will trip/reset when you turn on a light using a wall switch. See below for the reasons why flipping on a light switch could cause a breaker to trip/flip/reset.

SAFETY: Be sure to flip the breaker off when inspecting or troubleshooting any electrical issue. Use a flashlight or headlamp to safely inspect the area. Use the appropriate tools/gloves when working with electrical components. It is recommended to read this complete page before you begin troubleshooting your electrical issue.

Quick Troubleshooting: Start by turning the breaker OFF. Check the light switch by removing the switch cover. Fix any wires that are loose or damaged. Check the light fixture for any brittle/damaged or loose wires. If both the light switch and light fixture are wired properly, next inspect the wiring within the circuit. Most “breaker tripping” issues in this case involve the light switch and or the light fixture. For more detailed information keep reading below…

Recently replaced the light switch or fixture? If you have replaced the light switch or light fixture with a new one and the breaker trips when you turn the light on, the switch or fixture is most likely wired incorrectly. Turn off the circuit breaker and rewire the switch or fixture. Use the wiring diagram that came with the light switch/fixture to wire it correctly.

Having electrical issues with your ceiling fan? Ceiling fans may vibrate connections loose and cause a tripping breaker.

What do I check to fix the breaker from tripping? To find out why the breaker trips when you turn the light on, check the wiring, the light fixture, and the light switch. Inspect all components to be sure the wiring on the light fixture and light switch are not loose or damaged. Check the switch and fixture for the correct wiring with no shorts to neutral/ground. All of these conditions can cause the breaker to trip.

How To Fix Light Switch/Trips Breaker

Troubleshoot efficiently by checking the switch first. Remove the switch plate (2 screws) and check the switch with a flashlight. Inspect for any wiring touching the side of the box or other wires. Fix as needed, then check the light fixture and inspect the wiring for issues. If the issue goes beyond the light switch and light fixture, call an electrician to troubleshoot the problem.

Remove light switch cover and check wiring

When a light switch trips the breaker, a faulty light switch or light fixture is usually the cause. A wire may have come loose at the switch or fixture and is shorting out the hot wire. Always check the switch and fixture first.

Also check any GFCI receptacles that are on the circuit for a malfunction or fault.

If you recently hung a picture or put a nail/screw through the wall, this is likely your issue as a nail or drill bit may have damaged the wiring. If a nail or screw has damaged the wire, you can replace the wiring around the fault by using junction boxes for the splice.

Why Does Light Switch Trip Breaker?

See below for the reasons why a breaker can trip and what may be causing the problem. There can be more reasons but these are the most common/average.

Light Switch Can Trip Breaker When:

  • Light Fixture Fault
  • Light Switch Is Faulty
  • Wire Connections Are Loose
  • Short Circuit Issues
  • Ground Fault Problems
  • Nail/Screw Through Wiring
  • Rodent Chewed/Damaged Wires
  • Faulty GFCI Receptacle

Reasons Light Switch Trips Breaker

1. Light Fixture Fault If a light fixture is faulty, a breaker can become overloaded. The wires in an old light fixture can fall apart and cause a short or ground out. Turn off power before checking the light fixture for damage. Replace the light fixture if found to be faulty.

2. Light Switch Is Faulty A light switch that has become faulty can short out and trip a breaker. An old light switch can crack and become unusable and cause the breaker the flip. The wires can become brittle and cause a circuit overload or a short. Turn off the breaker when checking the light switch. Replace the light switch if found to be faulty.

3. Wire Connections Are Loose If any of the wires become loose it can ground out and short circuit causing the breaker to trip/reset. Remove power, remove cover if applicable, and inspect the terminal screws on the switch to be sure they are not loose. If loose, tighten the screws and be sure they are secure. Be sure terminal screws are tightened all the way down.

4. Short Circuits A wire is contacting another wire and current flows through and flips the breaker. Wires can become brittle and the insulation can fall off. Inspect all wires to be sure there are no short circuits. Replace any wiring if you find it to be brittle and or the insulation has become brittle and falling off. This causes grounding and shorts.

5. Ground Faults This happens when a live wire comes in contact with a metal area of the switch housing or similar. This can cause shock and also trip the breaker. Inspect all areas on the wiring to be sure there are no ground faults.

6. Nail/Screw Through Wiring If you have drilled into the wall to hang a picture lately, you may have drilled too deep and damaged a wire. This is a difficult scenario as the damaged wire will need to be repair and or replaced. It is best to call a pro at this point.

7. Rodent Chewed/Damaged Wires A rodent in the wall may have chewed on the wiring. This will cause damaged wiring and cause a short that will flip the breaker. The wiring will need to be repaired or replaced.

8. Faulty GFCI Receptacle Check any GFCI receptacles on the circuit for a malfunction. If the light switch wiring is going through a GFCI receptacle and the GFCI is faulty, this can cause a problem and trip the breaker. Replace the GFCI receptacle if found to be faulty.

More common electrical problems and solutions:

What To Do If Electrical Breaker Tripping In Your Home?

Microwave Oven Tripping Breaker

Power Out In One Room But Rest Of The House Has Electricity?

No Power To Outlets In One Room Or Wall

If you have read through this page and still have a light switch that trips the breaker, please describe your issue below and we will get back to you with a solution.

Please Share The Love

switch trips breaker when turned on

You May Find These Related Articles Helpful...

About the author, keith vetter, leave a reply.

  • Default Comments (8)
  • Facebook Comments

8 thoughts on “Breaker Trips When I Turn The Light On – How To Troubleshoot”

I just recently moved into a old family rental house and in the kitchen there is a ceiling fan light combo and a block off plate for the switch meaning no switch. Well I got tired of having to pull the cord while walking slowly to try and not trip in the dark. I pulled the cover off the wall and have old 2 wire 1 yellow or white and 1 black both capped off. So I thought easy enough and hooked a switch up to it not thinking. The light and fan have power so putting a switch here will do nothing. Well acted without using common sense and installed a switch, when the switch is off lights and fan working as they were before, when I flip the switch on it throws a breaker and the light and fan turn off. So I took the fixture down and it’s wired White wire to white wire green capped black to black and in the same wire nut black to blue there is 4 different wire strands coming into the ceiling box all 2 wire – black and white all besides 1 set are wired together and then to the fixture. Another reason I’m putting in a switch is because we’re thinking about moving the fan and light to the living room and putting a standard light fixture, we can’t do that if theirs no switch it stays on constantly.

I have 6 spotlights in my kitchen ceiling , when they are turned on after some time the breaker will trip , tried installing new spotlights and it still tripping , any suggestions please

My lightswitch has 3 sets of wires coming into it, live feed from the box, run to the light, and continued circuit through to the outlets. I wired a piggy tail from the live feed to the switch and connected the light run and outlet run together with a piggytail. All whites are capped and all grounds are capped. I have to power to my light switch but no power to my outlets. When I flip the switch it shorts out the AFCI Breaker. I then checked to see if it is the light and so I hard wired the light to the live feed from the breaker panel and the light stays on while the switch is off but I still have no power to my outlets. We ran the wire and it all testes great, only time we started to have issues was when I had to change the Breakers out with AFCI Breakers.

Cornelius, Sounds as if there is an issue with the breaker that you are using for the lights. If the breaker for the lights or outlets is causing the main breaker to reset or trip, then check the light breaker for faults or wiring issues. You may want to have a professional assist you as working in a main breaker box can be a safety issue if you do not have much experience with high voltage. -RR

I have a problem, my main power box trips when I switch the lights breaker on but when the light breaker is off, all of the electrical outlets are working, please what’s cause of the problem?

installed new light circuit, when the switch is in off position and I flip breaker on, the 2 light fixtures are on, hit the switch to on a the breaker trips. Power is getting to the switch, in off postion the circuit works, turn the switch to on and breaker trips. I must have a wire from switch in wrong plsce or wrong on the first light of two in the circuit.

The breaker started tripping when I added a second light on a combination switch and the switch is also powering a second room and all my wiring is done right, I’m assuming is that the breaker is overloaded but I will like a second opinion or confirm my deduction

I hung a new ceiling fan, the old one was just wired into the neural side of the wiring, all hooked up on the white wire. I rewired the new one into the wiring like it should be, black to black, and white to white, now when i turn on the wall switch it trips a breaker.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Copy and paste this code: xajama *

Leave this field empty

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed .

Quick Tool Tips

Why Does My Light Switch Keep Tripping The Circuit Breaker?

Why does my light switch keep tripping the breaker.

Your light switch keeps tripping the breaker because of a loose wiring connection or a ground fault. A faulty light fixture, a faulty light switch, or damaged wiring is another reason your light switch keeps tripping the breaker.

light switch tripping breaker

Loose wiring connection

A breaker can trip at the slightest switch movement if the switch is old and poorly wired. If any of the wire becomes loose or damaged, it can cause potential ground faults and short circuits that would result in a tripping breaker.

Turn off the switch’s power supply, remove the cover, and check whether the terminal screws are loose. If they are loose, ensure the screws are securely tightened.

Ground faults

This occurs when a live wire makes contact with a metal section of the switch housing or another component of a similar nature. This can cause shocks and also trip the breaker. Ensure there are no ground faults by thoroughly checking the wiring in every possible location.

Faulty light fixture

If a light fixture is damaged, it can cause a breaker to trip. The wires can break apart in an old light fixture and cause a short or ground out. You should turn off the power and check the light fixture for any damage.

If the light fixture is faulty, you should replace it with a new one.

Faulty light switch

Another common reason for a light switch to trip the breaker is a faulty light switch. A faulty light switch might cause a short circuit and the breaker to trip. The breaker may trip because an old light switch has cracked and is no longer operable.

The wires become fragile and cause circuit overloading or short. Before examining the light switch, make sure the breaker is turned off. Replace the light switch if it turns out to be damaged.

Damaged wiring

A rodent living in the wall may have chewed on the wires. This will break the wires and cause a short trip to the breaker. You will have to fix or replace the wiring.

How to fix a light switch that keeps tripping the breaker?

You can fix a light switch that keeps tripping the breaker by rewiring the wires connection or replacing the light switch. Replacing the light fixtures or tightening the wires is another method you can use to fix a light switch that keeps tripping the breaker.

Rewire the wires connection

Because of the improper connection of the wires, when the switch is turned on, the breaker will trip because of the short circuit. Rewiring the wires connection is essential to prevent your light switch from tripping the breaker. Here is how to rewire it;

  • First, connect the black wire of the circuit breaker to the white wire and other black wires that feed other devices.
  • Remember to put a black marker on both ends of the light switch and the light.
  • Then, connect the circuit breaker’s white wire to the light’s white wires.
  • Next, connect the black wire from your switch to the lights’ black wire.
  • Lastly, connect all the ground wires and the ground screw on the light fixture and the box.

Replace the light switch

A faulty light switch can short out and trip a breaker. If you notice the light switch is faulty, replacing the light switch is vital. Here is how to replace it;

  • Turn off the circuit breaker.
  • Take off the cover of the switch or outlet plate.
  • Loosen the screw that holds the switch and the wires together.
  • Connect the new switch.
  • Put the switch in the new electrical box.
  • Replace the cover plate for the switch.
  • Tighten the screws and cover the plate with a screwdriver.
  • Restart the power.

Note: Make sure there are no exposed or frayed wires or use a wire stripper to retouch them to meet your needs. Connect the new light switch the same way you disassembled the old one.

Replace the light fixtures

If a light fixture is damaged, it can cause a breaker to trip. You can fix this by replacing the light fixtures. The following are easy DIY steps to replace it;

  • Turn off the power of the old fixture.
  • Loosen the screws that hold the plate to the wall with a standard screwdriver to access the fixture.
  • Unscrew the black, white, and copper wires.
  • Take off the old fixture.
  • Connect the new fixture.
  • Secure the new fixture and adjust the length
  • Screw back the black, white, and copper wires.
  • Turn on the power and try the new fixture!

Tighten the wires

A loose wire will cause your breaker to trip, which can lead to other problems. Tightening loose wires in your light switch will stop the breaker from tripping. Here is how to tighten it;

  • Turn off the power
  • With the power turned off, you can take off the cover plate
  • Use a flashlight to carefully look at the screw terminals inside where the wires are connected.
  • If you find loose wire, tighten the screw terminals on the wires carefully.

Why does my light switch keep tripping the GFCI?

Your light switch keeps tripping the GFCI because the neutral connection on the switch is tied to the ground or a faulty GFCI receptacle. To make sure there are no electrical hazards, test any GFCI outlets. An issue could arise, and the breaker could trip if the light switch wire is connected to a malfunctioning GFCI outlet. When a GFCI outlet fails the test, it must be replaced.

A short circuit or an overload is another reason your light switch keeps tripping the GFCI. The breaker trips because two wires are touching and conducting electricity between them. When insulation wears away, wires become brittle and potentially hazardous.

If you want to be sure there are no short circuits, check all the cables. If you detect any of the wire to be fragile or the insulation to be peeling, you should have it replaced. If replacing the outlet doesn’t fix the issue, the fault may lie with another outlet on the line or an appliance hooked into it.

Disconnecting everything from the outlets on the same line is a good way to determine if the issue is a specific device or the outlet itself. It’s possible that you’ll need to check each plug separately.

Why does my light switch keep blowing a fuse?

Your light switch keeps blowing a fuse because it is becoming overloaded, a faulty electrical item, or a short circuit.

An overload

Overloading the circuit is the most common reason for a fuse to blow. Circuits can only handle a certain amount of electricity, and every light you turn on or appliance you use adds to that amount. Overloading them will cause them to draw more power than they can handle, which will cause the fuse to blow.

In this case, you should be able to find the cause by looking for an outlet or an appliance that is being used excessively. Cut down on how much power is going into a single circuit. Find places to plug in on other circuits or unplug what you’re not using.

Faulty electrical item

One possible cause of your fuse switches blowing is a malfunctioning electrical device. There could be an issue with the wiring, or the device could simply be too old and worn out to function properly.

Looking at the fuse box could help you determine the source of the issue. With the help of clearly labeled fuse switches, you may pinpoint the damaged appliance to its circuit.

Short circuit

Short circuits are one form of electrical fault. When the live (black) wire comes into contact with the neutral (white), ground (bond), or metal (box) terminals, this is called a “hard short.” Simply put, a short circuit occurs when an electric current takes a direction it shouldn’t.

Every time this occurs, the circuit is subjected to excessive heat because an excessive quantity of current flows through it. When this occurs, your fuse will blow. This happens due to several factors, including but not limited to: rust, dampness, insects, and other damage to the wiring and accessories.

The following is a simple step to fix a blown a fuse;

  • Unplugs electrical appliances
  • Then, disconnect the fuse box from the primary power source.
  • Find the fuse.
  • Identify the faulty fuse.
  • Unscrew the faulty fuse and screw in the new one; it must be the same as the old one.
  • Try out the new configuration.

Note: If your fuse keeps blowing, it could signify a more serious electrical issue. A fuse may be short-circuiting owing to loose wire connections, damaged wires, or an internal wiring fault. While blown fuses can be repaired repeatedly, a professional electrician should be called in when the problem lies deeper in the electrical wiring.

No related posts.

  • svg]:stroke-accent-900"> 826K
  • svg]:stroke-accent-900"> 622K
  • svg]:stroke-accent-900"> 246K
  • svg]:stroke-accent-900"> 45K

Why Is My Circuit Breaker Tripping? 4 Potential Problems and Solutions

By Glenda Taylor , Bob Vila , Evelyn Auer

Updated on Dec 21, 2023 8:55 PM EST

6 minute read

Photo: istockphoto.com

We may earn revenue from the products available on this page and participate in affiliate programs. Learn More ›

Q: Every few hours—sometimes minutes!—my living room and one side of my kitchen lose electrical power. I’ll check the breaker panel and, sure enough, a circuit breaker has tripped…again. Should I call an electrician, or is there a simple DIY fix I can try first?

A: While it’s frustrating when a circuit breaker keeps tripping, they are important safety mechanisms. Designed to shut off the electrical current when something goes wrong, circuit breakers are one of the best ways of protecting a home from an electrical fire. “When a circuit breaker trips, typically it is because we use too much electricity, which causes it to overload and turn off,” says Christopher Haas, expert electrician and owner of Haas & Sons Electric in Millersville, Maryland. For those who need an electrical panels 101 refresher course or aren’t sure how to reset circuit breakers, each breaker has an on/off switch and controls a separate electrical circuit in the home. When a breaker trips, its switch automatically flips “off,” and it must be manually turned back on to restore electricity to the circuit. For those wondering, “Is it dangerous if a circuit breaker keeps tripping?” the answer is that it can be, depending on the source of the problem. An electrician can ultimately deal with the root issue, but a little sleuthing will reveal whether it’s something that’s easily remedied.

In many cases, the cause of a circuit breaking tripping is an overloaded circuit.

A circuit overloads when more electrical current is being drawn through the wires than they can handle, tripping the circuit breaker. If this happens, there may be a few additional signs:

  • Buzzing noises coming from outlets
  • Devices charging slowly
  • Electrical outlets not working
  • Flickering lights
  • Scorch marks on outlets and light switches

If a circuit breaker keeps tripping in one room, homeowners can test for circuit overload by turning off all the switches in the affected area and unplugging all appliances and devices. After the breaker is flipped back on, the devices can be turned back on one at a time, with homeowners waiting a few minutes in between to see if the circuit remains on. If the breaker trips before all the appliances are turned on, the experiment can be repeated, this time turning them on in a different order. It may be necessary to do this several times to find out how many appliances can be operated at once before the circuit overloads.

“As a short-term solution, you can unplug unnecessary appliances to prevent tripping circuit breakers. You may still get some trips, but you can limit them by unplugging devices that you don’t need to use,” advises Dan Mock, vice president of operations at Mister Sparky , an electrical company with 90 locations in the U.S. The best long-term solution, however, is to pay an electrician for the cost to rewire the house and add additional circuits. The cost to replace an electrical panel is about $1,274 on average.

Other times, the issue may be caused by a short circuit.

A “short” circuit means that two wires that should not be coming into contact are inadvertently touching, triggering a sudden surge of electricity through the wires. A short can occur in an outlet, a switch, or within an appliance if wires are loose or have been chewed through by mice or pets. Some signs of a short circuit include:

  • Popping sounds
  • Discolored outlets or switches
  • Burning smells

Testing to see if an appliance has a short is similar to testing for an overloaded circuit. When an appliance that has a short in its wiring is turned on, it will immediately trip the circuit. Homeowners can also try plugging it into an outlet in a different room. If the breaker for that room trips, there’s a short in the appliance (if it’s unclear what breaker goes to what room, the breaker can be identified with one of the best circuit breaker finders ). Electrical shorts can be a major fire hazard, so it’s a good idea to call a licensed electrician for this circuit breaker repair. It’s wise to stop using the outlet or appliance until a pro takes care of the problem.

Another potential cause of a circuit breaker tripping is a ground fault.

A ground fault occurs when the electricity running through a home’s wiring diverts from the wiring loop and travels to the ground, usually due to faulty wiring or water infiltration in an outlet or switch box. Water is a conductor, which is why walking through puddles is often listed as something not to do in a power outage in case of downed power lines. Once water makes contact with wires, electricity can jump from the wiring loop and follow the water trail. This creates a surge in electricity leading to a tripped circuit breaker. If a person comes in contact with the electricity that is on its way to the ground, this can result in electrocution. Homeowners may notice a few signs of a ground fault, including:

  • Tripped GFCI (ground fault circuit interrupter) outlets;
  • A burning smell coming from an outlet; and
  • Lights flickering.

Newer electrical breakers have features designed to protect against the danger of ground faults. According to Haas, “Ground fault breakers sense electricity going to earth as opposed to going through the wires of the circuit. You’ll find [these] for bathrooms, kitchens, garages, exteriors, and basements.” GFCI outlets are another safety feature that shut off the electric current within a fraction of a second of sensing a ground fault.

If a ground fault is the problem, the cause of the errant water must be discovered and repaired, and any damaged wiring must also be replaced. It’s also a good idea to install GFCI outlets in rooms where water is commonly used. A GFCI outlet costs $210 on average.

Sometimes a bad or worn-out circuit breaker can be the culprit.

In some cases, the circuit breaker itself may be faulty. Breakers that are old, damaged, or were installed incorrectly may trip frequently for no apparent reason. Alternatively, faulty breakers may not trip when they are supposed to, leaving the home at risk of electrical fire. Some signs of a bad circuit breaker include:

  • The circuit breaker getting hot and tripping frequently;
  • The circuit breaker won’t reset;
  • It has been over 10 years since the breaker was last serviced; and
  • The breaker has scorch marks.

An important electrical safety tip to keep in mind is that resetting a breaker over and over again can cause what is called an arc flash, which is a small electrical explosion that can be deadly. If resetting the breaker once does not remedy the issue, it’s a good idea for the homeowner to hire an electrician near them who knows how to replace a circuit breaker safely. Mock warns, “Don’t take any chances with circuit breakers. Instead, call a licensed electrician who knows the safe ways to replace breaker boxes, upgrade circuits, and diagnose potential electrical problems in your home.” Wiring a breaker box is a job to leave to an experienced electrician.

A professional electrician can help determine the specific cause of a frequently tripping circuit breaker.

Most circuit breaker problems—aside from those explained in the sections above—will need to be inspected and addressed by a licensed electrician. According to the Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) , each year “thousands of people in the United States are critically injured and electrocuted as a result of electrical fires, accidents, [or] electrocution in their own homes.” While homeowners may be tempted to save on electrician costs by attempting circuit breaker replacement or repair themselves, electrical work is not suitable for casual DIYers. “Yes, you have to pay, but you can save many hours of head-scratching by hiring an electrician. Electricians will also have all the right tools for diagnosing and repairing the circuit,” Haas adds. “Lastly, they will come with a warranty/guarantee should something arise, and they will typically return at no additional cost.”

Anker’s New Home Battery Tower Is a Sleek, Modular Step Toward Complete Energy Independence Anker’s New Home Battery Tower Is a Sleek, Modular Step Toward Complete Energy Independence

By Chase Brush

The Government Is Paying People to Upgrade Their Home Comfort, Here’s Why The Government Is Paying People to Upgrade Their Home Comfort, Here’s Why

By Tony Carrick

Light Switch Trips Breaker: What To Do?

Light Switch Trips Breaker: What To Do?

Don’t you just hate it when a light switch trips the breaker? Aside from being annoying, the underlying issues may cause serious damage. What can you do about it, and how to keep it from happening again? Let’s find out!

What Does a Tripped Breaker Look Like?

Get your hands ready, check for water deposition, don’t touch a breaker switch with high amperage, turn appliances and devices off, adjust your circuit breaker, check your breaker panel, know when to call an expert, avoid overloading one circuit, check and replace old wiring, install your light switch properly.

When you open your electrical panel, there should be multiple breakers on a board.

Each of the breakers in the panel regulates a different electrical circuit in your house and has a switch with numbers printed on it. Typically, each one should be labeled with the name of the area that it controls.

Keep in mind that power cannot flow through the circuit until the switch is manually turned back on after a breaker trips. This causes the switch to flip to the “OFF” position automatically.

For example, if the light switch that caused the trip is located in the kitchen, you can easily locate the breaker switch labeled “Kitchen.”

You’ll probably see the “Kitchen” breaker switch tipped to the “OFF” side or right in the middle between “ON” and “OFF.”

What Are the Safety Precautions to Take?

Before we get down to business, let’s make one thing clear: safety is still our top priority.

You may be in a rush to get your problem fixed, but temporarily losing your power supply is so much better than losing an eye or a finger.

Here are some safety tips to keep in mind:

Working on electrical systems with wet hands is extremely dangerous. So, we recommend that you start by drying your hands properly before troubleshooting your light switch.

Then, you can wear protective goggles or use electrical-insulating gloves.

Water won’t always accumulate on the breaker, but it does happen occasionally. That’s why it’s always good to examine your panel carefully. If it seems wet, don’t touch anything.

You might notice a number on the breaker switch that indicates the amps or the measure of electrical current that flows in that circuit.

If the number is 25 or above, it’s better to leave it to the professionals. Meanwhile, if your breakers aren’t labeled at all, it isn’t recommended to attempt to reset them.

Sometimes, simply flipping your light switch can trigger a trip on your circuit breaker.

This is a common issue with newly installed lighting systems. However, circuit breaker trips from flipping a light switch may also be caused by a short circuit due to faulty or damaged wires.

Either way, let’s take a look at how you can approach the tripped breaker.

Start by unplugging all appliances, lamps, and other gadgets in the affected area.

Go to your electrical service panel and check if a particular breaker has tipped to the “OFF” side.

In some cases, the breaker may not tip completely to the “OFF” position and may sit between both sides. When this happens, you can move the switch over to “OFF” first before pushing it back to the “ON” side.

Now, there is a possibility that the switch will automatically tip back to “OFF” after you’ve just switched it to the “ON” side. If that’s the case, don’t try to reset your breaker once more. Instead, seek help from an expert.

After successfully resetting your breaker, flip your light switch to see if the issue is fixed.

If overloading is the culprit, your power will come back after switching your lights on or plugging your devices one at a time.

There may be instances when the light switch doesn’t turn on, but other plugged-in equipment may receive power. If that happens, you can suspect that the problem might have originated from your light switch.

If the previous steps don’t cut it or you’re uncertain about the root cause, it’s best to call your electrician.

Having your breaker trip twice in a row should already sound an alarm, and you shouldn’t try to fix the problem on your own.

The primary concern here is that repeatedly resetting your breaker due to recurrent trips can be risky and may result in overheating.

After all, serious complications and accidents are on the line, including the following hazards:

  • Overheating of internal components that may lead to fires
  • Visible damages like scorch marks on power outlets, sometimes with the presence of a burning smell and smoke
  • Sparks on the breaker
  • Odd clicks or buzzing sounds from the outlets or switches

How To Prevent Your Light Switch From Tripping the Breaker?

Since dealing with a light switch that trips the breaker is a hassle, you might want to check out these preventative tips and tricks:

Circuit overload is the main reason behind trips. That’s why it’s better to avoid plugging your bulb into one circuit with a ton of connected appliances.

Remember that using an extension cord to maximize connectivity will only make things worse. If you badly need to use multiple devices, try plugging your other devices into a different circuit connection or getting a new circuit installed.

Be sure to unplug devices or appliances that aren’t in use.

If your electrical wires have been sitting there for many decades and you start to experience frequent trips, they’re probably worn out.

You might even notice that rodents have damaged your wiring. So, it’s good to have your old wires replaced by an electrician.

We’d recommend double-checking that you’re using compatible fixtures before installing new lights or replacing any part of the lighting setup.

Then your electrician can check that all screws are all tight and wirings are connected properly to reduce the risk of tripping.

Related Articles

How To Connect LED Strips?

How To Connect LED Strips?

Who Invented Flashlights?

Who Invented Flashlights?

What Does Lumens Mean? Simple Explanation Here

What Does Lumens Mean? Simple Explanation Here

Why Do My LED Lights Glow when Switched Off?

Why Do My LED Lights Glow when Switched Off?

13 Best Recessed Lighting Ideas For Your Home

13 Best Recessed Lighting Ideas For Your Home

Which Is the Brightest Handheld Spotlight?

Which Is the Brightest Handheld Spotlight?

Galvin Power

Galvin Power is reader-supported. When you buy via our links, we may earn a commission at no cost to you. Learn more

Why a Circuit Breaker Trips When the Light Switch is Turned Off?

Written by  Edwin Jones  / Fact checked by  Andrew Wright

circuit-breaker-trips-when-the-light-switch-is-turned-off

Do you want to use electricity without problems, but your light switch is a headache? If a circuit breaker trips when the light switch is turned off, most likely, it’s a result of a common wiring mistake. However, there are other reasons you should keep an eye on.

You’ll never know what will happen if you let this malfunction go unaddressed, so keep reading and see the listed possible reasons. It is necessary to determine your next step on this matter to maintain a healthy power source for your home.

Table of Contents

You Have a Miswiring in a Switch Loop Setup

A double throw switch is causing the problem, what if your switch is a single pole single throw, a loose wiring connection.

breaker-trips-when-switch-is-turned-off

When you install lights, you buy new fixtures, switches, and perhaps a new set of wiring too.

Now you think you did the proper process — hot-to-hot wire and neutral-to-neutral wire, but in the end, the light switch trips breaker when turned off. Even though you reversed the way you plug the wires, the result stayed the same. This pain in the butt frequently happens when you have a switch loop set up.

A typical DIY guy mistake in a switch loop setup is when all black and white wires are connected. This miswiring causes the light to turn on even though the switch is off. Because it’s improper, it shorts the circuit and trips the breaker when the switch’s on.

To properly rewire this connection, you will need a marker and proceed to the following steps:

  • First, the circuit breaker’s black wire connects to the white wire and other black wires that feed other devices.
  • Remember to put a black marker on both ends of the switch and the light.
  • Then, connect the circuit breaker’s white wire to the light’s and other devices’ white cables.
  • Next, connect your switch’s black wire to the black wire for the lights.
  • Finally, link all the ground wires together and to the ground screw from the lighting fixture and the box.

light-switch-trips-breaker-when-turned-off

If your residence had a history of a bad renovation or electrical rerouting by an untrained contractor, your wirings might be in trouble. It is time to remove the cover panel of your switch box and investigate the situation of your switch inside the box.

A breaker that trips from an off light switch is not common among households today. This occurrence happens because of poor wiring of a light switch like the “Single-Pole, Double Throw” switch.

You’ll know you have this kind of switch when it doesn’t have ON and OFF markings on the switch toggle.

It’s a bad sign if your switch is leaning on the side of the grounded box where it is mounted. A switch is in an improper position when the switch pole screw lies against the switch box and the runner is shorted, which causes the fuse to blow when you turn the lights off.

Also, the breaker will trip if the runner short circuits to the ground or neutral wire somewhere along the wiring’s terminus.

If you have double-throw switches for a three or four-way switch, look out for a shorted traveler wire. It’s possible a switch was removed, causing the travel wire to short-circuit ( Read now how to test a shortstop circuit breaker here ).

my-breaker-trip-when-I-turn-the-lights-off

A standard single throw switch is a typical switch for a light fixture. You can typically find this at home with three screws for hot wires and a ground wire. Its clear difference from a double throw is that the switch toggle has an ON and OFF indicator.

Now, what’s the catch when you have a single pole, single throw switch? Will you have the same dilemma as with the double throw? Well, technically, the answer is yes. You can still experience a problem where a breaker trips when switch is turned off, but for other reasons.

If it’s a standard switch, it is easy to blame the button itself when you have a difficulty like this. The controller can be defective due to a manufacturing failure. However, a simple wiring mistake can trigger the breaker to trip just by turning the switch off.

If the ground wire and the hot wires are close enough to each other, toggling the switch can cause a slight movement that contacts them, then BOOM, a ground fault.

There’s also a possibility that the switch is in neutral. Keep an eye on this wiring mistake because you’re turning the power to the neutral and not the hot wire. Reverse wiring is a huge no-no, so try to fix it as soon as possible.

The fourth and simplest possible reason is a loose wire. Just like other devices at home, your switch gets old, and so does your breaker. When an electrical safety device comes to the point where you’ve been using it for ages, its wiring will eventually give up.

Sloppy wiring of an old switch can cause a breaker to trip, even with the slightest movement of switching it off. Like other issues stated earlier, a loose connection triggers a ground fault or a short circuit .

Furthermore, general wear and tear to your breaker and switch wirings result in repetitive breaker tripping. If you think loose or faulty wiring is not a big deal, watch this video by Andrew Pace:

It is necessary to check your terminal screws and wiring insulations from time to time. Sometimes an old wire turns brittle, and its insulations become damaged, so never let this happen to your switch and CB.

Wiring on the brink of destruction won’t only compromise a breaker but also increase the risk of multiple hazards. Always mind your safety.

There are four possible reasons why your circuit breaker trips when the light switch is turned off. Check if you have a switch loop setup, double/single throw switch, or loose wiring connections. These will help you determine a specific matter causing this problem.

If it’s the wiring that causes the problem, proceed on a safety action immediately.

Addressing an electrical problem is vital for the welfare of our homes. Never take safety for granted, and face the trouble as soon as you can.

Edwin-Jones

I am Edwin Jones, in charge of designing content for Galvinpower. I aspire to use my experiences in marketing to create reliable and necessary information to help our readers. It has been fun to work with Andrew and apply his incredible knowledge to our content.

Circuits Gallery

Light Switch Trips Breaker When Turned Off | Causes and Solutions

Light switch tripping breakers even when turned off might be one of the irritating problems to deal with while working on electrical issues. Even though it is not a common occurrence, it does occur, especially in older construction residencies. 

In this informative article, we will dive into the root causes of this issue and provide practical solutions to resolve it.

Light Switch Trips Breaker When Turned Off

  • Why Does Your Light Switch Trip the Breaker When Turned Off?

Tripped Breaker

Figure: Tripped Breaker

There might be several reasons behind this dilemma, such as faulty wiring, defective switches, or the circuit being overloaded when the light is turned on. 

Faulty Wiring

Faulty components and wiring are one of the primary causes behind this problem. If there is a fault in the wiring that results in a short circuit, it will cause the breaker to trip for safety reasons. 

Consult a qualified electrician to inspect and repair this issue. If you’re not confident enough, you should not engage in tinkering with electrical wiring, which may lead to a disaster. 

Defective Switch

The problem may lie in the switch itself. If the switch is old, broken, or malfunctioning, it may cause abnormalities when turned off.

If you detect any faulty switch, immediately replace the faulty switch with a new one. However, make sure the new switch is compatible with your electrical system and installed correctly.

Loose Connections

Loose electrical connections often result in breaker tripping. Improper and faulty connections can become loose due to a long time usage causing wear, tear or improper installation.

Proper maintenance and inspection of all the connections are necessary to avoid loose connections. If any loose connections are discovered, tighten and ensure they are properly secured.

Overloaded Circuit

If a circuit contains too many electrical devices, it draws more current than it can handle. The breaker can trip even when a switch is turned off.

If your electrical circuit is not distributing current properly, reconfigure and reduce the number of loads if needed.

Breaker Malfunction

There might be cases where the breaker is faulty, leading to unintentional trips.

Replace the breaker with a new one if you find that the breaker is faulty.

  • To Conclude

Whenever you’re dealing with electrical issues, safety should be the top priority. Under any circumstances, do not troubleshoot or repair any electrical circuit if you’re unsure about the problem. Make sure to check if the runner creates a short circuit to the neutral or ground wire . Consult a qualified electrician in case you’re skeptical about the solution.

Subscribe to our newsletter

& plug into

the world of circuits

Share this content

mm

A seasoned electronics enthusiast, Charles Clark is a key contributor to Circuits Gallery. From basic components to advanced microcontroller projects, Charles simplifies complex concepts with ease. His writings are a blend of expertise and passion, making electronics accessible to all. Whether it's circuitry or digital communication, Charles is the voice you can trust.

Similar Posts

DC Motor Control Circuits | Motor Driver Projects

DC Motor Control Circuits | Motor Driver Projects

DC Motor (control) driver circuits are the essential circuit of the Robotics workshops. If you are a robotic beginner and looking for motor driver projects, then this article is just for you. We will discuss the basics of some motor…

Can I Use 12V AC Instead of 12V DC [Answered]

Can I Use 12V AC Instead of 12V DC [Answered]

In the specialized field of electronics, the selection of an appropriate power supply is paramount for ensuring both the optimal performance and durability of electronic equipment. A query frequently encountered pertains to the viability of transitioning from a 12V DC…

Ceramic Vs Film Capacitors | Which One is the Best Choice?

Ceramic Vs Film Capacitors | Which One is the Best Choice?

Film capacitors are used more than ceramic Capacitors. Film capacitors are suitable for a wide range of capacitance values whereas ceramic capacitors are suitable for a range of capacitance.  Definition and Types of Capacitors  Capacitors are electrical devices used to…

What Causes a Capacitor to Explode? [6 Reasons]

What Causes a Capacitor to Explode? [6 Reasons]

Reverse polarity voltage and over-voltage are the two main factors that can make a capacitor explode. Compared to other types of capacitors, electrolytic capacitors are more likely to explode. In the following piece, we shall explore the primary factors contributing…

What Diode to Use for 12V | In-Depth Guide

What Diode to Use for 12V | In-Depth Guide

Use diode 1N5400 or 1N5402 up to 1N4008 for 12V. All these diodes are rated for a 3 Amp rating. Diodes for such currents can have a significant voltage drop. The voltage drop in a tiny silicon diode working at…

Assemble A DIY Multimeter | Digital Voltmeter and Ammeter

We are all aware of multimeters such as voltmeters (voltage meters) and Ammeters (Ampere meters).  A voltmeter is nothing but a device used to measure voltage between given two terminals. Apart from basic usage, digital voltmeters are also employed as…

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Copy short link

How to Reset a Tripped Breaker

What to do when a circuit breaker trips.

Lee has over two decades of hands-on experience remodeling, fixing, and improving homes, and has been providing home improvement advice for over 13 years.

switch trips breaker when turned on

The Spruce / Kevin Norris

What Causes a Tripped Circuit Breaker

Safety considerations, how to avoid tripped breakers, when to call a professional.

  • Total Time: 5 mins
  • Skill Level: Beginner
  • Estimated Cost: $0

A power breaker trip is an annoying occurrence when the power shuts off and you can't use the microwave, lights, or router. A breaker trip is far more than simply annoying when you need that router to send off a time-sensitive work assignment or when medical devices are diverted to time-limited standby power. Fortunately, it's easy to fix a circuit breaker trip in just a few minutes.

Tripped Circuit Breaker

A tripped circuit breaker is when a circuit breaker automatically shuts off to prevent devices on the circuit from overheating or from receiving excessive power. A circuit breaker protects your home against damaging or harmful short circuits and overloads.

  • Overloaded circuits : When too many devices are operating on the same circuit and are attempting to pull a higher power load than the circuit can carry, the circuit breaker will trip.
  • High-power devices : High amp devices like microwaves , dryers , wall heaters , or A/Cs are turned on for sustained periods, they can cause a power breaker trip.
  • Short circuits : In a short circuit, a powered or hot wire makes contact with a neutral wire or when wires are loosened .
  • Ground faults: In a ground fault, a hot wire touches anything that is grounded, such as the side of a metal electrical box , an appliance, an outlet , or a bare ground wire.

Need more help? Talk to an electrician near you

Our partners can help you compare quotes from top-rated professionals near you

Get a Quote

Watch Now: How to Safely Reset a Tripped Circuit Breaker

Working around an electrical service panel or circuit breaker board can be dangerous. Your home’s entire electrical load is contained in that box, concentrated around the metal lugs where the service drop’s wires enter the box. Unscrewing and removing the inner dead-front cover within the service panel exposes the highly powered lugs.

What You'll Need

Equipment / tools.

  • Circuit breaker directory (if available)
  • Rubber-soled shoes
  • Safety glasses

Instructions

Locate a flashlight.

Circuit breaker panels tend to be located in out-of-the-way locations with little, if any, ambient light. Find a flashlight. Use the light from a phone if necessary.

Turn Off Devices on the Circuit

Turn off all devices on the electrical circuit. This includes the device that may have caused the breaker to trip, such as a microwave, hairdryer, or A/C, plus all other devices on the same circuit.

Find the Electric Service Panel

The electric service panel, sometimes called a circuit breaker board, is a metal box with a door. The box may be inset in a wall, its face flush with the wall, or surface-mounted where the entire box is exposed.

Places to look: garage , closet, pantry near the kitchen, basement , mudroom, hallway leading to garage or backyard.

One clue is to first find the electric service drop from the main power lines. Usually, your home’s service panel is located below and nearby, on the inside of your home.

Open the Door to the Service Panel

Open the door to the service panel by sliding the plastic switch to the side or up. Next, swing the door open. Use the inset plastic switch as a handle to pull the door open.

Adhi Syailendra / Getty Images

Locate Tripped Breaker

The handle of a tripped circuit breaker should be in the middle position—not left or right. Visually or by feel, locate any breaker handles that differ from the right or left positions:

  • Tripped breakers : Tripped circuit breakers have a soft or springy feeling when you lightly press them leftward or rightward.
  • Live/active breakers : Breakers that are not tripped are either firmly left or right (depending on which side of the box you're looking at).

Certain breakers, such as Eaton breakers , trip to the off position, not the middle position. Check manufacturer's instructions for your particular product.

Turn the Circuit Breaker Handle to OFF Position

Flip the circuit breaker handle to its firm OFF position, toward the outer edge of the service panel (away from the centerline).

Double and Tandem Breakers

Double pole breakers are double-wide breakers with wide handles. They are often used for dryer or oven circuits. Both sides of double pole breakers operate as one. Tandem breakers are two narrow breakers that share the space of one breaker. Each side operates individually.

Turn the Circuit Breaker Handle to ON Position

Flip the circuit breaker handle to its firm ON position, toward the centerline of the service panel. The handle should seat firmly in place and should make an audible click.

Test Circuit

Turn the device such as the light or A/C back on. If you believe the breaker tripped due to an overload, it’s best to turn on only one device at this time, not multiple devices. Also, choose a device with a lower power draw such as a light fixture.

  • Remove some devices from the overloaded circuit and plug them into other circuits that aren’t drawing as much power.
  • Avoid running many devices on the circuit at the same time. In a kitchen , for example, stage cooking activities that require power so that they happen in succession, not all at once.
  • Install GFCI outlets so that the outlet shuts off before the entire circuit breaker shuts down in the case of a ground circuit. Just note that GFCI outlets are not circuit overload protection, but protection against dangerous ground faults.
  • Replace old outlets, light fixtures, and switches which may create short circuits or trip breakers.
  • Have an electrician separate hardwired devices that are drawing too much power from a single circuit. The electrician can move devices to another circuit or can set up an entirely new circuit to relieve the load.
  • Replace the circuit breaker.

A qualified, licensed electrician is trained to detect the cause of tripped breakers and to fix those causes. If your problem of tripped circuit breakers is more than just an overloaded circuit, you may want to seek the help of an electrician. Unless you are an advanced do-it-yourselfer , it’s best to hire an electrician to wire up a new circuit breaker .

Electrical Panel Safety . Office of Congressional Workplace Rights.

CH Circuit Breakers . Eaton.

Ground-Fault Circuit Interruptors . International Association of Certified Home Inspectors.

More from The Spruce

  • GFCI Receptacle vs. GFCI Circuit Breaker
  • Ground Fault vs Short Circuit: What's the Difference?
  • Calculating Electrical Load Capacity for a Home
  • Understanding Arc Faults and AFCI Protection
  • What Happens When a Fuse Blows
  • Line vs. Load Wiring: What's the Difference?
  • Subpanels Explained for Home Owners
  • How Much Does an Electrician Really Cost? We Break It Down by Service
  • A Basic Guide to Home Electrical Wiring
  • Understanding Fuses and Fuse Boxes
  • How to Reset a Circuit Breaker
  • Amps vs. Volts: The Dangers of Electrical Shock
  • How to Wire a Single-Pole Light Switch
  • What Is a Short Circuit, and What Causes One?
  • Line or Load With GFCI Connection
  • Inside Your Main Electrical Service Panel

switch trips breaker when turned on

  • Account Settings

Home Services

  • Home Security
  • Pest Control
  • Living Room
  • Other Rooms
  • Home Improvement
  • Cost Guides
  • Floor Plans

Housekeeping

  • Cleaning Tips
  • Organization
  • Popular Brands
  • Sizes & Dimensions

Smart Living

  • Dangerous Areas
  • Safest Areas
  • Most Affordable Areas

Top stories

Do You Tip On White Glove Delivery?

Why Does My GFCI Trip When I Turn On The Light Switch?

Upgraded Home Team

Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters, or GFCIs, are a necessary safety measure in modern times. They can prevent harmful ground faults that can cause dangerous and expensive electrical problems. So, why does my GFCI trip when I turn on the light switch?

Your GFCI will trip when you turn on a light switch if the neutral connection and ground are tied. The GFCI trips because it recognizes a drop in voltage that can be potentially dangerous as a safety precaution. If the light switch sends out 120 volts and gets nothing back, the GFCI will trip and shut off.

Never take it lightly if your GFCI trips when you turn on the light switch. Call a professional electrician if this happens so that they can diagnose the problem and repair it if necessary. Follow along as we explore why your GFCI trips when you turn on the light switch.

Do You Need to Hire an Electrician?

Get free, zero-commitment quotes from pro contractors near you.

switch trips breaker when turned on

Why Does My GFCI Trip When I Turn on the Light Switch?

A GFCI trips when you turn on the light switch if doesn’t receive the same voltage that it sends out . Many switches send out 120 volts, and they are supposed to receive 120 volts back. However, the GFCI will trip if it receives nothing back as a safety precaution.

This can also happen if the neutral connection is tied to the ground connection because that is dangerous. That can cause serious electrical problems and potentially start a fire if the GFCI doesn’t trip. A GFCI protects any switch or outlet connected to it and will trip if there is any inconsistency in voltage.

Any Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter on the same circuit as a switch or similar fixture will trip if there are voltage problems. GFCIs exist as a safety measure to interrupt a ground fault within 1/40 of a second .

What is the Point of a GFCI?

The primary purpose of a GCFI is to prevent electrocution. Every electrical outlet is designed to deliver and receive the same amount of voltage. If the hot wire (black wire) delivers 120 volts, then the neutral (white wire) must also send 120 volts back to the source. What if this doesn’t happen?

Suppose you have a corded skill saw. The cord is frayed, but you don’t notice the issue upon plugging in the tool. If you touch the hot wire in the cord, the electrical current will pass through you in its attempt to return to the ground.

If the tool is plugged into a GFCI, all you’ll receive is a small (but alarming) shock. The GFCI sensed that the neutral wire wasn’t carrying 120 volts back to the receptacle. As such, the GCFI opened the circuit in a fraction of a second, terminating the flow of electricity to both the tool and yourself.

GFCI Components

Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters consist of 5 simple components despite the advanced function. A GFCI can fail if any of the components come loose or suffer damage. That is why it is important to install them correctly or hire a professional electrician to avoid problems.

  • Two brass screw terminals on the right side for hot-wire connections.
  • Two silver screw terminals on the left side for neutral-wire connections.
  • One green screw terminal on the left side for a grounding connection.

The chief difference is that a GFCI has a “line” side and a “load” side. GFCI line sides are where you connect the incoming source of power. The load side is where you connect the outgoing source of power.

Importantly, the load side consists of the top two screws on either side of the GFCI (one brass and one silver). The line side consists of the bottom two screws on either side of the GCFI. Each component must be perfectly in line so that the GFCI can quickly trip in the event of a ground fault or voltage drop.

How To Install A GFCI

If you’ve installed a standard receptacle, you can probably install a GFCI. For simplicity’s sake, let’s say you want to connect a standard receptacle with a GFCI:

  • First, differentiate the cable serving the line end of the GFCI from the cable serving the load end of the GFCI.  The line end will originate from the electrical panel.
  • Strip the sheathing from the cable and the insulation from the ends of all the wires. Cut the wires back if necessary.
  • Join the hot (black), neutral (white), and ground (bare copper) together in a pig tail. You should have two wires connected.
  • Take a bit of black, white, and ground wire, and tie them into the pig tails you made in the previous step, securing all three connections with wire nuts. 
  • Take the open ends of the third wires, and connect them to the appropriate terminals on the GFCI: bare copper goes to the ground connection below the GFCI’s plug, the neutral connects to the silver line end, and the hot connects to the brass line end.

What you’ve done is create a circuit in which the downstream standard receptacle is unprotected. Why? Because the load portion of the GFCI is not connected to the wires traveling to the standard receptacle. They’re just pigtailed together.

In the event that you do want to protect the standard receptacle with the GCFI, simply remove the wire nuts on the neutral and hot wires. Get rid of the third wires you used to connect the spliced wires to the GFCI, and connect the wires going to the second outlet to the load terminals on the GFCI. Simple as that.

Venturing into anything more complicated than this is definitely an electrician’s territory. Attention to detail is imperative . Especially if you’re using junction boxes to connect multiple fixtures and receptacles to a single GFCI.

Related Articles

  • Surge Protector vs. GFCI: Which Outlet is Safer and Better?
  • Can Two GFCI Outlets Be On The Same Circuit? (Find Out Now!)

Upgraded Home Team

We are a team of passionate homeowners, home improvement pros, and DIY enthusiasts who enjoy sharing home improvement, housekeeping, decorating, and more with other homeowners! Whether you're looking for a step-by-step guide on fixing an appliance or the cost of installing a fence, we've here to help.

More by Upgraded Home Team

How To Keep Mosquito Larvae Out Of Your Bird Bath

How To Keep Mosquito Larvae Out Of Your Bird Bath

Popular articles.

Why Won’t My Bulbs Flower?

Why Won’t My Bulbs Flower?

How To Make Money Off My Garden

How To Make Money Off My Garden

10 Ways To Buy Furniture And Home Decor On A Budget

10 Ways To Buy Furniture And Home Decor On A Budget

What Type Of Privacy Hedges Grow Quickly?

What Type Of Privacy Hedges Grow Quickly?

How To Keep Mosquito Larvae Out Of Your Bird Bath

You may also be interested in

How To Stop Water Runoff From A Neighbor's Yard

How To Stop Water Runoff From A Neighbor's Yard

How To Hang Curtains Over Blinds That Stick Out

How To Hang Curtains Over Blinds That Stick Out

How Much Does Costco Flooring Cost?

How Much Does Costco Flooring Cost?

ReliaBilt Door Review: Possibly The Best Patio Sliding Doors?

ReliaBilt Door Review: Possibly The Best Patio Sliding Doors?

How To Insulate Exposed Roof Trusses

How To Insulate Exposed Roof Trusses

10 Most Dangerous Neighborhoods in Baltimore [Updated]

10 Most Dangerous Neighborhoods in Baltimore [Updated]

Is Hulu Activate Not Working? (Possible Causes & Fixes)

Is Hulu Activate Not Working? (Possible Causes & Fixes)

Can You Put An Electrical Outlet Under A Sink?

Can You Put An Electrical Outlet Under A Sink?

How to Stabilize Pea Gravel Walkways (In a Few Easy Steps)

How to Stabilize Pea Gravel Walkways (In a Few Easy Steps)

HVAC Duct Sizing Rule of Thumb (Ultimate Guide)

HVAC Duct Sizing Rule of Thumb (Ultimate Guide)

10 Types Of House Moths (With Photos)

10 Types Of House Moths (With Photos)

How To Reset Your White Rodgers Thermostat (All Models)

How To Reset Your White Rodgers Thermostat (All Models)

75-Inch TV Dimensions (with Drawings)

75-Inch TV Dimensions (with Drawings)

15 Most Dangerous Neighborhoods In Minneapolis

15 Most Dangerous Neighborhoods In Minneapolis

Water Heater Keeps Tripping Breaker? (Possible Causes & Fixes)

Water Heater Keeps Tripping Breaker? (Possible Causes & Fixes)

What Size Beam Do I Need For A 30-Foot Span?

What Size Beam Do I Need For A 30-Foot Span?

Standard Chair Dimensions (All Types & With Drawings)

Standard Chair Dimensions (All Types & With Drawings)

8 Types of Stone For Fireplaces (With Photos)

8 Types of Stone For Fireplaces (With Photos)

COMMENTS

  1. Breaker Trips When I Turn The Light On

    Reasons Light Switch Trips Breaker. 1. Light Fixture Fault. If a light fixture is faulty, a breaker can become overloaded. The wires in an old light fixture can fall apart and cause a short or ground out. Turn off power before checking the light fixture for damage. Replace the light fixture if found to be faulty. 2.

  2. Circuit breaker trips when ANY light switch on the circuit is turned on

    With no switches on, the breaker remains on. If I turn on any of the switches 1-3, the breaker instantly trips. If I turn on the switch 4, the breaker trips in about 2 seconds. If I turn on the switch 5 (no lights), the breaker doesn't trip. The breaker has a white "test" button. The test button trips the breaker ok.

  3. Why Does My Light Switch Keep Tripping The Circuit Breaker?

    A faulty light switch might cause a short circuit and the breaker to trip. The breaker may trip because an old light switch has cracked and is no longer operable. The wires become fragile and cause circuit overloading or short. Before examining the light switch, make sure the breaker is turned off. Replace the light switch if it turns out to be ...

  4. Why Is My Circuit Breaker Tripping? 4 Potential Problems and Solutions

    Devices charging slowly. Electrical outlets not working. Flickering lights. Scorch marks on outlets and light switches. If a circuit breaker keeps tripping in one room, homeowners can test for ...

  5. electrical

    I heard a loud pop at the switch (a dimmer switch). The breaker at the panel had tripped. Thinking it was the dimmer, I purchased a new dimmer and tried again. Another pop and the breaker tripped again.'. -After resetting the breaker, I bypassed the switch completely and the light worked. I then purchased a single pole switch (no dimmer).

  6. Light Switch Trips Breaker: What To Do?

    Adjust Your Circuit Breaker. Go to your electrical service panel and check if a particular breaker has tipped to the "OFF" side. In some cases, the breaker may not tip completely to the "OFF" position and may sit between both sides. When this happens, you can move the switch over to "OFF" first before pushing it back to the "ON ...

  7. Why does my breaker trip when I turn a light on?

    Feb 12, 2015 at 2:04. 1. Try plugging the light into an outlet on another circuit (another room). If it blows the breaker there, the problem is in the light. - DoxyLover. Feb 12, 2015 at 2:43. Did this problem just start happening, or did something change that caused the problem (modified electrical, hung pictures on the wall, got a new light ...

  8. How to Fix a Circuit Breaker That Is Red When Turned on

    Step 2. Turn the breaker switch back to the on position. If the breaker trips and the red flag is showing again, with a straight tipped screwdriver loosen the screw holding the black wire into the breaker. Pull the wire out of the breaker completely.

  9. How To Find What Is Tripping Your Circuit Breaker and Fix It

    If you suspect a short circuit, unplug your appliances and check the wires for melted coverings. You might also notice a burning smell coming from the outlet. Call in a professional electrician to find the source of the problem. 3. Circuit Overload. Circuit overloads are the most common reason that a breaker trips.

  10. How To Fix a Circuit Breaker That Keeps Tripping

    Find out the cost to replace an electrical panel. On every breaker, there will be an "On" and "Off" position. On a tripped breaker, the handle will be in the middle, neither On nor Off. To reset, flip the handle to Off first, then to On. Stand to the side of the panel and turn your face away when flipping breakers.

  11. How to Fix a Tripped Circuit Breaker That Won't Reset

    Locate your circuit breaker box and open the cover. Once you've located the tripped breaker, flip it to the "Off" position. Then, flip it back to the "On" position. You should hear a click as the breaker resets. If the breaker trips again, or simply won't reset, there may be a problem with your wiring.

  12. Why a Circuit Breaker Trips When the Light Switch is Turned Off?

    This miswiring causes the light to turn on even though the switch is off. Because it's improper, it shorts the circuit and trips the breaker when the switch's on. To properly rewire this connection, you will need a marker and proceed to the following steps: First, the circuit breaker's black wire connects to the white wire and other black ...

  13. Light Switch Trips Breaker When Turned Off

    The breaker can trip even when a switch is turned off. If your electrical circuit is not distributing current properly, reconfigure and reduce the number of loads if needed. Breaker Malfunction. There might be cases where the breaker is faulty, leading to unintentional trips. Replace the breaker with a new one if you find that the breaker is ...

  14. Breaker keeps tripping after installing new switch

    Ever since I put in the new switch, the old switch on the main floor trips the breaker whenever it is turned to the on position. As long as I keep the old switch in the off position the breaker doesn't trip. This never happened with the old switch upstairs. I have ensured there are no live wires touching anything in either receptacle box.

  15. The Circuit Breaker or GFCI Outlet Trips when I try to Turn the Light

    If a GFCI outlet or circuit breaker is tripping, it is typically because the Neutral connection on the switch is tied to Ground. This is a safety hazard and violation of National Electrical Code. If you are unsure please contact an electrician. Please note, shorting the output of a dimmer will probably cause permanent damage to the dimming circuit.

  16. How to Reset a Tripped Breaker

    What Causes a Tripped Circuit Breaker . Overloaded circuits: When too many devices are operating on the same circuit and are attempting to pull a higher power load than the circuit can carry, the circuit breaker will trip.; High-power devices: High amp devices like microwaves, dryers, wall heaters, or A/Cs are turned on for sustained periods, they can cause a power breaker trip.

  17. Why Does My GFCI Trip When I Turn On The Light Switch?

    The GFCI trips because it recognizes a drop in voltage that can be potentially dangerous as a safety precaution. If the light switch sends out 120 volts and gets nothing back, the GFCI will trip and shut off. Never take it lightly if your GFCI trips when you turn on the light switch. Call a professional electrician if this happens so that they ...

  18. Lights Out but Circuit Breaker Not Tripped

    When experiencing electrical imbalances, GFCI outlets trip much quicker to protect people from electrocution. If you hit the "test" button and it does not click, the GFCI has tripped. By pressing "reset" until you feel it click, you can restore the power to the outlet and any outlets downstream. Other issues can include loose wiring or ...

  19. Why are my new switches tripping the circuit breaker sometimes?

    Turn off breaker. Make sure it is off by using the non-contact voltage tester. ( After ensuring that the tester is in working order. ) Remove all the wires from the switch. Make sure those wires are out of the way, and are nowhere near touching anything. Make sure you leave a ground or neutral wire in a place where you can connect a probe ...

  20. Reset a Tripped Circuit Breaker

    A circuit breaker is a switch inside your breaker box that monitors the flow of electricity on a circuit and turns off or trips if the circuit becomes damaged or overloaded. ... Turn off all lights and unplug any appliances plugged into an outlet. ... If the breaker trips, you have located the source of the overload. Reset the breaker again and ...

  21. Light Fixture Wiring Issue : Circuit Breaker trips as soon as the light

    1) Always turn the circuit breaker off, and use a voltmeter or test light to make sure you are not dealing with any live circuits.2) This video is intended f...

  22. 3 Way Switch is tripping breaker

    1. If wired per the diagram it would work correctly, so you need to overcome the belief that it's wired as per the diagram, and figure out where you made a mistake. Then again, the diagram is inapplicable to new (or remodel) work in an area subject to NEC 2011 or later, where you'll need a neutral at each switch box, so the cable with the hot ...

  23. BNN LIVE: Rains and Tust talk Boise State sports on an ICCU Friday

    B.J. Rains and KTVB sports director Jay Tust discuss a variety of Boise State topics on an ICCU Friday edition of Bronco Nation News LIVE.

  24. wiring

    The 15a breaker came with the panel. I wired the lights by pushing the 14/2 wires into the supplied "auto-crimp" connectors. I wired the switch (es) by adding 6" leads to all four poles. Both grounds were connected to the box and I used a marette to connect the ground from the switch. Neutral / white was connected with a marette between switch ...